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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

***EARLY LAFAYETTE EDUCATION/SCHOOLING

From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 4, 1905:

TEACHERS' CONVENTION


Largest in the History of the Association.


The Louisiana Public School Teacher's Association held its first session Tuesday night and closed Thursday night. It was the thirteenth annual meeting of the Association and the largest in its history, over 300 teachers being present. Its general sessions were held in the auditorium of the Industrial Institute and the department meetings in the various class rooms. The Institute proved an ideal place for the meeting and Dr. Stephens assisted much in its great success by his untiring efforts to provide for the wants and convenience of the teachers. The various committees of citizens each performed their duties placed upon them zealously and faithfully and the sincere expressions of many of the teachers of appreciation of the generous and charming hospitality of Lafayette, testifies how well they looked after the comfort and pleasure of the teachers during their stay with us. Mr. Baxter Clegg deserves a special compliment upon the excellent manner in which he handled the transportation of the crowd. And a special compliment is also due Mr. L. F. Salles, manager of the Gordon Hotel, and those who assisted him, for the successful way in which they took care of over 100 guests. The difficulty can be appreciated when it is known that the hotel was not finished and everything had to be started at once; yet under such difficulties the service at the hotel was highly satisfactory, and its patrons left greatly pleased with their entertainment.

The dormitories at the Institute cared for a large number of the teachers and many were received in private homes in some of which were entertained free of cost.

This is Lafayette's first attempt at taking care of a large convention, and it was a successful attempt. It was also a pleasure to do so, and knowing now that we have the facilities to accommodate conventions, we will in the future be glad to welcome representative bodies of men to our little city.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/4/1905





We are requested to announce that Prof. F. A. Rogan will open a private school, next Monday the 7th inst. The Professor's tact and ability in conducting a school and imparting knowledge to his pupils is well known in this community. Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1878.



School Board Meeting. - There will be a regular meeting of the School Board, Monday, Jan. 3rd. 1898:
C. F. Latiolais, Supt.
"Jan. 9th". Stick this date in your hat.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/1/1898.



Don't forget that we must have a high school building completed and a school opened therein the coming fall. The town and parish needs and demands it. Laf. Adv. 1/28/1899.


School in Vermilionville. - We call the attention of our readers and of the public generally to the Prospectus of Mr. Alcee Judice. He will reopen his school in the town of Vermilionville at Mrs. Eastin's residence, on Monday the 11th inst. Mr. Judice has few superiors as a teacher, his varied acquirements, as well as tact in discipline, make him most worthy of public patronage, which no doubt will be cheerfully and liberally extended to him. Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1869.










From the Lafayette Gazette of January 10th, 1903.


Our Schools.
The enrollment of more than twenty new students is the very fine showing made by the Industrial Institute at the reopening of the school after the holiday vacation. The good work which is being done at the Institute is becoming known and the result is that the attendance is continually increasing. The Gazette does not think that any educational institution in this State has gained a larger measure of public favor in the first year of its existence than has the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute. The president and faculty of this school may well consider the recent increase in the attendance as a popular recognition of their efficiency. All the students who home for the holidays came back and, it gives us a pleasure to say, they brought others with them.

Hardly a week passes without the arrival in Lafayette of one or two families who are induced to come here by the splendid educational advantages offered by this town. When the children are not ready to enter enter the Institute they are enabled to fit themselves for matriculation by attending the local schools. This week Mr. Jules Clement, a well-known resident of Jennings, came here to enroll two of his boys at the Industrial, but as they were too young for that Institution they entered the High School where they will take a preparatory course.

The High School reopened last Monday with several new pupils, most of whom came from the parish. The people are finding out the worth of this school and the consequence is that all the available space in the building is being rapidly taken up.
Lafayette Gazette 1/10/1903.







The Lafayette Home Institute. - patrons of this school will be glad to know that Prof. Greig will continue in charge and that no interruption in the session need be anticipated. Mrs. W. G. Webb, a graduate of the Natchitoches State Normal, and for many years a successful teacher in public schools of this town and parish, will conduct the regular work with a qualified assistant. The Institute has an established reputation and certificates given pupils entitle them to entrance into the Industrial Institute without examination.Lafayette Advertiser 1/11/1905.




The Primary School. - The enrollment at the Primary School has now reached 130, and every seat is occupied. The attendance is excellent, and the children all manifest great interest in their work. The principal, Misses Bagnal and Younger are earnest, zealous teachers and the fine attendance and enrollment are evidences of a high appreciation of their work. All that is needed to place our schools in rank with the first school in the State is a first class modern public school building, and there is but little doubt we will have that within another year. Lafayette Advertiser 1/11/1902.









Property for a High School.

At its last meeting the City Council ordered the purchase of the two lots across from Castel's bakery for $2,100. These lots are the ones selected for the site of a new high school building which our increasing school attendance will make necessary very soon, and the city council has acted most wisely in providing grounds to meet the demands which the development of of the schools have already created. Lafayette Advertiser 1/10/1903.




One Hundred and Fifty.
One hundred and fifty children, boys and girls, are now enrolled in Prof. Greig's school. There are three teachers in this school and they should not be expected to give the proper attention to a greater number of pupils. All the room afforded by the school house is taken up and the authorities are compelled to refuse admission to applicants. Prof. Greig is negotiating for the purchase of improved desks which are badly needed in the school. Lafayette Gazette 1/12/1895.



School Board.
Vermilionville, La., Dec. 1st, 1877.

The Board of Directors met this day in called session. Present: Dr. T. B. Hopkins, Ones Broussard, Jos. Boudreaux, R. C. Landry, Dr. N. D. Young, Chas. Paddio, Narcisse Mouton and Will. Clegg. Absent: Dr. M. L. Lyons.

Proceedings of the last meeting were read and approved.

On motion of Dr. Young, the President was directed to draw a warrant in favor of Moses B. Williams for thirty dollars, for teaching colored school near Royville, in the month of September 1877. It was also ordered that Moses B. Williams be allowed to continue teaching the colored school where now located, until a school house is provided in the Simon Settlement.


Messrs. Landry and Boudreaux reported in regard to investigation of title, etc., of "Vermilionville Academy," and were continued as committee, to report further at next meeting. Directors from wards where school lands are now located, were authorized to notify parties occupying those lands, that they must either make satisfactory arrangements to rent the lands or vacate them, and if neither is done, that measures will be taken legally against them as trespassers.

Mr. Boudreaux was authorized to make a settlement with parties claiming to be interested in the school-house in "Simon Settlement" by receiving from them the difference between their claim and the value of the school-house.

Ordered by the Board that all schools in the 2d, 3d, and 4th wards be discontinued, after December, until further instructions.

Mr. Landry was authorized to have furniture made and glazing done for Broussardville school house and building put in order at the smallest expense.

The Board then adjourned to regular meeting, 1st Saturday of January 1878.
THOS. B. HOPKINS, President.
Will Clegg, Secretary. 

Lafayette Advertiser 12/5/1878.




The High School.
As per announcement in another column of this paper the High School will be opened on Monday, Jan. 22, under the direction of Prof. W. A. LeRosen, whose services have been engaged. Prof. LeRosen comes to us highly recommended by prominent citizens and leading educators of this State. He is a graduate of the Peabody Normal School of Nashville, Tenn., and is a teacher of experience, having served as president of the Arcadia Male and Female College and of the Simsboro Institute of Bienville parish and having taught school a number of years in the State of Georgia. The examination of pupils desiring to enter the High School will take place at the High School building on Jan. 18 at 10 o'clock. Lafayette Gazette 1/13/1890.




THE NEED OF BETTER SCHOOL HOUSES.

During the past few days Superintendent Alleman visited a number of the ward schools. With one or two exceptions the enrollment was found to be small, due to the fact that parents are still keeping their children at home to pick cotton. It is rather late in the season for cotton picking, but it appears that a portion of the crop is yet unharvested. The cotton picking season interferes very much with the schools, because such a large number of pupils are kept away from their studies that it is in many instances impossible to secure the required attendance. It would seem to be a wise policy to have the vacation during the cotton picking months instead of having it in the summer, but owing to the badly ventilated school houses the heat during the warm season is intolerable. There is a crying need for better school houses in this parish. In most cases the buildings are entirely too small, and with few exceptions they have been constructed without any regard for the health of the teachers and pupils. It is really incredible that a country so rich in natural advantages and settled by a people noted for their generosity and hospitality should be so poorly equipped in school houses. The School Board is unable to build better school houses because of lack of means, all the funds available being used to pay current expenses. It is a sad commentary on the intelligence and progressiveness of the people of this parish that they have not yet realized the importance of providing ample facilities for the education of our children. And it will not do to say that the government is responsible for this anomalous condition. The people are responsible and they have none but themselves to blame. It is the result of unpardonable apathy on their part -- of inexcusable indifference, and they might as well recognize the fact now that the question is up to them for solution. In plain terms, they have to go down into their geans and provide the only remedy. They must learn the doctrine of self-help. It is their own welfare which is at stake -- the future worth and usefulness of their children -- and unless they open their eyes to the impending dangers of illiteracy and ignorance they perhaps may not, but their offsprings will live to rue their mistake. Lafayette Gazette 1/18/1902.




Resigning from Lafayette High School.
There will be a vacancy in the corps of teachers of the Lafayette High School on account of the resignation of the second assistant, Miss Lizzie Mudd. See notice of the Superintendent of Public Education in this issue of the Advertiser. Lafayette Advertiser 1/18/1901.

 



SCHOOL BOARD PROCEEDINGS.
Lafayette, La. Jan. 5th, 1889.

The School Board met his day in regular session with the following members present: President Dr. J. D. Trahan, M. Billaud, Jasper Spell, T. Begnaud and Simonet LeBlanc. Absent, Dr. J. P. Francez and D. Hulin.

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

On motion, duly seconded, the President, appointed the following committee to examine the books, accounts, vouchers, etc., and H. E. Toll.

Mr. Chas. Caffery appeared before the Board and stated that he could not obtain a lessee for the 16th Section known as T. 11 S. R. 5 E. at $2.00 per acre, but thought it could be rented for $1.25 per acre.

On motion, duly seconded, Mr. Chas. Caffery was authorized to rent the 16th Sect. T. 11 S. R. 5 E., for $1.25.

A communication from the State Superintendent was read, in which he refers the Board to the District Attorney for advice in the matter of remitting the 5 per cent penalty due by the sureties of the ex-treasurer J. N. Judice.

Several of the teachers appeared before the Board and asked that they paid for the week that schools were closed between Christmas and New Year.

On motion, duly seconded, and agreeable to the above, the Superintendent was ordered to pay the teachers for the week between Christmas and New Year.

The Superintendent read his annual report respecting the schools in the parish, which was approved and ordered printed.

A communication from the 5th ward asking that Mr. A. J. Johnson, teacher of the colored school of said ward, be removed on account of incompetency and not having the proper number of pupils attending school, and that Mr. A. Hoard, be appointed as teacher of said school.

On motion, duly seconded, and agreeable to the above, Mr. A. J. Johnson was removed, and his removal to take place from this date.

By authority, the President appointed Mr. R. C. Greig, with himself, as a committee to see about having the school house in Lafayette repaired, and to accept bids for the same.

On motion, duly seconded, it was resolved, that the money received from rent of school lands be apportioned to the several wards according to law.

On motion, duly seconded, the Treasurer was requested to collect the 5 per cent penalty, due by the sureties of the ex-treasurer J. N. Judice.

On motion duly seconded, it was resolved, that the LeBlanc school in the 4th ward be and is hereby removed to Royville, and that the Meaux school be removed from its present locality to a place to be designated by the Board later.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.



SLI. Next week we will publish the list of subscription to the Industrial School and to the amount of expenses. Wonder if your name will be thereon?
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.




Re-opening Academy. - Mr. Alcee Judice will re-open his academy on next Monday, the 25th inst., at the residence formerly occupied by G. P. Voorhies Esq., and hereby gives notice to his former scholars and to the public generally. Mr. Judice, as we have before said, has few superiors as a teacher, his qualifications in point of ability are too well known to be commented on, whilst his tact of discipline has secured the confidence of all the parents who have favored him with the patronage. Friend Alcee -- we wish you success.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1869.



Summer Normals.

A conference of school officers was held in the parlors of the Gordon Hotel last Wednesday for the purpose of deciding the location of Summer Normal Schools in this section of the State. There were present at the meeting State Supt. J. B. Aswell and Prof. J. E. Keeney, representing the State Institute Board; Supt. McNeese of Calcasieu parish, Supt. Barry of Acadia parish, Supt. Murray of Cameron parish, Supt. Thompson of St. Landry parish, J. M. Booze, member of School Board of Calcasieu parish, and Dr. Moss, who represented the School Board of Lafayette parish in the absence of Supt. Alleman.

After explaining in detail the plan of work mapped out for the Summer Normal Schools by the State Institute Board and the good results which would follow this systematic work, Supt. Aswell invited a free and frank discussion of local conditions and needs by the school officers present, to enable the conference to decide upon a line of action that would best meet these requirements. The conference lasted two hours and reached an agreement to hold Summer Normal Schools lasting 4 weeks at Lake Charles and Crowley beginning June 12, at Opelousas, beginning July 10, and at Central Parish Institute of two weeks at Lafayette in August.

State Supt. Aswell expressed his pleasure that every parish invited to participate in the conference at Lafayette was represented at this meeting, and commented favorably upon the fact that the same interest and spirit was being manifested at all the points visited in the State thus far.

The public schools of the town were visited by the members of the conference in a body under the escort of President Moss, of the local School Board, and a visit was paid to the Industrial Institute by those remaining over for the five o'clock train going west.

The visitors from Lake Charles, Crowley and Opelousas, all three of which places are provided with substantial, commodious, modern school buildings, were impressed by the contrast with our buildings and expressed the hope that it might not be long before Lafayette also would be able to boast of a school building in keeping with its present needs and prominent position in educational affairs.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1905.
 



Needed Text Books. Supt. Alleman naturally felt very much honored in being selected to represent the parish superintendents on the committee to examine and recommend text books for use in the public schools of the State the next four years, and his friends and fellow citizens are also gratified at the distinction shown Lafayette. But Mr. Alleman is just beginning to fully realize the large amount of good hard work he is up against.

Books up in front of him.
Books back behind him.
Books all round him.
Pile up and threaten him,
While all his friends wonder if he can ever wade through.

And in addition, he is now beginning to reap the perquisites of the honor conferred on him, which are namely, the entertaining between times of various representatives of publishing houses. Yesterday he had the pleasure of being called upon by W. L. Lemmons, of the Southern Publishing Co., Sherman, Tex.; H. D. Newson, of Newson & Co., New York; and H. C. Cheney, of Scribner & Sons, New York.


Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1905. 





At The Institute. On Friday night, Feb. 24, an entertainment will be given at the Institute by the students for the benefit of the Athletic Association. Admission 25 cents. Everybody come and help a good Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1905. 
 





INSTITUTE.

For Parish Teachers Conducted by President Caldwell of the State Normal.

 The teachers of Lafayette will be better men and women ;  they will be better teachers for having come in contact with President B. C. Caldwell, of the State Normal School, in this parish institute during the past week. Mr. Caldwell is an inspiring teacher and lecturer, and a man of considerable magnetic force.

 Mr. Caldwell was introduced to this State as institute conductor, in which position he did so much for the cause of public education in this State. While it conceded that he is eminently fit for the presidency of the State Normal and that his promotion was merited, we cannot help but believe that for the present his power is much greater as institute conductor than as president of that institution. What Louisiana needs to-day is missionary work, and Mr. Caldwell is an educational evangelist among ten thousand. An institute conductor, he came in contact with every man and woman in the State, and he has never failed to impress communities with the sacred duty of educating the masses.

 The Gazette believes that a very large portion of the credit is due Mr. Caldwell for the condition of our school system to-day, and we are firmly convinced that ten years more of missionary work would result in an improvement in the public school system as noticeable as that of past decade. The Gazette believes that the most important office in the State should be the State superintendent and next the State institute conductor, and that these two positions should be filled by men large enough to fill them.

 The institute opened at ten,  and closed at two, with an intervening recess of fifteen minutes. Mr. Caldwell planned his work in such a way as to practically cover the subjects taught in the class-room. In each recitation he was the teacher and the parish teachers were the pupils. Each lesson was a skillful presentation by a master-hand and our teachers literally drank in the inspiration with open mouths. The teaching of the rest of the session in this parish will be of a higher order as a direct result of the institute. The sacred character of the work of teaching has been indelibly impressed upon the teachers and they have been given the fundamental principles that underlie scientific teaching as it is understood to-day.

 The conductor gave lessons in psychology, reading, geography, writing, music, and one period to a discussion of local problems. Each presentation was skillfully made and the teachers are now in possession of matter which if assiduously worked upon by them the clue to modern methods.

 Superintendent Alleman attended the whole session.
 Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1902.



LETTER FROM MR. GIRARD.
To the Editor of Laf. Gazette.

 You have frequently expressed the willingness to use the columns of your paper for the discussion of questions of public interest. I therefore take advantage of your kind and generous offer to submit a suggestion on the all important question of special tax for public education.

 The unanimity with which the tax-payers have always supported such tax propositions is sufficient proof of their interest in and appreciation of public education. The tax-payers of the town and parish of Lafayette have never failed in their duty in this respect.

 When the matter of the location of the Industrial Institute was submitted, the tax-payers with singular oneness of purpose, put aside all differences, political and all others, and by united effort secured for themselves the greatest benefaction that has ever come to this community.

 I feel fully justified in risking the statement, that whenever the proposition is submitted for a special tax for the improvement of the school facilities the authorities both town and parish to the duty they owe to the tax-payers in the matter of rendition of account of their trust in the management of public funds.

 A case in point which I think is particularly in point is that of the special tax for the water works and electric lights.

 I have been informed by some of those in position to know, that notwithstanding the tax has nearly all been collected, there is still a large proportion of those bonds still outstanding and unpaid, and that the amount yet available from that tax cannot possibly meet those bonds.

 I have also been informed, that the total revenues from the special water works and electric light tax should have been sufficient to meet the entire issue of bonds.

 I was unable to obtain any exact figures.

 While on this subject I consider it just and proper that the Police Jury should  furnish the tax-payers with a full statement of revenues and disbursements of the public funds.

 From the fragmentary statement, published from time to time, it is practically impossible to form any reasonable estimate of our financial affairs.

 Mr Editor, I stand ready at all times to advocate and support any proposition which the authorities think proper for public improvement.

 I think however that we must not lose sight of the importance and necessity of the proper use and distribution of the funds so realized. It is right and proper and the tax-payers of the town and parish can be depended on to do their duty in this respect.

 It is equally right and proper that, the people should have full information of the uses and purposes to which proceeds of the special tax are placed as also the present revenues derived from the regular taxes are applied.

 Thanking you for your kindness for permitting so great a trespass on your time and space, and earnestly hoping that all will pull together in this commendable enterprise.
            I beg to remain,
                 Yours very truly,
                            CROW GIRARD.
Lafayette Gazette 2/21/1903.

 




Improvements the year 1893 will give Lafayette:

  A New Railroad,
  A Sugar Refinery,
  A Cotton Factory,
  A Street Car Line,
  A Graded School,
  A Rice Mill,
  A Cotton Seed Oil Mill,
  An Ice Factory,
and a dozen minor industries.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/25/1893.

















From the Lafayette Advertiser  3/15/1893:
Our Schools. 


 MR. EDITOR. - As inducements to emigration to our town and parish are brought in review before the public now, with your permission I will say something through the ADVERTISER about our schools. Very recently I have enjoyed visiting a part of our schools, and as I have spent fifteen years in teaching, I think I can report intelligently.

 First I called on Mrs. Emily Bailey and her pupils, consisting of about twenty-five boys and girls, who are well disciplined and well instructed. The teacher seems to love the children, and the children seem to be equally fond of the teacher. I enjoyed my visit, and was agreeably entertained with some select reading by small children who knew very little English until they entered this school. Eddie Moss, George and Thomas Debaillon, Joseph Lacoste and Clara Hebert read well from the fourth reader. Am told that Mrs. Bailey has been teaching here for a number of years and she certainly deserves patronage as long as she may choose to teach.

 I next called on Miss Clye Mudd and her interesting school, who are comfortably housed in a beautiful oak grove in the city suburbs. Miss Mudd graduated with the highest honors when at school, and is not only qualified to teach, but seems devoted to it, and the "idea is certainly taught how to shoot there." She is fully abreast with the times in her methods, and requires very thorough lessons. One can do no better than to patronize Miss Mudd. I have enjoyed more than one visit to our free public school under the control of Prof. Robt. Greig and Miss Jamieson. Under the circumstances this is one of the best schools that I ever visited. What are the circumstances? They are not provided with a suitable building. There are about ninety children all in the same room, and of course there is not that quiet and perfect order that there would otherwise be, yet it is a fine school. The teachers stand upon their feet and labor hard to enforce discipline and to impart instruction, and the children are instructed, and well instructed. There is a great deal of oral teaching and reviewing which are highly commendable. It is hoped that there will be a better house in the near future.

 What is the outlook of the town in an educational point of view? In addition to these schools, there is a convent in a flourishing condition and an elegant high school building nearing completion, and inasmuch as this is a public enterprise, intended for the benefit of the entire public, the public heart and the public purse should take hold of it, and push it on to a grand success.

 Some seem to be afraid that if this enterprise succeeds, that some of the schools now in existence will fail. Not necessarily. There are uneducated children and youth enough in this town and vicinity to sustain as many more, and we should all remember that no one kind of a school will suit everybody. Then for the public good we should not be selfish, and as we cannot expect immigration and prosperity without good schools, and schools for all, let us have a high school that will be an honor to our town and means of attraction and increased prosperity.
      Cordially, H. ARMSTRONG.
3/8/1893. Laf. Adv. 3/15/1893.  

From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 16th, 1904:











 




A BIG GAIN.
Last year the revenues derived from the lease of the 2,000 acres of school land amounted to $749.40. This year the lease of 1500 acres will bring over $2,100. It is believed that the remainder of the land will be leased and that the revenues will exceed $2,500. This shows a large increase in the school funds accruing from this source. The Gazette congratulates Superintendent Alleman and the Board on this splendid showing.
Lafayette Gazette 1/18/1902.



Some Interesting Reading.

The School Board proceedings, which are published elsewhere in this issue, are specially interesting. They contain Supt. Alleman's report of the work of last year and give in detail the number in attendance, cost per child, number of schools, etc., etc., furnishing complete information on all points to the public.

The report calls special attention to the need for more school houses, and expresses the inability of the Board, even with the additional revenues from the school tax, Jury and Council, to meet the fast growing demand.

Every citizen should read the proceedings carefully.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/25/1905.










LAFAYETTE PARISH SCHOOL BOARD.

Among other business....

 The following communication from the ladies of Lafayette was received and read:

 To the Honorable President and Members of School Board:

 GENTLEMEN: -- The ladies of the committee who undertook to raise money with which to supplement the salary of a male principal for the High School in Lafayette, take pleasure in reporting to your honorable body that they have collected and placed in the bank the sum of $220 for this purpose, and they would most respectfully request that, if  it is possible for you to do so, you retain Miss Francis Greig as assistant in the school, and that you take immediate steps to accomplish the above object.
       Respectfully, etc.,
          MRS. FELIX DEMANADE, '' " M. P. YOUNG, " " DR. TOLSON, " " DR. BERAUD, " " DR. HOPKINS.

 De. Lessley moved that the superintendent be instructed to employ a gentleman teacher as principal for the High School, and when it is necessary, to employ an assistant for said school.

