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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

***EARLY LAFAYETTE BUS. MEN'S ASSOCIATION.

A Business Men's Association.

The heading of this article, "A Business Men's Association," would be a very good thing for Lafayette. The business men and citizen members could then consult with each other as to the best means of obtaining enterprises or industries. Such an association could be made of great benefit in building up our city. Industries could be induced to locate here which would advance the value of property, give our merchant's a larger trade and furnish employment for some of our people.There is not a village in Louisiana that possesses greater natural advantages than Lafayette and it only needs the first step to be taken to imbue with new life the great amount of dormant talent, energy and material that exists in our town.

We hope our enterprising business men and citizens will take hold of this matter and organize a Business Men's Association, not for a personal gain, but to advance the interests of the people.There are a number of good industries and manufactories that could selected any one of which would be a paying investment. Other towns have them and are prospering why should not we?

Lafayette Advertiser 1/21/1893






The B. M. A's. Public Spirit.
(Communicated.)

The movement that is being taken up by the Business Men's Association of Lafayette for the purpose of having literature concerning the agricultural and industrial opportunities of our town and parish printed in proper form and distributed through the immigration agencies of the Southern Pacific Railroad, is an enterprise deserving the attention and interest of all our citizens.

The exodus of population from the regions of the North and middle West into this section is no longer a rumor, a report, or mere boom cry for speculating purposes; it is a plain indisputable fact, substantiated by trainload after trainload daily passing through our city. And there is good reason for it besides. That section of our country is already over populated, relatively speaking, the climate is cold to the extent of great inconvenience and suffering, and the industries are so thoroughly worked up, that profits have dwindled to the minimum per capita. It is therefore a paying investment for a man to sell there and buy here. All the more intelligent classes are perceiving this, and are looking for literature concerning this newly discovered El Dorado of the Southwest.

Our citizens, therefore, should not neglect to have the merits of our town and parish thoroughly and accurately presented to the minds of prospective immigrants. We ought to describe our soil and its productiveness, list our lands that are for sale, write up our industries and suggest the half a dozen new ones that we ought to have, exhibit the progress that we are making education both in our public school system and in our splendid new State Industrial Institute, and invite those seeking homes and investment to come and see us.

After a conference last Saturday with G. M. McKinney, general immigration agent of the Southern Pacific Railway, followed by a called meeting Monday night, the Business Men's Association resolved to have prepared a twenty-four page pamphlet upon Lafayette, town and parish, and to give fifty thousand copies of this for general distribution in the North and middle West by the railroad's Immigration Bureau of Chicago. The cost of the pamphlets will be five hundred dollars of which one hundred and fifty dollars was immediately subscribed by only the few members present; and a committee was appointed to wait upon our citizens and raise the balance.

We heartily endorse the plan, and feel sure that its execution will result in a most valuable progress for our community and parish.


Lafayette Gazette 1/24/1903.


 
Push It Through!!!


The Business Men's Association held a meeting last Monday night to take action on the proposition submitted by McKinney, the general agent of the Emigration Bureau of the Southern Pacific and Illinois Central railroads, that his bureau would distribute free of charge fifty thousand booklets or folders describing the natural resources and advantages and educational facilities of Lafayette town and parish. There is to be no expense whatever attached to the service rendered by the bureau, but the community, is expected to furnish the advertising matter, which can be obtained at the trifling cost of one cent per copy for a 24 leaf folder or pamphlet, provided not less than 50,000 copies be ordered at one time.

The bureau in question operates through nearly 700 agencies scattered throughout the north and, east and middle west and each agency is in command of the very best facilities for distributing advertising matter in a thorough and effective manner. Through the personal efforts of President Stephens of the Industrial Institute, Mr. McKinney, the chief of this Emigration Bureau, was induced to spend a short while in Lafayette last Saturday and explain to a number of our citizens who were able to meet him on the short notice given, the best means by which Lafayette town and parish might reap some of the advantages of the general emigration movement southward being stirred up by the united efforts of the Southern Pacific and Illinois Central railroad companies. Mr. McKinney's suggestion that we adopt the plan of Iberia and other parishes in Southwest Louisiana which have entered in this movement, met with the approbation of those who happened to be present when the plan was explained, and it was decided to bring the matter before the Business Men's Association for final action. Recognizing the advantage it would be to the town and parish to present to the people of North, East, and West, in a practical and effective way, the vast undeveloped resources of this section and extending to these same people a cordial invitation to come and join hands with us in development of these resources, the Business Men's Association endorsed the movement on behalf of the community and appointed committees to raise the required amount of $500 by popular subscription, and the expectation of reasonable appropriations by both the City council and Police Jury, inasmuch as the establishment of a cotton mill, furniture factory or similar industry in our midst, for which we have an abundance of raw material, would redound to the great and general good of the town and parish. And the Business Men's Association is convinced that if the subject is presented in the intelligent and forceful manner now contemplated, to 50,000 people interested in buying homes and making investment in the South, that the $500 it is proposed to spend in the effort, will bring certain and handsome returns.

