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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

**EARLY LAFAYETTE MARDI GRAS.

Mardi Gras. - This year Mardi Gras and Washington's birthday fall on the same day. Lafayette has already successfully celebrated the former, and a second celebration would be no experiment. On that day our municipal pride should prompt us to show our prosperity in a fitting way to our patrons from the neighboring country. Next time, we can combine patriotism with merry making. One day in the year should be set out for a general gala one. No more suitable occasion could be selected than the twenty-second day of February. One day should be chosen when our friends from the country would leave their labors and enjoy a period of recreation. It is to be hoped that Lafayette will do herself proud on Mardi Gras. Lafayette Gazette 1/1/1898.



Mardi Gras Ball. - A calico masquerade ball will be given at Falk's Opera House on Mardi Gras, Feb. 6. The Loreauville band will furnish the music. No invitations will be sent out. Admission for gentlemen, 50 cents. Laf. Gazette 1/13/1894.



Mardi Gras. February 18-24.Low round trip rates via Mobile and Ohio Railroad to New Orleans and Mobile. For all particulars apply to your home or write Jno. M. Beall, M. & O. R. R., St. Louis. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.


Mardi Gras Ball.
Strict investigation will be made of the Masquerade Ball to be given by the Fire Department at Falk's Opera House on Mardi Gras. Lafayette Advertiser 1/21/1899.



There will be a grand ball at Falk's Opera house. Mardi Gras.
Laf. Adv. 1/26/1895.




Mardi Gras in New Orleans. - New Orleans Mardi Gras.One fare for the round trip from all points via the Texas & Pacific Railway. Dates of sale February 10-15, inclusive, final limit. February 20, 1904. On payment of fee of 50 cents an extension to March 5, 1904, will be granted. For further information call on any T. & P. Agent, or write, E. P. Turner, General Passenger Agent, Dallas, Texas.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/27/1904.  


Mardi Gras Ball.

Everybody should attend the ball on Mardi Gras. It promises to be a very enjoyable affair. The gentlemen in charge of the arrangements inform The Gazette that a large attendance is assured. Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1894.



Lafayette Should Have a Mardi Gras.

St. Martinville will celebrate Mardi Gras by a procession and other attractions. Why dosen't Lafayette get a move on herself and follow the example of our neighbor. Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1894.
 

Buy your tickets now for the Grand Masquerade Ball, Mardi-Gras.
Laf. Adv. 1/28/1899.

 Strict investigation will be made on the masqueraders at the Masquerade Ball to be given by the Fire Dept. at Falk's Opera House on Mardi Gras.
Laf. Adv. 1/28/1899.


 We are in receipt of a well gotten-up pamphlet issued by the Southern Pacific settling in relief the attractions of New Orleans during the Carnival season. Laf. Adv. 2/3/1900.


NEW ORLEANS MARDI GRAS. - One fare for the round trip from all points via the Texas & Pacific Railway. Dates of sale February 10 to 15, inclusive final limit February 20, 1904. On payment of a fee of 50 cents an extension to March 5, 1904, will be granted. For further information call any T. & P. Agent, of write, E. P. Turner, General Passenger Agent, Dallas, Texas. Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1904.


Southern Pacific Mardi Gras Rates. - The annual celebration of the Mardi Gras Carnival at New Orleans will take place February 15 and 16, and for this spectacular event the Southern Pacific railroad has announced a reduced rate of of one fare for the round trip from all points on its line. Tickets will be placed on sale February 10 to 15, inclusive, good for return until February 20. Those desiring to remain in the delightful old city of New Orleans may do so by depositing tickets with the joint agent at New Orleans and may remain until time to reach home by March 5. Any agent of the Southern Pacific can give information concerning the trip. Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1904.




 Beginning to-day, and until the 6th inst., the Southern Pacific Co. will charge one fare for the round trip from all stations along the road, as an inducement to the people to visit the Crescent city for the carnival festivities. Tickets will be good to return until the 10th. instant. A special train for the accommodation of excursionists will be run from Lafayette down. The train will leave this station at 10 o'clock a. m. each day. Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1894.


