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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

**EARLY LAFAYETTE SALOONS/LIQUOR

ONLY TWO LEFT.
 High license has made a clean sweep of the saloon traffic in Lafayette. Out of about twelve saloons only two have taken out licenses, Messrs. Begnaud & Comeaux, in the old town, and Pellerin Bros. at the depot. It is rumored though that perhaps two more may open.
 Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1901
      


 Editor Advertiser:
 It ill becomes me a vendor of the spirituous to comment on the actions of the town council of Lafayette, in their conclusions arrived at, concerning licenses.

 None the less the conclusions arrived at are monopolistic in every feature, and are bound to prove detrimental to this community.

 Were it nor that I am personally acquainted with the Honored members of the town council I would say that there was a negro in the woodpile.

 While it is yet time I would suggest a modification of the present license to-say Five hundred dollars. Two hundred of which to be paid on Jan. 2nd, and Two Hundred and fifty on March 1st. In this way the town will not only do itself justice in the way of deriving revenues (which it badly needs) but will prove itself honest in its motives and give satisfaction generally.
                   Respectfully submitted,
                        P. A. VILLERMIN.   Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1901



  


Mr. Don Louis Herpin has closed his saloon near the Court-House and will enter same business at Scott, having purchased the Foreman saloon at that place. We wish Mr. Herpin good luck in his new venture. Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1901.




High License.

 Under the new license ordinance of the town two saloons have been opened, one by Begnaud & Comeaux and the other by Pellerin Bros. It seems pretty certain that the saloon in Mr. John O. Mouton's building will be opened in the near future. Heretofore the town derived $2,800 from liquor licenses. The revenues from that source this year will, in in all likelihood, be $3,000. Eleven liquor licenses have been issued in the parish. This is about the same number as last year. 1/5/1901.



The Liquor License.

 The City Council met Wednesday and passed the $200 liquor license ordinance. At first there was a question as to whether it was necessary to have two-thirds of the whole Council or two-thirds of the meeting to nullify the veto, but Mayor Caffery settled the matter by giving it as his opinion that a two-third vote of the members present was sufficient to pass the ordinance over his veto. Seven licenses have been taken out. Lafayette Gazette 1/7/1899.


 Liquor License Costly in Lake Charles.

 The liquor dealers of this city have organized to resist a collection of $2,000 license imposed by the police jury, and at a meeting Saturday night employed attorneys to protect their interests. The city council fixed fixed the license at $500, and the contention of the dealers is that within the city limits the police jury has no right to collect a larger amount. Both ordinances went into effect Monday. Lafayette Gazette 1/7/1899.





Liquor Stock Moved. - Our young friend Theodule Hebert has removed his stock of liquors from Butcher's to Goddard's corner, which he has improved and stocked with liquors to suit amateurs of the most fastidious taste. We hope that the success which crowned his efforts at the old, will follow him at the new stand -- may he there thrive and prosper !!
Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1869.



Liquor Licenses.
The parish has sold six liquor licenses at $1,000, more than double the revenues from that source. There are three saloons in the sixth ward, one at Broussard, Scott and Youngsville. Lafayette Gazette 1/11/1902.





New Saloon in Laf.
Meyer Bros., of New Orleans, have opened a saloon in the Nichols building near the railroad station. Pellerin Bros. occupy the Jno. O. Mouton building. There are now five saloons in the town.
1/11/1902.




Saloon Reopened. - Mr. Philibert Crouchet has reopened his saloon near the depot. Under the old license law, the revenues of the town from the saloon business were $2,600. The three saloons now doing business in town pay $3,000. It is probable that another one will soon be opened thus giving the town a revenue of $4,000 a year from that business alone.  Lafayette Gazette 1/12/1901.




Roy & Vidrine. - In another column appears the advertisement of Messrs. Roy & Vidrine, who have rented the new Begnaud building in which they have opened a saloon. These gentlemen are experienced in this line of business and we have no doubt that their new stand will always be entitled to a share of the public's patronage. They have in addition ro their bar, pool and billiard tables and well equipped rooms for those who wish to enjoy a quiet social game. A portion of the building will be occupied by Walker & Co. with a restaurant. Six large, airy rooms upstairs will be rented for lodging. The proprietors have engaged the services of Frank McBride and Pat Guilbeau, one of whom will wait upon the customers in the day and the other during the night. The saloon will be open at all hours.
Lafayette Advertiser  1/14/1899.