 Mr. Trahan offered as an amendment to Dr. Lessley's motion, that a gentleman teacher be employed as principal or the High School and that Miss Miss F. S. Greig be retained as assistant of said school at a salary of $45 a month, which was carried by the following vote: Yeas -- J. O. Broussard, J. E. Trahan, D. Bernard and J. S. Whittington; nays -- Dr. Lessley and A. C. Guilbeau.

 On motion of Mr. Trahan, seconded by Mr. Bernard, Dr. Thos. B. Hopkins and Mr. E. G. Voorhies, with the superintendent, was appointed as a committee to select a suitable gentleman teacher as principal of the High School.

 On motion of Mr. Whittington, seconded by Mr. Bernard, the offer from the ladies of Lafayette was accepted and that a vote of thanks be tendered the ladies of Lafayette for their generosity and for the interest they have taken in the cause of education.

 The Board then adjourned.
     J. O. BROUSSARD, President.
     H. E. TOLL, Secretary.
   Lafayette Gazette 1/25/1896.








THE INSTITUTE BUILDING


 Nearing Completion.

 Mr. Roy's and Other Homes to Add to the Appearance of the Locality.

  Contractor A. E. Mouton is unusually happy these days. After many months of constant work he is on the eve of seeing the completion of the main building of the Industrial Institute. A few more days and the elegant and spacious structure will be finished. Aside from its great architectural beauty, this building has many exceptional advantages possessed by few others in the country. It is a thoroughly modern in every respect, and now that it is about completed, one may have an idea of how well it was planned. That the plan was conscientiously executed there seems to be no doubt. All, the president, building committee, architect, contractor and everybody else connected with it, tried to give the State a good job, and the building itself is the best evidence of the success of their efforts. It is a grand structure which will stand for ages as an eloquent monument to the intelligence and skill of the builders and to that enlightened spirit of progress which the people of Lafayette displayed in their efforts to have the institution located here.

 The cost of the building is about $41,000. In this are included a few extra improvements not stipulated in the original contract, amounting to a little over $2,000. As soon as practicable the dormitory and other buildings will be erected, preparatory to the opening of the first term next September.An engraver is working on the corner-stone. The lettering originally made on the stone was not satisfactory.



 The residence of Mr. J. A. Roy near the Institute is a very handsome and commodious structure, and adds greatly to the appearance of the surrounding. The building is the work of Contractor Ross. 

 We are informed that Dr. Moss and other citizens of the town intend to build fine homes in the neighborhood.


 Mr. Geo. K. Bradford, of Rayne, was at work during the week surveying Mr. Girard's land, with a view of laying it out in lots. We understand that it is Mr. Girard's intention to sell these lots.

 Surveyor Charles S. Babin has marked out the lines for the opening of Johnston street.
If the land-owners will exert themselves just a little bit that locality can be made very beautiful. The employment of some taste and a little cash will make the land adjacent to the college grounds exceedingly desirable for the building of residences.
Lafayette Gazette 1/26/1901.









TECHNICAL SCHOOLS.

 While the youth of Louisiana are enjoying the advantages of technical education in the State University at Baton Rouge and in the Ruston Industrial Institute, it should not be forgotten that all the world elsewhere is enjoying the same advantages, and that it becomes imperative for us in Louisiana to keep pace with the rest of the world or else lose our place therein. We are led to these reflections by reading a descriptive article concerning technical instruction in Queensland, that thriving English-Australian colony, where they are doing things in the English way, improved by American enterprise and energy.


 The Brisbane Technical College has about 1600 male and female students studying in day and night classes, all of whom are endeavoring to avail themselves of the excellent education that now becomes possible to them. All this should be very suggestive to us in Louisiana, and we trust that the youth of this State and of the other Gulf States will avail themselves of the technical education now so readily secured in our splendid educational institutions. - From the La. Farmer.

 Technical or industrial education has been neglected in the United States, particularly in the South. In the older countries it has long been the policy to give a child not only a literary education, but a trade or profession.

 A boy may graduate from college, though poorly equipped to earn a livelihood. The education ordinarily acquired in the colleges or academies in this country does not always give one a means of making a living. Not infrequently men who are highly educated fail to achieve even the smallest measure of success, because of their inability to put into practical use what they have learned at school; hence the great necessity of educating the hand as well as the head. A famous English author has well said that between a wife who could play on the piano and one who could cook a good soup he would unhesitatingly choose the latter. That he was wise in his choice no sensible man will gainsay, for well-cooked victuals are more necessary to the happiness and well being of the average husband than the most classical music. The reasons which guided the Englishman in his choice of a better half would no doubt induce a sensible woman to first ascertain a man's earning capacity before giving serious consideration to his matrimonial proposition. WE dare say that the applicant's ability to speak Latin or Greek would cut little figure in the transaction. The world is becoming more and more practical every day, and that man who can and knows how to work is in demand.

Parents who have the welfare of their children at heart should not fail to appreciate the importance of that technical instruction which fits the young man or woman to enter the serious duties of life. Many young men leave college and are thrown out into the world practically helpless, unable to successfully cope with the stern realities of the active struggle for supremacy which follows the scholastic period. Not so with the young fellow who has attended an industrial institute. While acquiring an education he has been quietly devoting a portion of his time toward the training of his hands, and when he goes out into the world to battle for an existence, his services are in demand, and he is spared the humiliating predicament in which his educated, but tradeless brother generally finds for himself.
Impressed with the necessity of technical instruction, the people of the parish of Lafayette have given over $80,000 for the establishment of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute at this place. The main building, which is about completed, is one of the handsomest structures of its kind in the South. In giving this large amount the people of Lafayette have conferred an inestimable boon upon the youth of this section, and time will surely prove the wisdom and patriotism which impelled this generous act.


 With Tulane, the Louisiana State University, the Ruston Industrial School, and last, but not least, the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute at Lafayette, the young people of Louisiana will be afforded exceptional educational facilities.
 Lafayette Gazette 1/26/1901.




HIGH SCHOOL,HONOR ROLL,  
January 1901.

 Pothier Voorhies, Matilde Richard, Annie Bell, Harold Demanade, Jeff Caffery, Alma Gulley, Ula Corronna, Wilhelmina Schmulen, Louis Constantin, Lydia Broussard, William Higginbotham, Etta Domengeaux, Helen Bell, Laurentine Guchereaux, Alex Guidry.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/26/1901. 



TEACHER’S INSTITUTE.
Lafayette, La. Jan 19th, 1901.

 The fourth session of the Parish Teacher’s Institute was held at the Public School house Jan. 19th.
The meeting was called to order by Conductor W. A. LeRosen.
The roll call was answered with quotations and the minutes of previous meeting were read and approved.
Then Miss Lizzie Mudd having tendered her resignation as secretary, it was accepted and Mrs. Ida H. DeLaney was elected to fill the vacancy.
 The practice classes followed and occupied 30 minutes after which W. A. LeRosen conducted the Critique.
 Much interest was shown in the History of Education lesson, which was next on the program.
 In the absence of Mr. R. H. Broussard the School Management lesson was conducted by Mr. W. A. LeRosen. During the lesson a very animated discussion on punishment of pupils arose, in which all the teachers present took part.\
The following is the program for next meeting, Feb. 16th.
Roll call,
Practice classes:
 Sixth Grade Arithmetic, Mr. G. H. Always,
Fifth Grade Reader, Mr. C. K. Olivier.
Second Grade Composition Work, Miss Virgie Younger.
Critique,
History of Education, pages 119 to 139, Mr. LeRosen, leader, School Management, pages 105 to 130.
Mr. R. H. Broussard, leader, Discussion on it.
How many Grades should be taught in Country Schools.
Mr. Chas. A. Boudreaux, leader.

MRS. IDA H. DELANEY,
Secretary.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/26/1901.





Last Saturday's Entertainment.

As we predicted in our last issue, the entertainment given at Falk's Hall in the interest of the Lafayette High School was a decided success.

Early Saturday morning and even at noon the weather was threatening indeed; and, for a while it was feared that many would be unable to attend the play on account of rain. But, as night came on, the skies cleared up, sunken hopes arose again, and additional interest in our Opelousas friends was manifested.

Scarcely had the doors been opened when the crowd began to pour in, and , fully an hour before the time appointed for the raising of the curtain, it became apparent that the audience would be larger than had been expected at any time.

A large and appreciative audience was not anxiously awaiting the opening of the play. All preparations being completed, the intense desire of the crowd to see "Above the Clouds," was changed to undivided attention.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1897







 Professor Stephens Expects the Industrial School to be Built Rapidly.

Will be Ready to Begin the Great Work as the Structure Rises. 

From the N. O. Picayune. - It has perhaps been the fortune of no other public institution of learning in the state to receive encouragements so large and substantial in the beginning as those offered by the people of southwest Louisiana for the benefit of the new State Industrial School to be established at Lafayette each year for ten years will approach a value at a conservative estimate something like $75,000. The twenty-five acres of land upon which the school will be located comes as a free gift from private individuals. The police jury of the parish gives a cash bonus of $3,000, and the city of Lafayette adds $5,000 more to this. But these offers are made doubly effective by an agreement on the part of the local banks to advance a cash amount of $10,000 at once, repayable out of the proceeds of the tax of the first two years. Thus in this way a cash amount of $18,000 is available immediately, while it is likely that a much larger portion of the ten years' tax may be capitalized if necessary.

Prof. Edwin Lewis Stephens, the recently elected president of the institute, was born in the parish of Natchitoches in 1872. He attended school in Natchitoches and at Keachie, La., until, at the age of 17, he entered the Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge. Graduating there with the degree of bachelor or arts in 1892, he was elected to the chair of Latin in the Louisiana State Normal School. In 1896 he received appointment to the Helen Gould scholarship in the School of Pedagogy of New York University, from which he was graduated in 1899 with the doctor's degree in pedagogy. He has done much institute work in the Summer Normal Schools of the state during the past six or eight years, and has had part in the educational organizations that have been uplifting the condition of the schools and the teacher's profession. At the time of his recent election he was the teacher of physics and chemistry in the New Orleans Boys' High School.
Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1900.



Night School.

 At the request of several parties, Prof. LeRosen has consented to teach a night school from 7 o'clock to 9 o'clock P. M. at the High School building, provided a class can be had. Branches taught will be arithmetic, spelling, reading, grammar, geography and writing. Tuition, $2 per scholastic month. Those desiring to attend will leave word at Mrs. Young's. Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1901.



TO TEACHERS. - A regular meeting of the Parish institute will be held on Saturday, Jan. 28, at half past ten a. m. in the public school building Lafayette. All teachers are earnestly requested to be present.
             Respectfully,
             W. A. LEROSEN.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/28/1899.




SCHOOL SYSTEM BROKE?
 School Board Proceedings.

VERMILIONVILLE Jan. 7th, 1882.

Pursuant to a call, the School Board to-day President Chas. D. Caffery called the meeting to order, with the following members present, Messrs. F. S. Mudd, C. Debaillon, D. Hulin, E. Dugat and P. Offpauir. Absent, D. Comeau.

On motion of Dr. Mudd, it was resolved, to sell at public auction all lands in this parish belonging to the Public Schools, and that is President of this Board and the Superintendent of the parish are hereby authorized to fix or appoint a proper time for an election for that purpose after 30 days advertisement.

On motion, it was ordered that the committee of examiners meet on the 28th of this month.

On motion of Dr. Mudd, it was resolved, that a warrant be issued for the relief of Alphonse Neveu, and be paid to him from the contingent funds. -- for the sum of $20, being amount received by him as School Board Trasurer in spurious currency.

Be it resolved, that all the schools where the funds are exhausted, be suspended until further orders.

On motion, the Board adjourned to the 11th day of February next.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, President.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/28/1882.




PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
New Teachers.



Last Saturday six young ladies from the State Normal school arrived to take positions in the Public Schools of Lafayette parish as follows: Misses Vivian Fair and Anna Gandy for the Broussard Central school; Miss Pearl Larche for the Lafayette schools; Miss Julia Johnson for the Ridge school; Miss Fanny Dunn for the Chas. Burke school, open this year by special act of the School Board; and Miss Leslie Carter for the Matthieu school.

 All of these young ladies are professionally trained teachers and in addition each is specially fitted for the particular position to which she has been assigned, and each comes to us highly recommended by the faculty of the State Normal.

 Broussard is soon to enjoy the comforts of a neat and thoroughly equipped school-house. The two story building recently donated to the School Board by the Farmers' Alliance is being renovated by carpenter and painter, and promises to be ready for occupation in the course of a few days. It will be the best school-house  in the parish and the only one constructed with reference to purpose for which it is intended to be used.

 In addition to all these good things there is a consignment of patent desks waiting to be mounted. These desks were obtained through the efforts of Mr. C. K. Olivier and Miss Edna Sprole, the teachers last session, both of whom have gone into other fields of action.

 There is a just pride manifested in this building by the leading citizens, and steps are being taken to dedicate it in a manner which will fittingly celebrate the completion of such an important public structure. By a peculiar coincidence the town of Broussard is at present building a large church, and the people will feel the impulse of two forces which in every enlightened community go hand in hand ;  two forces which stand for enlightenment, civilization and progress ;  two forces, which, according as they are directed either make or mar the communities in which they are situated -- the church and the school.

 The distinguished French scholar, Dr. Alcee Fortier, of Tulane University, has been invited to be the orator of the day and a committee of citizens is now at work on the details of a program for the dedication exercises.
CHECK DATE???


Shady School.

 A comfortable school-house in a well shaded school-yard is Mr. Judice's idea of a school. Mr. Judice has made himself felt in his community and this journal takes pleasure in stating that all of the school-houses within six miles of him have been white-washed or painted as a result of his interest. This gentleman has interested himself to the extent of planting enough Texas umbrella china trees for every school in the parish. The trees are now four feet high and the season is at hand for transplanting. Enough trees for any school yard can be easily carried in a buggy. The Gazette will be pleased to hear from any teacher who  may wish to avail himself or herself of this opportunity to get a good shade tree. We promise to have the trees on hand on February 7, teachers' meeting day. Write us at once telling how many trees you want.

 The Hon. J. V. Calhoun, State Superintendent of education, has promised to send us cuts of the leading school houses of the State.

 They will appear in later additions.

 Mr. Alleman has issued a pamphlet to the people and teachers of the parish. Its purpose is to systematize the public schools and to organize public school forces. The Gazette sincerely hopes that it will be read by every citizen of the parish and that we shall soon reach the much desired goal. It is a plea for all the children of the parish.  Lafayette Gazette 1/31/1903.   




THE HIGH SCHOOL.

The enrollment at the High School on last Monday reached 132, the largest in the history of the school. This speaks well for the efficiency of the school, and the high estimation in which it is held, and is a deserved compliment to Principal LeRosen and his assistants, Misses Devall and Christian.

Among the number enrolled last Monday are three young men from Terrebone parish.


Two weeks ago Friday afternoon exercises were instituted for the instruction of the children and brightening of school work. Each grade has a Friday set apart and invites the other grades to be present. The exercises are varied and consist of singing, recitations, etc., and the reading of the two school papers, the High School Weekly, and the Fifth Grade Bulletin. The papers are written, and, of course, there is but one copy ; but they are proving highly interesting to the children. They are edited by two editors for each paper, elected by the pupils; and the two issues so far show considerable talent, and are a credit to the grades represented.


Last Friday it was the 4th grade's turn to entertain, and they gave a very nice and entertaining program.


All parents and friends are cordially invited to come to these Friday afternoon exercises. They begin at 2 p. m. and close at 2:30 p. m.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1902.




Open a School-Close a Jail. 
 

 It is a blot on the intelligence of civilized communities that its criminals should be housed in palatial jails of preserved brick, well ventilate, well-lighted, supplied with waterworks and other conveniences, while the future citizens, the school children, are crowded into miserable huts that do not admit of even the ordinary comforts of life. And who is to blame?
 
Why is it that the parish of Lafayette has a well-ventilated, well lighted brick jail - a jail which has cost $12,000.00 - and that the thirty-one or more schools of the parish are meagre shanties, the best of which cost $200? Here we behold the sad spectacle of a community expending on its jail $12,000, and on thirty school houses about $6,000. The yearly appropriation of this parish and of many others of its type about twice as much for criminal expenses as the yearly appropriation for public schools. Yet in the face of these facts, should the question be put in a direct way to the men of the helm, "which do you consider more important to the future welfare of the parish, the blood-stained criminal of the educable youths of the parish; the man who is lost, perhaps irretrievably, or the developing child, the possibilities of whom are practically unlimited?" The answer is, the child; and yet how sadly neglected is the child of the school age in the poltical economy of our statesmen!
 
Is it the fault of the governor or of the Legislature; is it the fault of the School Board, or of the Police Jury?
 
The blame lies with neither of these, but altogether with the people themselves. For there never was a community that was served by a corps of officials of a higher order, mental or moral, than the average citizen, and an officer may be taken as type of citizen. Hence, if we have no better schools it is because the people have never demanded better schools, and it is not the fault of any officer, nor of any set of officers.
 
We have no complaint to lodge against sanitary jails, brick or marble, but in the name of common education let us have good school houses, and means with which to keep them open at least ten months of the year. It is time for the voters to demand schools and school facilities first, then criminal expenses and jails will take care of themselves to a large extent.
 
Victor Hugo says, "Open a school and you will close a jail."

Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1902.  





PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Largely Attended-More Rooms Needed.

 The High School has at present reached the high-water mark in respect to attendance. Since the opening of school on Jan. 2, there has been an increase of 20, making the enrollment 132. This is somewhat over the seating capacity of the school, but the teachers are managing somehow to accommodate them. At the Primary school also, the enrollment is so great, being nearly 150, that it is quite a difficult problem to seat the pupils. This large attendance is strong evidence that the work of the teachers is being appreciated, that there is a healthy educational sentiment, and last but not least, that our needs have grown way beyond the capacity of our present buildings, and that a new school house is an absolute necessity, if the children are to receive the full educational privileges they are entitled to. 

 It is to the hard work and ability of Prof. LeRosen and his assistants, Misses Devall and Christian of the High School and also to Misses Trichel, Bagnal and Younger of the Primary school, that we are indebted for the splendid showing our schools make.

 We learn that recently Friday afternoon exercises have been instituted at the High School, which are adding considerable interest and profit to the work. One feature is a school paper edited by the pupils and read at the exercises. The paper is proving a success, and demonstrates that there is effective teaching and considerable talent in the school. The exercises are open to all parents and friends of the school. Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1902.





Will Lafayette Get the Summer Normal?

 An effort will be made to induce to the South Louisiana Summer Normal and Chautauqua Association to select Lafayette as its next place of meeting. Several towns will try to secure the distinction and if Lafayette expects to be in the race it will have to hustle. A subscription of $250 is asked of the town or parish where the normal is held. This amount is added to the contribution of the association and the apportionment from the Peabody fund and is used in defraying the expenses of the normal. It ought to be useless to urge upon the people the importance of doing all in their power to induce the association to select Lafayette as the place to hold the summer normal. Aside from the educational feature and viewed from a purely selfish standpoint the proposition should receive the most favorable consideration of the people of the town. If held here, the normal will bring Lafayette not less than 200 teachers who will remain in town at least one month. To the cause of education it means a great deal more. The teachers who were at Franklin last year know how much good it is calculated to do. It will not only bring our teachers in contact with their confreres of other sections, but it will give them an opportunity to attend a first-class normal school conducted by the most eminent educators in the State. It will give an impetus to educational work in this parish that will not fail to bear good fruit. It means a normal school right at our doors during one month. If these were the only benefits to the derived from the holding of the normal here the people would be more than fully repaid for anything they might do or give. But the advantage of entertaining 200 men and women engaged in the profession of teaching is not to be overlooked, and the possibility of having a Chautauqua, including a number of lecturers of national reputation, should appeal strongly to this community in considering this matter. The question of selecting the place the place of meeting will be decided within the next ten days and if anything is done it must be done now. The Police Jury, School Board, City Council and the citizens of the town and parish should combine forces to secure the normal. Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1902.               


Music Lessons. - Mrs. H. McBride informs the public that she will, on Monday, Feb. 4th inst., open a music class at her residence, near the convent. Lessons will be given in piano, guitar and mandolin. Mrs. McBride is a musician of reputation, is well known in Lafayette and the Advertiser feels sure will receive liberal patronage. Lafayette Advertiser 2/2/1901.




First Term Closed.

 The first term of the public school has just closed. During the past week, the pupils at the High School have been busily engaged taking their term examination. Yesterday the teachers began making promotions and will finish to-day. The results of the examinations have been very satisfactory and show that good work is being done. The attendance is excellent, and the enrollment has reached, for all the schools, 466. Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1904.





Lafayette Teachers' Association.

 On Friday afternoon, after the Convocation exercises at the Industrial Institute, in response to a call by Dr. E. L. Stephens, the following teachers met in a class room of the Institute and orgainized under the temporary name of Lafayette Teachers' Association. Misses Lilly Guedry, McLaurin, Lefwich, Edith Dupre, Susie Rochelle, Zena C. Christian, Aliera Dickson, Edna Close, Fadra R. Holmes, Maggie Bagnall, Pearl Larche, Emma Horton; Messrs. L. J. Alleman, V. L. Roy, Ashby Woodson, L. W. Mayer, G. J. Young, Philip Martin, and W. J. Avery.

 After Supt. L. J. Alleman was elected temporary chairman, Mr. Roy stated briefly that the objects of the meeting are for the mutual improvement of all the teachers of Lafayette parish, both public and private, along pedagogical lines, and to prepare for the next meeting of the State Teachers Association, to be held in Lafayette. The chairman appointed Messrs. Mayer and Avery secretaries to write up the proceedings of the meeting for publication in the local papers.

 On motion the chairman was authorized to draft a committee to draft a constitution and by-laws for the organization.

 It was suggested that the chairman and Dr. Stephens arrange a programme for the next meeting. Duly moved and carried.

 On motion it was decided to hold the next meeting in the Industrial Institute library, at two o'clock. p. m., on February 13, 1904.

 There being no further business, the Association adjourned until the appointed time.
L. J. ALLEMAN, Chairman.
W. J. Avery, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1904.



The opening of the High School.
 
 The opening of the high school marks an era in the educational progress of Lafayette parish. It is decidedly a step in the right direction. For a number or years, the necessity for a central high school in each parish has been recognized by prominent educators. Owing to the prominent place that education has taken in the development and progress of each State, it is absolutely necessary for all the States and parishes to use all endeavors to build up a first class system of schools, and it is gratifying to all the friends of progress to see that our own parish is coming to the front. With unrivaled lands, a delightful climate and excellent public schools we offer every inducement to those seeking homes. Without good schools we can not hope to induce those seeking home to stop with us, buy our lands and help build up the parish to be one of the foremost in the State.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1894.



 
 Graded Course. - With the adoption of the graded course for the High School begins a systematic grading of the schools of the parish. This will necessarily take time; but it will begin at once to have a good effect by relieving the schools of work in the higher grades, thus leaving more time for thorough instruction in the lower ones.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1894. 
 
 
 


First Class Building. - Lafayette parish can now boast of a first class High School building, fully equipped with patent desks and other necessary school furniture. The building is admirably designed for the purpose, is well ventilated, and in every way comfortable. It will easily seat 200 pupils. The school has now 29 pupils in regular attendance, who represent the most advanced scholars from all the schools.
 Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1894. 


  The night school conducted by Prof. LeRosen, will begin Monday, the 5th inst. at 7 p.m. Laf. Adv/ 2/3/1894.


 
 
 Don't fail to see the charming Maude Atkinson in "Hazel Kirk" to-night, at Falk's Opera House. Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1894.