The Advertiser is thoroughly in accord with this movement for the upbuilding of Lafayette town and parish, and concurs in the opinion that good results will follow the plan it is proposed to carry out for advertising in a special way the advantages and the needs of our section of country, at a time when the railroad companies we have already named are busily engaged in arousing an active interest in Louisiana and Texas among many thousands of good people of intelligence and capital who are desirous of changing their homes to a milder climate, or who wish to invest their money in the development of the boundless idle resources of the country.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/24/1903.



Let Us Fall In Line.


We desire to direct the attention of the people of Lafayette to a fact over which there can not be any division of opinion: in just the same way we have found it possible to secure some substantial improvements by co-operative moves, in the recent past, we can add valuable acquisitions in the future. We have not unduly exerted ourselves along this line in times gone by and yet, within the comparatively short space of three years, we can point to no less than four very substantial enterprises that owe their existence in our midst to co-operative movements on the part of citizens. First came the Sugar Refinery at the eastern limits of the town; next followed by the Ice Factory; then, the Cotton Oil Mill and lastly the Water Works and Electric Light Plant. This is certainly a most gratifying showing and stands as indubitable proof of the great good to be accomplished by public spiritedness and co-operation.

If we have done well in the past may we not do even better in the future? The same forces we utilized before are still ours to command. They need only to be put in operation and kept in operation to bring grand results. Why not be up and doing then? Ours is a country of inexhaustible resources, a country of surprising possibilities - if the people who inhabit it will only develop the field.
There will be a good opportunity afforded to the citizens of Lafayette to come together next Monday night to make common cause of the future progress and prosperity of Lafayette town and parish. We refer to the meeting of the Business Men's Association announced to take place at Falk's Opera House, the 7th. instant. The efforts of this organization in the past have been of particular value to the community, and are fully recognized.

Every citizen of Lafayette who has the interest of the community at heart, should not fail to attend this meeting and join in the movement, well remembering the Providence only helps those who help themselves.


We must get in line, forthwith, in order that we may not get left in the rapid march of progress that has seized upon the entire country.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1898.


BUSINESS MEN'S ASSOCIATION.

 In another column of The Gazette appears an announcement of a meeting of the Business Men's Association at Falk's Hall, Monday, February 7.

 Lafayette possesses advanced methods of procuring water and light, and there could be no more fitting time than now to "boom" the town. The above named association has done incalculable good to our town already by concerted and united action and we hope that that their next move will meet with as much success as their former ones. We owe to them many of our recent improvements, and all our citizens should get together and help the association in its laudable efforts. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.

The B. M. A. 

 The Business Men's Association held a regular monthly meeting last Monday. Secretary Jno. I. Bell was at his post.

 On motion it was resolved that Hon. C. D. Caffery be requested to co-operate with Judge O. C. Mouton and Mr. Wm. Campbell to prepare a petition signed by the tax-payers of the town asking the City Council to call an election for the purpose of levying a special tax to construct a plant of waterworks and electric lights.

 On motion, Judge P. A. McFaddin, T. M. Biossat, Wm. Campbell, Alfred Hebert, N. P. Moss and S. R. Parkerson were appointed a committee to circulate the petition.

 Dr. Hopkins, Wm. Campbell and N. P. Moss were appointed a committee to arrange for a mass meeting Friday night at Falk's Opera house. Laf. Gazette 2/8/1896.






THE BUSINESS MEN

Effect the Permanent Organization of Their Association.

A Large and Enthusiastic Meeting of Representative Citizens.

 A Determined Effort to be Made to Secure the Abbeville Railroad.-

 The Meeting Addressed by Able Speakers from Home and Abroad.

 Last Monday evening there was a gathering in the Court House such as Lafayette had not witnesses before in years, fully, two hundred enthusiastic citizens being present on that occasion.

 Mr. C. O. Mouton, the Chairman pro tem, called the meeting to order at 8 o'clock, and in a short but enthusiastic speech explained the object of the association. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and on motion approved.

 The committee consisting of Messrs. O. C. Mouton, Alfred Hebert and A. C. Ordway, who were appointed at Friday's meeting to prepare the constitution for the organization, made their report, and presented the following articles, which were adopted unanimously as a whole:

PREAMBLE. -- Believing that a new era of prosperity is drawing for our State, and that those towns which make the greatest effort, and offer the most encouragement and support to both the people and capital seeking locations and investments, will be the ones to receive the greatest benefit, and fully realizing the truth of the old saying that in "Union there is strength," we, the Business Men and Citizens of Lafayette, form ourselves into an organization to be known as the 

BUSINESS MEN'S ASSOCIATION OF LAFAYETTE.

 ARTICLE I. - The object of this association shall be the furtherance and support of any and all legitimate enterprises, which in the opinion of the Association, will tend to advance the material progress and prosperity of both the town and parish of Lafayette.

 ART. II. - A Board of nine Directors, elected annually by the members of the Association, and shall elect from their own number  a President, Vice-president, Secretary, Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of three.

