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Thursday, July 25, 2013

***EARLY LAFAYETTE WEATHER

From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 2nd, 1869:

Cold blew the wind and black was the wintry sky when Christmas, once more came upon us with all its gayeties and related amusements. The old hugged the youth and talked cheerfully of days gone by, the young merrily (unreadable word) it over the (unreadable word) side walks whilst the merry (unreadable words) pester of pa's and ma's pockets, (unreadable word) over the town, and mingled (unreadable word) merry laughter to the music of a thousand fire crackers. Such was the scene on the eve of Christmas ; but bright was the scene, when, on the morn of Friday old Sol rose cloudless and brightened into reality all the fondest expectations of the previous day, Santa Claus had visited and replenished the urchins' stockings to their grand delight and mysterious astonishment ; one fond parental kiss the friendly grasp of the hand, with the usual congratulations, and heartfelt wishes, bounteous repast, where Bacchus was not least and the was o'er - night had shrouded the earth when rockets and other pyrotechnics vied in brilliancy, with the dazzling splendor of the azure vault and all went to rest, with the cry of Merry Christmas spontaneous from the lips and hearts of all, still ringing through our village streets; Merry Christmas such is our wish to you kind readers.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/2/1869.




Weather.

 Plenty of rain during the week; cisterns, ponds, and everything full-ah! Not exactly; we don't mean us. Lafayette Advertiser 1/11/1890.


Weather.
Last Tuesday it rained here nearly all day, with the wind from the South. Several times during the day we heard thunder. If there is anything in the adage that the first thunder of the year betokens the breaking up of winter, this winter is "busted." At dusk the wind shifted to the North, and it blew a fierce "norther" all night. Wednesday morning there was ice, and throughout the day it was cold, though the sky was clear and the sun shone brightly. Lafayette Advertiser 1/12/1889.





A Rare Snowfall in Lafayette.

On last Sunday we witnessed an event of rare occurrence in our section of country as snow began falling at 1. p. m. and for several hours fell very thick;  in the evening the snow fell again, to the great amusement and merriment of the young urchins who plagued the older with a thousand and one questions.

 "Pa," said one, "it's very cold and look Pa, what that?"

 
"That's snow my son.""I never seen that before pa!"

 "No sonny, snow does not generally fall in our country, it falls generally North." 


 "North ? that where the Yankees live ain't it?" 

 "That's so my son."
 

 "Well Pa I wonder if its them confounded fellows, brought the snow down here, and if they don't intend to change our fine climate."
  Lafayette Advertiser 1/16/1869.



A Stormy Wind. - Last Sunday night about midnight a storm of wind struck Lafayette. For fully fifteen minutes the wind blew steadily with great intensity, its velocity being about sixty miles and hour. When it subsided a downpour of rain followed. Notwithstanding the great force of the wind we have not heard of any casualties.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/21/1899


THE WEATHER - Ah ! well, people have been talking and writing about the weather since time whereof the memory of man runneth not to the contrary, - and all these commentaries, oral or written, have never exerted any influence on the head of the weather department, - at least not to the knowledge of any sublunary being. But when a spell of weather like the one of the past two weeks is the means of doing good, we say let her rip ! Yes, in the midst of our tribulations, i. e., mud in abundance on the outside, the middle chamber of our sanctum sanctorum covered with moisture, we say "let patience have her perfect work !"
Lafayette Advertiser 1/21/1882.

On account of the prevailing inclement weather, the roads throughout the parish and the streets in the town are in a very bad condition. The road overseers and the town authorities are doing their best to improve them. Lafayette Gazette 1/22/1898.

Rain! Rain! Rain! we had it. Some of the streets were transformed into Bayous, street-crossing bridges were floating at the mercy of the waves, and we just lacked boats and gondolas to remind us that Lafayette had been moved to Venice.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/22/1898.



Quite a new idea was ventilated in our sanctum, while we had a flood in miniature. To require the Water works to lay a net of suction pipes from the streets into their reservoir so as to take up the surplus water that our sewers are unable to carry off.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/22/1898.


The Heavens Rained Down. - The last week has been but a fit of the preceding one, the heaven's have been pouring incessant rain for the last two weeks, our country is flooded, the Vermilion, but a few days ago placidly sunk in its banks, has swollen into a turbid rolling tide sweeping over its sides and flooding the riparian proprietors, and the smallest stream of our prairies is either merged unseen in the boundless expanse of water covering the face of the country, or foaming and bounding within its contracted but deep laid, bidding caution to the traveler. Our roads are impracticable and the faces once so familiar are no more seen, and the town with its mired streets is thrown upon its own limited resources for sustenance. Never in the course of our experience have we witnessed such heavy and such continuous rains, and we must exclaim enough, enough mighty Jove, thou hast plentifully quenched the thirst of our parched fields. "Jam sat parata bibere." Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1869


The Weather. - Considering the long spell of cold weather, accompanied by blustering winds, and the fact that fires have been kept up constantly in all dwelling houses, Lafayette is particularly fortunate in not having a single conflagration; in fact, such a thing has not occurred for several years.

Tuesday night a heavy rain set in which lasted until Wednesday afternoon. Our ditches were sufficient to carry off the water, and to-day the streets are in good condition. Lafayette Advertiser 1/24/1891.






On account of the bad weather the Woman's Club failed to meet Saturday with Mrs. Jno. Kennedy. Laf. Adv. 2/8/1905.


The weather during the week has been delightful. We have nothing to complain of in this respect, except that it is too warm for the season of the year and vegetation of vegetation is most too far advanced. If a cold snap should happen to strike us just now we would be badly hurt. Laf. Adv. 2/8/1890




THE WEATHER. - For the last few days the weather man has provided us with New England weather. It has been cold, very cold. Overcoats and fires have been boon companions. On last Wednesday the ground remained frozen all day. This is indeed invigorating weather. It is better than mud.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/11/1899.



An Icy Time.

 Monday ice was in evidence everywhere. The plank walks were all covered with ice and walking was very precarious. The weather was so severe that many people left their horses in the stable and took it afoot. In the case of some few who found the use of their teams needed, the work of their horses was hampered by the frozen streets and slippery crossings. A number of instances occurred where horses slipped, getting bad falls, but fortunately none were crippled. And some people were no surer footed than the horses, for they, too, sat down at most unexpected times and in undesirable places. No serious accidents happened, but the cold was no joke, and a sigh of relief went up when Old Sol showed his face yesterday morning. Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1905.
 
 
 

February Was A Record Breaker.
February 1905 has been a record breaker for bad weather in all parts of the United States Cold wave has followed cold wave, each increasing in intensity and developing last week the severest known in many sections for years, especially the northwest and middle north, where snow-fall after snow-fall upon frozen ground has caused, with the wind howling out of the north, great suffering to man and beast. Temporary thaws have resulted in ice gorges in northern rivers, particularly the Ohio and Missouri, entailing tremendous property losses, with the prospect that when the rise in temperature comes with the consequent melting of the ice and snow, floods will add further to the suffering and destruction of property.