 POLICE JURY.
 Mr. Julian Mouton president of the School Board here appeared and suggested that the Police Jury appoint two trustees for the High School, subject subject to the approval and appointment of the School Board. By motion Messrs. Alex Delhomme Sr. and Aurelian Olivier, were proposed to serve as such trustees.
Laf. Gaz. 2/3/1894.


A LITERARY CONTEST.

 To assist in swelling the High School fund the ADVERTISER has concluded to inaugurate in Louisiana the latest English and New York fashion -- the missing word contest. The terms are as follows: Each person who wishes to try to supply the missing word in the paragraph that is given below, must cut out the "Missing Word Coupon" on this page of the ADVERTISER, and with name and address and the missing word plainly written in the proper place, send the same, together with 25 cents, to this office. The total of the fees received will be divided into two parts -- the first to be given to the high school fund and the second to be divided equally among those who currently guess the missing word. This coupon will be printed for one month. The result will be announced in the issue of this paper following the close of the contest.

 "This is the paragraph :
  If we are to have a High School it behooves the people to stir themselves and --------------."

 The missing word in this paragraph is known only to the editor, and it has been written and sealed by him in an envelope which will not be opened till the contest closes, when it will be opened by three prominent citizens. Competitors can make as many guesses as they choose, but each attempt must be made on a coupon taken from this paper and accompanied by the entrance fee of twenty-five cents.

     MISSING WORD COUPON.
[Cut this coupon out, fill up the blanks, and with twenty-five cents send it to the editor.]

Name....................................................

Post office address................................

Missing Word.......................................
Lafayette Advertiser 2/4/1893.

 






INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE NOTES.

 
The second term of the second session of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute was opened on last Monday week under conditions and with promises highly encouraging to every one that is interested in the success of this institution.


 In matters of attendance, of diligent work by students and teachers, of spirit in the literary societies, the school is steadily advancing, keeping abreast of the great wave of educational progress now rolling over the State.
 
The new term found over twenty young ladies and young gentlemen seeking admission into the Institute, nearly all of whom were sufficiently advanced to be admitted unconditionally, several entering the higher classes. The enrollment is now between one hundred seventy-five and one-hundred-eighty.
 
The increase in attendance made it necessary for the authorities of the Institute to employ another teacher, and the services of Prof. E. B. Smith have been secured. Mr. Smith is a native of Nova Scotia, a graduate of Dalhousie College and of Harvard University, where he took the degrees of A. B. and M. A. His professional experience extends over fifteen years. Of these five were spent in the splendid common schools of Nova Scotia, and the remaining ten in high school and academic work. Prof. Smith therefore enters upon the duties of his new position, endowed with a broad college training and an extensive experience; and hailing from "Acadie," the land whence the ancestors of Louisiana's Acadian population were driven into exile, Mr. Smith begins his work in Louisiana with broad sympathies and a clear understanding, borne of life-long association with a people similar to ours, a people in whom the same traits and characteristics prevail as are found among our own, a people among whom the names "Broussard," and "Thibodeaux" are found. Mr. Smith has been given charge of the classes in Latin and part of the classes in mathematics.
 
Officers have been elected in each of the two literary societies. The new officers of the Rules of Order Club are Mr. J. W. S. Lillebridge, president; Mr. Ashby Woodwon, vice-president; and Mr. L. W. Mayer, secretary. Those of the Attakapas Literary Society are Mr. Frederic Voorhies, president; Mr. Longanecker, vice-president; and Miss Annie Bell, secretary.
 
Many of the recent meetings of these organizations have been of great interest and benefit to all persons in attendance. Among such meetings may be unmentioned the court trial held under the auspices of the club during the past month. Members of the faculty and learned jurists took part in the suit. President Stephens was chief justice; his associates were Hon. O. C. Mouton and Dr. N. P. Moss; the attorneys for the plaintiff, Miss E. G. Dupre, were Hon. C. D. Caffery and Mr. V. L. Roy; and the defendant,  Miss Gertrude Mayfield, the attorneys were Judge Julian Mouton and Prof. L. W. Mayer. The trial was conducted strictly in accordance with court usages in Louisiana, this exemplifying before the entire student body the operation of one of the most important mechanisms in the government machinery of our State.
 
The meeting of the Literary Society which is to be held in the Auditorium to-night at 7:30 will be open to the public. Some numbers on the program will be rendered by members of the society, but the chief attraction will be an address by Mr. H. H. Ahrens, a distinguished representative of the New Orleans Picayune. The society is fortunate in having secured the services of Mr. Ahrens; and the officers extend an invitation on behalf of the society to all the friends of the Institute to be present at its session this evening to hear Mr. Ahrens.
 
A new feature has been introduced into the domestic science course by the instructor in charge. This consists in a weekly luncheon to be served in the dining room of the domestic science department. These luncheons are intended to afford a valuable practice to the students of cookery, and at the same time to be practical applications of the scientific principles inculcated in the domestic science department; incidentally they are very conclusive and pleasing demonstrations to the guests, of the high eminence attained in the art of cooking by these young ladies pursuing the course. The instructor's plan for these luncheons provides for an allowance of one dollar to each student; with this amount each young lady is to entertain four guests at luncheon. The meal is to be planned, prepared, and served by the student entertaining, and must be scientifically correct; that is the necessary amount of every food ingredient must appear in the aggregate of the dishes to be served, the dietetic value of the food being calculated beforehand. Miss Annie Bell served the first of the series of luncheons on Thursday, the 29th. The guests were members of the faculty. Miss Bell received gracefully, escorting her guests to the table which was tastefully decorated with an abundance of fresh violets. The menu consisted of four courses as follows:
 
1. Oyster soup and Crackers.
2. Hamburg steak, beaten biscuit, creamed potatoes, celery, green peas, and pickles.
3. Shrimp Salad.
4. Apple gelatin and orange tea.
 
On March 12 the management of the Institute Lyceum Course will present to the public one of the Wendling lectures. Mr. Wendling is one of the most popular lecturers on the American platform and never fails to please his audience. His lectures do not consist merely of entertaining fragments; they are consistent, thoughtful, and elevating presentations of dignified subjects. Mr. Wendling's lectures always result in a permanent good to his hearers, and are the type of lectures which make for the upbuilding of the communities where presented. The subjects of some of Mr. Mendling's lectures are as follows: "Unseen Realities," "The Man of Galilee," "Saul of Tarsus," "The Imperial Book," and "Stonewall Jackson."
Lafayette Gazette 2/7/1903.
 
 



Public School Visitors.

 A delegation of farmers from various parts of the parish, accompanied by by Mr. Alcide Judice of Scott, visited the Lafayette primary school Thursday of this week, to make observations on the methods and discipline of a model school. Miss Holmes, the principal of the primary school, who is always pleased to receive visitors, welcomed the delegation of citizens and conducted a number of exercises with her pupils illustrating the most approved method for instructing children in geography, history, arithmetic and other branches. A very favorable impression was made on the visitors, and Dr. Moss, who was present declared that it was the desire and intention of the School Board to establish first class primary schools and central schools in every section of the parish just as fast as circumstances would permit, and he expressed satisfaction at the great interest the people of the parish were now taking in educational matters, and said that this was one of the most hopeful signs of the times, as education was was indispensable to the highest welfare of the people. Lafayette Gazette 2/7/1903.




INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE.
 


Legislative Committee to Visit the School Next Wednesday. Plank Walk Needed. 
 


 The legislative committee, composed of Senators J. T. Barrett and T. J. Labbe and Representatives Overton Cade, James A. Ware and M. T. Brealin, appointed to visit the charitable and educational institutions of the State, will be at the Industrial Institute on the 19th instant. The report of this committee form the basis for the annual appropriation toward the maintenance of the various institutions of the State.
 
The Attakapas Literary Society is reviving with enthusiasm after the lapse due to examination times. A new set of officers and committees are soon to be installed.
 
The library is growing larger every few days. Several sets of standard works came in this week, and more are shortly expected. A public-spirited and scholarly citizen has expressed the intention of adding a valuable volume, or set of volumes, touching the early history of our French settlers.
 
The proposed plank walk along Johnston street is now greatly needed.
 
An arc light will soon be installed in the center of the circle in front of the main building.
Lafayette Gazette 2/8/1902. 
 



Parish Institute. - The Parish Teachers' Institute will convene at the court-house Monday and will continue in session until Friday. Mr. Caldwell being unable to come, the Institute will be conducted by Mr. Keeny. In order to enable all the teachers of the parish to be present at the Institute the schools will be closed one week. Lafayette Gazette 2/8/1902.


The High School.

 Prof. L. James will take charge of the High School of this place next Monday. Prof. James is a graduate of the State Normal School of Tennessee and comes to us highly recommended as a man thoroughly qualified for the position of principal of the High School. Miss Fannie Greig will be retained as assistant. Lafayette Gazette 2/8/1896.

 City Council Meeting Feb. 4, 1901.    
 A communication from citizens and Taxpayers asking for an appropriation for a Colored school was presented to the Council. Laf. Adv. 2/9/1901







SCHOOLS.

 South West Louisiana Industrial Institute, Dr. E. L. Stephens, President, corner Johnston and Industrial street.

 Lafayette High School, public. W. J. Avery, principal, Buchanan street between Second street and Hopkins avenue.

 Lafayette Primary School, public, Miss Fadra Holmes, principal, Main street between Johnston and Lee avenues.

 Home Institute, R. C. Greig, principal, St. John street, near Vermilion.

 Mt. Carmel Convent, Mother Zita, superior, square bounded by Lafayette, Convent and Madison streets.






Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1904. Prof. LeRosen opened his night school with nine pupils, last Monday. There are a score of more of young men in our town who might, and no doubt will, avail themselves of the opportunity offered them by Prof. LeRosen, of bettering their education without interference with their day duties which prevents them from devoting any time to study excepting at night.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.



SCHOOL BOARD.
Laf. La. Feb. 8, 1894.


Among other business....

 On motion of Mr. Spell seconded by Mr. Guilbeau, it was resolved that the contract made by Julian Mouton, President of this Board (as authorized) with Prog. W. A. LeRosen as principal of the High School, for the term of five months, beginning Jan. 22, 1894 and ending June 8, 1894, at the salary of $80.00 per month, is hereby approved and ratified; and that said principal be paid monthly on the warrant of the President as are the other teachers of the public school.

 Resolved further, that the President of this Board be and is hereby authorized to accept the transfer of the High School Building with its furniture and appearances from its Board of Directors as provided in the charter of the High School.

 On motion by Mr. Guilbeau seconded by Mr. Broussard, it was resolved that Messrs. Alexander Delhomme, Sr., and A. Olivier whose names have been suggested by the Police Jury to serve as trustees of the High School, are hereby approved and appointed as auxiliary visiting trustees of said schools.

 Resolved further that Mr. Charles O. Mouton be and is hereby appointed as an auxiliary trustee of said schools.
Laf. Advertiser 2/10/1894.


POLICE HURT -One thousand dollars was authorized issued to School Board out of amount now due. Laf. Adv. 2/11/1899.





Public School Notes.

 The citizens of the second ward near Ridge post office, have raised sufficient money by private subscription to erect a model central school building and furnish it with comfortable school furniture. The school house will be papered inside and painted outside and will cost about $1,200 when completed and furnished.

 While the citizens of the neighborhood in general have subscribed toward the building for this school, Chas. Burke, Wm. Wagner, Eloi Duhon and Phinis Hoffpauir deserve special mention for their zeal for the cause and for their untiring efforts in canvassing the community for the necessary funds. Three of the four men are German descendants, and this act of theirs in erecting in a rural community a school house of which the parish may be justly proud, and one which would reflect credit upon any community, shows that they have inherited the noble sentiments of the greatest man in all German literature - Goethe - who, though he lived one hundred years ago was well aware of the fact that the most important thing in all the world is a child.

 He knew that the greatest privilege of the parent and of the state was to make the greatest sacrifices for the children; and this poet-philosopher summed it all up in one short, significant, world-embracing sentence when he said, "The best is good enough for the children." Yes Goethe was right; Mr. Burke and Mr. Wagner are right; the best is good enough for their children. Every father, every man, every woman in Lafayette parish should emulate the example of these citizens and not rest satisfied until every school house is the best that money can buy; until every teacher is the best that money can procure. The best is always cheapest in the end.

 President B. C. Caldwell of the State Normal School has accepted the invitation of the people to deliver the address to them when the school building will be dedicated. 

 On account of bad weather last Saturday the shade trees could not be furnished to teachers.

 The Broussard school house is nearing completion and preparations are being made for the dedicatory exercises. The gathering promises to be one of the largest ever held in the parish.

 The enrollment and attendance of the schools of the parish have increased beyond the expectation of the most sanguine friends of universal education in Lafayette. As a result of the increased attendance the citizens have been compelled to improvise school rooms on few days' notice. Mr. Pierre Breaux and Mr. Alcide Judice have each given the use of buildings to accommodate the increased attendance of their respective schools. The Indian Bayou school has a result of a large increase in attendance. Scott school, Bertrand school, Mathieu school, Ridge school, Lafayette Primary and High schools, Broussard school have each required one or more teachers in addition to the corps employed last session. The Burke school will need an assistant as soon as the new building is completed. All the school of the parish are in a prosperous condition. Lafayette Gazette 2/14/1903.


THE ATTAKAPASIAN.

MARCELLE BLOT, Editor.

The Official Journal of the Attakapas Literary Society of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute.

The fourth year cooking class has been giving some delightful luncheons lately to faculty and friends. The manner in which they are carried on is this. One of the girls is selected and she is given one dollar with which to buy the provisions, then she chooses among her classmates, some to help her cook the meal which she serves to four invited friends. The reports are so favorable, as to give great credit to teacher and school.

It has become remarkable how many friends we cooking girls seem to have on the days we cook. Why, before we come out our way is blocked by a crowd saying, "Oh, I love you Dorsie, I'm your best friends," and all such exclamations, and before you know it you have not had a taste of the thing you cooked, for it would be impossible to resist your new friends.

The Institute, I am sure feels proud of its growing student body, which now numbers nearly two-hundred, New students have been coming in, all along, since the new term.

If you want to see a measly group of girls just go over to the dormitory. "The Measles" were very polite, and did not slight us, even if we don live out of the Corporation. Mrs. Baker treated them very nicely, and now that they have been so well received and had such a pleasant time, they are speaking of leaving. But Miss Morton has taken quite a liking to a set them and is now enjoying their company.

The Attakapas Literary Society will be pleased to hear from its nameless rival in the near future, and wishes it success.

The Athletic Club met on Wednesday for the purpose of electing various teams, and before long the campus will be resounding with the joyous echoes of the practicing teams.

The "Reign of Terror" as examination times were called, is thankfully over, and the faculty has expressed a satisfaction with the work of the students. But, as usual result of the "Reign of Terror" a very contagious disease has spread throughout the school - this change of courses.

Every one you meet says, "Where are going? What course are you taking?" Until really, you get so confused you don't know but that they are speaking to a waiter in some restaurant, and asking something about the dinner course. And such a thing would not be so unpleasant at certain times.

Miss Huger and Mr. Mayer gave the Rules of Order Club a delightful talk yesterday morning, and no doubt they were inspired by a sweet solo sung by Miss Ula Coronna.

Rumors are afloat that our worthy president is getting ready to put up a pretty cottage, which I am sure will add to the beauty of our school grounds. But, I heard it whispered, that the only objection was he intends building it on the boys' ground instead of on the girls' side. The faculty and students were all pleased to welcome in their midst, Professor Smith, who has begun his work in Mathematics and Latin. He has already made a deep impression on his pupils and other school members. The first days Mr. Smith was here, he courteously invited the students to call on him at his boarding place, expressing his wish of becoming soon acquainted with them, and this invitation was accepted by many.

It is startling to see how interesting a subject history has gotten to be. Last term it was a noticeable fact that history had a few devotees in its class, but now it would make your heart swell with joy to see the numberless eager faces, craving a wider knowledge of the world's past events. What influence wrought the change? Has our skilled doctor found a pleasant remedy that for "historical: disease that once threatened to become epidemic?

We were all very pleased to welcome back Mr. Perry Singleton, and it seems quite natural to see him passing through the balls.

We hope to see back real soon Misses Richard, Thibodeaux, Belliveaux and Morton, our young friends who have been absent on account of sickness.

We have missed Miss Montgomery's lively music very much for the past two weeks, during which time we were compelled to march to funeral music.

We were very sorry indeed to lose two of our club girls, Miss West and Miss Dudley.

Among two new arrivals we are pleased to announce Miss McLaurin's cousin, Miss Williams who has come all the from Mer Rouge, North Louisiana.

Where did Dr. Stephens contract his rheumatism? From beating time so vigorously during morning exercises.

Should any of the teachers want a neat looking paper, apply to Mr. Harry Smedes. He has become quite famous for respectable looking papers.

The editor of this paper has always looked upon a nickel as being a small amount, but was forced to change her idea, as that small sum has been the cause of disagreeable feelings between two of the lady teachers, which resulted in a law suit.

The authorities should be warned of a dangerous character that has appeared in the school lately, and has threatened to kill several persons with his glass pistol

The captain of the Tennis Club was pleased to notice that rackets would hardly be of any use to the players, as she remarked that Mr. Willie Mills, a new member - had done away with his racket, and in the future intended batting the balls with his hands.

Mrs. Baker phoned to a certain stable to send the bus out to the dormitory. The man said "all right" but after ringing off felt very much puzzled, and seeing one of his friends said, "say, you know every body here in Lafayette, can you tell me where that fellow "Dormitory" stays?

Miss First Year, putting her arms around Miss Second Year, said guyingly, "D. C. Smith was put on the committee." Miss Second Year answered innocently, "Oh! no, I didn't here his name called." But Miss Fourth Year wisely interposed and said, "Whoever didn't hear D. C. Smith's name called out, he certainly needs to consult an occultist, and perhaps next time he'll here."

They say that men are brave, but I'd like to know if we dormitory girls are not equally as brave when the whole gang of us come back from the kitchen after study hour, with large quantities of bread and syrup, which we have succeeded in stealing, after much fussing as to which one should have the most, and then as we came down the illuminated hall in mortal dread of being met by one of the teachers and still more so by our good Mrs. Baker - who I am sure does not suspect us. We are often disappointed however, for we sometimes find the bread locked up, and you can certainly know it when we don't find anything to eat.

In behalf of the Attakapas Literary Society I wish to congratulate our good friend the Picayune on its sixty-seventh birthday, and hope it will continue doing good until the end of time as it has done in the past.
Lafayette Gazette 2/12/1903.



The Cost of Education.

"But to establish and maintain schools for the fullest and best education of all our children will cost money ; we are poor and can't afford it." It will cost money ; we are poor and for that very reason we must afford it. It is the only permanent cure for the disease of poverty. Roads and bridges and factories cost money. The law is universal ; we must sow if we would reap ; and spare sowing never makes abundant reaping. Capital must be invested before dividends can be declared. It has been shown beyond doubt that the productive power of a people is in direct ratio to the quantity and quality of its education. It costs as much in equipment, time, and talent to educate the children of a poor people as it does to educate the children of a rich people, and the difference in money cost cannot be very great. Whatever else we save in, we must economize here by being liberal. There is a withholding that does not lead to wealth or any kind of prosperity.

After all, cannot a brave and noble people, industrious and economical, make from the intelligent use of the fertile fields, mighty forests, inexhaustible mines and the power of the thousands of singing waterfalls of this vast empire won for us by our fathers, the few millions necessary to fit out children for all that is best in life? We must do it. It is our first duty to our children for whom alone we live, and in and through whom we must lie after we are dead. The wealth we have is theirs-beyond what we must consume in the economic relief of the daily needs of our life. Sooner or later we must leave it to them; we are only their stewards and guardians. Shall we invest their money for them in bonds or brains; in land or life? Shall we leave them money, or skill to produce and a little of the higher wealth which can never be measured in terms of minted coin?

When we have done our full duty in providing facilities for the best education of all our children, developing the capacity of each; when the "forgotten man" has been remembered the "last wail" housed and redeemed, and every hidden talent brought to light and invested in the commerce of life then shall we enter into our rightful heritage and the wealth and power, the glory of a rich and abundant life shall be ours or our children's beyond what we can now comprehend.

And to this end the teacher above all must give their lives and persuade the people to give their wealth. They are the salt that must not lose its savor. Their duty does not end with hearing the lessons of their classes or the preparation of lectures on their particular subjects. Lafayette Advertiser 2/14/1903.



Serious Accident.

A serious accident happened at Broussardville last Sunday, in which fifteen persons were injured. A large crowd had gathered at the new public school for the purpose of celebrating the opening of the new building for school purposes. Prof. Alcee Fortier of New Orleans was to be one of the speakers of the occasion. Just before the exercises were to begin, and while the Sontag Band was playing underneath the gallery, a large number of people crowded the stairs and gallery, which proving too week, broke and fell upon those beneath. Tow of the Band members, Messrs. Anatole Piat and Eloi Broussard were seriously injured, the former being hurt about the head, and the latter in the chest. Mrs. Lucas Bernard was badly wounded, and Mr. Norbert Breaux's son had his arm broken, also a son of Mr. Geo. Malagarie was hurt about the chest, and a boy named Landry and a little girl of the name of Comeaux.

The gallery had only recently been built and had no posts to support it, and was not able to bear up the immense weight that was put on it. The accident is greatly to be regretted. It was indeed fortunate that nothing more seriously resulted. Owing to the accident the exercises were not carried out as intended.

Whilst the disaster is bound to be a subject of deep regret, yet no blame is attached to anyone in particular by those who were present and are familiar with circumstances attending the accident. The yielding of the platform and staircase was not due to faulty construction, but they were never intended to withstand such a great strain as was put on them at the time, and which it is impossible to foresee. On the other hand it is very gratifying to note the absence of any fatalities, and to be able to report continued improvement in the condition of all the injured persons, all of who, are expected to make a complete recovery.

No attempt was made after the accident to hold the dedication exercises, but it was decided to postpone them to a more favorable time, when it is hoped nothing will occur to interfere with the carrying out of the original intention of the school officers and the citizens of Broussard to make the event a pleasant and memorable one in the lives of the people. Lafayette Advertiser 2/14/1903.



We are authorized to say that the Public Schools of the Parish, will be re-opened on the first of March next. To all interested - take notice.

Laf. Adv. 2/14/1874.




Locations of Lafayette Schools-1905.

South West Louisiana Industrial Institute, Dr. E. L. Stephens, President, corner Johnston avenue and Industrial street.

Lafayette High School, public, W. J. Avery, principal, Buchanan street between second street and Hopkins avenue.

Lafayette Primary School, public, Miss Fadra Holmes, principal, Main street between Johnston and Lee avenues.
 





Home Institute, R. C. Greig, principal, St. John street, near Vermilion.

Mt. Carmel Convent, Mother Zita, superior, square bounded by Lafayette, Convent and Madison streets.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1905.



The Louisiana School Review comes to our office much improved in appearance this week, and with the addition of Dr. E. L. Stephens to the editorial staff. It contains a number of very readable articles, and the matter is fuller and better than usual. May it live long and prosper!
Laf. Adv. 2/15/1905.
 

INSTITUTE.

For Parish Teachers Conducted by President Caldwell of the State Normal.

 The teachers of Lafayette will be better men and women ;  they will be better teachers for having come in contact with President B. C. Caldwell, of the State Normal School, in this parish institute during the past week. Mr. Caldwell is an inspiring teacher and lecturer, and a man of considerable magnetic force.

 Mr. Caldwell was introduced to this State as institute conductor, in which position he did so much for the cause of public education in this State. While it conceded that he is eminently fit for the presidency of the State Normal and that his promotion was merited, we cannot help but believe that for the present his poer is much greater as institute conductor than as president of that institution. What Louisiana needs to-day is missionary work, and Mr. Caldwell is an educational evangelist among ten thousand. An institute conductor, he came in contact with every man and woman in the State, and he has never failed to impress communities with the sacred duty of educating the masses.