 ART. III. - Duty of officers. - It shall be duty of the President to preside at all meetings of the Association. It shall be the duty of the Vice-president to perform all the duties of the President in case of his absence or inability to act. The Secretary shall keep a correct record of all business transacted by the Association and also attend to all correspondence of the Association. The treasurer shall have charge of all monies of the Association, and shall collect all dues and fines that may be imposed by the Association. It shall be the duty of the Executive Board to examine into and investigate all propositions that may be made to the Association, and report the same to the Association. It shall be their further duty to exert a general supervision over the business of the Association and its officers, and it shall have the powers which are generally accorded to an executive committee.

 ART. IV. - All persons who are residents of Lafayette shall be eligible to membership, and shall become members in good standing by enrolling their name on the list of members and paying the membership fee.

 ART. V. - Each and every member shall pay the Treasurer the sum of one dollar as a membership fee, and further shall pay the sum of fifty cents as monthly dues.

ART. VI. - The Association shall hold one regular meeting each month, and special meetings shall be called by the Executive Committees whenever business of importance shall arise for the consideration of the Association.

ART. VII. - Any of the above articles may be amended or changed by a majority vote of the Association at any regular meeting of the Association.

 ART. VIII. - Parliamentary rules shall govern the Association at all its meetings and deliberations.

 After the adoption of the constitution, and the following named citizens enrolled as members of the Association: L. Levy, W. E. Bowen, O. E. Mouton, Numa Schayot, E. Priolland, Pierre Dugas, H. D. Guidry, Geo. M. Deiower, Alfred Hebert, L. F. Rigues, James Hannen, R. Coffey, Felix Demanade, B. Falk, I. A. Broussard, C. Lusted, H. C. Salles, Alfred J. Theriot, R. H. Wilkins, Leon Plonskey, B. I. Denlon, Chas. D. Caffery, P. A. Delhomme, Thos. F. Webb, Jr.,
Gustave Lacoste, I. N. Satterfield, Mouton & Salles, J. M. Jones, F. S. Mudd, E. Constantine, T. M. Biossat, A. C. Ordway, N. P. Moss, Arthur C. Mouton, J. Nickerson, P. J. Hanks, Julian Mouton, C. H. Bradley, J. E. Martin, Wm. Campbell, R. C. Greig, H. Church, Chas. O. Mouton, E. G. Voorhies, H. Billeaud, Wm. H. Cayard.

 A motion was made, and after some debate was carried, that the same committee that drew up the constitution select the names of nine members to act as a BOARD OF DIRECTORS and present the same to the meeting to be voted on. The committee made a report and presented the following names: Chas. O. Mouton, Wm. Campbell, J. Nickerson, Alfred Hebert, J. E. Martin, N. P. Moss, B. Falk, A. C. Ordway, W. E. Bowen.

 As this finished the routine business of the evening, different gentlemen were called on to address the meeting. Mayor Wm. Campbell, Judge O. C. Mouton, Mr. Julian Mouton, Dr. Mudd and others made enthusiastic and stirring addresses, and their remarks were greeted with enthusiasm and rounds of applause.

 Judge Allen and District Attorney Gordy were called upon and favored the meeting with fine speeches, and assured our citizens that they were in hearty accord with the movement, and that they felt confident that it would be carried through to a successful issue, bringing to Lafayette new people and new capital until she should take her place as the leading city in Southwest Louisiana.

 There can be no doubt but that our people are in dead earnest in regard to this matter, and mean to work with united effort to to carry it through. The meeting was the largest and most enthusiastic that has ever been held by the people of Lafayette for a similar purpose, and now that our citizens are awake to the advantages to be derived from this movement, no reasonable man can doubt that a grand and glorious future awaits Lafayette, and all that is needed is for the people to continue as they have begun, and the railroad, cotton factory and sugar refinery will become assured facts.

 No further business coming before the meeting, it adjourned to meet Wednesday night, in Falk's opera house, at 7:30 o'clock.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/11/1893.

 WEDNESDAY'S MEETING.

 Pursuant to adjournment the Business Men's Association met in Falk's opera house, Wednesday evening. The President called the meeting to order, and the Board of Directors reported the following permanent officers elected: President, C. O. Mouton ;  Vice-President, Wm. Campbell ;  Secretary, A. C. Ordway ;  Treasurer, John Nickerson ;  Executive Committee, Wm. Campbell, N. P. Moss, J. Nickerson.

 The President addressed the meeting and in well chosen remarks reviewed the work done and outlined the work necessary to be done in the future to make the movement a success.

 Mr. Julian Mouton addressed the meeting in regard to the necessity of securing the hearty co-operation of the people of the parish outside of the corporation, and concluded by making the following motion:

 Resolved, That the chair appoint at his leisure a committee of five to select three gentlemen from each ward to act as a general railroad committee, and agitate the question as soon as Mr. Leslie is again heard from; also, that a general invitation be extended to all citizens of the parish to become honorary members of the association, who shall be exempt from the payment of all dues and fees.