Mardi Gras By Train.
St. Martinville will celebrate Mardi Gras. The railroad company will sell half fare tickets to that town from Opelousas, New Iberia and all intermediate points. Tickets will be sold on the 13th and 14th, good to return on the 15th. A special train will run from Arnaudville. Lafayette Gazette 2/4/1899.


Mardi Gras Train Fares.
The Southern Pacific will sell tickets to New Orleans and return on Feb. 10, 11, 12 and 13, at the rate of one fare. Tickets good for return up to and including Feb. 24. Children under 12 years of age half adult rate. Laf. Gaz. 2/4/1899.




MARDI GRAS FEB. 14
Grand Masquerade Ball given by the Fire Department of Lafayette for the benefit of the Bell Tower.

TICKET RECEIVER -- C. O. Mouton.
COMMITTEE OF INVESTIGATIONS: T. A. McFadden, S. B. Kahn

.FLOOR MANAGERS:  E. Pellerin, Felix Mouton, O. B. Hopkins, B. Coumes, A. J. Alpha, Dr. G. A. Martin.

RECEPTION COMMITTEE: F. G. Mouton, C. D. Caffery, O. C. Mouton, C. Debaillon, A. E. Mouton, J. T. Allingham.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/4/1899.



A Grand Masquerade Mardi Gras Ball will be given by a joint committee, on Tuesday, February 14th, at Falk's opera house. The Breaux Bridge string band has been engaged for the occasion, and all who attend can be assured of a pleasant time. Laf. Adv. 2/4/1893




Mardi Gras Carnival.
New Orleans, La. Feb. 22, 1898.

 --The Carnival this year promises to exceed previous efforts in grandeur, and New Orleans will show to the world the insignificant effect her recent affliction has had upon the temper and resources of her people. The Southern Pacific will sell round trip tickets February 18, 19, 20, 21, from all points on its line to New Orleans at rate of one fare, limited for return to fifteen days from date of sale. Children will be carried at one-half the adult rate. Double daily train service with sleeper service in both directions. Local agents will furnish all information. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.



Mardi Gras for Lafayette.

 Last Monday a club was organized with the object of preparing some form of celebration for Mardi Gras, and especially to attend to getting up Parades.

 The work was divided into two sections and two executive committees appointed to superintend arrangements.

 There is a called meeting for Saturday at 4 p. m. at the Opera House when plans will be discussed and permanent arrangements made.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/6/1897.







 Remember that Tuesday the 17th instant is the day on which the grand masked and fancy dress ball is to come off at Hebert's Hall in Vermilionville. Lafayette Advertiser 2/7/1874.


 The Southern Pacific announces one-half fare rate for the round trip to New Orleans and return for the Mardi Gras celebration which will take place on the 18th of February. Tickets will be sold February 15, 16, 17, and 18, good for return until February 28, inclusive. Laf. Adv. 2/8/1896

A carnival celebration comparatively equal to that of the Crescent City will be held at New Iberia Feb. 18. Its citizens, with characteristic progressiveness and energy, have gone into the movement and their efforts have crystalized verily into a success. The pageant will be on a very elaborate scale. Two distinct associations are to participate and from their respective themes, the public can be assured of a most aesthetic and artistic display. The ball will be a memorable event. A lavish expenditure towards nit has been made and no stone has been left unturned that would make it a brilliant affair. Arrangements have been made with the railroads whereby a reduction will be given visitors along the line, and reasonable rates for board are promised. A hearty invitation is extended to all to join in the revelries of the day and a welcome awaits those who will avail themselves of it. Lafayette Gazette 2/8/1896.  


Low Mardi Gras Rates On Morgan Line. - Morgan's Louisiana & Texas Rail Road and Steamship Co. will sell tickets from Lafayette to New Orleans and return Feb. 10th to 15th, at the rate of one fare for the round trip, final limit Feb. 20th. Children under 12 years one half fare. For further information apply to local agent, or C. W. Owen, D. F. & P. A., of New Iberia, La. Laf. Adv. 2/10/1904.
 




New Orleans Mardi Gras. - One fare for the round trip from all points via the Texas & Pacific Railway. Dates of sale February 10 to 15, inclusive, final limit February 20, 1904, will be granted. For further information call on any T. & P. Agent, or write, E. P. Turner, General Passenger Agent, Dallas, Texas. Laf. Adv. 2/10/1904.