 The Gazette believes that a very large portion of the credit is due Mr. Caldwell for the condition of our school system to-day, and we are firmly convinced that ten years more of missionary work would result in an improvement in the public school system as noticeable as that of past decade. The Gazette believes that the most important office in the State should be the State superintendant and next the State institute conductor, and that these two positions should be filled by men large enough to fill them.

 The institute opened at tenb and closed at two, with an intervening recess of fifteen minutes. Mr. Caldwell planned his work in such a way as to practically cover the subjects taught in the class-room. In each recitation he was the teacher and the parish teachers were the pupils. Each lesson was a skillful presentation by a master-hand and our teachers literally drank in the inspiration with open mouths. The teaching of the rest of the session in this parish will be of a higher order as a direct result of the institute. The sacred character of the work of teaching has been indellibly impressed upon the teachers and they have been given the fundamental principles that underly scientific teaching as it i understood to-day.

 The conductor gave lessons in psychology, reading, geography, writing, music, and one period to a discussion of local problems. Each presentation was skillfully made and the teachers are now in possession of matter which if assiduously worked upon by them the clue to modern methods.

 Superintendent Alleman attended the whole session.
 Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1902.



DR. SMITH'S LECTURE.

 This community owes its thanks to the Industrial Institute for several splendid entertainments. Its debt of gratitude was largely increased on the night of the 7th instant by an opportunity to entertained by Dr. C. Alphonso Smith, the eminent scholar who occupies the chair of English literature in the Louisiana State University. The faculty of the Institute, the student body and  a number of people from the town gathered in the Auditorium Friday night and listened to one of the most interesting talks that it has ever been the good fortune of any audience to hear. Dr. Smith spoke about his European travels, and to those who know the speaker it is needless to say that he held the eager attention of the audience from beginning to end. He spoke in a conversational tone and told his hearers many things which generally escape the eye of the ordinary traveler but which mean so much when seen by the scholar and a man of the world. Dr. Smith has the distinctive faculty of making himself understood by his hearers, and it is safe to say that his address was thoroughly appreciated, not only by the older and well-matured minds, but by every boy and girl present.

 Dr. Smith's account of his trip to the old world, given in that simple and unaffected style which characterizes the man of scholarly attainments ;  his description of places of historical interest, the vein of genuine humor which kept the audience in a happy mood, the spirit o broad Americanism with which he treated European institutions, and the truly eloquent tribute which showed an inborn love for his native land, combined to make Friday night's lecture an intellectual treat of rare excellence. Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1902.


CITY COUNCIL.
Lafayette, La. Feb. 3, 1901.

Among other business....

 The waterworks and electric light committee reported that the pipes for work ordered at last meeting were on the ground and work would be started as soon as weather permitted, also poles for extension of lights had been ordered.

A petition signed by more than one-third of the property tax-payers of this town, asking that a special election be ordered to take the sense of the property tax-payers of this town upon a proposition to levy special taxes for public improvements therein named, was presented to the Council and read, and thereupon the following ordinance was unanimously adopted:

 AN ORDINANCE, Ordering a special election in accordance with Act 131 of the Acts of the Legislature of this State of the year 1898, and Article 232 of the Constitution, at which there shall be submitted to the property tax-payer of the incorporated town of Lafayette, La., entitled to vote under the general election laws of said State, the question of levying special aggregating five mills on the dollar per annum on the assessed valuation of property therein for a period of twenty-five years beginning with the first day of January 1902, and the issuance of bonds thereon for the following purposes to-wit:

1. To procure grounds and buildings for a first-class, modern High School.

 2. The extension of the water mains of said town, and for the extension of the electric light system therein.

 3. To procure ground and building for a first-class public market house.

 4. To call in and redeem outstanding bonds for the sum of thirty thousand dollars bearing six per cent annual interest issued under Act 90 of the Acts of the Legislature of this  State of 1896, to obtain a present water and light system of this town, said outstanding bonds to be replaced by five per cent bonds with greater length of time for redemption ;  said tax being set forth in detail in the body of this ordinance, and said election being ordered in conformity with the petition of more than one-third of the property tax-payers of said town, same being hereto annexed and made part hereof; and providing further for the mode of holding said election, making returns thereof, etc.

 Section 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, La., in regular session convened that a special election is hereby ordered and shall be held in said town of Lafayette, La., on Thursday, April 3, 1902, at which election there shall be held in said town of Lafayette, La., on Thursday, April 3, 1902, at which election there shall be submitted to the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette entitled to vote under the general election laws of the State, the question of levying the following special taxes to-wit:

 1. To procure grounds and buildings for a first-class modern High School for white children in said town, a special tax of one mill and half on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property in said town, on which tax bonds shall be issued for the sum of $24,000.

 2. For the extension of the water  mains and electric light system of said town, a special tax of one mill on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property in said town, upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $14,000.

 3. To procure the ground and building for a first-class public market-house a special tax of one-half of one mill on the dollar upon the valuation of property aforesaid shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $12,000.

 4. To retire and replace the outstanding bonds issued under Act 90 of 1896 for the present water and light system and special tax of two mills on the dollar of the assessed valuation of property in said town and upon which bond shall be issued for the sum of $30,000; there being submitted at one and the same time to said tax-payers the question of issuing bonds for the amounts hereinabove set forth in order to render said special taxes available by obtaining the money for immediate use; said election being ordered in conformity in all respects with the petition of more than one-third of the property tax-payers of said town hereto annexed and made part of this ordinance; said taxes are to be levied and collected according to law and the terms of this ordinance, and said petition of property tax-payers being in words and figures as follows, to-wit:

 To the Honorable Mayor and members of the City Council of Lafayette, La.

 We, the undersigned property tax-payers of the corporation of Lafayette, Louisiana, being and constituting one-third of the total number of property tax-payers of said town, entitled to vote under the provisions of the State constitution, respectfully show that the following described public improvements are urgent public necessities in said town, to-wit:

 1. Grounds and buildings for a first-class modern High School (for white children), requiring not less than $24,000.

 2. The extension of the water mains of said town, for the extinguishing of fire and other purposes, and also the extension of the electric light system for additional street lights and for private lighting, requiring not less than $14,000.

 3. Ground and building for a first-class public market-house, requiring not less than $12,000.

 And petitioners further show that there are outstanding $30,000 of six per cent bonds issued under Act number 90 of the acts of the Legislature of 1896, to obtain the present water and light system of this town, and that it is to the best interest of said town that the said bonds should be called in and replaced by five per cent bonds with a greater length of time for redemption;

 Wherefore, we respectfully petition your honorable body to order a special election in said town of Lafayette, Louisiana, under the constitution and laws of the State, for the purpose of a ascertaining and determining whether or not it is the sense and desire of the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette, that special taxes based upon the assessed valuation of property of said town according to the official rolls, be assessed, levied and collected for twenty-five years, beginning with the year 1902, at the rates and for the purposes hereinafter set forth, upon which tax, and the public faith and credit of said town, negotiable bonds shall be issued by the City Council of said town, in such denominations as may be found convenient, bearing five per cent, per annum interest (interest payable annually) payable in twenty-five years with right to call in the same as said tax is collected. And the rates of said taxes and the purposes of which they are levied and intended, and said bonds issued, are now declared to be as follows:

 1. To procure grounds and buildings for a first-class, modern public High School in said town, a special tax of one and one-half (1-1/2) mills on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property aforesaid shall be levied and collected, on which tax bonds shall be issued for the sum of $24,000.

 2. For the extension of the water mains and electric light system as herein set forth, a special tax of one (1) mill on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property aforesaid, shall  be levied and collected, upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $14,o00.

 3. To procure the ground and building for a first-class, public market-house, a special tax of one-half (1/2) of one mill on the dollar upon the valuation of property aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $12,000.

 4. To retire and replace the outstanding bonds issued under Act. 90 of 1896 for the present water and light system, a special tax of two (2) mills on the dollar of the assessed valuation aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $30,000.

 All of which taxes shall be levied and collected and said bonds issued for the time and in the manner as hereinabove set forth, and the title to said improvements shall lie in said municipality, and subject to the control of the City Council, and said bonds shall not be sold for less than par.

 Moreover the net revenue derived from the operation of said public market shall be used to pay said $12,000 of bonds, which shall be distinguished from the other bonds described in this petition; and in case of necessity that the City Council shall have the power to expropriate ground for said improvements, upon the payment of just and reasonable compensation to the owner.

 And we further petition that said propositions be submitted to the qualified voters at said election, in such manner that the voter may vote separately on each "for" or "against," as he may desire.

 (Signed):  Wm. Campbell, Wm. Clegg, Orther C. Mouton, Chas. O. Mouton, F. Demanade, Chas. D. Caffery, J. G. Parkerson, S. R. Parkerson, Jno. Whittington, N. P. Moss, F. V. Mouton, J. C. Nickerson, Julien Mouton, Louis Lacoste, Homer Mouton, F. E. Davis, Victor Levy, Frank F. Moss, D. L. Caffery, Albert Delahoussaye, H. H. Hohorst, Sidney J. Veazey, E. Mouisset, John Vigneaux, Geo. A. DeBlanc, B. J. Pellerin, R. C. Greig, A. T. Caillouet, John O. Mouton, W. J. Mouton, L. F. Rigues, J. Alfred Mouton, Sidney Mouton, C. M. Parkerson, H. C. Salles, J. A. Roy, Jules J. Mouton, J. A. Landry, F. R. Tolson, B. Falk, F. E. Girard, F. H. Mouton, F. K. Hopkins, J. J. Davidson, Isaac Plonsky, A. J. LeBlanc, Mrs. E. Constantin, Gaston Veazey,  J. B. Vandergriff, F. C. Triay, L. J. Serrett, People's Cotton Oil Co. per T. M. B. G. M., Leopold Lacoste, Anaize Courquet, Marte Courquet, Minor Meriwether, J. F. Mouton, T. M. Biossat, Levy Bros., V. Levy & Co., Wm. and Mose Levy,  W. A. Broussard, T. B. Hopkins Jr., for Lafayette Drug Co., C. H. Melchert, J. R. Domengeaux, Mrs. J. S. Whittington, Miss Mary Whittington per Mrs. J. S. Whittington, Miss Mary Whittington per Mrs. J. S. W., Crow Girard, Mrs. M. E. Girard per C. D. B., Mrs. Beraud, Felix O. Broussard, B. F. Anderson, Mrs. L. M. Creighton X her mark; witness C. D. C., B. Miller, L. Hirsch, Chas. Debaillon, Thomas Mouton, Frank H. Clark, Alfred A. Bonnet, M. Rosenfield, E. Pefferkorn, A. Prudhomme & Co. per A. Prudhomme,  T. A. McFaddin, Mrs. W. D. Huff, O. B. Hopkins, G. A. Martin M. D., S. E. Yandle, P. Krauss, F. Schmulen, H. Van der Cruyssen, P. M. Girard, Joseph Dauriac, A. B. Denbo, F. E. Voorhies, A. A. Mouton, James Hannen, Miss Ida Mouton, Mrs. Estelle Monnier, Suc. of A. J. Moss per N. P. Moss, G. Joseph, T. D. Coleman, P. H. Bailey, C. Debaillon, (reserving the right to vote against the public market.) A. and M. Debaillon, per M. Debaillon, J. T. Allingham, Mrs. Ant. Guidry, Thos. B. Hopkins, Mrs. Odeide Mouton, Paul Demanade, Levi O. Emes, Abraham Amuny, C. S. Babin, Louis Chopin, I. A. Brousssard, William Hane, Mrs. C. Homer Mouton, Mrs. J. G. Parkerson, Philip Mouton, F. H. Gregory, Aug. Bourgeois, Joseph C. Breaux, Jos. A.  Lacoste,  Mrs. T. Hebert Jr., Arthur Bonnet, Moss & Co. per A. R. M. L. Monnier, Mrs. James Higginbotham, Mrs. W. Tanner, Miss Nydia Campbell, W. J. Shows, Voorhies & Hopkins, F. B. Thompson, J. W. Clifford, C. C. Mabry, Chas. C. Weir, Marie Julie Mouton, Hyman Plonsky, D. V. Gardebled, Dr. J. L. Duhart, Miss Amelie Guyot, C. H. Lusted, J. M. Cunningham, Raoul Guidry, C. D. Boudreaux, (Mrs.) L. Domengeaux, W. V. Nicholson, J. Nickerson, Mrs. Geo. Babcock (Mrs. M. P. Young), Mrs. Adele Cornay, Mrs. H. Landry, Mrs. S. B. Kahn, (Rose), R. J. Tanner, Paul Castel, A. Mouton, J. B. Coumes, E. P. Broussard, Pierre Guchereau, H. Gankendorff, A. Courtnay, B. J. Donlon, Jules O. Dugas, Mathilde Gardner, C. C. Higginbotham, Jacob Bachert, W. J. Riu, Mouton Bros., R. B. Raney, Mrs. L. F. Rigues, Arthur Couret, O. J. Mouton, L. Turpin, Hector Prejean, Leonce Gladu, Couret & Patin Fur. Co., M. Patin, Mrs. J. Alfred Mouton, A. Degrez, Alicia Dugas, (Mrs. Horace Broussard) Mrs. C. P. Alpha, (Mrs. Alcee) Celimene Mouton, Mrs. Clet LeBlanc, Ed. G. Voorhies, Mme. Paul Castel, C. Trahan, Mrs. O. C. Mouton, M. Mouton.

 Lafayette, La., Feb. 3, 1902. - I, the undersigned, Assessor M. Martin, Assessor of the parish of Lafayette, La., after a careful examination of the assessment rolls of the town of Lafayette, La., of the year 1901, do herby certify that the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette whose names are signed to the foregoing petition constitute more than one third of the property tax-payers of said town.

 Witness my official signature this Feb. 3, 1902.
                       A. M. MARTIN,
                                     Assessor.
Laf. Advertiser 2/15/1902.

Prof. L. James is now principal of the High School. He has been in charge since Monday. Laf. Gaz. 2/15/1896.




LOUISIANA'S GREATEST NEED EDUCATIONALLY.  
 

In answer to the question, what is Louisiana's greatest need educationally, propounded by the Louisiana's School Review to a number of leading teachers over the State, the response was almost unanimous that more efficient supervision was the greatest need, which, was probably the answer expected, as not alone by the teachers, but by the people generally is it coming to be forcibly recognized that the efficiency of a school system depends upon the kind of supervision.

This recognition has grown into a certainty in the few parishes where trained superintendents have been employed, notably in this parish, where there as been such a betterment that it really seems strange that the school boards of every parish have not followed the lead promptly. Prof. V. L. Roy, of the Southwest Louisiana Industrial Institute, expresses very clearly in his reply the value of a trained superintendent as follows:

A competent superintendent presupposes a competent school board; but, of the two, the superintendent is the more important. No parish is so poor that it cannot afford to have, and to pay for, a qualified superintendent; nor is any parish so wealthy that it can commit such an extravagance as to employ an incompetent superintendent, be his salary $25 per month.

The qualified superintendent is almost a panacea for school ills; he appoints better teachers, secures better teaching, creates a healthy school of sentiment, influences taxation for schools, obtains larger school appropriations from police juries, and administers the school affairs of the parish generally in a proper manner.

As he states, a cheap superintendent is a costly luxury, where as a high priced one is a cheap necessity, and the time will soon come when it will be deemed just as necessary to have a trained superintendent as it is to have schools.

The greatest salary permitted under the law is $1,200 per year, which by some is considered excessive, because they do not understand the real value of a good superintendent. We shall see later, that this amount will be increased, and a generous rivalry among the parishes for the best superintendent. This won't happen to-morrow, it is a little farther off, but it is coming just the same.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/17/1904. 
 
 
 


Public School Exhibit Sent to the World's Fair at St. Louis.

 Supt. Alleman sent the rest of the public school exhibit for this parish to the World's Fair at St. Louis last week, the first part having been forwarded some months ago. The exhibit is a very creditable one, consisting of examination papers, school work, silhouette drawings etc. An interesting feature is the photographs of various country school buildings, showing the old and the new in contrast, which was included as showing the progressive movement along educational lines in Lafayette parish.
Laf. Adv. 2/18/1904.
  
 
 


Exercises in the Memory of Dr. Curry.

 Monday afternoon, Dr. E. L. Stephens of the Institute called the student corps in the auditorium, and presided over memorial services held in memory of Dr. J. L. M. Curry, the South's great educator who died on the 13th instant. Rev. A. C. Smith pronounced benediction, and Miss Ella Montgomery played an appropriate funeral march.

 Dr. Stephens delivered an eloquent address on the life and labors of the eminent Southerner, which The Gazette reproduces in this issue.

 Many townspeople and a large number of public school children attended the ceremonies. Laf. Gazette 2/21/1903. 




"A GLIMPSE OF THE SOUTH"

 That the pamphlet issued some weeks ago by Supt. Alleman will do much good we have not the least doubt. It will not only advance the cause of public education in this parish, but it has already forced itself upon the attention of school-people in a distant State. The county Superintendents' Monthly, an educational journal published in far-away Nebraska, reproduces several pages of Mr. Alleman's pamphlet, under the significant caption, "A Glimpse of the South." As many readers of The Gazette may not have read Mr. Alleman's splendid pamphlet, the following excerpts from it -- taken from the Nebraska paper are printed:

 "We cannot hope to have a school that will command the respectable community without having a respectable school-house.

 "Too few of our school-houses, in fact none of them come up to the standard of what a school-house  must  be if it is to render its best services to the community. A great deal can be done by us in arousing communities to the necessity of building school-houses that will supply the demands of this enlightened century. As one old gentleman of the parish has aptly said, "Our schools should be as sanitary as our jails, and we should tax ourselves at least as much for the education of our children as we do for the conviction of our criminals." This philosopher has given, in that one sentence, the key to the whole situation in this State.

 "Does it not seem reasonable to believe that communities which willingly spend on criminals from four to five mills of the tax raised, could be easily induced to tax themselves as much for the education of their own children? And does it not seem incumbent upon us who understand this to question to present it to our neighbors who will never understand it unless it explained to them?

 "Should we not emulate the noble example of Governor Aycock, Governor Montague and the host of public-spirited citizens of Virginia and North Carolina, who, led by the governors, are waging a crusade against illiteracy in those sections of the South? Let us join hands with the Southern Education Board, the General Education Board, with Governor Heard of the State in their attempt to ameliorate educational conditions in this otherwise fair State. While much has been done in the past, we cannot afford to rest upon the laurels of our ancestors. It remains for us to carry the work to its legitimate end. It is the privilege and sacred duty of an enlightened citizen to help his help is fellow man out of the bondage of ignorance. Every enlightened man owes this to his community. A greater or more sacred service can no man render, be he governor, judge, priest, lawyer or doctor.

 "By the earnest efforts of a few leaders this was induced to levy a tax of two mills for ten years to obtain the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute, which stands a monument to their united effort. Yet this magnificent institution reaches but a small percentage of the school population of this parish. And how can we hope that our children will ever be able to enjoy the benefits of that splendid institution unless we improve our public schools? There are thirty-five public schools in this parish, but the revenues are not sufficient to equip and maintain them. The revenues will never be sufficient until we make them so by using our own efforts. If the Industrial Institute could elicit such energy on our part, how many times more should we exert ourselves for the schools which will give 90 per cent of our children all the education they will ever receive?

 "We know that the Industrial Institute is a great blessing; that it costs the wealthy parish of Lafayette the paltry sum of $9,000 a year for ten years. Knowing this we should stick to our convictions and discourage the petty grumblings of the chronic kicker who says that the people have been deceived. The argument that children are not admitted to the kindergarten department in the Industrial Institute is no evidence that it will not be done as soon as the funds will permit. And besides, the public schools of the town of Lafayette offer instruction under skilled teachers who have made professional preparation for their work. Any child in the parish will be enrolled in the public schools of the town. We have something to work up to, and it now remains for us to make a study of  the educational systems of the communities which have good schools. There is no surgeon in the parish who does not use the latest improved surgical instruments; no farmer who has not the latest improved mowing machines and rotary hoes. Why should not we introduce the best system into our schools?

 "When the matter is properly presented, communities, no matter how illiterate,  can always be depended upon to do their full share toward raising funds for building decent school-houses and for maintaining good schools. The special school tax movement of the first ward is an example of what can be done when the proper leadership is at hand. Every ward in the parish would do the same thing under the same conditions. The question of raising ample funds for maintaining in this parish a school system worthy of the name is an issue which the intelligent men and women of the parish can no longer ignore, and an issue which must be met now. The women of the parish are a power we must enlist in this great work which is worthy of the best efforts of the noblest women in the Southland. The time is at hand. Let us act.

 "Decent school-houses and a good system of schools are good things of this world that never come before demanded by a strong, healthy public sentiment; and public sentiment; and public sentiment never comes spontaneously. When we reflect over the fact that there are 8,000 children of school age in this parish and that there are less than one thousand attending school, every true man and woman instinctively feels an impulse to join the holy task of enlightening those hungry souls. I insist that there is no excuse for this condition of things at this stage of the development in our country, and I firmly believe that God will hold us who have enlightenment; us who distribute the public funds; for us who hold responsible positions of influence; us who have been woefully negligent in the past -- God will hold us responsible for what we fail to do in this matter. These 7,000 little ones in utter darkness are holding up their hands in supplication to us, and we must do our whole duty, and we must do it now. And teachers, your lives are given to this holy work. Will you sit with arms folded or will you reach out for whatever portion of the benighted little ones within your district, and thus do a great service to the human race? This is an effort worthy of the best men and women that ever trod upon earth. Teachers, these little ones can be saved if you will only make the effort. Go out among your people, visit them, plead with them. Show them their duty toward the children, show them the necessity for better schools and longer terms.

 "Great has been the progress made in this parish during the past few years, and credit must be accorded those who deserve it. But we must not close our eyes to the fact that we have only made a faint beginning. This is plainly shown by the appalling statistics of great illiteracy and of small school attendance. We have obstructions mountain high to remove, but we take up the task like the true and brave men and women that we are. Our path of duty is plainly marked for us and it is for us to decide whether we will heroically perform this duty to our country or whether we will cowardly shirk it.

 "The intelligence and the brain of the parish can be counted on in this struggle for light, and the teachers can be counted on to resume with redoubled energy the good work done last session. Meeting of the patrons at the school-house, at which the needs of the school and the school system are discussed, and where addresses are made, have resulted and will continue to result in building up public sentiment in favor of better facilities for public education. With little energy on our part, our attendance can be easily doubled, yes, and even trebled. Let us hope that the new teachers will fall in line and continue the good work until every child of school age is in the schoolroom. A teacher's value to a community is not measured by the grade of the certificate she holds, but her value is in direct proportion to what she stands for in that community. She must be a leader, a doer. She must impress upon her people that whatever the child's education costs is an investment which will yield an eternal interest not to be measured in dollars and cents. She must show that the education of the child is worthy of the greatest sacrifice on the part of the of the parent.

 "And citizens of Lafayette parish, we too, can and must remedy this great evil."
Lafayette Gazette 2/21/1903.   

    

      

THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.
 The Executive Committee of the Board of Directors Held a Meeting in Lafayette This Week.

 
Transacted Business Preparatory to the Establishment of the Institution as Early as Possible.