The "Sunny South," too, has been in the grip of the blizzards. Telephone and telegraph wires down with railroads hampered by snow and wash-outs from the heavy and protracted rains have brought discomfort and pain, while icy Boreas from his northern lair, embracing the fair South, with biting breath kissed her cheeks, and drove away the warm blush of healthy color, leaving her trembling with cold.

In Lafayette, with her green prairies stretching away to the gulf, over which the gentle breezes fan away the blistering heat of summer and temper the wintry air. February has reigned with rain and cold, finding none prepared for such severity. The swish of the northern ice queen's garments, too, has wafted freezing air over this land of Magnolias and Cape Jessamine's and twice within the week coated the ground with ice and sleet, while Monday snow dust from her flying sleigh told of her royal passage across her realms. Yesterday his majesty, the sun, again mounted in his glowing chariot and traveled his beautiful skies, beaming upon his happy subjects.


Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1905.

 
 




Last Wednesday night a heavy rain and East winds set in, which lasted throughout Thursday. It was warm, however, and vegetation is developing rapidly. This is probably the opening of Spring, as it was predicted that we would have an open Spring. We have wondered how we could have a stopped up one. Laf. Adv. 2/15/1890.


AN OUTRAGE.


Last Sunday the train which left here at 11:45 for New Orleans was wrecked a short distance on the other side of Cade. The track was blockaded and no train could go through that point. The railroad authorities were certainly aware of this condition of affairs, but strange to say the east bound train, scheduled to leave here about 1 o'clock, left as usual, as if nothing had happened. The railroad company knew that the train could not go through Cade, and it knew also that in the coaches were a number of women and children, who, in case of a long stay at Cade, would be subjected to much inconvenience, if not real suffering. The train reached Cade at about 1:30 and remained there until 2 o'clock the next morning. Anyone can imagine to what the passengers, especially the women and children, were exposed. With the thermometer registering six degrees above zero and little or no fire in cars, and without anything to eat, they were penned up and compelled to stand the bitter cold. What reason can Superintendent Owens, who was present, give for keeping these people over 12 hours at Cade without a mouthful to eat? Had the superintendent had a decent regard for the comfort of the patrons of his road he would have ordered the train back to Lafayette or some point where they would have been able to secure proper accommodations. It seems to us that the people of this section have some rights left which even Mr. Owens ought to be made to respect. There is absolutely no excuse for this outrage perpetrated upon the traveling public. Had the superintendent been unable to avoid all this, we are confident that there would not have been a word of complaint uttered, but as it was the result of either indifference or something worse, be believe the traveling public should exercise their privilege of registering a lusty and vigorous kick if that is all the satisfaction they can get.
Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.
  



 The Cold Weather. 

 Mr. J. J. Davidson, the representative of the weather service at this place, informed us that his thermometer registered six degrees above zero last Sunday night and Monday morning. This is 12 degrees colder than the coldest weather during the snowfall of 1895.
 
The damage caused, is from all accounts, very considerable. The crops will no doubt suffer very much. There are conflicting opinions among our planters as to the damage done to the cane plant. It is generally conceded, however, that the cane in mattresses and the stubble have been injured to a great extent. That which was properly windrowed is believed to have escaped but with small damage.
 
There seems to be no doubt as to the fate of the orange trees. They, from all indications, were killed out-right. The other fruits, such as pears, peaches and figs, were affected only where the buds were already out.
 
As we had few or no vegetables this season, owing to the incessant rains, the gardens were not materially affected.
 
It is feared that the next potato crop will be greatly reduced.
 
Some damage was done to the waterworks plant as several pipes were broken by the ice. At the refinery the damage was quite heavy. The machinery at the compress sustained but inconsiderable damage.


Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.
 
 





Snowballing Almost Ends in a Tragedy. 
 Opelousas, Feb. 15 - Snowballing by the young boys came near ending in a tragedy yesterday evening at a late hour. Carlton N. Ogden, a young man of this town, was holding a negro, while the young boys were pelting him with snowballs, when Webster Castain, one of the ward constables, came up and interfered. An altercation ensued and Ogden struck Castain with a whip, and witnesses claim that at this moment Castain jumped back into the street and made a movement as if to draw a weapon, and Ogden opened fire on him with a 45-calibre Colt pistol. Castain, who, as it subsequently developed, was unarmed, broke and ran, Ogden firing in the meantime. Castain slipped and fell in the middle of the street, and Ogden thinking that he had struck him stopped shooting. The shooting occurred in the heart of town, and created intense excitement. One of the bullets went through a window of the court house. Ogden fired three shots, none taking affect. He surrendered and is out on bond.

 Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.





Says Winters Getting Colder. 
 
The "oldest inhabitant," with his yarns of bitter cold in days past, has been completely knocked out. Six degrees above zero was more than he could stand. He has sufficiently recovered his senses, however, to tell us that it's the climate that has changed, and that the winters are getting colder and colder every year. Said he to The Gazette the other day: "When wine, vinegar and McIlhenny's Tabasco freeze, it's no use to talk of how cold it used to be," and, he added with a huge regret in his voice, " '99 is a record breaker in more ways than one. Our statesmen are trying to make us believe old Father Washington was somewhat of a success at cutting cherry trees, but that when he told us to keep out of entangling alliances he was talking through his hat, and that Tom Jefferson wrote a pretty good declaration of independence, but when he said governments derived their powers from the governed, he didn't make any allowances for steam and electricity and Hanna and McKinley and the Philippines. Yes sir, '99 is a record-breaker. Not only does it break the record in statesmanship, but the weather too seems to have taken cognizance of the new order of things. The "Sunny South" is a thing of the past as well as the constitution which folks used to think was a masterpiece. The newspapers used to call this the land of perpetual summer, flowers and pretty women. The pretty women and there yet even if they do ride bicycles, but the perpetual summer as turned into sleet, snow and ice and the flowers have faded and withered. Yes, you may write it down that the whole world seems to be on a protracted spree. With Arizona weather in Louisiana, Grandma Hoar eulogizing the Johnnie Rebs, Ben McKinley wearing a Confederate badge, Joe Wheeler in the Yankee army and Uncle Sam and John Bull shaking hands for humanity's sake, it's high time for an old State's Right Democratic like myself to crawl into his hole and stay there until Old Nick retires from business and holiness becomes triumphant throughout this wicked world." The "oldest inhabitant" then shook our hand and wended his way homeward.
Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.



No more floods. The City Council has taken measures to prevent them. Thanks.
Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.


The fragrant little magnolia fuscata is now in bloom, and its sweet aroma pervades the atmosphere. Laf. Adv. 2/21/1891.


The glorious Springtime has come at last. Birds have mated and are singing their sweetest, and all vegetation is unfolding in the balmy breezes. Laf. Adv. 2/21/1891.


As the weather seems disposed to clear up and settle down to business, our farmers have yet ample time to put in crops, and, if the season is good, will have all they can manage to gather them. Laf. Adv. 2/21/1891.


Remember the late frosts last year. A good start now on a favorable season, and the farmers of Lafayette will again come out ahead. We see no cause as yet for despondency or forebodings of a failure. Laf. Adv. 2/21/1891.






Heavy Rain. - Saturday evening just after six o'clock Lafayette was visited by a tremendous downpour of rain. In less than one hour the streets were flooded. The heavy part ceased about 7 o'clock, but the rain continued more or less during the night and practically all of Sunday.
Laf. Adv. 3/21/1905.