Mardi Gras Rates. - The annual celebration of the Mardi Gras Carnival at New Orleans will take place February 15 and 16, and for this spectacular event the Southern Pacific railroad has announced a reduced rate of one fare for the round trip from all points on its line. Tickets will placed on sale February 10 to 15 inclusive, good for return until February 2o. Those desiring to remain longer in the delightful old city of New Orleans and may remain until time to reach home by March 5. Any agent of the Southern Pacific can give information concerning the trip. Laf. Adv. 2/10/1904.





Carnival Low Rates.

 The Carnival season in New Orleans is a season of absolute gaiety and good humor. The fame of the Crescent City in relation to its Mardi Gras festivals has spread until it has encompassed the entire earth. The Carnival is made up of a series of "fiestas" in which the people participate generally and which creates a long train of brilliant in the history of New Orleans. There will be two additional parades; the one occurring Feb. 21, at night, being an electrical display, the others occurring as follows:

 At night, Feb. 22, Momus; at noon Feb. 26, arrival of Rex; on night of the same day, Proteus; at noon Feb. 27, Mardi Gras Day, Arrival of Rex, and on Mardi Gras night Comus.

 Arrangements have been made for general elaboration of the various spectacles and street masking. The Southern Pacific, Sunset Route, will make a one far for the round trip rate, with tickets on sale Feb. 19, to the morning of Feb. 27, inclusive, going, and good for returning until March 10. For particulars see agent S. F. B. Morse, Passenger Traffic Manager; I. J. Parks, General Passenger and Ticket Agent, Houston, Texas. Lafayette Gazette 2/10/1900 

 

Mardi Gras Day.

 It was confidently asserted by some, that the persons who occupied positions on the parish roads' flat boat drawn down the streets Mardi Gras day, were members of the Police Jury, the disfiguration of their physiognomies that rendered it impossible for their acquaintances to recognize them, being only a natural transformation of their features consequent on the very severe strain under which their nervous systems are laboring on account of these jurors being compelled to travel the parish roads, like other citizens. Of, course, only a very few people will believe such a story, for it is well known that Police Jury never do dive down into bog holes if they can possibly go around them, and besides this flat boat scene was never intended by the designers to reflect on the members of the Police Jury, but only as a slur on the present most pitiable status of the parish roads. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.


 A scene that proved itself an object of great amusement and one that was particularly appropriate to the purpose in hand, was that presented on our streets Mardi Gras day in the shape of a large flat boat drawn by a pair of mules. Fastened to standards on either side of the boat were pieces of white cloth bearing this inscription: "This is the way we travel Lafayette parish roads," and to emphasize further the significance of the design, a much dilapidate two wheeled vehicle was made to closely follow the flat boat, bearing as an excuse for its badly crippled condition the explanation on canvas "Bad roads did this." The whole affair was certainly a capital 'get off' on the present miserable condition of the parish roads, and citizens of Lafayette are bound to regret that these should ever be in such a state as to furnish just occasion for jest or ridicule of this nature. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.




The Mardi Gras Ball.
The masked ball at Falk's hall on Mardi Gras was a success in every particular. The hall was filled to its utmost capacity by pretty girls and handsome boys. Many visitors from the adjoining towns were noticed in the crowd. The music was good, being furnished by the Broussardville String Band. The management deserves much credit for the perfect and orderly manner in which everything was carried out. Lafayette Gazette 2/10/1894.
 



MARDI GRAS COSTUMES.
Get One! - Mardi Gras costumes from the French Opera's wardrobe to rent for the ball fo next Tuesday. Apply to the Advertiser.
A nice prize will be given to the best lady and gentleman dancers at the Mardi-Gras Ball.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/11/1899.



 S. P. & Mardi Gras. - The Southern Pacific will sell tickets to New Orleans and return on Feb. 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th at rates of one fare. Tickets good for return up to and including Feb. 24th.
Children under 12 years of age adult rate. 
Lafayette Advertiser 2/11/1899.

Remember the great ball of Mardi Gras on Tuesday, Feb. 22 at Falk's Opera House. Laf. Adv. 2/12/1898.

Our merchants will have "advertising floats" on Mardi Gras day.
Laf. Adv. 2/12/1898.