- Messrs. Roy and Vidrine, two gentlemen of sterling qualities, have opened a first class saloon in the building of S. Begnaud opposite the Court House. Any one will find it a nice place, well conducted, and the proprietors have resolved to keep only - what may be called good goods. Some nice rooms will be found on the second floor where parties can enjoy themselves.Lafayette Advertiser  1/14/1899.




New Saloon Opening.
Messrs. Roy and Vidrine, two gentlemen of sterling qualities, have opened a first class saloon in the building of S. Begnaud opposite the Court House. Any one will find it a nice place, well conducted, and the proprietors have resolved to keep only -- what may be called good goods. Some nice rooms will be found on the second floor where parties can enjoy themselves. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.





The Pellerin Brothers saloon is now very nicely fitted up and is one of the prettiest in this section. Lafayette Gazette 1/22/1898.


High Liquor Licenses.
We think that our esteemed brother of the Baton Rouge Truth is unnecessarily alarmed. He fears that the enforcement of a high liquor license will cause blind tigers to thrive in the capital city and that the high-balls and Manhattan cocktails which have made Baton Rouge famous will be supplanted by the vilest of concoctions. We have been having a high liquor license in Lafayette for some time and we are in a position to reassure the good people of Baton Rouge on this score. Here we have an iron clad high license law but the sightless beast has never shown his hideous form in these parts nor have our citizens been driven to the necessity of quenching their thirst with Dr. Peppers, Hostetter bitters and "brandy cherries," and we are sure there is no reason to fear anything of the sort in Baton Rouge. And has the Truth thought of what would happen if Baton Rouge placed any obstructions to the free and unhampered flow of the spirits? The capitol would be removed to more congenial surroundings or the weekly migration of the law-makers during the session of the Legislature would be a daily occurence. Lafayette Gazette 1/25/1902.



Schlitz Beer. In the name of the beer that has made Milwaukee famous and Pellerin Bros.' bar popular. It is reputed to be the purest beer that was ever brewed. Sold by Pellerin Bros. Lafayette Gazette 1/26/1901.


Robert Richard and family, of Gueydan have moved to Lafayette. Mr/ Richard has accepted a position in the Gordon Hotel bar. Laf. Adv. 2/8/1905



Found Unconscious.

A white man was found lying unconscious in front of Meyer's saloon on Monday morning. He was taken up by the police, and every effort was made to revive him, but it proved unsuccessful and he died Monday night. It is supposed that his death was caused by exposure, as it is believed that Sunday night he started home and being very drunk, fell and was unable to rise, so lay there all night exposed to the severe cold. So far the identity of the man has not been established, though there is some reason to believe that he was a railroad switchman by the name of Donovan. He was 5 feet, 10 inches in height and weighed about 165 pounds, and seemed to be somewhere near 40 years of age. He had gray eyes and a blonde moustache. He had $14.50 in his pockets. He was buried by the city Tuesday morning.  Lafayette Advertiser  2/8/1902.


Fifty Cases. - Fifty cases of Old Murray Hill Whiskey just received at Pellerin Bros'., near the Southern Pacific station. This brand of whiskey is famous for its purity. It is absolutely free from any unhealthy ingredients. For a drink of Murray Hill call at Pellerin's saloon, or if you want a bottle or more call up phone 37. Lafayette Gazette 2/9/1901.


The Pellerin Bros. have improved their saloon by enlarging the bar-room. The place was greatly beautified by C. E. Carey who tastily papered and decorated it. Laf. Gaz. 2/11/1899.


New Bar-keeper. - Joe Lazaro has been employed as bar-keeper in the Domengeaux saloon. Mr. Domengeaux is making changes which will enable him to add pool and billiard tables to his establishment.
Laf. Gaz. 2/11/1899.