 
Deadly Weather. - Killed by Lightning near Scott, while returning from Lafayette, during the severe rain and thunderstorm which swept over the parish.
Laf. Advertiser 3/22/1905.



Bad Weather.

 Last Monday night the elements got together and for an hour or so had quite a lively time.

 The wind and rain seemed to be trying to out-do one another, and then the thunder and lightning took a hand, and for a while there was no knowing whether it was horse-play or a "fight to the finish". It seldom rains harder for half an hour's time than it did between nine and ten o'clock that night, and the wind at one time created some little alarm as though it meant to be dangerous; and as the thunder rolled and tumbled in the darkness, the lightning threw on its search light to show that all was fair. But after all there was nothing to be "squered" about, they were only celebrating the vernal equinox. The great king of the day returning from his winter trip is about to cross the equator and this is about to cross the equator and this is what the commotion was all about. If we have many more such rains, serious damage to crops will result. As it is, planting is set back nearly a month, and a dry spell of three weeks or more is needed to get in the season's work. Lafayette Advertiser 3/24/1894.




Wet and Disagreeable.



 The weather for the few days past has been wet and disagreeable, and will we are certain, interfere with the repairing of our highways and the planting interests of the Parish ;  a great many have already planted and seed is still in the ground with an almost certainty, there to rot. The heavy rains of this and the preceding week, are certainly injurious to our cropping prospects, but we know the same will be remedied by the determination and indomitable disposition evinced by our planting and growing population, white and black, in their many preparations for the coming harvest. As we have already said more can be effected for our country by the united and untiring efforts of the cultivator and husbandman, than by the useless and futile declamations of our ablest orators, against the extractions of a government whose cut and dried system and programme of oppression must run its course to self destruction. Let our great planting interests be never lost sight of, but by proper cultivation, untiring industry, improvement in our different staples and cereals, baffle all misfortunes and in the midst of oppression make our fields smile and teem with plenty. Lafayette Advertiser 3/27/1869.



More On  the Rains.

 In another article previous to writing this we noticed the heavy rains, with which our section of the country has been drenched and afflicted, but since the same, heavy winds have blown down fences and residences and out houses, in various portions of our Parish. In our Town a good deal of the fencing was destroyed and one crib and stables completely torn down. At Vermilion Bridge, a negro girl had both legs broken and her head severely, if not fatally injured, by the fall of a tree. Various other accounts of damages to property and person are every moment reaching our ears ; the extent of damages to property and person are every moment reaching our ears ; the extent of damage by the wind on Wednesday, cannot as yet be ascertained. Lafayette Advertiser 3/27/1869.



A Hard Rain.

Monday night a heavy rainfall fell, followed by a cold wave. It broke into the nice spring weather we are having in a somewhat rude fashion and made overcoats a warm friend indeed.

The past week has been a fearful one in the North and Northwest. Intense cold weather has prevailed, in Chicago and other Northern cities the weather has been the coldest in twenty years, and the sufferings of the poor have been something terrible. Over that section the thermometer has registered from 20 to 40 degrees below zero. Ice gorges have formed in nearly all the rivers, causing the water to back up and flood many towns causing loss of life and great destruction of property
.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/27/1904. 

Monday there was plenty of ice, followed by heavy frosts Tuesday and Wednesday. Thursday came in with a heavy rain, which lasted through the day. Laf. Adv. 2/2/1889.

The recent long spell of wet weather has caused a cessation of all farming operations, and the un-navigable state of the roads has for the time being almost made foreigners of our country friends. Laf. Adv. 2/2/1889.



Our Late Flood.
Various persons have tendered us their opinion for the cause of our recent flooded streets.
We thought like everybody else that the quantity of water that has descended upon us was the only cause of our flood, but after investigation we found that we were mistaken. At the time, we had called the attention to our sewers but we ought to have said our ditches. These latter ones are the main cause why our streets were transformed into bayous. We took a survey of the drainage water ditches in some portions of our town and we find them in a deplorable condition, especially would we call the attention of our street committee to the ditch which is located on the upper side of Mr. Chas. Caffery's residence. This ditch is entirely out of date for this section where the quantity of rain is far above the average. It ought to be broader, deeper and some means could be devised to keep it from caving. If planks were not sufficient to protect its banks from caving in, bricks ought to be used. At the intersection of this ditch and the one running in front of Judge Parkerson's house is almost all level with the street; going by the judge's house we found this ditch filled up with obstructions of various kinds and to our mind a cleaning up is greatly needed. Crossing, Lincoln Avenue, this ditch is continued through a channel which is too narrow for the quantity of water it is expected to carry; this continuation is like the main part of the ditch filled with obstructions of various kinds, old cans, etc., etc. We hope our street committee will look after this matter, without delay, and a general overhauling of these ditches and others prevent another flood in our streets.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1898.




The weather during the past week has been most disagreeable; on Thursday night the rain fell in torrents flooding our streets and overflowing the coulees in different sections of the parish.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/7/1874.

The spell of weather that lasted from the 8th to the 15th instants, was one of the bitterest and most disagreeable experienced in this section for many years.
Laf. Adv. 2/9/1895.

Thursday night was a complete "record breaker" as regards cold weather in this latitude. The government thermometer at Lafayette registered 11 1/2 degrees above zero, the mercury having made the remarkable fall of 67 degrees in about 36 hours.
Laf. Adv. 2/9/1895.

Bright Weather, Bright Trade. - Owing to the bright weather trade had been in town during the week. The cold wave struck us here, the first part of the week, only a glancing lick, bringing a little ice and several frosts. The fair weather which accompanied it was highly appreciated after the recent wet spell. Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1889.


 Backbone Broken. We believe we can safely predict that the "backbone of Winter is broken," although we tried to break the old fellow's back last month with thunder, and failed most signally.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1889.
 



We had quite a long spell of cold weather and it still continues.
Laf. Adv. 2/9/1878.



An Ill-Wind.
The uplifting and carrying some distance of the heavy cover that guards the opening through the metal roof of the bank building, and the partial demolition of one of the chimneys of Mrs. A. C. Young's residence, were wild feats performed by the violent wind Thursday morning. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.



 On Thursday morning last there was a miniature wind storm in town. In fact, about eight o'clock a. m., there was for some minutes all appearances of an impending tornado, but fortunately the wind shifted from South to West, and while it continued to blow steadily throughout the day, was by no means dangerous. In the morning, some few fences were blown down, and branches of trees blown off. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894. 



Yellow Fever. - With the hard weather of the last few days all germs have been stamped out and so have the germs of high prices for first-class goods been killed by Levy Bros., the up-to-date merchants. Go and and see them if you need something  in their line from a pin to a suit of clothes. Laf. Advertiser 2/11/1899.


Mrs. J. E. Declas, a railroad employee, stated to the Advertiser reporter, that notwithstanding the severe weather he had a fine patch of strawberry vines and expected to have the ripe strawberries in about a month.
Laf. Adv. 2/15/1905.




We have had four frosts this week, the heaviest Friday morning. Some of our friends tell us they saw a little ice. We learn that a good deal of corn is up in the parish, but owing to the damp weather it was not materially injured.
Laf. Adv. 2/15/1890.





