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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

***EARLY LAFAYETTE TOWN MARKET

A Market for Lafayette.
 

 In our last issue, we were contemplating for the organization of a firemen company, as an indispensable thing that we were in need of. We hope that steps have been or will be taken, to organize same.

 Today, we present to our readers, another necessity, that we ought to have, verily we don't see how we can get along without it.


 Our City needs a Central Market, where all the necessary eatables, which are indispensable to the subsistence of the human body could be found.


 It may be that we shall raise a (unreadable words) storm of objections (unreadable words) plan is tried, we shall be the center of all speaking flying deadly tongued arrows; but an editor's path, is not always strewn with roses and surely there couldn't be any exception in our favor.


 What advantages could a Central Market afford us? They are many. First, if acknowledged by all competent persons, that besides sanitation, pure food is conducive to good health. Now, we don't suppose that anyone is selling us adulterated food, and yet the writer of this article has seen on our streets a few days ago, a milk wagon, bearing the inscription "Pure milk." Is there any other kind of milk sold in our City, but pure milk?

 Second, in having a central place to buy our vegetables, our meats, our milk, this going about from house to house would be stopped. It is a fact that, a visit of the cook to the market, would become necessary to supply the family; but, what would be considered as inconvenient would be gained in better prices.


 Competition would bring the prices down,  and the one man business would be over. Third, the farmers would have a place to sell their products, and what would be lost to them in prices, would be gained (unreadable word"s" ) and to the farmers time is (unreadable word).


 The city itself could erect this market,  as it is done in all other cities, could appoint a competent man, to inspect meats, milk and other edibles, so that none but food of the purest quality could be sold to our people; and from the renting of stalls and other privileges, the city could increase its revenues.


 We only suggest this innovation, but it seems to us, that it could be readily executed, without any great expense to the tax-payers, an in return it would be of an incalculable benefit to the inhabitants.


 Let us have our market.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/15/1898.









CITY COUNCIL.Lafayette, La. Feb. 3, 1901.

Among other business.... The waterworks and electric light committee reported that the pipes for work ordered at last meeting were on the ground and work would be started as soon as weather permitted, also poles for extension of lights had been ordered.

A petition signed by more than one-third of the property tax-payers of this town, asking that a special election be ordered to take the sense of the property tax-payers of this town upon a proposition to levy special taxes for public improvements therein named, was presented to the Council and read, and thereupon the following ordinance was unanimously adopted:

 AN ORDINANCE, Ordering a special election in accordance with Act 131 of the Acts of the Legislature of this State of the year 1898, and Article 232 of the Constitution, at which there shall be submitted to the property tax-payer of the incorporated town of Lafayette, La., entitled to vote under the general election laws of said State, the question of levying special aggregating five mills on the dollar per annum on the assessed valuation of property therein for a period of twenty-five years beginning with the first day of January 1902, and the issuance of bonds thereon for the following purposes to-wit:

1. To procure grounds and buildings for a first-class, modern High School.

 2. The extension of the water mains of said town, and for the extension of the electric light system therein.

 3. To procure ground and building for a first-class public market house.

 4. To call in and redeem outstanding bonds for the sum of thirty thousand dollars bearing six per cent annual interest issued under Act 90 of the Acts of the Legislature of this  State of 1896, to obtain a present water and light system of this town, said outstanding bonds to be replaced by five per cent bonds with greater length of time for redemption ;  said tax being set forth in detail in the body of this ordinance, and said election being ordered in conformity with the petition of more than one-third of the property tax-payers of said town, same being hereto annexed and made part hereof; and providing further for the mode of holding said election, making returns thereof, etc.

 Section 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, La., in regular session convened that a special election is hereby ordered and shall be held in said town of Lafayette, La., on Thursday, April 3, 1902, at which election there shall be held in said town of Lafayette, La., on Thursday, April 3, 1902, at which election there shall be submitted to the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette entitled to vote under the general election laws of the State, the question of levying the following special taxes to-wit:

 1. To procure grounds and buildings for a first-class modern High School for white children in said town, a special tax of one mill and half on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property in said town, on which tax bonds shall be issued for the sum of $24,000.