 After a discussion of the question, in which Messrs. O. C. Mouton, J. Nickerson and C. H. Bradley took part, it was carried and the president appointed the following named gentlemen to constitute said committee : Julian Mouton, Chairman; E. Constantine, Wm. Campbell, Chas. D. Caffery, Gustave Lacoste.

 Judge O. A. Mouton addressed the chair and made a plea in favor of the high-school, stating it as his belief that the association should take some action in the matter looking toward the speedy completion of the building, and made a motion that the chair appoint a committee of three to take charge of the matter and see what help could be obtained from the town council and police jury. The motion was carried and the president appointed the following gentlemen to act as such committee :  Messrs. O. C. Mouton, R. C. Greig and T. M. Biossat.

 The next question to come before the meeting was that of the state convention. Several spoke in regard to the matter, and a motion was made that a committee of three be appointed by the chair to take charge of the matter, solicit subscriptions, and correspond with the Governor in regard to the holding of said convention in Lafayette. Messrs. Wm. Campbell, Julian Mouton and A. C. Ordway were appointed on the committee.

 On motion the president was empowered to appoint a committee at his leisure to act as a Corresponding Committee, whose duty would be to prepare and have printed descriptive matter setting forth the advantages of our soil and climate, and inaugurate a systematic plan of making known to the outside world the great inducements the parish offers to emigrants.

 The matter of securing a regular meeting place for the association was discussed, but as Mr. Falk generously offered the use of the opera house without compensation, it was decided to hold the regular meetings at that place, and the first Wednesday of each month was selected as the regular meeting night of the association.

 The meeting then adjourned.

 It will be seen that the association has taken hold of several very important matters, the chief of which is the school question, and will endeavor to push them through at the earliest possible moment. 
Lafayette Advertiser 2/11/1893.






B. M. A.'S
Meet at Falk's Hall and Discuss Matters of Interest.

 An important and well-attended meeting at the Lafayette Business Men's Association was held at Falk's Hall Monday evening. About three scores of hour substantial citizens, business and professional men and artisans, were present and took a lively interest in all that  which was proposed. The chair was occupied by Mr. O. C. Mouton, the president of the organization and Mr. Jno. I. Bell was at the secretary's desk. In a neat and short address, the chairman explained the objects of the meeting. He said the purpose of the call was to reorganize and to elect a new set of officers. He wanted to see new blood infused into the organization by admitting new members and changing the personnel of the officers. After this would be accomplished, then it would be accomplished, then it would be time to propose active work towards initiating improvements in the town and parish. He, therefore, extended his resignation as president of the B. M. A. The members of the association present, in a few complimentary remarks to the efficiency and public-spiritedness of the president during his incumbency in office, refused to accept his resignation and he and Mr. Bell were unanimously re-elected by acclamation.

 At the invitation of the association about twenty-five new members were enrolled by the secretary.

 The first matter brought before the meeting was the proposed organization of at least three fire companies, that being an immediate want of absolute necessity. The chair appointed the following committee on this subject: Judge C. Debaillon, Wm. Campbell, Crow Girard, S. R. Parkerson and Orther C. Mouton. These gentlemen met at the bank Tuesday evening and appointed canvassers to solicit membership among our citizens. Mr. J. T. Allingham announced to the meeting that a fire company had already been organized, and that an application for the necessary appliances had been made to the council to no avail. Dr. Hopkins, in behalf of the council, said at that time they were not in a position to grant the request, but that a few hours before the city fathers had contracted for a thousand feet of hose, besides the other necessary appurtenances. The whole matter was left in the hands of the committee appointed by the chair to take charge of it.

 The question of establishing a cotton compress was then agitated. It was declared that gentlemen interested in putting up such an improvement had recognized Lafayette as the most available town in the section of the State. Judge DeBaillon, Dr. Hopkins, Messrs. Ed. Voorhies, J. J. Mouton and Wm. Campbell were appointed by the chair to take this matter in hand. From remarks made by a few of our citizens to whom this question was referred, we conclude that in the near future we will have in our midst that needed institution.

 A want, a little less pressing and immediate, but nonetheless important, that of railroads, was brought before the meeting. Several projected roads from points in North Louisiana to the Gulf were explained, at which time Mr. Crow Girard took the opportunity to admonish our people for their lack of interest in this matter in the past to the benefit of some of our neighboring towns. Messrs. Wm. Campbell, T. M. Biossat, Crow Girard, B. A. Salles and Orther C. Mouton were appointed a committee on railroads.

 A plan to establish a city market in a central location was then discussed. The appealed strongly to some of our local epicureans and it is safe to say that if any of the proposed improvements are realized, this one will be the first. Dr. Moss and Messrs. H. A. Van der Cruyssen and J. T. Allingham will see the cith market proposition carried through.

 Meetings of the B. M. A. will be held the second Monday of every month, at Falk's Hall, Mr. Falk having given the use of it for free for this purpose.