The Advance Guard.A few flakes of snow fell over this town Tuesday morning. It must have been the advance guard of the snow-storm that struck this section Wednesday the during the night. Laf. Gaz. 2/16/1895.

THE BEAUTIFUL SNOW.

An Unprecedented Downfall in Lafayette.
            An Average of 14 Inches. 


This section has been visited by a very heavy snow-storm. The oldest inhabitants say it is the heaviest within their memory. The fleecy flakes began to fall Wednesday night at about 10 o'clock and when the people awoke Thursday morning they were surprised to see a perfect mantle of white covering the town, with indications in the heavens that they would be treated to a regular snow-blizzard. At first the snowy particles were welcomed with expressions of real delight, but later in the day things assumed a more serious aspect when the average depth of the unprecedented downfall measured five, six, and eight inches.
 
 In the hours of the afternoon the streets of the town were enlivened by the appearance of sleighing parties composed of the younger part of the population, while the older and more sedate ones remained at home and looked on with wonder at what they termed "the heaviest snow-storm in the history of Louisiana."
 
 At the close of the day the snow seemed to come down with renewed vigor and kept on adding to the thickness of the coat which had already reached proportions that would do honor to a more pretentious State than Louisiana. At about bed time the average depth is reported to have been about 12 inches, and Friday morning to the inexpressible wonder of all myriads of specks could be seen floating in the atmosphere until about half past nine o'clock when the beautiful snow stopped falling, the Sun making a fain effort to come out after a long absence, and the people of Lafayette felt as if they had just returned from a visit to some blizzard-stricken country.
Lafayette Gazette 2/16/1895.


THE WEATHER.


 As some one has said: "The clerk of the weather has turned his wrath upon the Sunny South." Be that as it may, nevertheless the weather of the last few days has been more than disagreeable.Sleet, snow, glacial wind and frozen ground have been unwelcome visitors not only in Lafayette but throughout the State and the whole country.

Last Sunday will be a day long to be remembered. With good fires one could not help but freeze. The southern homes will not beat cold weather of last Sunday's type.


 Milk froze, eggs cracked and frozen water by the fire would not thaw.

Many bayous over the State are frozen. Lake Providence is frozen over for the first time in twenty-five years.At Houma, La., the thermometer reached thirty degrees below zero. Brrrr!


 (30 degrees below zero is obviously, incorrect - According to Dr. Jeff's Weather Wunder page the temperature in Houma, La. reached 5 degrees above zero on Feb. 13, 1899. Still very cold by our standards.)

 At Meridian, Miss., coal oil froze in the lamps.


 At New Orleans, La., the thermometer went down to 6.8 degrees above zero. At Charleston, S. C., the snow fell to a depth of 40 inches. This city has record of the weather since 1638, and such weather has never been seen. At Bay St. Louis, Miss., the gulf is frozen for a distance of 3 miles from the shore. Galveston, Texas, had one foot of snow.


 Washington, D. C., welcomed three feet of snow and hard freezing weather but our legislators are still there. New York has been cut from communication with the world during three days. Even in Florida as far South as Tampa, ten degrees above zero were recorded.

The losses in oranges, pine-apples, peaches, apples, plums and early vegetable will be immense; but, as says the clerk of the weather bureau at Washington, D. C., now in New Orleans, this weather has been a blessing in disguise (frozen disguise) as it has killed all germs of the s0-called yellow fever of late years. And now we have mud, sticking mud. My ! how hard it is to live in this world and be contented. What say ye?


Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1899.



As The Crow Flies. It has been noticed that crows have been migrating in large numbers, which indicates, in the opinion of the Smithsonian Institution scientists, a severe winter. Laf.  Adv. 2/18/1882. 


Record Cold. - Mr. J. J. Davidson, who for some time has kept a record of the temperature in Lafayette, informed us that last Saturday night the thermometer registered 6 degrees above zero. The lowest heretofore had been 16 1/2. Pretty cool weather for Lafayette. Laf. Advertiser 2/18/1899.

 

AN OUTRAGE.


Last Sunday the train which left here at 11:45 for New Orleans was wrecked a short distance on the other side of Cade. The track was blockaded and no train could go through that point. The railroad authorities were certainly aware of this condition of affairs, but strange to say the east bound train, scheduled to leave here about 1 o'clock, left as usual, as if nothing had happened. The railroad company knew that the train could not go through Cade, and it knew also that in the coaches were a number of women and children, who, in case of a long stay at Cade, would be subjected to much inconvenience, if not real suffering. The train reached Cade at about 1:30 and remained there until 2 o'clock the next morning. Anyone can imagine to what the passengers, especially the women and children, were exposed. With the thermometer registering six degrees above zero and little or no fire in cars, and without anything to eat, they were penned up and compelled to stand the bitter cold. What reason can Superintendent Owens, who was present, give for keeping these people over 12 hours at Cade without a mouthful to eat? Had the superintendent had a decent regard for the comfort of the patrons of his road he would have ordered the train back to Lafayette or some point where they would have been able to secure proper accommodations. It seems to us that the people of this section have some rights left which even Mr. Owens ought to be made to respect. There is absolutely no excuse for this outrage perpetrated upon the traveling public. Had the superintendent been unable to avoid all this, we are confident that there would not have been a word of complaint uttered, but as it was the result of either indifference or something worse, be believe the traveling public should exercise their privilege of registering a lusty and vigorous kick if that is all the satisfaction they can get.
Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.
  



 The Cold Weather. 

 Mr. J. J. Davidson, the representative of the weather service at this place, informed us that his thermometer registered six degrees above zero last Sunday night and Monday morning. This is 12 degrees colder than the coldest weather during the snowfall of 1895.
 
The damage caused, is from all accounts, very considerable. The crops will no doubt suffer very much. There are conflicting opinions among our planters as to the damage done to the cane plant. It is generally conceded, however, that the cane in mattresses and the stubble have been injured to a great extent. That which was properly windrowed is believed to have escaped but with small damage.
 
There seems to be no doubt as to the fate of the orange trees. They, from all indications, were killed out-right. The other fruits, such as pears, peaches and figs, were affected only where the buds were already out.
 
As we had few or no vegetables this season, owing to the incessant rains, the gardens were not materially affected.
 
It is feared that the next potato crop will be greatly reduced.
 
Some damage was done to the waterworks plant as several pipes were broken by the ice. At the refinery the damage was quite heavy. The machinery at the compress sustained but inconsiderable damage.


Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.
 
 





Snowballing Almost Ends in a Tragedy. 

 Opelousas, Feb. 15 - Snowballing by the young boys came near ending in a tragedy yesterday evening at a late hour. Carlton N. Ogden, a young man of this town, was holding a negro, while the young boys were pelting him with snowballs, when Webster Castain, one of the ward constables, came up and interfered. An altercation ensued and Ogden struck Castain with a whip, and witnesses claim that at this moment Castain jumped back into the street and made a movement as if to draw a weapon, and Ogden opened fire on him with a 45-calibre Colt pistol. Castain, who, as it subsequently developed, was unarmed, broke and ran, Ogden firing in the meantime. Castain slipped and fell in the middle of the street, and Ogden thinking that he had struck him stopped shooting. The shooting occurred in the heart of town, and created intense excitement. One of the bullets went through a window of the court house. Ogden fired three shots, none taking affect. He surrendered and is out on bond.

 Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.




AN OUTRAGE.


Last Sunday the train which left here at 11:45 for New Orleans was wrecked a short distance on the other side of Cade. The track was blockaded and no train could go through that point. The railroad authorities were certainly aware of this condition of affairs, but strange to say the east bound train, scheduled to leave here about 1 o'clock, left as usual, as if nothing had happened. The railroad company knew that the train could not go through Cade, and it knew also that in the coaches were a number of women and children, who, in case of a long stay at Cade, would be subjected to much inconvenience, if not real suffering. The train reached Cade at about 1:30 and remained there until 2 o'clock the next morning. Anyone can imagine to what the passengers, especially the women and children, were exposed. With the thermometer registering six degrees above zero and little or no fire in cars, and without anything to eat, they were penned up and compelled to stand the bitter cold. What reason can Superintendent Owens, who was present, give for keeping these people over 12 hours at Cade without a mouthful to eat? Had the superintendent had a decent regard for the comfort of the patrons of his road he would have ordered the train back to Lafayette or some point where they would have been able to secure proper accommodations. It seems to us that the people of this section have some rights left which even Mr. Owens ought to be made to respect. There is absolutely no excuse for this outrage perpetrated upon the traveling public. Had the superintendent been unable to avoid all this, we are confident that there would not have been a word of complaint uttered, but as it was the result of either indifference or something worse, be believe the traveling public should exercise their privilege of registering a lusty and vigorous kick if that is all the satisfaction they can get.
Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.
  



 The Cold Weather. 

 Mr. J. J. Davidson, the representative of the weather service at this place, informed us that his thermometer registered six degrees above zero last Sunday night and Monday morning. This is 12 degrees colder than the coldest weather during the snowfall of 1895.
 
The damage caused, is from all accounts, very considerable. The crops will no doubt suffer very much. There are conflicting opinions among our planters as to the damage done to the cane plant. It is generally conceded, however, that the cane in mattresses and the stubble have been injured to a great extent. That which was properly windrowed is believed to have escaped but with small damage.
 
There seems to be no doubt as to the fate of the orange trees. They, from all indications, were killed out-right. The other fruits, such as pears, peaches and figs, were affected only where the buds were already out.
 
As we had few or no vegetables this season, owing to the incessant rains, the gardens were not materially affected.
 
It is feared that the next potato crop will be greatly reduced.
 
Some damage was done to the waterworks plant as several pipes were broken by the ice. At the refinery the damage was quite heavy. The machinery at the compress sustained but inconsiderable damage.


Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.
 
 





Snowballing Almost Ends in a Tragedy. 

 Opelousas, Feb. 15 - Snowballing by the young boys came near ending in a tragedy yesterday evening at a late hour. Carlton N. Ogden, a young man of this town, was holding a negro, while the young boys were pelting him with snowballs, when Webster Castain, one of the ward constables, came up and interfered. An altercation ensued and Ogden struck Castain with a whip, and witnesses claim that at this moment Castain jumped back into the street and made a movement as if to draw a weapon, and Ogden opened fire on him with a 45-calibre Colt pistol. Castain, who, as it subsequently developed, was unarmed, broke and ran, Ogden firing in the meantime. Castain slipped and fell in the middle of the street, and Ogden thinking that he had struck him stopped shooting. The shooting occurred in the heart of town, and created intense excitement. One of the bullets went through a window of the court house. Ogden fired three shots, none taking affect. He surrendered and is out on bond.

 Lafayette Gazette 2/18/1899.




THE WEATHER.


 As some one has said: "The clerk of the weather has turned his wrath upon the Sunny South." Be that as it may, nevertheless the weather of the last few days has been more than disagreeable.Sleet, snow, glacial wind and frozen ground have been unwelcome visitors not only in Lafayette but throughout the State and the whole country.

Last Sunday will be a day long to be remembered. With good fires one could not help but freeze. The southern homes will not beat cold weather of last Sunday's type.


 Milk froze, eggs cracked and frozen water by the fire would not thaw.

Many bayous over the State are frozen. Lake Providence is frozen over for the first time in twenty-five years.At Houma, La., the thermometer reached thirty degrees below zero. Brrrr!


 (30 degrees below zero is obviously, incorrect - According to Dr. Jeff's Weather Wunder page the temperature in Houma, La. reached 5 degrees above zero on Feb. 13, 1899. Still very cold by our standards.)

 At Meridian, Miss., coal oil froze in the lamps.


 At New Orleans, La., the thermometer went down to 6.8 degrees above zero. At Charleston, S. C., the snow fell to a depth of 40 inches. This city has record of the weather since 1638, and such weather has never been seen. At Bay St. Louis, Miss., the gulf is frozen for a distance of 3 miles from the shore. Galveston, Texas, had one foot of snow.


 Washington, D. C., welcomed three feet of snow and hard freezing weather but our legislators are still there. New York has been cut from communication with the world during three days. Even in Florida as far South as Tampa, ten degrees above zero were recorded.

The losses in oranges, pine-apples, peaches, apples, plums and early vegetable will be immense; but, as says the clerk of the weather bureau at Washington, D. C., now in New Orleans, this weather has been a blessing in disguise (frozen disguise) as it has killed all germs of the s0-called yellow fever of late years. And now we have mud, sticking mud. My ! how hard it is to live in this world and be contented. What say ye?


Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1899.






Record Cold. - Mr. J. J. Davidson, who for some time has kept a record of the temperature in Lafayette, informed us that last Saturday night the thermometer registered 6 degrees above zero. The lowest heretofore had been 16 1/2. Pretty cool weather for Lafayette. Laf. Advertiser 2/18/1899.

 

The Weather. - Now that the weather has been fine and the roads are drying off,we would advise our gallants to drive the young ladies and visitors out to the new "pinhook" bridge. It is well worth seeing. It is an evidence of progress, and is the finest structure of the kind in this section of the State. Laf. Advertiser 2/18/1888.


Weather reports are now received daily, except Sunday, at the post office. Reports are sent from the New Orleans Weather Bureau, which is under the able management of Prof. Robert E. Kerkaw. Laf. Gaz. 2/19/1898.

The wind on last Saturday night was very disastrous on Cote Gelee, in this parish. The Royville church, with its high and commanding steeple was leveled to earth, likewise the residence of Dr. Young, the cotton gin of Messrs. Billaud & Pellerin, and several other buildings in the same neighborhood, too numerous to mention. We heartily sympathize with the sufferers. Fortune sometimes repays her frowns with many a smile. Lafayette Advertiser 2/20/1869.



Don't mind the weather, just ring us up and we'll bring your groceries to you. - Morgan & Debaillon. Laf. Adv. 2/22/1905.


Thursday was another disagreeable, rainy day. It began raining early in the morning and continued steadily all day.
Laf. Adv. 2/22/1905 


The weather the past week has been entirely too warm and damp for health or comfort. Laf. Adv. 2/22/1890



Last Wednesday, it blew quite a gale here, from the South-east. We have heard of some trees and fencing having been damaged, but not to a great extent.
Laf. Adv. 2/23/1878


The weather the past week has been most delightful, both day and night. Verily this is an earthly paradise.
Laf. Advertiser 2/25/1893.