Low Rates to Opelousas.

Morgan's Louisiana and Texas Railroad and Steamship Company will sell tickets from Lafayette to Opelousas and return Feb. 22 and 23, 1903, with return limit Feb. 25, 1903, at a rate of 65c. on account of Carnival and Parade. Lafayette to California,Common Points, Colonists rates $30, Feb. 15, to April 30, 1903. For additional particulars, apply to local agent or to C. B. Ellis, Division Passenger and Freight Agent, New Iberia, La. Laf. Gaz. 2/14/1903.


Remember that Tuesday the 17th instant is the day on which the grand masked and fancy dress ball is to come off at Hebert's Hall in Vermilionville.
Laf. Adv. 2/14/1874.
The Southern Pacific announces one-half fare rate for the round trip to New Orleans and return for the Mardi Gras celebration which will take place on the 18th of February. Tickets will be sold February 15, 16, 17 and 18, good for return until February 28, inclusive. Laf. Gaz. 2/15/1896.




Carnival Low Rates.

 The Carnival season in New Orleans is a season of absolute gaiety and good humor. The fame of the Crescent City in relation to its Mardi Gras festivals has spread until it has encompassed the entire earth. The Carnival is made up of a series of "fiestas" in which the people participate generally and which creates a long train of brilliant occasions and gorgeous pageants. The Carnival of 1900 will be the most brilliant in the history of New Orleans. There will be two additional street parades; the one occurring Feb. 21, at night, being an electrical display, the others occurring as follows:  At night, Feb. 22, Momus; at noon Feb. 26, arrival of Rex, on night of same day, Proteus; at noon Feb. 27, Mardi Gras Day, Arrival of Rex, and Mardi Gras night, Comus.

 Arrangements have been made for a general elaboration of the various spectacles and street masking. The Southern Pacific, Sunset Route, will make a one fare for the round trip rate, with tickets on sale Feb. 19, to the morning of Feb. 27, inclusive, going, and good for returning until March 10. For particulars see agent. S.  F. B. Morse, Passenger Traffic Manager; L. J. Parks, General Passenger and Ticket Agent, Houston, Texas.
Lafayette Gazette 2/17/1900.




     Dr. J. D. Trahan and Chas. D. Caffery, Esq., left Monday for New Orleans to attend the meetings of the Grand Lodge of the Masons. Laf. Gaz. 2/17/1894.







Mardi Gras.

 Among those from this town who went to New Orleans for the carnival festivities are: Prof. and Mrs. W. A. LeRosen, Judge and Mrs. O. C. Mouton, Mrs. T. B. Hopkins, Mrs. R. T. Delaney, Misses Eliza Hopkins, M. Bagnal, Nella Alpha, Lizzy Mudd, L. parr, E. McCampbell, Jennie and Levinia Torian, Marie Mouton, Marthe Mouton, Mrs. Jno. O. Mouton, Berthe Poupart, Heloise Mouton, Mrs. Alfred Chargois, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Plonsky, Prof. Simmons, Judge Julian Mouton, Sheriff Broussard, O. B. Hopkins, P. B. Torian, Aby Demanade, Louis Lacoste, Robert Richard, Edward Mouton. Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.

  
 


Mardi-Gras Ball.

 Notwithstanding the very disagreeable weather of last Tuesday quite a number of people attended the Masquerade Ball at Falk's Opera House, but the attendance was not as large as in preceding years. The maskers were few and besides three or four costumes there was no attraction in the sight.

The firemen of Crowley, La., to the number of twenty-four having accepted the invitation of their colleagues of Lafayette were present lending an added attraction to the ball.

Their coming was highly appreciated and without doubt the firemen of Lafayette will sometime return the compliment.

The grand march was executed by all the firemen present in full uniform and the sight was grand to behold.

In the name of the Fire Department, the Hon. Wm. Campbell in words well chosen thanked the firemen of Crowley for their presence. Reply was made by one the visiting firemen.

The prize offered by Mr. Falk, a gold medal for the best Lady and Gentleman dancers was awarded to Miss Isaure McDaniel, of Lafayette, and Mr. Ivick, of Houston, Texas.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1899. 



 
Mardi-Gras Ball.