 The meeting was a success in all particulars. Those who attended were business men and who had gone there on business, and the several committees will immediately go the work and "boom" the town in their particular respects. The Gazette was glad to see the general interest taken all during the meeting and gives its unqualified endorsement to the good work of the Business Men's Association, which has already accomplished good and with the help of all, will again do so for our town and people. Lafayette Gazette 2/12/1898.



     



B. M. A.'S

Meet at Falk's Hall and Discuss Matters of Interest.

 An important and well-attended meeting at the Lafayette Business Men's Association was held at Falk's Hall Monday evening. About three scores of hour substantial citizens, business and professional men and artisans, were present and took a lively interest in all that  which was proposed. The chair was occupied by Mr. O. C. Mouton, the president of the organization and Mr. Jno. I. Bell was at the secretary's desk. In a neat and short address, the chairman explained the objects of the meeting. He said the purpose of the call was to reorganize and to elect a new set of officers. He wanted to see new blood infused into the organization by admitting new members and changing the personnel of the officers. After this would be accomplished, then it would be accomplished, then it would be time to propose active work towards initiating improvements in the town and parish. He, therefore, extended his resignation as president of the B. M. A. The members of the association present, in a few complimentary remarks to the efficiency and public-spiritedness of the president during his incumbency in office, refused to accept his resignation and he and Mr. Bell were unanimously re-elected by acclamation.

 At the invitation of the association about twenty-five new members were enrolled by the secretary.

 The first matter brought before the meeting was the proposed organization of at least three fire companies, that being an immediate want of absolute necessity. The chair appointed the following committee on this subject: Judge C. Debaillon, Wm. Campbell, Crow Girard, S. R. Parkerson and Orther C. Mouton. These gentlemen met at the bank Tuesday evening and appointed canvassers to solicit membership among our citizens. Mr. J. T. Allingham announced to the meeting that a fire company had already been organized, and that an application for the necessary appliances had been made to the council to no avail. Dr. Hopkins, in behalf of the council, said at that time they were not in a position to grant the request, but that a few hours before the city fathers had contracted for a thousand feet of hose, besides the other necessary appurtenances. The whole matter was left in the hands of the committee appointed by the chair to take charge of it.

 The question of establishing a cotton compress was then agitated. It was declared that gentlemen interested in putting up such an improvement had recognized Lafayette as the most available town in the section of the State. Judge DeBaillon, Dr. Hopkins, Messrs. Ed. Voorhies, J. J. Mouton and Wm. Campbell were appointed by the chair to take this matter in hand. From remarks made by a few of our citizens to whom this question was referred, we conclude that in the near future we will have in our midst that needed institution.

 A want, a little less pressing and immediate, but nonetheless important, that of railroads, was brought before the meeting. Several projected roads from points in North Louisiana to the Gulf were explained, at which time Mr. Crow Girard took the opportunity to admonish our people for their lack of interest in this matter in the past to the benefit of some of our neighboring towns. Messrs. Wm. Campbell, T. M. Biossat, Crow Girard, B. A. Salles and Orther C. Mouton were appointed a committee on railroads.

 A plan to establish a city market in a central location was then discussed. The appealed strongly to some of our local epicureans and it is safe to say that if any of the proposed improvements are realized, this one will be the first. Dr. Moss and Messrs. H. A. Van der Cruyssen and J. T. Allingham will see the cith market proposition carried through.

 Meetings of the B. M. A. will be held the second Monday of every month, at Falk's Hall, Mr. Falk having given the use of it for free for this purpose.

 The meeting was a success in all particulars. Those who attended were business men and who had gone there on business, and the several committees will immediately go the work and "boom" the town in their particular respects. The Gazette was glad to see the general interest taken all during the meeting and gives its unqualified endorsement to the good work of the Business Men's Association, which has already accomplished good and with the help of all, will again do so for our town and people. Lafayette Gazette 2/12/1898.


     

BUSINESS MEN'S ASSOCIATION MEETING:

 A large number of business and citizens of Lafayette representing all the leading business houses and avocations of our city met last Monday night at 8 o'clock (sharp time) at Falk's Opera House to discuss the possibilities of advancing our city in the march of progress and by the amount of business transacted, the assemblage was real, earnest one, having a heart above everything else the welfare and prosperity of Lafayette. The meeting was called to order by the president Chas. O. Mouton, who stated that they had assembled to reorganize the Business Men's Association of Lafayette, elect new officers, infuse new life into the organization and go to work as there was a great deal to do. Remarks were made that the organization was satisfied with its managing officers and that the greatest need was to infuse new life and new vigor by the accession of new members. Quite a number of them were received. The president stated that he did not stand for re-election but nevertheless he was re-elected unanimously, as was also Mr. Jno. I. Bell, for Secretary.