Death of a Stranger. - Last Saturday morning a man was found on the pavement in front of Meyer Bros.' saloon. From all appearances he had been exposed to the cold part of the night and was in an unconscious condition. He was taken in by the police and provided with lodgment and medical aid, but he died Sunday night. It was ascertained that the man had been drinking freely which accounts for his failure to secure a place to sleep, as he had some $14.00 in his possession. His identity is not positively known, but it is believed that his name was Donovan and that he was a railroad man.
Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1902.




 Sold Liquor on Sunday. - C. W. Mapes appeared before Mayor Caffery yesterday morning on two charges -one for violating the Sunday law and the other for selling liquor without a license. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $35 and costs for both offenses. His attorney, Mr. Jos. A. Chargois, has taken an appeal and will carry the case to the district court. Mapes claims that he has been running a club-room and did not sell, but gave away, the goods. If the matter is taken to the court it is believed that the decision of that tribunal will settle the question of whether or not alleged club-rooms have a right to serve drinks and cigars to their patrons, without rendering themselves amenable to prosecution.
Lafayette Gazette 2/22/1902.





























THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC.
 In the conviction that the highest mission of the press is to serve humanity by encouraging the good and opposing the evil in this life, the present owners of THE ADVERTISER have steadfastly refused to lend the aid of the advertising columns of this paper for extending the harmful influence of the liquor traffic and the quack medicine trade, both of which agencies are actively and effectively at work undermining the health and the happiness of the human family.

 Every intelligent person knows that alcohol is a brain poison and that, as such, it is a most fruitful source of crime, misery, insanity and pauperism. In proof of this charge we need only to consult the records in every civilized country of penal institutions, insane asylums, alms-houses and poor-houses, which show that the downfall of from eighty to ninety per cent of the inmates is traceable to strong drink.

 The liquor traffic by striking at the intelligence and morals of the people becomes a powerful foe of progress and civilization, and the saloon, as the recognized institution for pandering to the weak side of humanity and alluring and educating men, women and children to use alcohol in the form of intoxicants, becomes the most deadly enemy of the home and family.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/15/1903.   



Here Comes the Cold Beer!!!


The first consignment of beer for the Lafayette branch of the American Brewing Association, of Houston, arrived Tuesday.


 This Company has erected a cold storage ware house near the railroad, where Mr. Ed. Higginbotham will look after their interests and supply the trade with "Dixie Pale."
Lafayette Advertiser 4/3/1897.


The American Brewing Company, in Houston, made two different beers. The "Dixie Pale," and "Hackerbrau."

 


Mr. F. Lombard is having a new floor laid in his saloon, and other reparations done in his woodwork of the interior of the place. New plank and cinders, he has also employed to good advantage, on the side walk lining his property. Laf. Adv. 1/26/1895.


City Council.

 Lafayette, La., Dec. 27, 1898. -- The City Council met this day in special session with the following members present: Mayor Caffery, Councilmen Davidson, Mouton, Hahn, Martin, Landry, Hopkins. Absent: Bru.

 The mayor stated the meeting was called in response to the following petition:

 Lafayette, La., Dec. 26, 1898. -- To the Hon. Chas. D. Caffery, Mayor of the Town of Lafayette, La.: -- We, the undersigned members of the City Council, would respectfully that you call a special meeting of the Council at once, in order to reconsider, if possible action on liquor dealers recently adopted by our body.

         G. A. MARTIN, A. E. MOUTON, JOHN HAHN, J. A. LANDRY, J. J. DAVIDSON.

 Thereupon, Dr. Martin moved, seconded by Mr. Mouton, that the license ordinance relative to retail liquor dealers, be amended so as to conform to the following schedule, to wit:

 Class I. When the said gross annual receipts are $10,000 or more and less than $15,000, the license shall be $400.

 Class 2. When the said gross annual receipts are $7,500 or more and less than $10,000, the license shall be $300.

 Class 3. When the said gross annual receipts are $5,000 or less, the license shall be $200.

 Provided, however, that said ordinance, except as hereby amended, remain in full force and effect.

 On call of the roll the vote stood as follows: Yeas -- Mouton, Hahn, Martin, Landry.  Nays -- Davidson and Hopkins.