It was quite cool at the beginning of the week.
Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.





The weather during the week has been fair and windy, and the ground is drying out rapidly. Our farmers are stirring themselves and humming with preparation, like a hive of bees that have been shaken up from a long sheep.
Laf. Advertiser 2/28/1891. 

This time last year we were visited by a disastrous freeze, and the china and fruit trees were in full foliage. Now the trees are just putting forth tender leaves. The wiseacres tell us that a late season like this promises and abundance of fruit. The measles has been prevalent in Lafayette for several weeks, but it is of mild form and yields readily to treatment. Laf. Advertiser 2/28/1891. 




The weather during the week has been fair and windy, and the ground is drying out rapidly. Our farmers are stirring themselves and humming with preparation, like a hive of bees that have been shaken up from a long sheep.
Laf. Advertiser 2/28/1891. 

 Robins are lingering here later that usual this Spring and are still quite plentiful. If you go to their roost late in the evening you can get all you want in a few shots. Sonny Landry now leads the record on robins with a bag of forty-nine in four shots. Laf. Advertiser 2/28/1891. 




Damage by the Storm. - The storm last Sunday night caused considerable damage in the vicinity of Mauriceville and LeRoy. Steve Landry's house was blown down causing injuries to two children. The residences of Bebe Clark and Henry Hebert were demolished, but fortunately no one sustained any injury. Lafayette Gazette 3/1/1902.

During the week the weather has been oppressively warm, with blustering winds and light showers. It has been good growing weather for corn. Laf. Advertiser 3/1/1890.


The cold wave following in the wake of the recent violent cyclone struck us Friday morning about 2 o'clock. It was one the most sudden changes we have had this winter. The sultry weather of the few days previous made the change all the more severe.
Laf. Advertiser 3/1/1890.




Vegetation is well advanced for the season - peach and plum trees commenced blooming some time ago - and if there should be no more cold weather, the fruit crop will be early and abundant.
Laf. Advertiser 3/2/1878.


Farming operations have been retarded by the wet weather that prevailed during last fall and winter. With a few exceptions, ploughing has but lately commenced, but our farmers seem determined to make up for lost time. With a favorable year, our generous soil will yet bountifully reward the agriculturist for his labor and industry.
Laf. Advertiser 3/2/1878.













Heavy Blow Sunday Night.

 The parish was visited by a sever wind storm again Sunday night, but little damage was done in Lafayette, beside blowing down a few shade trees and some parts of the telephone lines.

 Carencro was so unfortunate as to again be in the part of the storm, the handsome new church, which but a week before had sustained damages to the amount of $500, was completely wrecked by this gale, the new building was not yet fully completed but as it stood represented an outlay of $9800, this amount had been amassed by the zealous and untiring efforts of the Pastor Rev. Father Laforest, supported by the energetic and and interesting people of Carencro. This is a rude shock to their hopes for a permanent church home but we trust they will not be discouraged and extend our sympathy in their misfortune. Lafayette Advertiser 4/3/1897.



Change in Weather. - Following rain Monday evening and night it was pretty cool yesterday, being a decided change from the summer weather preceding. The change in temperature was an effect from the blizzard conditions existing in the West Saturday.
Laf. Adv. 4/5/1905.


 The weather the first part of the week was bright and warm, and highly favorable for farm work of all kinds. From all of our correspondents, and from our farmer friends from all sections of the parish, we receive the most encouraging news. Everybody is hard at work, and the prospects are splendid.
Laf. Adv. 4/6/1899.


 The farmers have been taking full advantage of the beautiful weather to push their crops, consequently we have seen but few of them in town during the week. This is what our merchants like to see. A farmer who loafs in the Spring is not apt to find much favor with our merchants. Laf. Adv. 4/6/1899.


 Yesterday was one of the most disagreeable and dusty days of the season.
Laf. Adv. 4/8/1893


We are having now delightful weather.
Laf. Adv.  4/8/1899. 




An outgoing member of the present City Council expressed himself thus to the reporter of the ADVERTISER. "We have done the best we could under the circumstances, we had "a boiler" and a "rainy weather" to contend with. We didn't burst and we didn't stay in the mud." The reporter then thought of what the next council will have to contend with. Laf. Adv. 4/8/1899.


 A good rain was most welcomed last Wednesday night.
Laf. Adv. 4/8/1899.


The weather during the week has been perfectly lovely, and altogether favorable for farming operations. Our farmers have not been idle. Planting corn and cotton is pretty well over with in this parish, and we are just waiting for a good rain to give the crops a start. Laf. Adv. 4/13/1889.


For about six weeks we have had but two small showers of rain. A more liberal supply would be thankfully received, and prove very beneficial to farmers and gardeners. Laf. 4/13/1878

 
The weather after the rain last Saturday was quite cool for a few days, fires feeling very comfortable. Laf. Adv. 4/19/1893



The Weather.

 A delightful and welcome rain fell last Sunday in time to renew the buoyancy of our farmers and to spread smiles of contentment upon their faces. It was very welcome as the land had become thirsty, but Providence was watchful and kind. Since, we have enjoyed balmy spring days, listening to the warbling of the birds and smelling the fragrant flowers.

 This is indeed growing weather.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/22/1899.



Welcome Rains. - The rains have worked gloriously on the crops and all vegetation. Some of our farmers think they have had a little too much, but they are not complaining, while the general report is that it was just right. Throughout the parish the condition of the crops is excellent. Lafayette Advertiser 4/26/1890.  



Very Localized Rain.

The rain last Tuesday evening was very cooling and refreshing to us here in town, being sufficient to lay the dust and thereby abate a great source of discomfort, but it was what might be called a "spotted shower." There was a vast difference in the quantity which fell at the courthouse and in the neighborhood of the depot. Only a short distance East of town, on the Revillon place, and in that neighborhood, we learn that the rain came down in torrents, followed by a destructive hail, which necessitates the replanting of some of the crops. Lafayette Advertiser 4/27/1889.


Weather Destroy's Vegetable Crops. - We sympathize with Major Sosthene Mouton in the destruction caused by the cyclone which passed over his place Tuesday afternoon. His extensive garden (about seven acres), luxuriant with a fine grove of fruits and vegetables was completely obliterated. A cloud-burst deluged the ground to the depth of several inches; the wind blew down the fences, followed by a fall of hail at least four inches deep, completing the destruction. The track of the cyclone was narrow and almost as distinctly marked by a line of fence.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/27/1889.   



The Weather the past week has been a little warmer than is usual at this season of the year; but it was beautiful for the growing crops.Laf. Adv. 4/27/1889 






Big Rains.
Last Tuesday night between nine and ten o'clock we were treated to quite a little storm. The electrical display preceding the rain covered the entire heavens, and flashes of sheet lightning played simultaneously, lasting for an hour or more. Then came the rain which though not a down-pour, was something more than a shower. With the rain there was also a considerable fall of hail, which we hear did some damage to young crops. Lafayette Advertiser 4/28/1894.