 

Judging from all appearances it is safe to say that things anent the Industrial School are about to take definite shape. The members of the executive committee, Messrs. Martin, Lee and Buchanan, were here this week. Prof. Stephens, president elect of the institution was here also. The main purpose of the committees meeting was to consider the proposition to select a site two or three acres from the ones originally chosen. We are informed that the committee has decided to accept the new site which is considerably nearer town. It is a part of the property of Mrs. M. A. Girard and Mr. Crow Girard, who are perfectly willing that the change be made if it is the desire of the authorities entrusted with the affairs of the school. When a change was first proposed we were inclined to doubt the wisdom of such a move, but after visiting the two sites and considering the advantage of each we were soon convinced of the superiority of the second site over the first one offered. We are therefore of the opinion that the decision of the committee is eminently proper and calculated to redound to the welfare of the school.

 

We understand that a meeting of the Board will soon be called and measure will be taken looking to the early commencement of the buildings. It is the intention to put up the main building at a cost of about $35,000. There are only $18,000 of available cash at this time, but the Legislature will be called upon to make up the difference. The main building at Ruston cost $12,000. It is believed that the laying of the corner-stone will take place sometime in April and then the work will go on as rapidly as possible. It is the intention of President Stephens to have everything in readiness for the opening of the next scholastic year.

 

Owing to the absence from this State of Gov. Foster, who has gone to West Point, Miss., to visit a sick daughter, the Board may not meet this week as was intended by the executive committee.

 

Prof. Stephens has just returned from an extensive tour which he visited several industrial institutions in search of information which will be of great help to him in the preparation of his plans.

 

Prof. Stephens speaks interestingly of the work which is being done in the various institutions which he recently visited. He was accompanied in his trip by the well-known New Orleans architect, Mr. Favrot, who visited this place a couple of months ago. Mr. Favrot went along with the professor to thoroughly familiarize himself with the best and most modern plans of constructing industrial colleges.

 

Prof. Stephens expressed himself as being favorably impressed with the local outlook. To say that he was pleased with this town and the many evidences of good feeling for the institution noticeable on every hand is to express it mildly.
Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1900.





CHILDREN'S COLUMN.

The management of the ADVERTISER has decided to place at the disposition of the children and youths of Lafayette, a standing space for their special use and benefit. We hope that those for whose profit this is intended will improve the opportunity thus afforded them and will not feel any undue timidity or backwardness about utilizing the space it is purposed shall be devoted to their interests. Parents and teachers will be doing a good turn by the children in encouraging them to write short communications and compositions for publication, express opinions, seek and impart information, etc., within the compass of their years. It will be of practical benefit to the young people and the results of their efforts in this direction will prove to be a source of pleasure and satisfaction to them. The idea here presented had occurred to our mind several months ago but we neglected to put it to regular account until now when it is forced on our attention again by a request to publish the two following productions of a pair of juvenile minds arrayed against each other in debating the question "Who did the most for America, Columbus or Washington?"

 The little debaters are pupils of the Carencro public school having Mrs. E. W. Glenn for principal. This worthy lady has been for many years an ardent promoter of education and innumerable young minds have received a practical and useful mental training under her careful guidance. The purpose of publishing the compositions in question is well explained in the words of Mrs. Glenn herself. "I send two debates regarding which I wrote you. The little children are delighted with the idea if their publication, but for private reasons you will pleased sign only the "nom de plume' to each one.

 I hope this may lead to an effort in the same direction, not only in my school but in others of our parish. The stimulating effect to be thus exerted on the minds of the children must necessarily be productive of good."
Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1894.   











1905 School News.

 The Lafayette Primary School is being repaired, a bad leak having developed during the continued rainy spell.

Supt. Alleman received a telephone message Saturday from Mr. A. Judice that the patrons of the Cormier school in the eighth ward, are building a residence for their teacher, Prof. J. Madison Jones. They are also contemplating proposing to the School Board to pay half the expense of furnishing the school with patent desks.

We have been informed that a move is on foot at Pilette to build a modern school house.

The Simon School in the fourth ward is going up. It will be like other new school buildings in the parish.

Work on the Duson building has been delayed because of failure of mills to ship lumber.

The project of building an inter-parish school for Vermilion and Lafayette at Milton is in contemplation with all probability of being carried through successfully. It is to be a strictly modern building.  
Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1905.



ATHLETIC MEET.

To Be Held Here April 29, Also so the Annual Convocation of Parish Schools Same Day.

The following letter has been addressed by the Committee on Athletics of the Industrial Institute to the principals of the High Schools of Southwest Louisiana -- looking towards the great meeting to be held here on Saturday, April 29 next. Judging from the enthusiasm with which this movement is being pushed, as well as from the great success of the first annual meeting it gives every promise of being the greatest school ever known in Southwest Louisiana, if not in the whole State. This is made particularly probable by the fact that the great convocation of the public schools of the Parish an opportunity to see the field day games and sports of the higher schools and will render their day all the more interesting to them. They will be admitted entirely free of cost both to the field events and to the oratorical contest. Let us all take hold and work together for the success of this great and important undertaking.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1905.





SCHOOLS.

 Southwest La. Industrial Institute, Dr. E. L. Stephens, President, corner Johnston avenue and Industrial street.

 Lafayette High School, public, W. J. Avery, principal, Buchanan street and Hopkins avenue.

 Lafayette Primary School, public, Miss Fadra Holmes, principal, Main street between Johnston and Lee avenues.

 Home Institute, R. C. Greig, principal, St. John street near Vermilion.

 Mt. Carmel Convent, Mother Zita, superior, square bounded by Lafayette, Convent and Madison streets. Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1905.


At the "TEACHER'S INSTITUTE".
Lafayette, La. Feb. 16th, 1901.

The Teacher's Institute held its regular session on Feb. 16th., with fifteen teachers present: Conductor W. A. LeRosen, called the meeting to order. The roll was called all responding with a quotation and the minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted: The practice classes were called, Miss Virgie Younger taught a first grade composition lesson. As Mr. Kossuth Olivier was not present, Miss McLaurin kindly volunteered and taught a fifth grade reading lesson.
The critique followed.
By a unanimous vote Miss McLaurin was thanked for volunteering to give the reading lesson in place os Mr. Olivier.
The lesson on History of Education was postponed, as also that on whitis school management owing to the absence of the one assigned as leader.
The following program was adopted for the next meeting.
Practice class: second grade reading, Miss Nella Alpha; fourth grade geography, Miss Webb; third grade arithmetic, J. W. Faulk. History of Education, W. A. LeRosen leader.
'School management, R. H. Broussard leader. Management of pupils, Philip Martin. Grades in country school for general discussion. The meeting then adjourned to meet on March, 16th, 1901.
Mrs. I. H. Delaney,
Secretary.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/23/1901.

TO THE PUBLIC: - As any complaint current against a teacher is liable to be greatly exaggerated, and at the Hon. School board requested my resignation without calling in any defense. I feel justified in bringing forward the following facts. I have been principal of the Verot School for five years. During the first three years we enrolled 41 boys and 10 girls. Last year there were enrolled 38 boys and 7 girls.
 Last September, as there was some talk of a change of teachers all the patrons signed a petition to have me retained. In order to quiet idle gossip the following article was also signed by all patrons who had sent both boys and girls to school during the previous year:

Parish of Lafayette, La.
Ward 7th, Sept. 26th, 1900.



Lafayette Negro to Graduate
University of N. O.


 It may be of some interest to our readers to know that Lafayette has contributed one member to the graduating class of 1894, of the New Orleans University, in the person of I. C. Chapman, to be known hereafter as a Doctor of Medicine. A negro regular graduate of medicine is a novelty never before enjoyed in the experience of this community. Chapman is a son of old Isaac Chapman, the brick-mason, who died in this parish a few years ago. At an early age he evinced a marked disposition to improve and elevate himself, educationally, and persevered in that direction until he entered upon the study of medicine. The institution from which he graduated on the 21st. instant, the medical department of the New Orleans University, was regularly incorporated under the laws of this state in the year 1873, and is authorized to confer the degrees of Bachelor of Law and Doctor of Medicine, and the persons receiving such degrees are entitled to practice their profession unrestricted, in Louisiana. Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1894.






TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.

This certifies that any suspicious or surmises of indiscretion on the part of G. H. Alway which may have been entertained by this community, or any part of it, are unfounded and unwarranted. We exonerate him in full.This is signed after being duly read, explained, investigated, and deliberated upon:


 HYPOLITE SAVOIE, ONEZIPHORE COMEAU, DOLZE BROUSSARD, SEVERIN BONIN.

During the present session I enrolled 34 boys and 3 girls. It is true that last January 1st, I became involved in a difficulty with one of my patrons. But the trouble was not of my seeking. I was impressed against my will, by the guests there assembled. Even after this occasion, 31 boys and the 3 girls came regularly to school up to my last day which ended Feb. 1st., 1901.

Yet as the patron bearing the grievance stood highly in favor with the "powers that be," I deemed it best to comply cheerfully with the request of the Board.
Respectfully.
G. H. ("A.C.") ALWAY.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/23/1901.



In Honor of Washington. - Appropriate exercises were held at the High and Public schools Thursday evening in commemoration of Washington's birthday. Short lectures were made by the teachers and the smaller pupils were made happy by the announcement that there would be no school on Friday.
Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.  






Yesterday was Washington's birthday and a holiday in the public schools of the parish. Laf. Adv. 2/23/1895



A Rumor.
Editor Advertiser.

 It is rumored that one of my students failed to pass the required examination at the Industrial Institute, and was refused admittance. I will state that there is no foundation for such a report. The student who I am told failed to pass the required examination, was a student from a college, and has never attended my school.

 I prevailed upon him to got the Industrial, thinking he was qualified, and I wrote to Dr. Stephens, telling him that I had never examined the student, and if there was any possible chance for him to enter the Industrial, let him do so.

 In conclusion I will say, that all of the students from my school who presented themselves for examination, at the Industrial, passed a very creditable one, and were admitted.
                                    G. J. YOUNG.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1904.


Lafayette Teachers Club.

 At two o'clock Saturday, February 13, 1904, the following teachers met in the Industrial Institute and permanently organized the Lafayette Teachers Club:  Messrs. L. J. Alleman, Arceneaux Ashby Woodson, J. W. Lillibridge, J. M. Barnham, V. L. Roy, and W. J. Avery. Misses Hahle Lefwich, Zelta C. Christian, Christene Rifs, H. D. McLaurin, Edith Dupre, Emily Horton, Edna Close, Susie Rochelle, Virginia Robertson and Kathleen Reed. Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1904. 


At the Primary School.

 Did you pass the Primary School Monday?  If so, as you looked in, a flash of color, red, white and blue, met your gaze?

Had you stopped only a minute you would have heard the sound of childish voices, singing with such hearty good will, that even the well worn air "America" deemed to have imbibed a new life.
 They were celebrating the Birthday of Washington, and in the salutation of the flag one hundred and fifty pledged their hearts and lives, to protect the flag for which Washington fought so well. This birthday should mean much to us, because it commemorates the life of one of the greatest men of which America can boast.
 Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1904. 


 

Truant Captured. - Prof. Young had three detectives on the look out last Friday for a truant, and after a chase of two hours they cornered him at the Southern Pacific Railroad depot, and after considerable resistance he was over powered and taken back to school.
 Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1904.







THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

 
 The Executive Committee of the Board of Directors Held a Meeting in Lafayette This Week. Transacted Business Preparatory to the Establishment of the Institution as Early as Possible. 

Judging from all appearances it is safe to say that things anent the Industrial School are about to take definite shape. The members of the executive committee, Messrs. Martin, Lee and Buchanan, were here this week. Prof. Stephens, president elect of the institution was here also. The main purpose of the committees meeting was to consider the proposition to select a site two or three acres from the ones originally chosen. We are informed that the committee has decided to accept the new site which is considerably nearer town. It is a part of the property of Mrs. M. A. Girard and Mr. Crow Girard, who are perfectly willing that the change be made if it is the desire of the authorities entrusted with the affairs of the school. When a change was first proposed we were inclined to doubt the wisdom of such a move, but after visiting the two sites and considering the advantage of each we were soon convinced of the superiority of the second site over the first one offered. We are therefore of the opinion that the decision of the committee is eminently proper and calculated to redound to the welfare of the school.

 

We understand that a meeting of the Board will soon be called and measure will be taken looking to the early commencement of the buildings. It is the intention to put up the main building at a cost of about $35,000. There are only $18,000 of available cash at this time, but the Legislature will be called upon to make up the difference. The main building at Ruston cost $12,000. It is believed that the laying of the corner-stone will take place sometime in April and then the work will go on as rapidly as possible. It is the intention of President Stephens to have everything in readiness for the opening of the next scholastic year.

 

Owing to the absence from this State of Gov. Foster, who has gone to West Point, Miss., to visit a sick daughter, the Board may not meet this week as was intended by the executive committee.

 

Prof. Stephens has just returned from an extensive tour which he visited several industrial institutions in search of information which will be of great help to him in the preparation of his plans.

 

Prof. Stephens speaks interestingly of the work which is being done in the various institutions which he recently visited. He was accompanied in his trip by the well-known New Orleans architect, Mr. Favrot, who visited this place a couple of months ago. Mr. Favrot went along with the professor to thoroughly familiarize himself with the best and most modern plans of constructing industrial colleges.

 

Prof. Stephens expressed himself as being favorably impressed with the local outlook. To say that he was pleased with this town and the many evidences of good feeling for the institution noticeable on every hand is to express it mildly.
Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1900.


Lafayette Negro to Graduate
University of N. O.


 It may be of some interest to our readers to know that Lafayette has contributed one member to the graduating class of 1894, of the New Orleans University, in the person of I. C. Chapman, to be known hereafter as a Doctor of Medicine. A negro regular graduate of medicine is a novelty never before enjoyed in the experience of this community. Chapman is a son of old Isaac Chapman, the brick-mason, who died in this parish a few years ago. At an early age he evinced a marked disposition to improve and elevate himself, educationally, and persevered in that direction until he entered upon the study of medicine. The institution from which he graduated on the 21st. instant, the medical department of the New Orleans University, was regularly incorporated under the laws of this state in the year 1873, and is authorized to confer the degrees of Bachelor of Law and Doctor of Medicine, and the persons receiving such degrees are entitled to practice their profession unrestricted, in Louisiana. Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1894.

On last Wednesday the first trees were set out on the new school grounds by Mr. Julian Mouton. If any one is interested in the high school has extra trees which they can spare. of suitable age for transplanting, Mr. Mouton would be glad to have them.
Laf. Advertiser 2/25/1893.


"Our Boys" have organized an Amateur Minstrel Troupe to play for the benefit of the high school, and have commenced rehearsing.
Laf. Advertiser 2/25/1893.

THE SCHOOL BOARD.

 VERMILIONVILLE, Feb. 11th, 1882.

 Pursuant to adjournment the Parish School Board met this day, and was called to order by Chas. D. Caffery, President, with the following members present :  Dr. F. S. Mudd, R. Dugat and Preston Huffpauir. Messrs. Comeau, Hulin, and Debaillon being absent.

 The Treasurer being present reported as having the sum of three thousand, one hundred dollars and eighty dollars on hand to be apportioned among the several wards of the parish, - in connection therewith the following was adopted :

 Ordered, that the Treasurer set aside of said funds to the credit of the contingent fund, the sum of one thousand and eighty dollars and to distribute the balance as required by law.

 On motion, it was ordered, that all schools now suspended he opened on the first Monday of March next, in the localities and with the teachers heretofore designated by the Board.

 On motion of Dr. Mudd, the following was adopted :

 Ordered, that Messrs. Debaillon, Caffery and Martin, secretary, constitute a committee to examine the books of the School Board Treasurer and report the condition of same at the next regular meeting of the Board.

 The Superintendent having reported that section 16 T. 9. S. R. 5. E., belonging to the public schools of this parish was un-surveyed, he was ordered to have the same surveyed by a competent surveyor, for the lowest cash figure.

 The following was also ordered and adopted :

 Ordered that one-third of the amount coming to the schools of the 3rd ward, of the funds undistributed, be and is hereby appropriated for the purpose of building a school house at Vermilionville in the 3rd ward ; also the balance on hand to the credit of the Vermilionville white school, said amounts to be added to the amount heretofore set apart for the same purpose.

 Ordered further, that Messrs. Mudd, Debaillon and Caffery be and are hereby appointed a committee to make the preliminary arrangements for the building of said school house and that the same be done without delay.

 The committee appointed to obtain a settlement with Mr. R. L. McBride for the claim held by the board against him reported that they had accepted and obtained sale for a half lot of ground in Mills addition in full settlement of said claim, -- which was approved of and the committee discharged.

 There being no further business, the Board adjourned to time of next regular meeting.
   CHAS. D. CAFFERY, President; A. E. MARTIN, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/25/1882

 

School Board Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., Feb. 7th, 1898.


Among other business...

 The school board met this day with the following members present: Messrs. Delhomme, Hopkins, Durke, Olivier, Dupuis, Broussard, Whittington and Clegg. Absent: W. G. Bailey.

The report of the Sheriff's collection of poll taxes was accepted as follows and a quietus granted him.

 The Committee consisting of Ed. G. Voorhies, chairman, J. O. Broussard and Baxter Clegg reported that they had examined the account of I. A. Broussard sheriff, for the collection of poll taxes for the years 1893, 94, 95, 96, having found some duly accounted with proper vouchers thereof recommend that he be given a quietus for same for the years herein mentioned.

 The following committee consisting of Messrs. C. D. Caffery, J. O. Broussard and W. G. Bailey was appointed to try and secure cooperation from the police jury in draining Sec. 16 T. S. 10 S. R. 8 of the public school land.

 This committee is also to ask an increase in the appropriation made by the budget committee for school purposes.

 The bill of Hon. C. D. Caffery for one hundred dollars fees in renting school lands was approved.

 The bill for a black board laid over at the last meeting was approved.

 Mr. Ben Avant account laid over at the last meeting was also approved.

 It was resolved that no accounts for improvements or fixtures on school properties should be approved in the future unless previously authorized by the Board. Lafayette Advertiser 2/26/1898.

The post-office, Bank and Public schools were closed last Tuesday on account  of Washington's birthday. Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.

 



From "The Attakapasian," the official journal of the Attakapas Literary Society of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute.

Monday evening at 3 o'clock memorial services were held in the Auditorium in honor of the late Dr. J. L. M. Curry, the well beloved friend of education who passed away on Friday, February 13, 1903, and was buried on the 16th. The audience was composed of the faculty and students, the public school children accompanied by their teachers, and many of the town people; these had met to pay their last tribute of respect of this great man, who always will be remembered as a faithful friend to education as well as to other good causes for which he worked.

 Rev. A. C. Smith of the Methodist church officiated at prayer services. Miss Montgomery played Chopin's Funeral March, after which Dr. E. L. Stephens delivered an able address, relating the life of Mr. Curry and as he had known him personally, and giving several reminiscences of him. "Lead Kindly Light" was then sung by a number of teachers and students, after which the audience left.

 The program for the last meeting of the Rules of Order Club consisted as a valuable as well as charming talk  by Prof. Smith about Nova Scotia. He spoke principally of some of the sports carried on during the winter, all of which was extremely interesting. He also gave some splendid details of the country itself, illustrating his talk by means of maps drawn for the occasion. The other numbers on the program were a song by the "Naughty Eight," who were "encored," and a reading by Miss Lucy Guidry.

 Several visitors were shown around the building during the last two weeks.

 The school is proud to boast of two literary societies; the Attakapas and the "Avatar" which was organized last Saturday night and which is composed chiefly of apostates from the old society. The idea of having two societies is a splendid one as it will awaken a new spirit among the different members.

 Miss Huger has a very industrious set of girls in charge to whom she has just commenced teaching several kinds of fancy stitches and other sort of odd work that is done at the Newcomb College. At the May exhibition will be seen some shirt waists on which the girls will have made some of their original designs.

 Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Stephens, Miss Mayfield and Miss McLaurin have joined this class.

 The boys are really mean to the dormitory girls, for last week they had the audacity to catch one of our pet rabbits, who reside under our plank walk, and have a game of "catcher" with him. I suppose that what you would call it. One of the boys would throw poor little cotton tail as far out as he could -- and a mob ran after him to see which one would overtake him. Of course they caught him every time; and so, after having amused themselves during all of recess in this manner, one of the boys took the poor rabbit home to stew him for supper.

 Another one of the boys' sports has been boxing. You have no idea what fine boxers we have, some of them I am sure will become famous as great fighters. It is very interesting to watch the games and see the boys give one another graceful charming love-taps. Several of them, however, have black eyes, broken fingers, and lips as big as eggs.

 "What is a proverb," asked the teacher of one of the students. He answered correctly, but on being asked to explain, "Do not spur a good horse," he replied: "If you spur him he will throw you over and nothing more."

 A great habit among the students is chewing gum, and Mr. Mayer has come to the conclusion that it is very injurious to the eyes as one of his pupils in stenography - a gum amateur - could not see the difference between the doubling and halving principles.

 Since a few days Mr. H. D. Smedes has been more reasonable, and is handing in better looking papers. We are all wondering what could have brought about such a change. Can it possibly be that his long trousers are the cause of it?

 Some one rang up at the dormitory for Mr. Hugh D. McLaurin. He really meant Miss McLaurin.

 Miss Florence Theriot has resigned from the "A. L. S." Has she some attraction in the Avatar?

 Little Minor Meriwether says should he ever get in trouble he would get a writ of "Corpus Christi."

 The fourth year class English teacher will soon begin to teach her class how to conjugate the verb "See" as she has found it quite necessary to instruct them once more in English Grammar. It's all on account of Miss Alma Gulley, too, for she has not yet learned how to use the verb "See" correctly.

 The other day an old man with a basket of books on his arm was looking high and low for "Miss Lilly Bridge," and finally he found him in the Commercial Department.

 The south west part of the building was in great danger Tuesday morning. The third and second year classes were making beaten biscuits and if you had heard the pounding for a half hour, you would have had very serious doubts of ever seeing home and mother again.

 Mrs. Baker has been endeavoring by all means possible to keep the boys away from the dormitory and her last attempt was in making a dozen scare-crows. She dressed her orange trees up in white and red. They look very queer, especially at night, but it is hard to tell if her scare-crows are keeping the young men away, for Mr. Woodson came up to the dormitory Tuesday evening and I don't believe he was the least bit frightened, for I saw him coming up, just as bold as ever with his hands in his pockets. Lafayette Gazette 2/28/1903. 

 



George R. Wendling Lecture. - The management of the Institute Lyceum Course will offer to the people of Lafayette on Thursday evening, March 12, one of the best lectures yet delivered from the platform of the auditorium. This will be one of Mr. George R. Wendling's famous lectures. Speaking of Mr. Wenlding the Atlanta Constitution says: "When he had finished speaking the crowd literally went wild with enthusiasm." The Louisville-Courier-Journal calls Mr. Wendling "one of most accomplished orators of America."
 See next week's issue for further particulars.
 Lafayette Gazette 2/28/1903.





Ideal School Grounds.

 The purchase of the two lots of ground owned by Achille Figaro last Saturday, by the City Council, was the second serious step in the movement inaugurated several months ago to provide enlarged school facilities for the rapidly growing population of Lafayette.

 This tract of ground, with its fine shade trees, added to the other two lots previously acquired from Mrs. Beraud, will afford an ideal location for the two-story modern school building which it has been the purpose of the Council to erect during the course of the present year.

Our present school accommodations are entirely inadequate, and no time should be lost in meeting the legitimate requirements of the community in this respect. And it will no doubt be of interest to the residents of McComb Addition to know that at the special meeting that the Council held to authorize the purchase of the ground referred to above, it was agreed to provide a separate school house at some convenient point for the children living in that section of the town, on account of the great distance between the McComb addition and the proposed new school building down town.