 The mayor then stated that the ordinance as originally adopted was manifestly in the interest of the people, and moreover that the revenue to be derived therefrom was absolutely necessary to meet the expenses of the coming year, and for these reasons that the would exercise the right conferred upon him by charter and did thereupon veto said amendment.
     The Council then adjourned.
         CHAS. D. CAFFERY,
 J. J. DAVIDSON. Lafayette Gazette 1/28/1899.


Mr. Jean Breaux, after disposing of his saloon near the court house, removed to Lake Charles with his family, last Wednesday, where he will engage in business.
Laf. Adv. 1/28/1899.
 


Mr. Emile Romero, on last Tuesday, sold his grocery and liquor store to Mr. G. M. Derouen. Mr. Derouen is a live, energetic business man, and we predict for him success and prosperity in his new venture. Mr. Romero, we understood, will remain in Lafayette, and will probably embark in some other line of business. We wish him success in whatever he may undertake. Laf. Adv. 1/28/1899.



William Hane, who has recently bought the Tivoli Saloon near the depot, has received handsome pool and billiard tables. Laf. Gaz. 1/29/1898



There was a "fire distribution" at Jno. O. Mouton saloon during the week. A special brand of "Bourbon" was the thirsty topic and a "mash" it was.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/29/1898.




 Pellerin Bros.are having their saloon overhauled, and renovated, and when the work is completed, they will have one of the nicest and best places in town. They are devoting special attention to their restaurant, and are arranging to make it one of the most attractive features. Jack Praeger is in charge and that is a sufficient guarantee that the service will be strictly first class. Special provision will be made to serve lady customers. Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1902.


 Fifty Cases. - 50 cases of Murray Hill Whiskey just received at Pellerin Bros'., near the Southern Pacific station. This brand of whiskey is famous for its purity. It is absolutely free from any unhealthy ingredients. For a drink of Murray Hill call at Pellerin's saloon, or it you want a bottle or more call up phone 37.  
Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1901. 


A partition recently built in Mr. Begnaud's saloon has considerably enhanced the appearance of this popular resort. Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1895.



A petition signed by sixteen liquor dealers praying for a reduction of license from $200 to $100, was read, but refused. Petitoners based their prayer upon the stagnation of business during 1899 and the failure of crops, etc.
Laf. Gaz. 2/3/1900.


  Mr. A. M. Martin sold out his saloon near the court house to Mr. Alphonse Peck, on the 26th. of last month. Laf. Adv. 2/3/1894.



POLICE JURY On motion, The grog shop license of Sevenne Babineaux is remitted. Laf. Advertiser 2/22/1873.


Turf Exchange
   SALOON.
BIELKIEWEZ & INYOUF
PROPRIETORS.
Successors to D. O. Fontenot.

 Dealers in Fine Liquors, Tobacco and Cigars.
Saloon open day and night.
Restaurant and Barber Shop will be opened in the near future.
Laf. Advertiser


 
We call attention to a card published in another column concerning the "Turf Exchange Saloon." The proprietors are energetic young men from Avoyelles Parish and they solicit your patronage. Laf. Adv. 2/23/1901.




Small Fire. - The roof over Alphonse Peck's saloon was discovered to be on fire at nine o'clock Wednesday night. Some gentlemen happened to see the fire in time and succeeded in putting it out before much damage was done. Only a few feet of the roof was burned. Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.

  

An individual from Vermilion parish, a few days ago, undertook to test the quality and strength of Lafayette whiskey. The consequence was, that he became boisterous and disturbed the peace and finally sobered down in the calaboose. He must know something about such hospitality for he was formerly a Constable of Abbeville.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/23/1878.



Exempt from Taxation.
 