 Notwithstanding the very disagreeable weather of last Tuesday quite a number of people attended the Masquerade Ball at Falk's Opera House, but the attendance was not as large as in preceding years. The maskers were few and besides three or four costumes there was no attraction in the sight.

The firemen of Crowley, La., to the number of twenty-four having accepted the invitation of their colleagues of Lafayette were present lending an added attraction to the ball.

Their coming was highly appreciated and without doubt the firemen of Lafayette will sometime return the compliment.

The grand march was executed by all the firemen present in full uniform and the sight was grand to behold.

In the name of the Fire Department, the Hon. Wm. Campbell in words well chosen thanked the firemen of Crowley for their presence. Reply was made by one the visiting firemen.

The prize offered by Mr. Falk, a gold medal for the best Lady and Gentleman dancers was awarded to Miss Isaure McDaniel, of Lafayette, and Mr. Ivick, of Houston, Texas.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1899.


The masked ball at Falk's Hall last Saturday evening was well attended (unreadable words) the young people from this and adjoining towns, who gathered to participate in and enjoy the whimsical costumes, extravagant masks and the merriment such affairs always affords.
Laf. Adv. 2/18/1888. 




 
 


 From Gay to Grave. 
From gay to grave is the order of entertainment promised at New Orleans. Following closely upon the gorgeous and mirth-provoking pageants and spectacles of Mardi Gras, (February 22,) comes the third session of the Catholic Winter (unreadable words) Thursday (unreadable words) eminent lite raseur, Marion Crawford, will inaugurate the lecture course, (his theme, being of universal interest and one in which he has won conspicuous distinction, "Leo XIII"), Mrs. Frances R. Hayward, Rev. Thomas J. Conatay, D. D. Charles Sprague Smith, Rev. J. F. Mulaney, Prof. Alcee Fortier, Henry Austin Adams, Frank Gordon, Rev. Albert Biever, S. J., and Hon. Patrick Walsh, of Georgia, succeeding him in the order named. This list presents a splendid array of talent, and is most happily diversified in quality and kind - as should be the case to satisfy popular tastes. The Catholic Winter School is a growing power in the work of higher education.

Lafayette Gazette 2/19/1898.
 
 


Mardi Gras in Lafayette. Though late in making a beginning, Lafayette will do itself marked credit in its initial celebration of Mardi-Gras, after the fashion of New Orleans and lesser places in the state. A large source of skilled mechanics and talented artists has been at work day and night since the movement was first set a foot to observe the event in becoming style, with the result that most gratifying advance has been made and an assurance guaranteed to home people and visitors of a street pageant with highly pleasing spectacular effect. The brilliant regal costumes to be worn by the King and his court and the five (unreadable word) and their retinues have been engaged at a great monetary outlay, and will be a feature of the occasion.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/20/1897:

About all of our truants to the New Orleans Mardi Gras Festivities have returned home. Many of them, as they ram their hands way down in their pockets are divided in thought as to whether they are glad or sorry they went. Laf. Adv. 2/21/1891.


 
 
 


Splendid Carnival. - The recent carnival at New Orleans is said to have been the most gorgeous and attractive pageants ever witnessed in that city of wonderful processions, and drew together a large crowd than ever assembled there before. Miss Nita Shakespeare was Queen and Mr. Sylvester P. Walmsley was Rex. The theme for illustration was "The Rulers of Ancient Times."
Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1890.



 Wednesday night four special excursion trains passed through returning from Mardi Gras. They were all long trains, and filled to their capacity. This gives you some idea of what an immense crowd must have invaded the city. Laf. Adv. 2/22/1890



WILL BE IN LAFAYETTE.
Twelve Mystic Knights May Favor us With Their Presence.

 The following received by The Gazette, is self-explanatory. From it will be seen that there is yet a possibility of a parade in our streets on Mardi Gras:

 To the Lafayette Gazette.
   You may announce to your many readers that twelve Mystic Knights who were to be the guests of his Majesty, Rex, at New Orleans, were lost in the Pine Woods of North Louisiana and are doing their best to reach Lafayette in time to board a train to join Rex, at New Orleans. If they get to your town too late to reach their destination in time, they may, should they feel so disposed, parade the principal streets of Lafayette. These faithful subjects of Rex are about ninety miles from Lafayette and there are no railroad tracks in sight. Their trunks and clothing have been somewhat damaged by the snow. They have had a hard time, and barring accidents, would have reached New Orleans by Feb. 20.