Let the good work go on !
Lafayette Advertiser 2/28/1903.




Lecture at the Institute.

 The management of the Institute Lyceum Course will offer to the people of Lafayette Thursday evening, March 12, one of the best lectures yet delivered from the platform of the auditorium. This will be one of Mr. George. W. Wendling's famous lectures. Speaking of Mr. Wendling the Atlanta Constitution says: "When he had finished speaking the crowd literally went wild with enthusiasm." The Louisville Courier-Journal calls Mr. Wendling "one of the most accomplished orators of America." See next week's issue for further  particulars. Lafayette Gazette 2/28/1903.

 


SHOULD ALL BE POLITICIANS.

 "There is something defective in the education or rearing up of a people who care so little for their government. It would seem that the importance of discharging their civic duties has never been properly instilled in the minds of the men of to-day. Both the home and school appear to have been derelict in this respect. The percentage of a citizen who are not conversant with the workings of the government is appallingly great. The popular idea seems to be that the government is a thing which will take care of itself and that is not the citizen's business to take part in its administration.

 "The only remedy for this condition of affairs lies in the hands of the State. It is the correct education of the child which the State alone is able to give offers the sole cure for this common disease which so seriously affects the body politic. In a country like this where the people are supreme and where the popular will is law, it is important that the voters should have a proper appreciation of their duty to the State. Too much about the government can not be taught in the schools, and it should be impressed upon the mind of every boy that it is a great privilege to be born an American citizens and it is still a greater privilege to be allowed to exercise the rights of American citizenship." - Lafayette Gazette


...The publication "The Felicianas" responds to the Gazette's article...


 What the Gazette says is true - only too true. But how is the trouble to be remedied? There is not now a text book in existence that will answer requirements, nor is it possible to originate one. A great deal can be accomplished in this direction by text books, but they fall far short of requirement. The solution of this trouble is to be found in newspapers of the better class. One of the metropolitan dailies should comprise a part of the daily course of every school in the land, both as a source of general information and a means of arousing an intelligent, active and patriotic interest not only in this country, but in life itself. The schools of this or any other country could do the world no greater service than make a rule and practice to turn out habitual and methodical newspaper readers. Our government is controlled by this element, and it is entirely too small.  We need more men and women capable of thinking and reasoning intelligently for themselves concerning the living issues of the day, instead of either ignoring them entirely or being led astray by demagogues who delight in coddling their ignorance. The disgrace is not in percentage of illiteracy in the several States, but in the degree of ignorance among those who are not illiterate, concerning the affairs of every day life, particularly of an intelligent conception of the duties of citizenship. We will never have a better class of citizens nor better government until we get a better and more general class of newspaper readers, and this will never be until children are taught at home and at school to make the papers a part of their daily study. Those who are not habitual newspaper readers cannot grasp the full import of this idea, but we beg those who are to ponder it well. It is worthy of serious consideration. To teach of the past and not of the present is to ignore the most important and practical half of history. It is preposterous that the living issues and incidents of the present should not be taught the youth of the land until they became ancient history. Matters educationally have not kept progress with, or availed of, all the facilities afforded by the Art Preservative. -- The Felicianas.


Now The Gazette now summarizes....

 No doubt more newspaper reading by the people would result in a distinct gain along the lines suggested by The Felicianas; but it is in the schoolhouse where the work must be done. It is there the idea of civic duty must be instilled in the mind of the child. The boy must not only be taught that freedom is his birthright, but that he must do something to preserve it; that in order to discharge intelligently the duties of citizenship he should first understand what they are. It is a sad commentary upon the times that there are men of light and leading in this country - teachers, ministers, doctors, lawyers - who do not even vote.

 The education of the young should be directed in a manner to render indifference to civic duties dishonorable in the eyes of the people. Every man should be a politician - not a politician in the modern sense, but in that better sense which means that he is a citizen who takes a proper interest in the administration of public affairs.

 If all men were politicians as they should be, there would be no bosses and there would be no need of reformers with spasmodic attacks of political virtue. Lafayette Gazette 2/28/1903.



PUBLIC SCHOOL NEWS.

 Misses Fadra Holmes and Zelia Christian, two of the most zealous teachers in Lafayette parish, gave their children a lesson in patriotism on Friday, February 20, in commemorating the birth and life of the greatest name in American history -- Washington.

 The Gazette had occasion to refer a few weeks ago to the little attention paid to the subject of civics in our public schools. The subject can best be introduced to young children through the lives of such men as Washington, Lee and Lincoln. While it is impossible to have formal civics in the lower grades of public schools much interest can be aroused and local government can be profitably studied by the children of the lowest grades. The subject can and should be taught in the same manner as local geography is now taught by progressive teachers.

 Miss Agnes Morris, of the State Normal School has prepared a pamphlet on the civil government of Louisiana which would be of value to all teachers.

 It is to be hoped that next time Washington's birthday comes around every teacher in the parish will take advantage of the opportunity to impress upon their children the sublimity of character possessed by "The Father of his country" and to teach patriotism. We are all American citizens and the sooner our children are taught this fact the better.

 On page 19 of Superintendent Alleman's pamphlet recently issued to the teachers we find these words: "It is well to have exercises on such days as Thanksgiving, Washington's birthday, Christmas eve, etc. In graded and central schools exercises should be given oftener".
Lafayette Gazette 2/28/1903.

 


 HOSPITALITY OF LAFAYETTE.

 Appreciatively Acknowledged by Louisiana School Review, Official Journal of State Teacher's Association.


 The following extracts taken from the Louisiana School Review in a write up of the meeting of the Teacher's Association here Christmas week, will be of interest to Lafayette people:

 The local organization in Lafayette for taking care of the convention did good service. It not only took care of the convention in pretty good shape, but it came out ahead - having so calculated as to give good entertainment, free transportation, various accommodations and refreshments, and still maintain a safe margin out of the seven hundred dollars that had been subscribed by the citizens and public bodies of the town and parish. But the committee did more than this - it developed some strong material; it paved the way for future successful conventions in Lafayette. The next big convention of any sort that gets an invitation from Lafayette can count on being fully provided for, Baxter Clegg, Dr. Moss, Mayor Caffery, Hon. Paul DeClouet, Louis Lacoste, and the other heads and active workers of the various committees have expressed no intention of moving away - and they have demonstrated the most earnest zeal and the most distinguished ability in that trying form of public service. In fact (borrowing one of Governor Aycock's most effective figures), the committee had "suffered out" the whole conversation weeks and months before it assembled.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.



Observed Washington's Birthday.

 All the public schools of Lafayette observed Washington's birthday with appropriate exercises. Very entertaining programs were rendered, which were greatly enjoyed by the visitors present. Laf. Adv. 3/1/1905.


A Grand Success.
[From SLI publication "The Vermilion."]

 The entertainment given for the benefit of the Athletic Association, proved a grand success. The weather was all that could have been wished and a large crowd took advantage of the thoughtfulness of the weather clerks and witnessed one of the best entertainments given in the auditorium this year. The audience frequently gave vent to its enjoyment and appreciation in round after round of applause.
 The hit of the evening was song entitled, "The Track Team," sung by ten members of the team. The song was original and served to show the spirit of the team and the confidence of the team which the team has in itself. The program is as follows:

PROGRAM.

Song...Glee Club
Recitations...Marie Patin
Play...A Domestic Dilemma
1...Mary Dutsch
2...Annie Thibodeaux
3...May Hahafey
4...Robt. Dutsch
5...Willis Roy
Song...Track team.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.



Musical Program -  The music program furnished by local musicians under the direction of Prof. F. Sontag of the Industrial Institute proved a most attractive addition to the teachers' program. Mr. F. V. Mouton's deep baritone voice proved a fitting climax to the program of the first night; and, in fact, it was evident that his singing had received a distinct stimulus from the burning eloquence of Governor Aycock, who had just preceded him and there was a striking illustration of a reaction of art upon art. Both artists "had an audience." Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.



Salt Mine Excursion.

 General Passenger Agent Batturs deserves a place in the story for giving us that special train for the salt mine excursion for the low rate of $1.50 per capita on our guarantee of not less than $100 for the trip; and we returned him the compliment by making the excursion worth $246 to the company instead of $150. But the excursion was worth all it cost to all concerned. The day was ideal. The view across Vermilion Bay was alone worth the price admission. And notwithstanding queer reports to the contrary in some of the papers, the railroad made perfect connections, and no teacher was delayed a minute on his return home by reason of the excursion to the salt mine. In fact, the kind and courteous assistant of the road Mr. C. C. Mallard, accompanied bye excursion in person for the express purpose of seeing the schedule carried out - and he did. Lafayette Gazette 3/1/1905.    






INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE.

Washington's Birthday Commemorated 
Baseball Team Organized.
Students Return to their Work.

 A serious accident occurred in the workshop this week, in which Moore Biossat, of the second year class, was so unfortunate as to have his left thumb and index finger cut off at the first joint. He was sawing a block at the circular ripsaw and was attempting to remove with his hand, the scrap cut off, and his hand was thus placed too near and struck the saw. He bore the pain of the wounds and the surgical operation upon them very bravely, and is enduring the loss he sustains very philosophically. He has the universal sympathy of the students of the Institute and the faculty, and his class have shown a very special interest in him by passing appropriate resolutions of sympathy. We all hope for his rapid recovery, and that he may soon be back in his accustomed place.

 Now that the football season is over the boys at the Industrial Institute are about a baseball team ;  in fact, the necessary equipment in the shape of masks, stomach-protectors, bats and balls, have already been ordered, and it will not be long ere the people of Lafayette and vicinity will have the pleasure of witnessing a match game between these boys and a team from some neighboring town. It is needless that everyone wishes them success in this new field sport - the same success that has characterized their every effort in the past to establish the supremacy of the Industrial teams, and to hold on high the colors which have not yet known defeat. A match game, as well as various other out-door sports, will take place some time in March, to see which a small entrance fee, say 25 cents,  will be charged. The sports will be such as to attract a large number of people, and a gala day is expected. Let everyone turn out.

 One of the new features introduced at the Institute after the first half session was the morning inspection. This takes place every morning at 9 o'clock, just prior to the marching of the students to the auditorium, where the national anthem is sung, and any announcements necessary for the day are made. Before marching up all students file out into the hall from their classrooms, each class at a time from its respective classroom, and stand double column, heads erect and face front, ready for the inspection. This requires several minutes, and consists in seeing that all faces, hands, collars, cravats and shoes are clean and well cared for. The class teachers have charge of this work, and the short time since the introduction of this new feature into the life of the school has already proven its usefulness in the in the wonderfully improved appearance of the student body.

  Great interest is taken by the students every month when their "marks" are announced; that is, when they are told what their highest and lowest percentage in any given studies is for the four weeks preceding the time of the announcement. Very much interest was manifested this month, it being the first in the second half session.

 Since making note of happenings at the Institute the last time, we are pleased to record the fact that the Young Ladies' Boarding Club as a new member, Miss Gertrude Logue, of Jennings, La. Slowly but surely the people of the surrounding towns and country are beginning to realize the unusual advantages to be derived from an Institute like the Industrial. May they continue to come. A hearty welcome is extended to all.

 The Attakapas Literary Society held a meeting last Saturday, Feb. 23, in commemoration of Washington's birthday. Every number on the program - song, essay, debate or speech - was a tribute to his memory and elicited applause from the auditors.

 A profitable number was the wholesome advice given by Dr. Stephens to the society and his patriotic utterances inspired by the occasion. None the less important was the able criticism of Miss Dupre, who is critic for the society. Great interest is developing among the members in the welfare and success of the society. The question for debate at the next meeting as posted on the bulletin board, is; "Resolved that Napoleon was a greater general than Ceaser."

 The school was glad this week to welcome back to its student body three members who had been absent, one since December, the others since January, on account of sickness. These are Newton Normand, Henry Broussard and Gabriel Bouevalt.
Lafayette Gazette 3/1/1902.

School Notes.

 The people living in the vicinity of Mouton Switch are taking steps to raise money to enlarge the public school building there and to buy improved desks, black-boards, charts, etc. This school is in charge of Mr. Claude Martin, and is very well attended.

 Mr. Hugh Wagner, teacher of the Louis Bonin school in the second ward, was in town Thursday. Mr. Wagner stated that an effort was being made by the patrons of the school to enlarge the building and to secure new and more suitable desks for the pupils.

 The Gazette is informed by Mr. Alleman, the superintendent of schools, that by co-operating with Calcasieu and Monroe institute associations it will be possible to secure an unusually able corps of lecturers for the chautauqua.
Lafayette Gazette 3/1/1902. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chautauqua




School Board Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., Feb. 18, 1904.

 At a special meeting of the school board on the above date the following members were present: Alex Delhomme, Sr., Jasper Spell, Dr. N. P. Moss, A. C. Guilbeau, and S. J. Montgomery.  Absent: A. Olivier, Dr. Roy O. Young, H. Theall and A. D. Verot.

 Dr. Moss was made temporary chairman, and the board received a delegation of citizens from Carencro who told of the rapid increase of the attendance at that school and the necessity for more class room and more teachers. Messrs. S. J. Breaux, and G. H. Guilbeau, the local trustees of the school, were assured by the board that all that is possible would be done for the school and the matter was referred to the building committee with power to act, if in their discretion, the board was in a position to do so.

 The board received two delegations from the Sellers school one for, and the other against, the removal of the Sellers school from the present site to one about a mile north. On motion of Mr. Spell seconded by Mr. Guilbeau, the matter was referred to Dr. Young, Mr. Theall and Mr. Alleman with a request that they investigate the situation more closely and make recommendations at the next meeting.

 The community at the Isle de Cannes school made a request for a schoolhouse to replace the present inadequate one; and asked that the school be furnished with modern furniture in order to enable the pupils and teacher to do more and better work. The following resolution relative to the Isle de Cannes petition was adopted:

 Whereas the citizens of the Bertrand school have petitioned this board for an additional room to their schoolhouse, to be built on conditions proposed by the people of the community and,  Whereas the board accepted these conditions and agreed to construct the addition to the schoolhouse several months ago, and as the community has not fulfilled the condition.

 Be it resolved, that the citizens of the Bertrand school be given fifteen days in which to fulfill the conditions of the board. If after the expiration of fifteen days' notice the conditions have not been complied with, then the Isle des Cannes community will be given the refusal of the proposition made by the board to the Bertrand community.

 The secretary was instructed to notify Mr. R. B. Martin that inasmuch as he is at present ineligible to appointment to a position in the public schools of this parish, the board can not act favorably on his petition to be reinstated as a teacher until he qualifies in the regular manner.

 Messrs. Delhomme and Alleman were authorized to have the necessary repairs made on the Matthieu school.

 The following resolution was unanimously adopted:

 Whereas we have learned of the public spirited and patriotic offer of the Woman's Club to plant trees on the public school lot of the town of Lafayette; to beautify the school-rooms of the town with suitable school decorations or to furnish them with necessary apparatus according to the discretion of the teacher; and to furnish suitable reading matter to be distributed among the rural schools of the parish.

 Be it resolved that this board heartily the co-operation of the Woman's Club in providing suitable surroundings for the future men and women of this parish, believing that the present public spirited act of the Club can be made a worthy precedent in the organization, and an act worthy of emulation by the best men and women in the parish of Lafayette.

 Be it further resolved that a certified copy of these resolutions be transmitted to the Woman's Club.

 The following resolution relative to the act of the Department of Agriculture in sending a lecturer to the Parish Teachers' Institute was adopted:

 Be it resolved that the School Board of Lafayette appreciates the efforts of Maj. James G. Lee, Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture, to help the local authorities to properly introduce the subject of elementary agriculture in the public schools of this parish by furnishing a competent lecturer on the occasion of the last Teachers' Institute. The board is convinced that an intelligent introduction of the subject of elementary agriculture in the public schools can not but result in great good to the State and recommends to the Department of Agriculture that steps be taken to have the subject taught at all of the summer schools and the lecturers be sent to different parts of the State from time to time.

 On motion the Isle des Cannes school was accorded modern desks, and the Ridge school was allowed a sufficient number of desks to seat the pupils who are now without seats.

 On motion of Mr. Spell seconded by Dr. Moss the petition of the citizens asking that the Bonin school be re-opened was granted.

 On motion duly seconded Mr. Alleman was duly authorized to represent the parish school board at the annual meeting of the Department of Superintendence of the National Educational Association to be held at Atlanta, Ga., on February 23, 24 and 25.

 The board selected April 30, 1904 to be set aside and known as Public School Day on which the entire school population of the parish shall assemble at the Industrial Institute where appropriate exercises, to be announced later, shall be given by the pupils of each school in the parish. Much good can result from a convocation of this sort and the board calls upon the teachers of the parish to enter into the spirit of the movement and to arouse all the enthusiasm possible not only among their patrons. Each teacher will be expected to be present with a strong delegation of pupils and patrons.

 The action of President Olivier in purchasing a map of Louisiana for each school in the parish was approved, and the secretary was requested to confer with civil engineer Babin and find out his price for a blue print of the parish map for each school in the parish.

 There being no further business the board adjourned.
                                  N. P. MOSS,
                             President pro tem.
              L. J. ALLEMAN, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1904.   














Directors Of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute Will Meet To-day.

 The meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Industrial Institute which was to be held last Saturday did not take place because of the non-attendance of members, only three being present. The members present. The members present were Prof. Brown Ayres, Capt. Buchanan and Mr. Martin.

 An effort will be made to hold a meeting to-day, when, it is hoped there will be a full attendance as business of great importance to the Institute. The Gazette in informed that the local banks will offer to take up the bonds to be issued in order to realize the money of the town and parish tax. If a satisfactory agreement can be effected with the Lafayette banks no time will be lost and the work of putting up the buildings will be done without further delay.

 Mr. A. E. Mouton has been practically relieved of all responsibility pertaining to his duties as contractor by the architects, Favrot & Livaudis, who have accepted the main building of the Institute. Laf. Gazette 3/2/1901.



S. L. I. Directors Meet.  The meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Industrial Institute which was to be held last Saturday did not take place because of the non-attendance of members, only three were present. The members present were Prof. Brown Ayres, Capt. Buchanan and Mr. Martin.

An effort will be made to hold a meeting to-day when, it is hoped, there will be a full attendance as business of great importance to the institute will come up for consideration. The dormitory and machine shop are to be built before the opening of the Institute. The Gazette is informed that the local banks will offer to take up the bonds to be issued in order to realize the money of the town and parish tax. If a satisfactory agreement can me effected with the Lafayette banks no time will be lost and the work of putting up the buildings will be done without further delay.

Mr. A. E. mouton has been practically relieved of all responsibility pertaining to his duties as contractor by the architects, Favrot & Livaudis, who have accepted the main building of the Institute.

Lafayette Gazette 3/2/1901.









HIGH SCHOOL.
HONOR ROLL,
February 1901.
Laura Magnon, Louise Constantin, John Whitmeyer, Arthur Poinboeuf, William Higgenbotham, Alex Guidry, Sam Plonsky, Helen Bell, Etta Domengeaux, Matilde Richard, Annie Bell, Alma Gulley, Jeff Caffery.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1901.

THE SCHOOL DIRECTORS.
Lafayette, La., Feb. 23 1895.

 Pursuant to call the board of School Directors of the Parish of Lafayette met this day with the following members present:  J. O. Broussard, President; Dr. W. W. Lesley, A. C. Guilbeau, J. S. Whittington, and J. E. Trahan.  Absent: P. A. Chaisson, Jasper Spell and D. Bernard.


 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 On motion of Mr. A. C. Guilbeau, seconded by Dr. W. W. Wessley, it was resolved that 5 per cent of all moneys received by the treasurer for the schools, be set aside for a contingent fund to be expended by this board in session, and the balance to  be placed to the credit of the teacher's fund, and that all motions and resolutions in conflict with the above and hereby repealed.

 On motion of Dr. Lessley, seconded by Mr. Guilbeau, the president was instructed to employ a lawyer to bring suit to collect the notes due for rent of school lands.

 The following offer made by the editors of the Advertiser and Gazette was received and on motion duly made was accepted:

To the Hon. President and Members of the School Board Lafayette, La.


 GENTLEMEN - Our last year's contracts having expired on Oct. 7, 1894, we are willing to enter a new one dating from Oct. 7, 1894 to Oct. 7, 1895, for a consideration of ($50.) fifty dollars made payable quarterly.

 The proceedings will appear, as in the past, in both papers.

Homer Mouton, for Lafayette Gazette.
H. A. Van der Cruyssen, editor Lafayette Advertiser.

 On motion duly made a vote of thanks was tendered the editors of the Lafayette Advertiser  and Lafayette Gazette for publishing the proceedings of the School Board last year free of charge, and for the very liberal offer this year. Lafayette Gazette 3/2/1895..


School Board.
Lafayette, La., Feb. 23rd. '95.

 Among other business...

 On motion of Dr. Lessly, seconded by Mr. A. C. Guilbeau, the President was instructed to employ a lawyer to bring suit to collect the notes due for rent of school lands.

 The following offer was submitted by the editors of the Lafayette Advertiser and the Lafayette Gazette which was on motion duly made excepted.

 "To the Hon. President and members of the School Board of Lafayette parish La.

 "Gentlemen.

 "Our last year contract having expired on Oct. 7th, 1894, we are willing to enter into a new one dating from Oct. 7th, 1894 for a consideration of fifty dollars payable quarterly. The proceedings will appear as in the past, in both papers.

  Homer Mouton, for Lafayette Gazette; H. A. Van der Cruyssen, Editor Lafayette Advertiser.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1895.





























From the Lafayette Advertiser  3/15/1893:
Our Schools. 


 MR. EDITOR. - As inducements to emigration to our town and parish are brought in review before the public now, with your permission I will say something through the ADVERTISER about our schools. Very recently I have enjoyed visiting a part of our schools, and as I have spent fifteen years in teaching, I think I can report intelligently.

 First I called on Mrs. Emily Bailey and her pupils, consisting of about twenty-five boys and girls, who are well disciplined and well instructed. The teacher seems to love the children, and the children seem to be equally fond of the teacher. I enjoyed my visit, and was agreeably entertained with some select reading by small children who knew very little English until they entered this school. Eddie Moss, George and Thomas Debaillon, Joseph Lacoste and Clara Hebert read well from the fourth reader. Am told that Mrs. Bailey has been teaching here for a number of years and she certainly deserves patronage as long as she may choose to teach.

 I next called on Miss Clye Mudd and her interesting school, who are comfortably housed in a beautiful oak grove in the city suburbs. Miss Mudd graduated with the highest honors when at school, and is not only qualified to teach, but seems devoted to it, and the "idea is certainly taught how to shoot there." She is fully abreast with the times in her methods, and requires very thorough lessons. One can do no better than to patronize Miss Mudd. I have enjoyed more than one visit to our free public school under the control of Prof. Robt. Greig and Miss Jamieson. Under the circumstances this is one of the best schools that I ever visited. What are the circumstances? They are not provided with a suitable building. There are about ninety children all in the same room, and of course there is not that quiet and perfect order that there would otherwise be, yet it is a fine school. The teachers stand upon their feet and labor hard to enforce discipline and to impart instruction, and the children are instructed, and well instructed. There is a great deal of oral teaching and reviewing which are highly commendable. It is hoped that there will be a better house in the near future.

 What is the outlook of the town in an educational point of view? In addition to these schools, there is a convent in a flourishing condition and an elegant high school building nearing completion, and inasmuch as this is a public enterprise, intended for the benefit of the entire public, the public heart and the public purse should take hold of it, and push it on to a grand success.