WEATHER. - We have had copious rains this week, broken once in a while by the invigorating rays of old Sol. The earth had become parched by the last north winds, our fields were already suffering and the crops were fast wilting, to the sore disappointment of all our planters. Now, hope beams on every countenance and new courage seems to actuate every one - and the bright results that we had predicted from our growing crops will we feel certain, be fully realized. Lafayette Advertiser 5/1/1869.



The dry weather which has continued now for for some time is detrimental to the crops, as yet there has been no real injury, and the retarding effect has been greater on cotton than on cane, but unless a good rain falls soon there will be considerable harm done. Laf. Adv. 5/2/1903



Major Weather Event.
On Saturday the 26th ult. there was fall of hail, such as the oldest citizens deny ever having seen before. It lasted about ten minutes, and in that time fell thick and fast enough to cover the ground. Some of the pieces picked up were fully as large as a hen egg. The cotton and corn crop, as far as we can learn, were not injured to any extent, except in the upper portion of the parish where the fall was even heavier than here. The gardens suffered considerably, and the fruit crop was badly injured. Lafayette Advertiser 5/3/1879.


Need Rain. - We have had no rain of any consequence for the past two months and the effects of the drought are becoming serious. Water is scarce, crops are suffering and in some instances even perishing. At the present writing (Friday), there are some indications of approaching rain.
Laf. Adv. 5/4/1878.



 

Street sprinkling is a quite necessary commodity.
 Laf. Adv. 5/7/1898.


Courageous Ladies Brave the Storms.

 Notwithstanding the heavy wind and rain storm which ushered in the evening of May 3rd, our courageous young ladies were not to be deterred from showing their deep regard for their amiable and popular young friend, Miss Nita Hohorst, and their high appreciation of the kind extended by her mother, Mrs. Ed. Pellerin. Bravely they confronted the elements, and right richly were rewarded for their unselfish perseverance. Rapidly the storm drifted away, and the skies, as if in sympathy with the occasion, beamed placid and reassuring. Soon a large number of our charming belles and gallant beaux were assembled in that cosy home beneath a hospitable roof, and the evening was devoted unrestrainedly to that delicious social intercourse and "flow of soul" which can only be fully enjoyed and appreciated by those in the "heydey" and liquid dew of youth." There were promenades about the tastefully arranged floral garden, music, dancing, and tete-a tete sub rosa. A rare and sumptuous repast was spread in the garden, which was brightly and cheerfully illuminated by beautiful variegated Chinese Lanterns. Mrs. Pellerin was everywhere, dispensing cheery hospitality and tireless in administering to the pleasure of her fair and manly guests, assisted by Mrs. Jno. O. Mouton and Mrs. T. Cornay. Our jovial old friend, Ed. Pellerin, though a little out of his element, showed up like a full blown - sunflower, his genial face beaming with kindly interest and his features wreathed with a complacent smile ever exceeding that he always exhibit when wrestling with a pound gaspergoo. Miss Nita was most graciously and royally assisted in the reception and entertainment of her guests by Miss Yolande Rigues. Those participating in the pleasure of this most enjoyable evening were: Misses Bertha Erwin, Leila Singleton, Evelyn Wall (of Abbeville), Leonora Bisland (of Orange, Texas), Maud Young (of Royville), Edie Young, Yolande Rigues, Alix Judice, Louise Judice, Martha Mouton, Stella Trahan, Haydee Trahan, Marie Campbell, Mimie Cornay, Eliza Corney, Zerelda Bailey. Messrs. Paul Barke, Alex. Delahoussaye, Geo. B. Petty, J. G. Davis, Alf. Mouton, Sidney Mouton, John P. LeBesque, John Comeau, D. V. Gardebled, Felix Girard, J. J. Davidson, Geo. Richard, Florian Cornay, Ned Mouton and Emmanuel Pellerin. Lafayette Advertiser 5/10/1890.
               





Monday was another rainy day accompanied by much thunder and lightning. Entirely too much rain, and the farmers are complaining in earnest.
Laf. Adv. 5/10/1890.

Small Tornado - About 1 o'clock Monday morning many of our citizens were startled from their slumbers by the roar and rattle of a miniature tornado which struck our town, probably an offshoot of the destructive Texas cyclone. Though the wind was fierce for a few minutes and the clouds looked threatening, fortunately it passed off without doing any damage. 
Lafayette Advertiser 5/10/1890.


The Day of Wind and Dust.
 

 Last Sunday may very appropriately be referred to in the future as the day of wind and dust. The "oldest inhabitant" surely cannot bring to mind anything like it. The wind blew strong and steady and, for two hours or more, threatened to do some damage; it appeared to scoop the dust from the streets, and after reaching the proper elevation, carried it forward with a rush. A damper, however, was put upon this uncomfortable state of affairs in the afternoon by the much needed rain, - which was everywhere considered a genuine blossoming, for the suppression of dust as well as the good to crops and gardens. In this connection it may not be amiss to say that crops in this parish were never more promising, and are considered everywhere well advanced. The cool mornings and nights of the past few weeks retarded, and in some cases were injurious to, the growth of cotton, but those are inseparable from the season. Lafayette Advertiser 5/13/1882.



RAIN! RAIN! - Oh, for a good shower of rain, is the cry of every one in this parish. The crops are suffering greatly from the drought. The gardens are parched and all kinds of vegetable are drying up. The dust in our public roads and streets average from one to two inches in depth. Laf. Adv. 5/16/1874



 We were favored with a pleasant little shower last Saturday night. The weather has been delightful since the rain. Laf. Adv. 5/17/1893.




The weather has been quite cool for the past day or two.
  Laf. Adv. 5/20/1893.




DUST!  DUST!!  DUST!!! 


A simoom has been caressing us for now many weeks, and should such fanning continue, which is not improbable, for another like period, what will become of the denizens of this spot of beauty - this gem of fair Louisiana - Lafayette, without artesian wells and sprinkling machines for our streets? We are in hope that our new "city fathers" will appreciate the dusty situation, which prevails every year, and vote means wherewith to extinguish at least the dust, if nothing more.
   - NECESSITY.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/23/1891.



Weather.This week has been fickle and tantalizing weather. Every morning it would cloud up, and you would almost sweat it would rain before night. But "nixie!" No rain yet. Meantime "we live, and move, and have our being," in - dust. Lafayette Advertiser 5/23/1891.

 Last Friday evening time seemed to turn backward in its flight, and frost hovered around for three or four days. Though unseasonably cool it was, we have yet heard of any injury to crops or gardens, as suffered in less fortunate places. Laf. Adv. 5/26/1894.

 In consequence of the North wind during the first part of the week, and the hot sun in combination, the ground dried very rapidly and for a while dust was plentiful. We hear that the sprinkler will shortly begin to roll and it is to be hoped residents of the town will avail themselves of it generally.  Laf. Adv. 5/26/1894.




Planters Happy. - Accounts from every corner of the parish go to show that planters are satisfied with the crop prospect. The rain on last Saturday and Sunday was of immense benefit and in consequence every one is happy. The cool nights of late no doubt retarded the growth of cotton without doing any material injury. Lafayette Advertiser 5/27/1882.