 Witness my hand and seal this 23d day of February, A. D. 1895.
                   KALLAIK DANNAO,
                 Chief High Monk.
Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.




Masked Ball.
There will be a masked ball at Falk's Opera House on Mardi Gras. night. The gentlemen in charge of this ball request The Gazette to state that the best order will be preserved and that everything will be secured for the pleasure of the guests. No cards have been sent out, but a general invitation is extended to the ladies by the management. Good musicians have been engaged, handsome and neat programs have been printed, the floor will be waxed, and a pleasant time is assured to all.
Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.



 The magnificent street parades of Rex, Proteus and Comus at New Orleans on Mardi Gras, illustrated in colors, will be on sale at Moss Bros. & Co. The price of each edition is 10 cents and copies may be engaged in advance by applying now, at Moss Bros. & Co. Lafayette Advertiser 2/23/1895.


Mardi Gras Ball. - The ball given by the Benevolent Knights of America on the evening of the 16th proved a most highly enjoyable and successful affair in every respect. Many ladies and gentlemen from Breaux Bridge and other towns were present and lent beauty and charm to the happy occasion. Refreshments were served and social intercourse added to the many pleasant features of enjoyment. The Association extends its hearty thanks to the ladies who so kindly served at the tables.  Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1904.




Low Carnival Rates.

 The Carnival season in New Orleans is a season of absolute gaiety and good humor. The fame of the Crescent City in relation to its Mardi Gras festivals has spread until has encompassed the entire earth. The Carnival is made up of series of "fiestas" in which the people participate generally and which creates a long train of brilliant occasions and gorgeous pageants. The Carnival of 1900 will  be the most brilliant in the history of New Orleans. There will be two additional street parades; the one occurring Feb. 21, at night, being an electrical display, the others occurring as follows: At night, Feb. 22, Momus; at noon Feb. 26, arrival of Rex; on night of the same day, Proteous; at noon Feb. 27, Mardi Gras Day, Arrival of Rex, and on Mardi Gras night, Comus.

 Arrangements have been made for a general elaboration of the various spectacle and street masking. The Southern Pacific, Sunset Route, will make a one fare for the round trip rate, with tickets on sale Feb. 19, to the morning  of Feb. 27, inclusive, going, and good for returning until March 10. For particulars see agent S. F. B. Morse, Passenger Traffic Manager; L. J. Parks, General Passenger and Ticket Agent, Houston, Texas. Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1900.

Carnival Association.
A meeting was held at Falk's Opera-house for  the purpose of organizing a carnival association with a view of celebrating next Mardi Gras in a fitting manner. The meeting was well attended and the new organization seems to have a very good beginning. The following officers were elected: Dr. F. E. Girard, president; C. O. Mouton, vice-president; F. E. Moss, secretary; Wm. Campbell, treasurer; H. A. VanderCruyssen, artist. The following board of directors were selected: J. T. Allingham, E. Pellerin, Gus Lacoste, Paul Castel, Ben Falk, Victor Levy and Homer Mouton. A small monthly fee will be collected from members which will create a nucleus of the fund necessary to defray the expenses to be incurred by the association in carrying out successfully its project. There is no reason why Lafayette should not have a Mardi Gras parade of its own and we hope the association will meet with the encouragement that it deserves. Lafayette Gazette 2/25/1899.





THE CARNIVAL ASSOCIATION.

 A large number of our citizens met last Tuesday night at Falk's Opera House to organize an association having in view to celebrate hereafter Mardi-gras in Lafayette.

All those who were in attendance manifested the greatest desire to see the enterprise succeed, and consequently the association was organized on a sound and safe basis.

Until now 42 members have joined the association and it is expected that very soon it will have 200 members or more.

After some discussion as to the various plans to follow for the raising of funds the association voted a monthly due of 50 cents to each member payable in advance.

The following officers have been appointed:
President, Dr. F. E. Girard
Vice President, C. O. Mouton
Secretary, F. E. Moss
Treasurer artist, H. A. Van der Cruyssen.