 Some seem to be afraid that if this enterprise succeeds, that some of the schools now in existence will fail. Not necessarily. There are uneducated children and youth enough in this town and vicinity to sustain as many more, and we should all remember that no one kind of a school will suit everybody. Then for the public good we should not be selfish, and as we cannot expect immigration and prosperity without good schools, and schools for all, let us have a high school that will be an honor to our town and means of attraction and increased prosperity.
      Cordially, H. ARMSTRONG.
3/8/1893. Laf. Adv. 3/15/1893.  


From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 16th, 1904:







THE TOWN SCHOOLS.

Five Hundred Pupils Enrolled. Pupils Show Great Interest. Libraries Started in all the Rooms.

 More than five hundred pupils have been enrolled in the town schools, and yet they come. The attendance at present is the best of the year. The pupils are regular, punctual, and are manifesting an unusual interest and loyalty. Their interest is varied. The boys regale themselves with base ball and other games; the girls with basket ball; and indoors, both are concerned with their lessons, the war and internal improvements - improvements in the school. They not only listen to suggestions, but often make and execute their own plans. They have subscribed for six copies of the Youth's Companion and one copy of the daily Times-Democrat. Pictures have been bought, framed and put up by the pupils of the several rooms in all the schools.

 Early in the autumn a library was begun in Miss Dicksons's room, and there is now a small one in each of the rooms at the High School and in Miss Holmes' room at the primary. Some of these books have been donated by the pupils, some loaned, and others bought; all are being read.

 Much of this loyalty and keen interest on the part of the pupils is due to home influence and the hearty co-operation of the parents with the teachers.

 To the parents: Know thyself, thy child and his teachers.

 To the teacher: Know thyself, thy pupils and his parents.

Lafayette Advertiser 3/23/1904.



 

April 3rd.  -
A Most Important Day in The History of Lafayette.
  
 Next Thursday, April 3, is the day for the election to decide whether we will vote to issue bonds for the purpose of building a modern public school, extend the water-work and electric lights, erect a public market, and redeem our present outstanding water-works bonds. Each of these is to be voted upon separately. This election means a great deal in the history of Lafayette. If carried, and we have every reason to believe that it will be carried almost unanimously, it is another forward step on the road to great things. Lafayette is indeed fortunate in its location, railroad facilities, and splendid agricultural territory. All that is needed for growth is wise action, progressiveness, and liberality, and with these the return will be a hundred fold. People seeking in (unreadable portions) will come to us. We want them too, for foreign capital is required to develop our resources, to build us more railroads, and especially to establish factories here. Now that fuel can be secured at the oil wells of Beaumont in unlimited quantities, and cheap as the cheapest, cotton factories will soon be looking for sites. We must be in a position to offer inducements, and one of the strongest is a fine public school system. We have the Industrial School, that is the top. Next we must have the foundation to complete it. We have good public schools considering the poor quarters and accommodations ;  but (unreadable) them better and in line with the best in the state, we need a suitable building to furnish full scope to the teachers and complete facilities to the children. Our children are certainly our most priceless possessions. Is there anything a loving father or mother would deny them if they knew it was for the children's welfare. An education, and the best possible, is what every parent owes his child, and we believe there is not a true father or mother in Lafayette who would for one moment hesitate to do all in his or her power to give their children the priceless boon of an education, and the best to be had, if it lay in their power.

 From a material point of view, good schools enhance property, brings in desirable citizens, make land salable at good prices, and exerts a powerful social influences for good. Schools are foes of ignorance and the friends of virtue. They lessen crime by making good citizens. They uphold the law and render property and life more secure. They save expense by reducing the number of law breakers. They produce happiness by assisting parents to make true men and women of their precious children. Many a boy and girl has found in school the stimulus that caused them to grow up into noble men and women, the just pride of father and mother. Schools have made towns famous, and attracted a fine citizen and good families. Schools have decided the location of enterprises and factories. Schools have increased the population and wealth of towns. They have made land quadruple in value. Add a complete public school system, and property will still increase. Water-works, fire protection to every part of town, electric light making every street safe in the darkest nights, still further added, and we have a town second to none in Louisiana. We will have something to offer the stranger who comes to our gate knocking. We can bid him enter, share with us and help us to take up our loyal work in keeping our beautiful, fortunate little city in the van of twentieth century progress. Lafayette Advertiser 3/29/1902.     


 


Lafayette to the Front.


School and Water & Light Tax Carried.

Another Victory for Progress.

 The people of Lafayette have again demonstrated to the world that they believe in progress, push and public spirit. When two years ago the parish voted the enormous sum of $70,000, for the Industrial School, it attracted the wondering attention of the entire State and its fame was spread abroad. The appointment of a school superintendent, purely because of his fitness of and experience as a practical educator, increased the wonder and won for our people both compliments and admiration. Thursday, the town of Lafayette sustained the enviable reputation it has already achieved. The propositions submitted to the people for their decision on that day were all carried with a safe majority with the exception of the public market. It means that within the near future the water-works will be extended to all parts of town, and that every home will be given fire protection, that plenty of electric lights will be placed over the town to give all citizens the benefit of light, and best of all, it means that Lafayette will, have a fine modern school building, that educationally Lafayette will be the peer of any town in the State.

 Lafayette with its growing reputation for progress, for being wide-awake and alive, will attract capital; will bring others here to help us develop, and increase our values. We are proud of Lafayette and see a great future for her.

 One of the prettiest and most interesting features of the election was the parade of the children bearing banners and singing. There were nearly 300 children in line and each and every child was heartily, earnestly, and deeply in favor of the school. They took this method of asking the generous people of Lafayette to "Remember the Children T0-Day" and the people did remember them. They were certainly a pleasing sight and their singing was sweet and musical. We can well take pride in the fine showing of our schools and congratulate ourselves that we are going to do still greater things for our "little citizens of the future".

 Judge Julian Mouton and Mayor Caffery addressed the children, before the Court House.

 The election passed off very quietly with nothing to mar the harmony and peace of the town. What opposition there was showed only in the quiet work of the opposers. It was simply to ascertain the will of the people, and when the vote was counted, the defeated side accepted the verdict. The 
vote in detail was as follows:

Water-works and Lights.
Votes
For: 124 / Against 77.

MARKET.
For 59 / Against 146.

SCHOOLS.
For 105 / Against 96.

BONDS.
For 120 / Against 79.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/5/1902.



School Entertainment. - The town public schools will give an entertainment on the new school lot, corner of Main and Jefferson streets. Friday, April 28, to raise money to pay off some debts owed. Laf. Adv. 4/12/1905.

The Industrial Institute gave holiday from Wednesday afternoon to Monday to allow the teachers to attend the meeting of the Teachers' Association in Alexandria. Numbers of the students took advantage of the holiday to visit home. Laf. Adv. 4/12/1905


Public Schools will Run Nine Months. - Dr. Moss and Supt. Alleman appeared before the City council at its regular meeting and asked that the council make an appropriation of $360 to extend the city schools one month, thus insuring a nine month session. The council generously and promptly did so, for which they are assured of the hearty thanks of the people.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/12/1902.



ATHLETIC MEET.

At the Industrial Institute Saturday, April 16.

 High Schools of Lake Charles, Abbeville, Marksville and Leesville Will Take Part in the Oratorical Contest and Field Sports.

 The big athletic meet to held at the Industrial Institute Saturday, April 16 promises to be an event of great interest. A number of high schools have signified their intention of taking part, among them Lake Charles, Abbeville, Marksville and Leesville, and a series of interesting events are scheduled to take place, consisting of athletic and oratorical contests.

 To add to the interest of the occasion Mr. T. M. Biossat has offered a beautiful silver championship cup, which is on exhibition in his window, on which is inscribed, "The T. M. Biossat Inter-Scholastic Championship Cup." Mr. F. E. Davis will give two fine tennis rackets to the successful young lady and young man in the tennis game, and Dr. F. E. Girard has offered a gold medal and silver medal to the best all around athlete and to the champion hundred yards dasher.

 The Committee on Athletics are making arrangements for a most successful day of sport, and a big crowd is expected. Lafayette Advertiser 4/13/1904.




Louisiana School-Terms Too Short. - In some parishes of Louisiana the school-term is less than five months. What a neglect and misfortune it is that the people do not vote a tax in these parishes to enable them to extend the term of school. Every district or parish in the state has the legal right on its own to motion to vote the money, yet they continue to act as if the responsibility and obligation did not rest with them. The State does well by the children, but many of the parishes do not supplement the state aid and short school-terms result. This is not as it should be and means an injustice to the rising generation from those who are in a position to help them in their helpless condition. The law permits and encourages taxation for schools for the children, hence the responsibility rests with the taxpayers of every community. They are free to meet this responsibility which they are under to the children, or to willfully neglect this means of promoting the development and happiness of their respective communities.


 The parish superintendent should widen his sphere of usefulness and present these facts and conditions to his school board and the patrons of the schools, to the end of arousing the people to a realization of their duty to provide the proper school facilities and deserved educational advantages for the children.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/20/1901.


  
AN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL?

 We remind people of a fact that seems to have escaped their memory, namely the establishment of an Industrial School to be located in this district.

 Since the legislature passed the Act creating such an institution we have, at various times, urged our people to take some steps to secure this school to Lafayette.

 Has anything been done by our people in that direction? We don't think so, and while we have been apathetic on the subject, other towns in the district have been wide awake to their interest and have done the preliminary work towards ascertaining if the conditions required to secure the institution in their midst could be met.

 And yet our people are as much public spirited and liberal as in other towns.

 In fact we can report that at several times some of our public spirited citizens have stepped in our office expressing the desire to subscribe hundreds of dollars towards securing the Industrial School.

 Judging from appearances all that is needed now is an awakening from the seeming stupor in which we have fallen and go to work in earnest, starting the preliminary work that will bring the Industrial School to Lafayette.

 In some towns the work is done.

 In New Iberia, the ENTERPRISE informs us, that the committee on subscriptions of the Industrial School, having about completed their labors, the board of Directors has decided to have subscribers give notes for the amount subscribed, payable in four equal installments.

 In Jeanerette the people are wide-awake, and we are informed they are sanguine to succeed.

 What will Lafayette do about it?

 The inestimable value of the prize is within our grasp, all we have to do is secure it.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/22/1899.





The district convention of the Teacher's Institute of Louisiana will be held in Lafayette on May 28th. Addresses will be delivered by prominent Educators to different divisions of the assembly both in Falk's Opera House and at the High School building. The public schools will be closed during the entire day. Laf. Adv. 4/24/1897.



A Graded School. - We deem it not only wise but expedient to say a few words at this time in regard to the so-called high school. There seems to be quite a wide spread misunderstanding in regard to it. many people seem to imagine that the new school building is to be used as high school pure and simple. This idea is entirely erroneous. The building will be used for a graded public school only, at least, for the present. There is no need for a high school in Lafayette at present, and were one established there would be no scholars to attend it. It will be at least several years before any of our scholars are sufficiently advanced in their studies to make a high-school or academic department necessary.

 Some claim that the people are being deceived in the matter. That those in charge of the building are leading people to believe that a high school is to be established. This is untrue. The gentlemen in charge of the matter do not claim that anything but a first class graded school will be established.

 There has been about $750 contributed during the last two months toward finishing the building which we believe is about to complete it. Work is progressing as rapidly as possible and in all likelihood every thing will be ready this fall to open the school. It will be necessary, however, to provide means to pay the principal of the school. It will cost probably $1000 a year to provide a competent man to take charge of it. The future success and prosperity of the school will depend largely upon the manner in which it is started. Teaching to-day is as much a science as the practice of medicine or law. We will need a modern, up-to-date, scientific teacher to take charge of the school, and his salary for the present will have to be provided for privately, therefore let the work continue; let entertainments be given frequently, and a large share of the money needed can be raised before fall.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/26/1893.



NEW DORMITORY FOR SLI?


The Building Committee of the Industrial Institute, which met here last Saturday, rejected all bids for the contract to build the new dormitory, and decided to employ Mr. A. E. Mouton to do that work under the direction of the Architects and through a Series of of sub-contracts which will bring the cost of the new building to about Eighteen thousand dollars.

Plans will soon be arranged for the opening of the main building to be celebrated in the big Assembly Hall on Saturday, June 15th. Lafayette Advertiser 4/27/1901.


Last Saturday afternoon an interesting game of ball was played by the High School nine and the Institute Juniors on the Institute grounds the score was 13 to 12 in favor of the latter. Laf. Adv. 5/2/1903



CONVOCATION A SUCCESS. - The presence of over three thousand children and adults at the Industrial Institute Saturday, notwithstanding the day opened cloudy and threatening, was weighty evidence both of the interest in the public schools and the estimation in which Convocation Day is held. The participation in contests by representatives from practically all of the schools of the parish, and the large attendance from the various schools showed that the annual gathering had had a fine stimulating effect on the children, developing both the ambition to excel and a school spirit that gives splendid promise of the future.

 And, too, this bringing together of all the school children of the parish to take part in patriotic exercises, to make friendly trial of attainments and to mingle socially can not fail to cultivate love of country, to awaken a desire to execute, and implant feelings of friendly regard that will in later years tend to unify the citizens of the parish in all things for the general good.

 The great success of this second Convocation has demonstrated that it has a place in our school system and it may be assumed as a fact that as the years pass by one of the marked days of each recurring April or May will be Convocation Day.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/3/1905. 


Public Schools Opening. - The public schools in this parish will all soon be again in operation. In this town, the colored school was opened last Monday ;  Mrs. H. A. Kennedy will open a school for white girls next Monday, the 6th inst. ;  the school for white boys will be re-opened on the first of June next. Laf. Adv. 5/4/1878.





About the High School Site.

 The City Council at its meeting Monday appointed a committee of seven to investigate the matter of site for the proposed High School and to obtain all information in regards to same and report thereon at the next meeting of the council. The committee is composed of the following gentlemen: Messrs. C. D. Caffery, Judge Julian Mouton, Wm. Campbell, J. C. Nickerson, H. Hohorst, F. E. Girard and F. Demanade.

 The Advertiser is glad to note that efforts towards securing a site for the new school have begun and trust that the committee will have success in finding a location that is in every suitable. By suitable or course, it is understood that school should be located as near the center of town as possible. Under no condition, not even if the land were donated, should the school be placed as to make it a hardship on the children. It must be remembered that little children 5 and 6 years old will attend and they should not be forced to walk too far. The school is to be for the convenience and accessibility should be the first consideration. Plenty of play ground and shade, if possible, but plenty of play ground by all means is of equal importance. Convenience and large grounds are the essentials and the Advertiser trusts that the committee will consider no location lacking these. As this is to be a permanent home for the school let there be no mistake. It is far better to pay somewhat more to secure the right site, than to accept as a gift a place entirely unfit. The people of Lafayette do not want any mistake made this time. Lafayette Advertiser 5/10/1902.



The white children of the Lafayette public schools enjoyed a holiday and a picnic in the woods at Martin's springs yesterday, Mr. R. C. Greig, principal having charge of the expedition. Laf. Adv. 5/10/1980



S.L.I. Inaugural. - President L. E. Stephens, has chosen the fifteenth of June as the inauguration day of the State Industrial Institute. All will be in readiness for that date as the furniture is on its way to Lafayette now and in our next number we shall give full details of the inaugural ceremonies. Work on the dormitory building has begun and will be pushed with activity. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.


For the Benefit of the Public Schools.

 The people of Lafayette will have the rare pleasure hearing the famous Southern story teller, Richard T. Wyche, next Saturday. Through the efforts of Miss Holmes, principal of the Lafayette Primary School, arrangements have been made by which Mr. Wyche will entertain the school children of the town and parish in the forenoon, and entertain the public at night.

 Mr. Wyche will tell a number of the unwritten stories handed down by the old-time negro, along with many from Uncle Remus, such as "Tar Tar Baby," and "Brer Rabbit and the Mosquitoes." His stories are interesting and educative, and it is said of Mr. Wyche that there has never been a teller of stories in Athens that ever approached him in the art of engrossing the attention of his bearers and keeping them well entertained throughout a whole evening's entertainment.

 In the morning at 10 o'clock the children will be delightfully entertained, and all the school children of the public and the private schools in the town and in the parish will be admitted FREE of charge. Parents and others will be welcome, and an admission fee of 25 cents will be collected from these.

 At half past eight o'clock at night the entertainment is intended for the whole public, men, women and children, and everybody will be charged admission - children 15 cents and adults 25 cents.

 J. Y. Joyner, State Supt. of public instruction of North Carolina, says, "Mr. Richard T. Wyche has mastered the art of storytelling." It is true that Mr. Wyche has a special gift as a teller of tales, and his stories possess high literary meaning and value.

 The school children will sell tickets for the night entertainment, and  one-half of the door receipts will be donated to the Primary School to finish painting the building.

 The pleasure of the evening will be enhanced by vocal and instrumental music by Misses Robertson and Reid, of the Primary School, and others.

 Both entertainments will take place at Falk's opera-house, and an enjoyable time is promised to all who will attend. The date is Saturday, May 14, and the night program will be entirely different from the day program.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.

High School. The graduating exercises of the High School will take place on Friday night, May 19th, at 8 o'clock at the High School. All of the parish teachers are requested to have the pupils selected to take part in the exercises on that occasion. The public cordially invited to be present.
                W. A. LeRosen, Principal.
   Lafayette Advertiser 5/13/1899.



Let's Get "THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL!!"

What is Lafayette parish going to do about the industrial school? Talk may be very good in its way, but unless talk be ably seconded by action, it is of no avail. Is Lafayette going to remain idle in such an emergency and allow a more energetic neighbor to snatch from it so valuable a prize? Let us be up and doing, men and women of Lafayette parish, who have a just appreciation of the far reaching benefits that is implied by the location of a State Industrial school located in our midst. Practically, no price would be too high, that we might be called on to pay for so great an acquisition!

 What are the conditions upon which we may secure the industrial school? First, that we shall donate not less than 25 acres of land for a building site and farm experimental purposes. Secondly, that we shall contribute a sum of money greater than any other locality competing for the school, in the third congressional district. Question: CAN WE COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS? The answer remains with the people of Lafayette. That we are able to meet the conditions imposed is a certainty. The means is TAXATION of course. A special tax so light that it will be almost imperceptible, and that will be returned to the property-holder tenfold by the object to be attained. TAXATION, that always unpopular topic, and yet the most ready as well as the most effective means for securing valuable public improvements. A topic that is unpopular chiefly because so little understood by the masses and the great panacea for which is to be found in popular education.

 The Advertiser stands on the high ground that the common people (and by the COMMON people we mean the people as a whole) are always ready to listen to reason and are always willing to apply the knowledge this appropriated. The Advertiser has an abiding confidence in the judgement of the common people when once brought into exercise. Let this industrial school question be explained to the people in a practical and intelligent manner, and there is no doubt of it that the proposition of taxation will meet with popular approval and will receive the earnest support of the property-holders, generally.

 The presence of a modern industrial school in Lafayette parish, maintained at the expense of the state, means for our boys and our girls and our young men and women, as thorough training in the arts, trades and sciences to enable them to battle successfully in life, in this most progressive of all ages; it means an education along the most approved  lines and so intensely practical as to make the man and the woman essentially independent and self-reliant; and this training and this education to be received FREE OF COST. People of Lafayette, contemplate for a single moment the significance of this day for yourselves and your descendants and, in all candor, say if you can afford to throw away the grand opportunity that now offers itself to you!

 New Iberia is the only serious competitor in the field for the State Industrial School, and that place, with its full quota of special taxes already to bear, must depend on private contributions and public entertainments to raise funds for this purpose. And although the public entertainments to raise funds for this purpose. And although the public spirited citizens of Iberia are responding nobly to the call of duty in the present instance, it is easily within the range of probability that under the existing within the range of probability that under the existing conditions Lafayette parish can outstrip Iberia in the race. BUT WE MUST BE UP AND DOING.

 Lafayette parish offers an ideal location for an industrial school in the third congressional district. The mildness of the climate and the great adaptability of the soil for diversified farming leave nothing to be desired from that standpoint, and the transportation facilities make the locality readily accessible to the other portions of the district, as well as to the state at large. And if to these is added the necessary cash bonus, the promised State Industrial School is within our grasp, beyond a doubt.

 What are we, as a people, going to do about it? The proposition is a simple one, and the duty of the hour IMPERATIVE. Lafayette Advertiser 5/13/1899.

 




Report of the Industrial Institute.

 The Advertiser has received the first report of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute issued by Pres. E. L. Stephens.

The report contains among other things, a description of the buildings and equipments of the school, an account of the bond issue, the treasurer's report, appropriations by the General Assembly for the school, and an outline of the first year's work. The report states that the enrollment for the year was 95 boys and 50 girls, making a total of 145; that 8 teachers have instructed these students in English, French, Latin, History, Mathematics, Science, Singing, Drawing, Gymnastics, Manual Training the workshops, Stenography, Book-Keeping, Sewing, Cooking and Domestic Science. The expenses for salaries of teachers amounted to $6,274.20. We make the following extract from the report.

 "No report concerning the Institutes's first work would be adequate that did not take into special account its interest and influence is the community and section in which it is located. The people of the town and parish of Lafayette and of Southwestern Louisiana have shown themselves solidly united upon the question of education and in their determination to decrease the percentage of illiteracy, and set up high standards of learning, of art, of industry, of conduct. They are rapidly becoming aware that the hitherto unsuspected resources of their soil are the richest known in the world, and they keenly perceive that the younger generations must be intellectually active and bravely industrious, in order to hold, develop, and deserve this rich heritage. Possessed with this idea they look to the schools. The people of Lafayette, town and parish, have the distinction of having given the greatest local support to the establishment of a State institution of learning that has ever been given in this section of the country ;  namely, their self-imposed tax for ten years of two mills on the dollar assessed valuation of their property, besides very large and generous private donations, including the site of twenty-five acres given by a private individual. And the example of these acts has led to other important movements in the same direction, both here and in the neighboring parishes. The existence of the Industrial Institute at this point sets up a standard towards which the public school must look, in order to prepare their pupils for the work here. This in turn demands and requires greatest efficiency in the lower schools. Accordingly special taxes are being voted all about us for the establishment of larger and more adequate high schools and grammar schools. The town of Lafayette has again led off within a month past by voting another two-mill tax for ten years for the purchase of building a large, modern high school. Thus the clearest promise is given that not far in the future we shall have in our own section of the country that educational ladder from the kindergarten to the university which characterizes the systems of the most advanced and enlightened states and nations. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1902.




Bad News For the High School. - The Advertiser regrets to state that more than likely the tax recently voted for the purpose of building a high school, extending, water works, etc., will have to be annulled owing to the fact that the present holders of water-works bonds refuse to accept the bonds just authorized, as they object to the conditions under which they object to the conditions under which they were voted. It is very unfortunate that this has occurred, but when a town or community is earnestly in favor of public improvements it isn't very difficult to remedy such a mishap, and we trust that the people will not hesitate to try again. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1902.

The closing exercises of the Lafayette High School will take place on Friday night, May 30 at Falk's Opera House. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1902.


 
Improvements at S. L. I.  Improvements at the Industrial Institute are increasing daily, with a view to being most satisfactorily prepared for the big celebration on the occasion of opening the main building on Saturday June 15th. The program now being arranged is to consist of exercises in the building, in the morning and at night, while the City Fire Department will give its annual parade in the afternoon. The exercises of the morning will be the presentation of the building to the State, its acceptance by Governor Heard, and the dedicatory address by the orator of the day, not yet chosen. In the evening, when the whole building will be illuminated with light from the City Power House turned on for the first time, the exercises of greeting from other institutions of learning in the State, interspersed with an attractive musical program by the excellent local talent in and about Lafayette.