 The first subject discussed was about the organization of fire companies. After good many speeches all in favor of such organization, the following committee was appointed by the president, Messrs. Judge Debaillon, Campbell, Crow Girard, S. R. Parkerson and O. J. Mouton. Said committee to attend to the organization of a fire department and report the result of their labors to a subsequent meeting of the business men association to be called by the president. Then the president made a statement that a gentleman representing a Cotton Compress Co. had interviewed him as well as several other business men, upon locating a compress in Lafayette, being favorably impressed as the best locality for the erection of such a plant in Lafayette. A committee of 5 was appointed to act as a "Cotton Compress Committee" to receive communications from this company and learn what kind and amount of help they were in need of. Dr. Hopkins, E. G. Voorhies, O. C. Mouton, Judge Debaillon and Crow Girard with the president as Chairman ex-officio.


 Mr. Crow Girard, declining to serve, by reason of business pressure, Mr. Campbell was substituted in his place. The next subject was brought to the attention of the meeting was an article contained in the Times Democrat of New Orleans, of Sunday, Feb., 6, speaking about the projecting of two new Rail Roads. There seems to be two line of R. R. to be constructed in the near future and Lafayette is spoken as either the central point, the terminus or important station on the way of these railroads. Such being the facts brought to the attention of the meeting, a motion was made to appoint a committee on R. R. to look after the interests of Lafayette - the following committee of 5 with the president as chairman ex-officio was appointed to look after these R. R.'s and see what could be done to induce them to come to Lafayette. Wm. Campbell, T. M. Biossat, Crow Girard, B. A. Salles and O. C. Mouton. Last but not least the following resolution was adopted unanimously by the meeting.

Resolved: That it is the sense of the Business Men's Association of Lafayette that the city ought to have a public market where all vegetables, meats, and fishes be sold for the consumption of its inhabitants and that a committee of 3 be appointed with the president as chairman, ex-officio to present said resolution to the City Council and urge upon them the erection of a public market as soon as possible.


There being no further business the meeting adjourned.


A harmonious session it was, everyone pulled the same way, no one balked, and therefore we are justified in saying that we are looking forward to an era of prosperity for the town and parish of Lafayette.


Let us all pull together and something will be obliged to move.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/12/1898.








 
WATER AND LIGHT. 
A Large Meeting Held at Falk's Hall - Waterworks and Electric Lights Discussed. 


About 300 persons, among whom were many ladies, assembled at Falk's Opera-house last Monday night to hear discussions by local speakers upon the question of water-works and electric lights. The meeting was not as large as expected, but the 'earnestness visible on all hands and the enthusiasm which prevailed gave unmistakable signs of the popularity of the movement. The audience was of a representative character, a feature which may always be taken as a good omen for the success of any undertaking of this kind.
 
C. O. Mouton, Esq., president of the Business Men's Association, in a brief talk explained the object of meeting and introduced to the audience the Rev. Father E. Forge, who was the first speaker. The reverend gentleman delivered a very sensible address. He dealt at length upon the great necessity of protection from fire. He said that any further procrastination in this matter was little short of criminal on the part of the people of this town. He said he would support the measure with all his energy and would use his influence toward the success of the move just inaugurated. At the conclusion of his address Father Forge handed to the president of the B. M. A. a one hundred-dollar bill to be used for the proposed plant. Short addresses were then made by Messrs. Wm. Campbell, Chas. D. Caffery and Julian Mouton.
 
The speakers explained that petitions would be presented to the tax-payers for their signatures for the purpose of asking the City Council to call an election to see if the required number of people are willing to be taxed 5-mills on the dollar to raise the necessary amount to build the water-works and electric light plant. A number of signatures were obtained before leaving the hall. Well-informed persons are of the opinion that the opponents to the tax will not be sufficiently numerous to defeat the measure and it is hoped when the question will be thoroughly explained there will not be any opposition worth mentioning. Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1896.
 
 
 


B. M. A.

Meeting at Falk's Hall at 8 o'clock Monday to Take up an Important Matter.

 The citizens of the town are urged to attend a meeting of the Business Men's Association to be held as stated above. This will be a most important meeting and a large attendance of present and prospective members is desired.
 The object of the meeting will be explained when it will be called together.

 In this connection The Gazette will reiterate its advice to the people of this town to join the B. M. A. This association is calculated to do much good and the larger its membership the better prepared it is to do effective work.
 Every man in town should be a member of the B. M. A., because every one is interested in the prosperity of the town. The B. M. A. has done much in the past and can do more in the future.  Lafayette Gazette 2/17/1900.




Painful Accident. - Mr. John Nickerson met with a very serious and painful accident last Saturday evening about 7 o'clock. He had just got into his cart to drive up town to attend a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Business Men's Association, when the horse he was driving became fractious and he was thrown from the cart. Arising, he attempted to catch the animal when the horse reared up and struck him with his fore feet, causing a simple fracture of the thigh bone. Dr. Trahan was called and set the injured limb. Mr. Nickerson bears his misfortune like a Trojan, and although suffering a great deal of pain, he is still enthusiastic on the question of a railroad. He has the sympathy of the entire community in his misfortune. Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1893.