Governing Board.
J. T. Allingham, E. Pellerin, Gus. Lacoste, Paul Castel, B. Falk, Victor Levy, Homer Mouton.

All those who wish to become members of the association are requested to hand in their names to the secretary F. F. Moss or to a committee consisting of E. Mouisset and H. A. Van der Cruyssen.

It us unnecessary for us to point out the many advantages that are to be derived by a Mardi-Gras celebration.

With the push and energy of the citizens of Lafayette there is not a valid excuse for not entertaining the crowds who seek pleasure and amusement at that particular time of the year.

As to the financial benefits, any business man will readily acknowledge that they are many, and therefore the business men will be backing the enterprise.

With the set of officers at the (unreadable word) the association, it is bound and will succeed.

The next meeting will be held on Wednesday next, March 1st, at Falk's Opera House and all those who have the intention to join the Association are respectfully invited to be present at this meeting.

 Lafayette Advertiser 2/25/1899.
 
 

Mardi Gras Ball. - A grand masquerade and calico ball will  be at St. John's night, Sunday March 19th, in Falk's opera house, under the direction of the employes of the Southern Pacific railroad. A general committee consisting of Messrs. F. C. Tuay, H. J. Church, J. B. Coumers, R. Coffey, and W. E. Bowen have charge of the arrangements, and it is needless to say they will be perfect. The proceeds will be turned over to the high school fund. The object is a worthy one and should meet with a hearty support from everyone.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/25/1893.




Our Mardi Gras. - Our Mardi Gras celebration this year consisted of several fellows mounted on ponies whose appearance betrayed a close acquaintance with the plow and a total absence or corn in the cribs of their respective owners. To break the monotony of the mounted brigade a few youngsters, dressed in all the colors of the rainbow and wearing hideous masks, appeared in different parts of the town and afforded much amusement to the little boys who crowded the street corners, and made the welkin ring with shouts of joy. Everything passed off very quietly, all the maskers behaving well and creating no disturbance of any kind. A spirit of fun and good fellowship reigned everywhere. However, there was one feature of the day's celebration which, we believe, was ill-advised and displayed very bad taste. It was the carrying of the coffin through the streets of the town. The coffins was placed in the center of a wagon and around it sat a half dozen maskers. This ghastly scene was explained by the following inscription evidently painted by some ambitious young artist: "Our carnival interest has departed, 1898."

 After parading itself through the streets this lugubrious float stopped near the Southern Pacific depot, we presume for the purpose of showing to the passengers on the west-bound train what some of our local talent were capable of producing when properly inspired. This may or may not have been the reason why this dazzlingly brilliant piece of Mardi Gras enterprise was exhibited to strangers, but it is safe to say that it made a rather unfavorable impression upon the minds of those who are not familiar with the eccentricities of some of our boys. Lafayette Gazette 2/26/1898.












Blind to Our Own Interest.
 From official sources we found that 289 persons went from Lafayette to the Crescent City on last Tuesday, and that 454 went to New Iberia on the same day. Calculating the railroad fare ($4.30) of the 289 passengers to New Orleans we find that $1262.70 went away from Lafayette.


The fare of those who went to New Iberia amounted to 454 at 60 cts. - $272.40.

In supposing that the New Orleans passengers spent only $10 which extra which is a very low figure. $2,890 found its way from the pockets of our people into those of the wide awake people of the city, and adding to that $2,270 for the amount was disbursed by those who spent Tuesday in New Iberia which is a very conservative estimate as it only gives a $5 bill to each one of the 454 we have a grand total of $6,675.10, quite a snug sum to have our "Rex" at home.


Of course we realize now that we have made a mistake in allowing ourselves to fall into this lethargic state but it is too late to cry when the milk is spilled; all we can do now is to let the cream and milk go and keep out stock in readiness for another year.


Now adding to the expenses above the money that would have been left by our visitors, Lafayette would have been ahead, as year before last 2000 visitors were in our midst and allowing the same ratio of pocket money to each one of them that we allow to our people, $10,000 were into the pockets of our merchants.


Oh! blindness! blindness!!


It is surprising that we can't see our own interests in this matter, let us hope that in the future we shall remove the blindness from our own eyes and that we will understand that in investing a few dollars to entice visitors to come here we will reap a rich harvest.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/26/1898.