 2. For the extension of the water  mains and electric light system of said town, a special tax of one mill on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property in said town, upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $14,000.

 3. To procure the ground and building for a first-class public market-house a special tax of one-half of one mill on the dollar upon the valuation of property aforesaid shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $12,000.

 4. To retire and replace the outstanding bonds issued under Act 90 of 1896 for the present water and light system and special tax of two mills on the dollar of the assessed valuation of property in said town and upon which bond shall be issued for the sum of $30,000; there being submitted at one and the same time to said tax-payers the question of issuing bonds for the amounts hereinabove set forth in order to render said special taxes available by obtaining the money for immediate use; said election being ordered in conformity in all respects with the petition of more than one-third of the property tax-payers of said town hereto annexed and made part of this ordinance; said taxes are to be levied and collected according to law and the terms of this ordinance, and said petition of property tax-payers being in words and figures as follows, to-wit:

 To the Honorable Mayor and members of the City Council of Lafayette, La.

 We, the undersigned property tax-payers of the corporation of Lafayette, Louisiana, being and constituting one-third of the total number of property tax-payers of said town, entitled to vote under the provisions of the State constitution, respectfully show that the following described public improvements are urgent public necessities in said town, to-wit:

 1. Grounds and buildings for a first-class modern High School (for white children), requiring not less than $24,000.

 2. The extension of the water mains of said town, for the extinguishing of fire and other purposes, and also the extension of the electric light system for additional street lights and for private lighting, requiring not less than $14,000.

 3. Ground and building for a first-class public market-house, requiring not less than $12,000.

 And petitioners further show that there are outstanding $30,000 of six per cent bonds issued under Act number 90 of the acts of the Legislature of 1896, to obtain the present water and light system of this town, and that it is to the best interest of said town that the said bonds should be called in and replaced by five per cent bonds with a greater length of time for redemption;

 Wherefore, we respectfully petition your honorable body to order a special election in said town of Lafayette, Louisiana, under the constitution and laws of the State, for the purpose of a ascertaining and determining whether or not it is the sense and desire of the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette, that special taxes based upon the assessed valuation of property of said town according to the official rolls, be assessed, levied and collected for twenty-five years, beginning with the year 1902, at the rates and for the purposes hereinafter set forth, upon which tax, and the public faith and credit of said town, negotiable bonds shall be issued by the City Council of said town, in such denominations as may be found convenient, bearing five per cent, per annum interest (interest payable annually) payable in twenty-five years with right to call in the same as said tax is collected. And the rates of said taxes and the purposes of which they are levied and intended, and said bonds issued, are now declared to be as follows:

 1. To procure grounds and buildings for a first-class, modern public High School in said town, a special tax of one and one-half (1-1/2) mills on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property aforesaid shall be levied and collected, on which tax bonds shall be issued for the sum of $24,000.

 2. For the extension of the water mains and electric light system as herein set forth, a special tax of one (1) mill on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property aforesaid, shall  be levied and collected, upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $14,o00.

 3. To procure the ground and building for a first-class, public market-house, a special tax of one-half (1/2) of one mill on the dollar upon the valuation of property aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $12,000.

 4. To retire and replace the outstanding bonds issued under Act. 90 of 1896 for the present water and light system, a special tax of two (2) mills on the dollar of the assessed valuation aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of $30,000.

 All of which taxes shall be levied and collected and said bonds issued for the time and in the manner as hereinabove set forth, and the title to said improvements shall lie in said municipality, and subject to the control of the City Council, and said bonds shall not be sold for less than par.