POLICE JURY-By motion of Mr. Avant, duly seconded, the following ordinance fixing the Parish licenses for the calendar year 1897 was adopted :  Yeas-Brown, Avant, Billeaud, Primeaux and Lacy.  Nays-None. Laf. Adv. 2/20/1897.




St. Joseph's Day.
 The Business Men's Association will give a ball on St. Joseph's day. With the aid of a number of gentlemen, headed by Mr. A. T. Allingham, a parade will be gotten up for the occasion. The floats have already been secured and the work of designing and decorating will soon be commenced. Dr. F. E. Girard and Mr. H. Van der Cruyssen went to New Orleans Wednesday morning for the purpose of procuring the material necessary to decorate the floats. Nothing will be left undone to make this celebration a brilliant success. A number of young men offered their services to the committee and no pains will be spared in carrying the project to a successful termination. The ball promises to be one of the fines ever given in Lafayette, as the association is determined to make it so.
NOTE - Just before going to press we were informed that this celebration has been postponed and will take place on the fourth of July.
Lafayette Gazette 2/29/1896. 

 































A Suggestion to the Business Men's Association. The letter appearing below is a sample of the numerous requests of which we have been in receipt during the last few months, and which we have endeavored to attend to, to the best of our ability by private correspondence, but this requires time which we can ill afford to bestow and attend to our business. We think such matters as this should come under the care of the Business Men's Association, and we would suggest that no more satisfactory way of meeting such requests could be arranged than by the preparation of a small pamphlet, descriptive of our various resources and possibilities, showing the adaptability for promptly moving freight in any direction.

 The location of Lafayette giving it an unexcelled prestige as advantage paint for trade, etc. This is a little matter perhaps and it might be easily overlooked, but this is a case where every little bit helps and if only one in every town who apply the information could be induced to locate among us and become property owners it would soon amount up to a nice little thing in the general improvement of the parish. Let us hear from some one else on this subject, our columns are open. Lafayette Advertiser 5/1/1897.





The committee appointed by the Business Men's Association, to offer inducement to the Northern Louisiana and Gulf Railroad now in course of construction from Junction City to Vermilion Bay, met at the court house and elected Hon. O. Cade chairman and R. C. Greig secretary. Messrs. B. Flanders and Hon. O. Cade were appointed to correspond with the management of the road and take such measures as might secure the construction of the line through Lafayette parish. Lafayette Advertiser 5/6/1899.

 




We'll "Get There."


  The conditions that make Lafayette a peculiarly desirable location as a business center and point of distribution, are attracting increasing attention from capitalists. This fact is becoming more and more evident from the growing frequency of inquiries and personal visits on the part of prospective investors, some of which promise results of no small importance to us. A large cotton compress is under serious consideration at present, with very fair prospects of success. This point is an ideal one for a cotton compress, which would command in almost unlimited source of supply of cotton. As an investment the compress could not fail of being highly remunerative. and as a magnet for business it could not well be surpassed. A number of smaller manufacturing industries are in contemplation by interested parties, and it is reasonable to infer that by the close of the present year Lafayette will have several new enterprises place to her credit.

 It is due in a great measure to the efforts of the Business Men's Association that the town's advantages is a business center are coming to be more fully recognized, and the association should not let up one iota in its endeavors to bring Lafayette into its proper position in the line of forward march. We may have to wait a little longer than we would like to witness the realization of our hopes, but we will surely shorten the time by trying to help ourselves. Lafayette Advertiser 5/8/1897.




 CONVENTION.
For the Attakapas Region to Convene in Lafayette, Wednesday, June 14th.
 
 In another column will be found a call for a road and immigration convention to meet in this city on June 14th, to be composed of delegates from the parishes which constitute the Attakapas region. The state immigration convention, of recent date, adopted many resolutions, and listened to many flowery speeches, besides providing for the appointment of a state executive committee, whose duty it should be to encourage the organization of local or parish immigration societies; but as nothing has been accomplished, and it has been deemed wise by our Business Men's Association to call this convention with the object of doing some practical work. The convention will be conducted on purely business lines, leaving politics severely alone. A series of questions will be formulated and sent to each delegate as soon as they are appointed, and they may give the different subjects some thought and attention and come to the convention prepared to work. In this manner it is earnestly hoped that much good may result.

 It was thought best to combine the two questions - better roads and immigration - which are two of the important matters confronting our state to-day. With our present poor roads, it costs our planters as much, if not more, to haul the products of their farms to the railroads as it does for the freight to the market towns or cities. The present system of working roads must be done away with and a new and better method adopted. What this new and better method adopted. What this new and better system shall be is yet to be determined. The plan now in vogue of calling men out to do a certain number of days work on the roads is a farce. It is safe to say that instead of doing ten days work, as provided by law, that not one out of a hundred does one full day's work. About the only practical plan would be to have a direct road tax and then contract for the road work. The planters would be reimbursed a hundred fold for every cent paid out in the manner; their property would increase in value as the roads improved; with good roads they could haul more at a load and thus save much valuable time. We do not need more railroads as bad as we need better wagon roads. Therefore, it is wise to thoroughly discuss the question, that some feasible plan may be adopted and action taken by the next Legislature.