The suit instituted by the parish against Mr. Numa Schayat, who lives in what is known as the McComb addition, for a license tax was decided by Judge Allen last Tuesday in favor of the defendant. The suit was for the recovery of a license tax as retailer of spirituous liquors and retail merchant. The defendant among other things, contended that he, as a resident of the town, was exempt from the payment of a parish license by virtue of the act of 1836 incorporating it, although the territory where he carries on his business was not in the limits of the corporation as therin fixed; and this because the town authorities had, by an election, amended the charter, taking in the territory in question. The parish contended that this territory, having been placed under the jurisdiction of the parish in 1823 when created, could not be taken by the town to the exclusion of the power of the parish to tax it - the same as other towns in the parish. The judge found that from the evidence these salient facts appeared: that 1884, some time after the town had taken in the territory, the then Police Jury appointed a committee to meet a like committee to meet a like committee from the City Council to confer and report as to whom was due the licenses from persons doing business there; that the joint committee reported they were due to the town; that this report was adopted by the Police Jury, which body never attempted to collect licenses from that part of the town; that the town authorities took charge of the territory, made streets, etc.,m and that it was only several years when a new Police passed a resolution instructing the sheriff to collect licenses.

 

Under these facts the court held that the parish had relinquished its right to levy a license tax on people doing business in the territory included in the corporation limits as extended by the amendment. The judge added that the question is involved in many legal difficulties.

 

We understand that the case is appealable to the Supreme Court.

Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1894.
























To Whom It May Concern. 


This is to certify that Messrs. PELLERIN BROS., of Lafayette, La., have the exclusive agency for the sale of our celebrated MURRAY HILL CLUB WHISKY in Lafayette. This well and favorably  known brand of whisky, like all other good things, is imitated. Consumers can protect themselves against fraudulent imitations, by examining packages carefully. See that they are in their original condition, and bear our name and trade-mark.

 
Signed at Cincinnati, this 13th day of March, 1902.
                      JOS. A. MAGNUS & Co.

Pellerin Bros' Saloon. Headquarters for good Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco. Orders will be delivered at domicile. Phone 37.

Lafayette Advertiser 4/12/1902.



To Fill a Want Long Felt.

 For an absolutely PURE WHISKY, which can be recommended conscientiously to those seeking it for medicinal purposes, we have secured the agency for I. W. HARPER'S NELSON COUNTY WHISKY, which stands at the very head of fine whiskies made in Kentucky. Shipped to us direct from the distillery where it has been stored for five years, it has become as soft and mellow as a June apple. In flavor equal to the Imported Cognac Brandy, and in purity far exceeding it.

  John O. Mouton, Lafayette La.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/15/1886.





 

REGULATING RETAIL LIQUOR IN LAFAYETTE:
At the City Council Meeting...


RETAIL LIQUOR BUSINESS.

Be it ordained, by the City Council of Lafayette, La., that hereafter no license shall be issued to any one to engage in the retail liquor business in said town, unless and until, application be made in writing accompanied by the written consent of not less than two thirds of the residents and property owners within a radius of 200 feet from the place or room in which business is to be conducted.

 Be it further ordained that said application shall be made yearly by those continuously engaged in said business as well as by those starting anew.

 Be it further ordained, that any license issued in contravention of the ordinance shall be null and void and subject to the be revoked by the Council. Carried unanimously.
   C. D. Caffery, Mayor.
  J. P. Colomb, Asst. Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1905.


REGULATING RETAIL LIQUOR IN LAFAYETTE:
At the City Council Meeting...


RETAIL LIQUOR BUSINESS.

Be it ordained, by the City Council of Lafayette, La., that hereafter no license shall be issued to any one to engage in the retail liquor business in said town, unless and until, application be made in writing accompanied by the written consent of not less than two thirds of the residents and property owners within a radius of 200 feet from the place or room in which business is to be conducted.

 Be it further ordained that said application shall be made yearly by those continuously engaged in said business as well as by those starting anew.

 Be it further ordained, that any license issued in contravention of the ordinance shall be null and void and subject to the be revoked by the Council. Carried unanimously.
   C. D. Caffery, Mayor.
  J. P. Colomb, Asst. Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1905.



THE NICHOLLS HOUSE
-AND-
BILLIARD SALOON,
ALBERT JUDICE, PROPRIETOR.

Corner of Main and Lafayette Sts., in front of the Court House.
 
The choicest Liquors and Cigars kept constantly on hand.  Laf. Adv. 6/21/1879.

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