 Many of our young folks have taken advantage of the fine moonlit nights we are having, for evening promenades. Laf. Adv. 5/27/1893



We need rain badly. Several days during the past week have been the most disagreeable of the season, the strong winds filling the air with clouds of dust. How long, oh Lord, how long must we suffer from these dust clouds, before our people are awake to the necessity of sprinkling our streets.?
Laf. Adv. 6/3/1893

The weather the past week has been extremely coquettish. Each morning it would mist and cloud, and give every promise of rain, only to be dissipated by bright sunshine and a pleasant West wind. The report from the parish at large is that the cotton that is up is doing fairly well, but corn, potatoes and vegetables are withering fast, though a good rain just at present would save a majority of the crops. Since the above was written, Thursday afternoon we had a splendid shower, though it did not continue half long enough. It was general throughout the parish, and did a vast amount of good.
Laf. Adv. 6/8/1889.



 Showers of rain in and around town of late have exerted a very refreshing effect on the atmosphere.
Laf. Adv. 6/9/1894







Thunder showers  have been welcomed during the week.
  Laf. Adv. 6/10/1899

 

At Mount Carmel. - The entertainment given at the Mount Carmel Convent last Wednesday evening, was partly a disappointment, so far as attendance was concerned, which was owing to the inclemency of the weather, a heavy storm began to approach just before the hour for opening preventing many from reaching the entertainment. There were a number, however, who braved the weather despite its threatening aspect, and the attendance was, after all, a very fair one. The exercises were creditably rendered and the program was interesting. The prize for the most popular young lady pupil, was a main feature of the evening, being awarded to Miss Florence McKeun. The flower hill was especially pretty and unique. The young ladies and Sisters of the Convent have every cause to congratulate themselves on the pleasing character and success of their entertainment.
On account of the unfavorable weather existing on last Wednesday evening, and more especially to satisfy the wishes of a good number of persons, the sisters of Mount Carmel Convent will will repeat their entertainment of that evening.


 The admission fee will be reduced to 50cts. for reserved seats, and 25cts. for general admission. The date of the entertainment is set for Thursday June 25th. at 8 o'clock. Tickets for sale at the Advertiser Office.
Amounts of Contest.
Miss F. McKeun.....$44.90
Miss B. Judice.....$37.78
Miss C. Duplantis.....$29.90
Miss A. Deffez.....$10.40.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/13/1896.



Local showers of rain in various parts of the parish this week have produced very beneficial effects on the crops. Laf. Adv. 6/13/1903



Heavy showers of rain fell throughout the parish Sunday and Monday.
  Laf. 6/14/1890.
 
Last Sunday, June 8th, was the day sacred to St. Medard. According to the popular legend, if it rains on that day it will rain each day for forty days. It did rain on that day, and it seems that we are in for it. However, the crops in our parish have been well worked and are out of the grass. Laf. Adv. 6/14/1890

 

Rains. - The recent rain has generally benefited the growing crops. The corn crop in some portions of the parish suffered materially from the drought, but nevertheless there will be a large crop harvested. The cotton crop throughout the parish is doing well and promises a fair yield. Taken altogether our farmers have had but little cause to complain up to this time, and we sincerely wish, that their hopes of an abundant harvest may be realized this fall.  Lafayette Advertiser 6/14/1879.


Heavy Rains.

 The past week has been but the continuation of the preceding ones, the heavy rains have been pouring an almost incessant for the last thirty or more days, our country is flooded, the bayou Vermilion has swollen into a turbid rolling tide sweeping over its banks and flooding the riparian proprietors, and the smallest stream of our prairies is either unseen in the boundless expanse of water covering the face of the country, or foaming and bounding within its contracting but deep laid bed, bidding caution to the traveler. Our roads have become almost impracticable, and but few of our country citizens are able to come to town. The crops are greatly damaged, particularly the corn crop which has been totally destroyed on many places ;  and the cotton crop, should the rain cease now, would only promise a one-third yield, provided we have no caterpillars this year. Never in the course of our experience have we witnessed such heavy and continuous rains, and we must exclaim, "Enough, enough, mighty Jove, thou hast plentifully quenched the thirst of our parched fields."
Lafayette Advertiser 6/14/1873.     


Drought Finally Broken.

The weather the past week has been all that could be desired for the crops.

 The rains set in last Saturday, and we have had showers every day since. These extended over the parish, except in the regions about Carencro, Scott and Duson, where they only got a few sprinklings up to Thursday, when a soaking rain relieved the distress and gladdened their hearts. Lafayette will yet make an average showing a the outcome of the crops. 


 The recent rains have been a wonderful help to the blackberry patches, and the berries now ripening are large and plump. The little pickers can fill their buckets a heap quicker. Our devil has gained ten pounds within the past week. Laf. Adv. 6/15/1889.


Disagreeably Hot Weather.

 The weather is getting disagreeably warm and many of our people think of hiding themselves to a cooler clime. In a recent conversation with one of our local ticket agents we were told that more than twenty tickets would be sold her of the Pan American Exposition at Buffalo and inquiries are daily made at the office for rates and information for many other places. The Summer exodus will be larger this year than ever before and though many think of travelling to distant States. Several families will enjoy the delightful places on the Gulf coast. Lafayette Advertiser 6/15/1901.


A Copious Rain. - A copious rain fell Friday throughout the parish with the exception of a small strip north of Carencro, relieving a drought of nearly four weeks. The corn and especially the cotton and cane were beginning to show the effects of the lack of moisture. The rain Friday, however, was in good time. Laf. Adv. 6/15/1904.



 

A beneficial rain has fallen throughout the parish greatly relieving our farmers of the anxiety caused by the prolonged drought.
 Laf. Adv. 6/17/1889.


 Crops.- The crops of the Parish, though belated, are as promising as can be expected, and the bright expectations sometime ago indulged in by us and our people, bid fair to be fully realized. The cotton, corn, cane and other produce of the Parish cannot be in a more cheering and growing condition, the employer and employee work together with such concert of action, that should there be no unfortunate mishap in the course of the year, we will again be able to enjoy a little of the ante-bellum peace and prosperity.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/19/1869.



 We had a fair rain in Lafayette on Sunday evening, the 14th, and several sprinkles since. The streets are free of dust, which makes things pleasant, but water is a scarcity in town. Laf. Adv. 6/20/1891

 The frequent showers during the week, although not as heavy as desired, have done a great deal of good. We are hopeful yet of good crops.

Laf. Adv. 6/20/1891

 We had the pleasure of a visit Thursday morning from Mr. Antoine Guidry. He reports that a good refreshing rain fell in his neighborhood last Monday.
Laf. Adv. 6/20/1891



Crops and Suggestions. - The constant and unprecedented rains that have fallen for nearly two months past, have seriously damaged the prospects of the crops in this section of the country. During this time, farming operations have been almost entirely suspended and grass and weeds have flourished with more than usual luxuriance. Much of the corn is entirely lost and even under the most favorable circumstances and the devoting of much attention and labor, we estimate the probable yield of corn, at less than one-half of what they might have been. Vegetables and other products have suffered to a proportionate extent.

 The season has been very discouraging and vexations.
   Lafayette Advertiser 6/21/1873.

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