 Now the question of immigration.


 It is generally admitted that our state needs immigrants and capital. The question is how to attract them. We do not particularly want foreign immigrants; but what we do want is a class of intelligent western and northern farmers. And we can get them, too, if we go the right way about it. We do not believe that the idea suggested at the recent State Convention, of having descriptive pamphlets printed to be given away a the Chicago Exposition would produce much effect, for the simple reason that there will be hundreds, aye, thousands of pamphlets, circulating, etc., advertising every imaginable thing under the sun, given away there, and were a visitor to retain a hundredth part of what will be handed him there each day, he would need several large boxes to take them home in.

 In advertising our country we must bear in mind two things.

 First. - That our country is practically unknown to the majority of the people of the north, and,

 Second. - That as a rule the people of those sections believe that a great amount prejudice and ill-will still exists in the South against Northerners.


 This idea has been kept alive by selfish politicians and must be overcome before we can expect any large exodus to our State. There are hundreds and thousands of desirable families who would be only too glad to leave the cold north and come to us if they only knew our great resources and kindly feelings. To illustrate: Monday morning as we were going to the city we sat in the seat with a gentleman who we noticed was intently gazing out of the window. Just after we left New Iberia he turned to us and said: "God and nature have certainly done all that it were possible to do for a country here. I never had an idea that there was such a country on top of earth." We learned that he was from Dakota and on his return from a trip to Mexico. He asked us what land was worth, and when we informed him that it could be had from $20 to $25 and acre, he would hardly believe it. "Why," he said, "I had to pay $25 an acre for prairie land in Dakota four years ago, and if we net $8.00 an acre from it we think we do well." He had intended to go right home, but said he was going to stop over at New Orleans and come back and have a look at the country. He further said: "But if a northern man moves in here, the people don't treat him well do they?" We simply told him to make a visit back and converse with the people, and he would learn that he would be accorded with the most hospitable treatment, and that it would be from the heart, too. We have told this simply to show the general idea held in the North of the Southern people, and to show what we must overcome if we wish to induce people to move here.

 We believe one of the best plans that could be adopted would be to have published a series of letters in the country papers of the north and west, describing our people, their feelings and our lands. Such letters written in an interesting manner would be published by many papers for nothing, and would do more good than all the pamphlets that could be printed.
When the convention meets all these matters can be discussed and some practical plan adopted. Let each delegate devote some thought and study to the question before coming to the convention, so that when it does meet it will not be a repetition of the State Convention, but rather a working convention of men with practical ideas.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1893.



The great sporting event of the season will be the ball game between the lawyers and business men's nine. The proceeds will be given to the high school.
 Laf. Adv. 5/17/1893.


 Laf. City Council:
Mr. O. C. Mouton, by authority of the Business Men's Association turned over to the Council the $100 donated by Rev. E. Forge and requested that the amount be used in paying for the site of the water works and electric lights plant.
 Laf. Adv. 6/6/1896.







Railroad Between Lafayette and Palmetto? Monday the last Business Mens' Association held a meeting during which they decided to appoint a committee of three to correspond with Mr. L. S. Thorne, Vice-President and Gen. Mgr. of the Texas & Pacific Railroad, to ask that a branch be established from Palmetto to Lafayette. Those of the committee were Messrs. Chas. D. Caffery, B. A. Salles and Dr. T. B. Hopkins. We will give in our next issue the result of the inquiry.
Laf. Adv. 6/6/1896. 


 It seems that that railroad spur was never built between Lafayette and Palmetto;  however a railroad line currently does go through Palmetto ; its between Alexandria and Brusly ( pronounced "broo-lee") which is across the  Mississippi River from Baton Rouge.



LAFAYETTE TO CELEBRATE FOURTH OF JULY.  At the Business Men's Association meeting Monday night it was decided to celebrate the 4th of July in Lafayette. A good old-fashioned celebration was the unanimous choice of the meeting. A celebration to which we can invite our neighbors and friends to participate in and enjoy the hospitality  of Lafayette. An executive committee was appointed to interview the leading citizens and learn what favor a celebration would meet. They were encouraged by almost everyone approached on the subject and held a meeting Tuesday evening and partially outlined a program and appointed different committees. Wednesday evening the subscription committee made a tour of the business houses and raised nearly $200.00 for the celebration. The business men were almost without exception in favor of the movement and the general advice was to do it well. The fund has been materially raised since Wednesday and will doubtless be about $300.00 by the time the money is needed.

 It is hoped that every citizen of Lafayette will lend a helping hand to the celebration and make it an occasion long to be remembered. Those on the committees given below are especially requested to take hold of the part assigned to them and see that that particular part is a grand success.


 The program given below is only a rough outline. The Business Men's Association meets Monday night and will then prepare a more elaborate one which will be strictly carried out. Among the attractions not mentioned before will be a number of novelty races, and last, but not least, a grand display of fire-works at night.

 Lafayette Advertiser 6/8/1895.

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