CARNIVAL.
 
Will Be Celebrated Next Year In Lafayette.
    
Merchants and Others Saw Their Mistake.
        
And Are Willing to Subscribe Large Amounts for Next Carnival.

Sadness was the order of the day in Lafayette last Tuesday. Except the cries of a few masqueraded kids, the town was dead and upon every face could be seen wrinkles of disappointment. The weather being very fine aggravated the fault committed. Looking to each other, reasoning , questioning the empty space, nothing was in sight for satisfying the wish looked for.
Everything lacked, everything was sad and gloomy, the town was deserted and those present were (unreadable words).

Now and then masquerades would appear but instead of being a relief their appearance was the reopening of a wound from which everybody seemed to suffer and the murmurs reached the highest pitch. Everyone looked ashamed of his lack of energy that he had manifested after such success of the preceding year.

The lesson was hard but will be profitable, we are quite certain of that, as the day after we heard nothing but words of encouragement as everybody is resolved to help and everybody will see that next year Lafayette will have its "Rex". We are better prepared than ever to celebrate the occasion as we took breath this year by doing nothing and we will have new strength for next year.
A great number of persons came to see us and have already subscribed large amounts for next year's festivities remarking that it is their desire to never witness any more, such a day in Lafayette as was last Tuesday. We have here all that is necessary to entice strangers to visit us and at the same time to keep our own people at home. The Mardi-Gras of the preceding year was but a miniature of what could be done in Lafayette with everyone pushing to the wheel and yet it was a great surprise to many.

By next year "Rex" and his imposing cortege will be grandiose as we will be in shape to unite in the celebration all the new corporations that are in formation and we will have firemen, militia, etc. etc.
Let us work from now until then.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/26/1898.




The burlesque on Lafayette's Mardi Gras celebration was to gruesome to ben enjoyable, and was in bad taste. Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.



Mr. P. B. Torian, the genial assistant ticket agent of the S. P. R. R., has informed the Advertiser that over 800 tickets were sold to New Orleans for Mardi Gras. On average of $14.30 per head including fare and expenses, makes the large sum of $11,440 taken out of Lafayette in two or three days. Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1901. Mr. A. L. Dyer, of Royville passed through town Tuesday on his way to the city. Mr. Dupre Bernard as accepted a position with the Southern Nursery Co.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1901.



MARDI GRAS.
Lafayette Puts on Holiday Attire and Celebrates.

Did you see the parade?

 It was there all right enough, in fact two of them, and when it comes to celebrating Mardi Gras Lafayette isn't out taking any lessons. New Orleans may think she has a cinch on this sort of thing, but she hasn't. Lafayette bites off a slice of Mardi Gras herself and knows it is good.

The day was fair and just such a day as Rex might have ordered had he (unreadable word) to stop, but his bold knights knew how to enjoy it and perhaps did enjoy it more than if his Royal Highness had lent the weight of his august presence to the occasion.


 Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1895.





Last Tuesday's Parades.
 
Mardi Gras of 1895 in Lafayette will be remembered as an occasion of special interest, by the people, because of the unusual character of the public demonstrations indulged in by some of our citizens on that day.

The populace appeared to greatly enjoy the spectacle provided for their entertainment, of two sets of floats parading the streets of the town, simultaneously - the one set of burlesquing present city administration with special reference to the stock-law of its fathering, and "taking off" in ludicrous style the ephemeral efforts of the citizens to capture a full grown sugar refinery that must surely be somewhere within reach among the clouds, and the futile attempts of our young men to maintain a local brass band for more than three months "hitting back" in several respects and by amusing methods, at the reflections and insinuations of the oppositionists. Inscriptions and caricature were employed with commendable ingenuity and telling effect, and no doubt sounded the signal for active preparations in the opposing political camps, both eager for the fray that shall decide who will be the "ins" and who the "outs" for two years following next May, at which time will be held the regular election of municipal officers.


An incident of the day's doings that excited both admirational pleasure was the participation in the parade of about a score of ladies wearing attractive costumes and borne a tastefully decorated carriage arranged for the occasion. It was the queen and her court joining in the festive celebration and displaying a banner bearing the significant inscription "The ladies of the society of Good Will will help to success." Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1895.






 

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