 The teachers in attendance at the Southwestern Louisiana Summer Normal School at Franklin will make a special excursion to attend these exercises, and negotiations are being made to obtain excursion rates from all directions good from June 14th., to June 16th inclusive.

 Our people all feel that the event of opening this handsome building and starting it upon the career of usefulness and helpfulness, both at home and to the State, that it is so well adapted to fulfill, marks the beginning of an epoch in our history. We are therefore assured that all our citizens, our ladies, and the boys and girls, will unite in their efforts to make this occasion the great success that is expected of anything of the kind that happens in Lafayette.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/18/1901.


The commencement exercises of the Lafayette High School will take place on June 8th and 9th. Laf. Adv. 5/26/1894.



Enough Money for High School. - We learn from Mr. C. O. Mouton, treasurer of the high school fund that there is now about enough money to complete the building. It will now be necessary to raise sufficient money to paint the building and purchase the necessary seats, etc. There is no time to lose if the building is to be ready to hold high school in the fall. Lafayette Advertiser 5/27/1893.

Elsewhere we publish the monthly report of the Lafayette public school, which now allows an average attendance of 70. It will be seen from the report that a number of scholars are sufficiently far advanced in their studies to deserve promotion to a high school, which shows the great need of opening the new school building this fall. Laf. Adv. 5/27/1893




Closing Exercises: Lafayette High and Primary Schools.  
Last Thursday evening the closing exercises of the Lafayette High School and Primary schools were held in Parkerson Grove. An immense concourse of people gathered to witness the exercises. The Sontag Military Band lent their services, and with their delightful music added greatly to the pleasure of the occasion. The exercises were opened by Prof. LeRosen, who in a short speech spoke of the progress of the schools, the great increase in attendance, and the urgent necessity for more room, stating that it would be only a short time before the children and their friends would ask for a new building. At the close of his speech the first number of the program was rendered, consisting of a brilliant piece called the Sun God by pupils from the 5th and 6th grades, which was a success. "Songs" by the little tots of the Primary School succeeded and evoked much applause. Lafayette Advertiser 5/30/1903.

  

HIGH SCHOOL. - The first commencement exercises of the Lafayette High School will be held at Falk's Opera House on June 8th & 9th. A very entertaining and instructive program has been arranged for the occasion and will fully repay all who may attend. The exercises will consist of recitations, dialogues, character sketches and short plays, interspersed with excellent music and singing. A hand will be in attendance both nights and after the exercises the hall will be given up to the young people to enjoy themselves. An admission fee of 25 cents for children will charged each night, for the purpose of purchasing a cistern which is badly needed, and making some other additions. We trust that the people of Lafayette and the friends of the High School everywhere will assist by their presence both nights. Remember the dates, June 8th and 9th. Lafayette Advertiser 6/2/1894.



SCHOOL.
(Now U of L).

As our readers will see by the proceedings of the B. M. A. and L. I. S. A., Lafayette has gone to work in earnest about securing the Industrial School.

 A vast amount of work has been done in a few days which shows conclusively the animation of our public spirited population especially our ladies.

 A mass meeting of all the citizens of the parish has been called for Saturday, June 10th, at which final ways and means will be discussed to bring the Industrial School to Lafayette.

 A grand entertainment will be provided for that day by the ladies and therefore a good time is to be anticipated. Lafayette Advertiser 6/3/1899.


A Pleasant School Picnic. - On last Thursday a very enjoyable picnic was given to the Royville public school, by the teacher, Mr. Wm. Webb. The picnic was held in the beautiful grove on the banks of the Vermilion, owned by Mr. D. Claverie, and was attended by fully 150 person, including the scholars. Mr. Julien Mouton, president of the parish school board, accompanied by Sheriff Isaac Broussard, went from this place. Mr. Mouton made an eloquent plea in French for better education of the masses, which was well received by those present.

 Mr. Webb's school, although it has been running only a few months, is in a very prosperous condition, having enrolled 60 scholars, with a large average attendance. Mr. Webb is an earnest and efficient teacher, whose heart is in the work, and is exerting a good influence in the community where he is universally esteemed, and the school is constantly growing in numbers.

 A fine dinner had been prepared by the ladies of the community, and it would be a waste of space to say that full justice was done to the good things so bountifully provided.

 Every one present enjoyed themselves to the utmost, and all were sorry when the time arrived for them to return to their homes.

 Mr. Mouton informs us that another school house is to be erected in that ward in the near future. The interest in educational matters is growing so rapidly throughout our entire parish that the board find it necessary to constantly build new school houses to furnish accommodations for the scholars.  Lafayette Advertiser 6/3/1893.










   Town Schools Closed. - The session's work of the town schools came to a close Friday. No special exercises marked the closing, the regular work was continued up to the last day and then the children were dismissed for a well earned vacation.

 The work of the schools last year was fully up to the high standard maintained in the past, and in enrollment a marked increase is shown, there having been over 500 pupils enrolled. Of this number about 40 per cent were from the country.


 The growth in attendance has now reached the capacity of the present buildings, in fact, it was necessary during the past year to refuse admission to some pupils in the kindergarten and primary departments, and for next year provisions will have to be made for a larger attendance, which will bring up for present consideration the advisability of increasing the number of frame school buildings or building a large modern brick building which will meet the need of the town for the next ten or fifteen years.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/7/1905.               


HIGH SCHOOL. - The popularity of the High School and the interest shown with which it is regarded was shown last Friday night by the immense crowd that gathered at Falk's Opera House to witness the closing exercises. The house was packed to its fullest capacity, and it is estimated that more than 200 people were turned away for lack of room to admit them. A very interesting program had been prepared and was executed by the children in a manner to reflect credit upon themselves and their teachers. There was not a dull number on the program, and the singing which was excellent, was indeed a surprise to the audience. The drill was a beautiful sight and was one of the most attractive features of the evening. "Selecting a Jury" was a laughable burlesque and was done nicely by the pupils.

 The Pantomine from Hiwatha was a piece of real art, and showed both excellent training, and high intelligence in the children. Mayor Caffery's address was short and good. He spoke about education and the need of every one to be alive to the necessity of doing more for our schools. In the course of his remarks he paid a deserved compliment to our school board and to the teachers of the High School and urged the people to wake up to the importantance of education and the support of the schools. "The Little Gleaners," a charming song by six girls and six boys closed the program.

 The High School has just closed one of the most successful years in its history. The work in all departments has been most excellent as the program Friday night testified.

 Great credit is due to the Principal, Prof. W. A. Rosen and his able assistants Misses Devall and Christain for their splendid years work.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/7/1902.

 

 The Primary School. - The Primary School closed the session last Friday with a very entertaining program at the school building. The exercises began at 5 o'clock, and quite a large crowd was present; in fact the building was crowded to its full limit. The little folks all did well and by their excellent rendition of their several parts reflected great credit upon their teachers.

 Miss Kate Trichel was principal last year and was assisted by Misses Virgie Younger and Marie Bagnal. These young ladies have done good work during the year, and the presence of such a large and interested audience demonstrates that their work is appreciated and that the people are taking great interest in the education of their children.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/7/1902.



 Watch for that big flag over Falk's Hall next Thursday, and remember the Lafayette School exhibition. Laf. Adv. 6/9/1894


 


School Activities.

 St. John - The boys of St. John school were out in full force on Wednesday last for a "pic-nic" and no doubt made hay while the sun shone. There was no declamation of speech-making of any kind, - they were out for a real good time and they had it.


 Mt. Carmel - Quite a happy arrangement was animated in town Wednesday, and was withal equally quiet. Thirty-two young ladies from Mount Carmel Convent of Washington, chaperoned by some of their teachers, came down by some of their teachers, came down on the local train and were met at the station by a full delegation of teachers and pupils from the convent at this place, whence the two parties repaired to the spacious grounds of the latter institution for a joint pic nic. The occasion must have been an enjoyable one the participants. We hope the young ladies of Washington will come again, but in the meantime, we suppose the daughters of Vermilionville will return the call.

Lafayette Advertiser 6/10/1882.







The Battle For Obtaining S. L. I.
(later USL and UL) 

  
The few lines below are taken from the "Weekly Iberian" of June 3rd, and refers to one of our head lines in connection with an article written about the Industrial school. The Weekly Iberian writes:  

 "The Lafayette Advertiser very tragically exclaimed in connection with the Industrial School, 'Let us do or die!' If you are going to "do" anything we advise you to turn your energies in some other direction, for New Iberia will get that school."

 We have not died. Why? Because we have been doing, but as much as we feel thanked to our brother editor for his kind advice about going to "do" anything and turning our energies in some other direction for New Iberia will get that school; we would like to inform our fellow editor that we have not anything to "do" just now but to spend all of our energies towards securing that Industrial School, and when the people of Lafayette puts it in their head to "do" anything they are going to "do" something to secure that Industrial School, and we are mighty afraid that the editor of "The Weekly Iberian" will have to exclaim :  My advice was "Nit" good.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/10/1899:   



 Well, we know how New Iberia feels about Lafayette winning the Industrial School for itself, but, how do the rest of the neighboring towns feel on this subject. First we hear from Crowley.
 


 Lafayette, La., is making a determined, organized effort to secure the establishment of the Industrial School at that place. Besides the active work of the Business League a large committee of ladies are lending their help to secure the needed amount of finances to make the movement a success.
From the Crowley Mirror.


 And a couple of communications from St. Martinville:
 

 Lafayette has entered into the contest for the Industrial School, and she looks upon her chances of getting it, as bright as those of any other of the towns fighting for it.

 The Industrial School campaign committee held a meeting here Tuesday, preparatory to the securing of the signatures of the tax payers, to ask the Police Jury to order an election to test the sense of the people in regard to the levy of the special school tax.
 


 From the St. Martinville Messenger. 


 Watch the Industrial School Mass Meeting to be held in Breaux Bridge, on Sunday June the 18th.
VALLEY OF THE TECHE, BREAUX BRIDGE.Lafayette Advertiser 6/10/1899. 
 
 
 
 



Don't fail to attend the festival given this evening at A. M. Martin's Grove, proceeds of which are to defray expenses of the Industrial School Association. Laf. Adv. 6/10/1899


A Generous Act. - Simeon Begnaud and A. Judice, two of Lafayette's liberal and progressive citizens, offered the School Board at its last meeting to build the Begnaud school, and let the Board repay the money at their convenience without interest. Such a generous act on the part of these two gentlemen deserves the highest appreciation, and should be an example promptly to be imitated by those in a position to do so. Were others to do likewise, the day of the cabin and shack would soon close, and instead, modern, comfortable school houses would dot the parish and stand as monuments to the large-hearted, patriotic men, who believe that services for their fellowmen is the highest achievement. Lafayette Advertiser 6/13/1903.



S. L. I. - To-day at eleven o'clock the ceremonies of the Inauguration of the South Western Louisiana Industrial School (now U of L) will take place and at half past five o'clock this afternoon The Firemen will have their annual parade, and one of the most glorious days for Lafayette will close with exercises at the Industrial School at half past eight.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/15/1901.



After its first few months open....
THE HIGH SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT.

On last Friday and Saturday evenings large and appreciative audiences assembled at Falk's Opera House to witness the closing exercises of the High School.

 The program consisted of vocal and instrumental music recitations drills and other interesting selections well suited to please the audience the pupils performed their respective parts admirably scoring mounted applause from the spectators. Some of the parts were laughable, some pleasing and others intensely interesting and instructive and inspiring to the students who participated in them.

 The High School is a new venture in Lafayette, and considering that it has been in operation only a few months we think the teachers and pupils have been faithful and untiring in the performance of their duties and can justly congratulate themselves on their success in this first commencement. The friends of the school have cause to rejoice at the work accomplished, the good it will do and the influence it will exert as a factor for the promotion of higher education in the parish.

 We regret that lack of space prevents us from publishing the entire program and the names of the pupils participating.

 The principal Prof. W. A. LeRosen has by his devotion to duty, his firm and kindly way toward the pupils and his pleasant demeanor in the community won the esteem of his pupils and the admiration of our people. Lafayette Advertiser 6/16/1894.   



An Enjoyable Outing.
The pupils of the High School and their invited friends spent an enjoyable day at the Chargois Spring, on the 11th instant. A shower of rain somewhat lessened the pleasure of the occasion, but not to the extent of seriously interfering with the outing of the young folks. In caring for the comforts of the pupils Prof. LeRosen was materially assisted by Mesdames Felix Demanade, Alex. Morgan, Thos. B. Hopkins, Fred Webb, and Miss Lizzie Kavanaugh. Lafayette Advertiser 6/16/1894.
    

Quite a number of people joined the High School pupils in an outing and pic-nic in the woods Monday. Laf. Adv. 6/16/1894




MIXED SCHOOLS?


 We copy the following from the West Baton Rouge Sugar Planter (June 1870)

 It seems strange that the Radical party persists in attempting to enforce this obnoxious measure upon the people when it is clearly evident that it is against their wishes, and that they will rather withdraw their children from the public schools than see them seated with negroes. As the city acts in this matter, so will the country. It is difficult to understand why a few adventurers of the carpetbag fraternity should endeavor to convince an enlightened people that their objection to mixed school is simply the result of prejudice? Admitting that it is prejudice, we to submit to the dictation of a few vagabonds of the Parson Conway order, and be required to cast the prejudice aside? What presumption - what unblushing (unreadable words) how soon may we not be compelled, under the same rule, to ignore our respective faiths, and receive the teachings of the children of Plymouth Rock? The subject of mixed school is beginning to assume serious proportions. Behind it lurks danger greater than that in the foreground, and the people should grapple with the first before it is too late.

 Of one thing the advocates of  this objectionable measure may rest assured, and that is, they wish to destroy the public school system of the State, they have but to persevere in enforcing it. The white people will never consent to it, and no law of power under the sun can compel enforcement. Our citizens must be prepared to act with determination now, or the time will assuredly come when greater sacrifices will be demanded. From the West Baton Rouge Sugar Planter and in the Lafayette Advertiser 6/18/1870:






CHARTER OF THE 
"Lafayette High White School,"
    (LIMITED.)

STATE OF LOUISIANA,
PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.
 


WHEREAS by voluntary subscriptions and the generous assistance of the public in general, a certain sum of money has been raised for the purpose of constructing a suitable building to establishing a free public High School in the town of Lafayette, Louisiana,, for the education of the white children exclusively of the parish of Lafayette,  which school house, is to be constructed on a lot of ground situated within the corporate limits of the town of Lafayette, and belonging to the the Lafayette High School, now for the purpose of carrying out the object as proposed and intended by those aiding and contributing to such fund.


ARTICLE I. - The object and purposes for which the corporation is created and established are the instruction of the white children of the white children of the parish of Lafayette, in all branches of learning taught in the public schools of the State of Louisiana.

ARTICLE II. - The name and style of this corporation shall be and is the "Lafayette White High School," in which corporate name all the business shall be transacted. Its domicile and place of business is fixed at Lafayette, State of Louisiana.

ARTICLE III. - The corporate powers of the corporation are vested in and shall be exercised by a board of directors composed of nine trustees, one of whom shall be president of the corporation; and majority of said trustees shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of all business.

 ARTICLE IV. - This corporation shall have the right to sue in the name of its president, for the use and benefit of said corporation, and can be sued, in its corporate name. Citation and all legal process to be served on its president, or in his absence from domicile of this corporation, said citation and processes to be served on the secretary of the corporation.

 ARTICLE  V. - The corporation shall have the right to own property and with the concurrence of a majority of the trustees, composing the board of directors, it shall have the right and power to acquire property, both movable and immovable, by purchase, assignment, transfer, donation "mortus causa" or otherwise, and to do all acts that are impliedly necessary for the furtherance of its own corporate purposes.

ARTICLE VI. - The time during this corporation shall exist shall be fifty years to date from the day of the registration of this charter with the approval of the District Attorney in the office of the Recorder or the parish of Lafayette.

ARTICLE VII. - A secretary of this corporation shall be appointed by the board of directors, and he shall hold his office3 subject to the pleasure of said board, he shall keep minutes of all business transactions and proceedings of this corporation and shall transcribe and preserve the same in a well bound book. The secretary shall be ex-officio treasurer of this corporation and as such shall furnish bond and security in such sun as may be fixed by the board of directors.

ARTICLE VIII. - The board of directors shall make and adopt such rules and by-laws for the management of the business of this corporation not in conflict with this charter and the laws of this State.

ARTICLE IX. - The following persons, viz Julian Mouton, C. O. Mouton, Alexandre Delhomme, Dr. Thos. B. Hopkins, Chas. P. Alpha, Benjamin Falk, Antoine Guidry, Dr. Geo. W. Scranton and John Hahn are hereby appointed trustees to compose the present Board of Directors of this corporation, and Julian Mouton is hereby appointed president of the Lafayette White High School, said trustees and president shall hold their offices until the first Monday in May, A. D., 1892, until their successors are elected or appointed and qualified. In case of a vacancy in their office of trustees, the same be fixed immediately by a majority of the remaining ones; and in case of a vacancy in the office or president said trustees shall immediately appoint among themselves a successor. This corporation is hereby limited under provision of act No. 36 of A. D., 1888, of the State of Louisiana.

ARTICLE X. - On the first Monday in May, A. D., 1892, and annually thereafter, there shall be an election held at the house of the High School for nine trustees to constitute the Board of Directors, at which said election to be called by its president, every member of this corporation shall be entitled to vote either in person or by written proxy and the nine receiving a majority of the votes cast at said election shall be trustees and board of directors for the term of two years from the date of said election; and they shall be considered as having qualified on giving a written notice to the secretary that they have accepted the trust.

ARTICLE XI. - Any white person wishing to become a member of this corporation shall present to the secretary a written application accompanied by whatever contribution he or she desires to offer to the common fund of this corporation, and application to be addressed to the Board of Directors, a majority of whom at a regular meeting consenting and accepting shall ipso facto constitute the applicant a member.

ARTICLE XII. - In furtherance of the object and purpose for which in this corporation has been created and established, the nine trustees composing the present Board of Directors of this corporation and their successors in office are requested and they are fully authorized and empowered to assign, transfer and turn over gratuitous use of said school house with all furniture and appurtenances belonging to this corporation to the School Board of the Parish of Lafayette, on condition that the said School Board shall open and keep open a public school in said house for the instruction of the white children of this Parish, subject in all other respects to the rules and regulations governing the public schools in this State, on the further condition that the professor or professors in said school shall be selected and assigned by the School Board, and shall be paid as other teachers, out of the public school fund of the State, and if the School Board does not furnish the necessary instruction as above required, the use of the property to be transferred to it, shall revert and return to the control and management of the Lafayette White High School.

 ARTICLE XIII. - The charter of this corporation,may be amended at any time by a vote to that effect two thirds of the members of said corporation.

 Done, read and signed at my office at Lafayette, La., on the day, month and year first written at the caption thereof in presence of Messrs. Leopold Hirsch and A. M. Martin, competent witnesses, who have signed these presents with me, Notary, after due reading hereof.

THOS. B. HOPKINS, CHAS. O. MOUTON, LOUIS G. BREAUX, ANT. GUIDRY, L.C. DELHOMME, I. A. BROUSSARD, JULIAN MOUTON, D. A. DIMITRI, F. W. COURTNEY,  JNO. P. LEBESQUE,  RAOUL GENTIL, P. D. BERAUD M. D., G. W. SCRANTON,  H. D. GUIDRY, WM. GRASER, ALEX DELHOMME, JOHN HAHN, B. A. SALLES, L. S. BROUSSARD,  LEON PLONSKY, C. P. ALPHA.
EDW. G. VOORHIES, Not Public.

Lafayette Advertiser 6/20/1891.






Inauguration of the Industrial School.

 June 15th was a memorable day in Lafayette and the people came en masse to the Industrial School to take part in the inauguration of that institution. Two excursion trains from from the neighboring parishes, and many distinguished visitors participated in the exercises.

 The large assembly hall of the main building was crowded to its utmost when Hon. T. H. Lewis of Opelousas, one of the trustees of the school made the formal presentation of the building to the State.

 Gov. Heard made a speech of acceptance, and President E. L. Stephens in assuming charge of the institute, spoke eloquently of the possibilities of the Louisiana Industrial School.

 Rev. J. W. Cooper delivered the dedicatory address and Rev. C. C. Wier the invocation. Laf. Adv. 6/22/1901.

Closing Exercises at Primary School.

 A large and appreciative audience filled the Institute Auditorium Monday night to witness the closing exercises of the Primary School, which was the first of the three entertainments to be given by the public schools. Every seat was taken and many had to stand.

 The exercises were not long, just a nice length, and owing to the their high excellence the time appeared shorter than it really was.

 The little folks attempted quite a difficult little play, called The Happy Family of Father Time, a juvenile cantata, but their skillful rendering of all the parts showed that their efforts were fully up to their ambition. There was not a single part that was not creditably performed, which is a high compliment to the ability of the children and to the able and careful drilling done by Miss Fadra Holmes, the principal, and Misses Read and Horton, her assistants. All the little bit of seconds, and they were little, boys and girls aged 4 to 6 years old, sand and marched and played their parts as sweet as could be.


Lafayette Advertiser 6/22/1904.   


School Time. - As the season approaches when boys and girls take up again the thread of school life, we are reminded that the work in behalf of our high school is not yet ended; much has been done by willing hands in the work necessary to put the school in operation but we hear no talk of its opening soon. This is because the task so generously begun by the people is not yet finished. It is because of this that we mention the subject now. The interest heretofore shown by the people in this particular work should not be allowed to die. We do not know exactly the status of the High School fund but it is safe to say there is not near enough money on hand to run the school for one term. We have not heard of any plan in regard to the school; we do not know whether the Director's hope to open the school in the fall, but it is safe to say they will do for the best. Our present mission is to urge the importance and necessity of keeping alive the very wholesome interest heretofore exhibited in the work. It must not be allowed to flag. It is our plain solemn duty to build up and establish on a solid basis, a good high school in our midst. The season advances now when much good may be done for the cause.  Let us again put aside every other consideration and give the High School, another shove forward. For our part we have the deepest interest in the work and are ready to do our share in attaining success. Lafayette Advertiser 9/2/1893.



 
School Board.
Vermilionville, La., Dec. 1st, 1877.

The Board of Directors met this day in called session. Present: Dr. T. B. Hopkins, Ones Broussard, Jos. Boudreaux, R. C. Landry, Dr. N. D. Young, Chas. Paddio, Narcisse Mouton and Will. Clegg. Absent: Dr. M. L. Lyons.

Proceedings of the last meeting were read and approved.

On motion of Dr. Young, the President was directed to draw a warrant in favor of Moses B. Williams for thirty dollars, for teaching colored school near Royville, in the month of September 1877. It was also ordered that Moses B. Williams be allowed to continue teaching the colored school where now located, until a school house is provided in the Simon Settlement.


Messrs. Landry and Boudreaux reported in regard to investigation of title, etc., of "Vermilionville Academy," and were continued as committee, to report further at next meeting. Directors from wards where school lands are now located, were authorized to notify parties occupying those lands, that they must either make satisfactory arrangements to rent the lands or vacate them, and if neither is done, that measures will be taken legally against them as trespassers.

Mr. Boudreaux was authorized to make a settlement with parties claiming to be interested in the school-house in "Simon Settlement" by receiving from them the difference between their claim and the value of the school-house.

Ordered by the Board that all schools in the 2d, 3d, and 4th wards be discontinued, after December, until further instructions.

Mr. Landry was authorized to have furniture made and glazing done for Broussardville school house and building put in order at the smallest expense.

The Board then adjourned to regular meeting, 1st Saturday of January 1878.
THOS. B. HOPKINS, President.
Will Clegg, Secretary. 

Lafayette Advertiser 12/5/1878.







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