 Moreover the net revenue derived from the operation of said public market shall be used to pay said $12,000 of bonds, which shall be distinguished from the other bonds described in this petition; and in case of necessity that the City Council shall have the power to expropriate ground for said improvements, upon the payment of just and reasonable compensation to the owner.

 And we further petition that said propositions be submitted to the qualified voters at said election, in such manner that the voter may vote separately on each "for" or "against," as he may desire.

 (Signed):  Wm. Campbell, Wm. Clegg, Orther C. Mouton, Chas. O. Mouton, F. Demanade, Chas. D. Caffery, J. G. Parkerson, S. R. Parkerson, Jno. Whittington, N. P. Moss, F. V. Mouton, J. C. Nickerson, Julien Mouton, Louis Lacoste, Homer Mouton, F. E. Davis, Victor Levy, Frank F. Moss, D. L. Caffery, Albert Delahoussaye, H. H. Hohorst, Sidney J. Veazey, E. Mouisset, John Vigneaux, Geo. A. DeBlanc, B. J. Pellerin, R. C. Greig, A. T. Caillouet, John O. Mouton, W. J. Mouton, L. F. Rigues, J. Alfred Mouton, Sidney Mouton, C. M. Parkerson, H. C. Salles, J. A. Roy, Jules J. Mouton, J. A. Landry, F. R. Tolson, B. Falk, F. E. Girard, F. H. Mouton, F. K. Hopkins, J. J. Davidson, Isaac Plonsky, A. J. LeBlanc, Mrs. E. Constantin, Gaston Veazey,  J. B. Vandergriff, F. C. Triay, L. J. Serrett, People's Cotton Oil Co. per T. M. B. G. M., Leopold Lacoste, Anaize Courquet, Marte Courquet, Minor Meriwether, J. F. Mouton, T. M. Biossat, Levy Bros., V. Levy & Co., Wm. and Mose Levy,  W. A. Broussard, T. B. Hopkins Jr., for Lafayette Drug Co., C. H. Melchert, J. R. Domengeaux, Mrs. J. S. Whittington, Miss Mary Whittington per Mrs. J. S. Whittington, Miss Mary Whittington per Mrs. J. S. W., Crow Girard, Mrs. M. E. Girard per C. D. B., Mrs. Beraud, Felix O. Broussard, B. F. Anderson, Mrs. L. M. Creighton X her mark; witness C. D. C., B. Miller, L. Hirsch, Chas. Debaillon, Thomas Mouton, Frank H. Clark, Alfred A. Bonnet, M. Rosenfield, E. Pefferkorn, A. Prudhomme & Co. per A. Prudhomme,  T. A. McFaddin, Mrs. W. D. Huff, O. B. Hopkins, G. A. Martin M. D., S. E. Yandle, P. Krauss, F. Schmulen, H. Van der Cruyssen, P. M. Girard, Joseph Dauriac, A. B. Denbo, F. E. Voorhies, A. A. Mouton, James Hannen, Miss Ida Mouton, Mrs. Estelle Monnier, Suc. of A. J. Moss per N. P. Moss, G. Joseph, T. D. Coleman, P. H. Bailey, C. Debaillon, (reserving the right to vote against the public market.) A. and M. Debaillon, per M. Debaillon, J. T. Allingham, Mrs. Ant. Guidry, Thos. B. Hopkins, Mrs. Odeide Mouton, Paul Demanade, Levi O. Emes, Abraham Amuny, C. S. Babin, Louis Chopin, I. A. Brousssard, William Hane, Mrs. C. Homer Mouton, Mrs. J. G. Parkerson, Philip Mouton, F. H. Gregory, Aug. Bourgeois, Joseph C. Breaux, Jos. A.  Lacoste,  Mrs. T. Hebert Jr., Arthur Bonnet, Moss & Co. per A. R. M. L. Monnier, Mrs. James Higginbotham, Mrs. W. Tanner, Miss Nydia Campbell, W. J. Shows, Voorhies & Hopkins, F. B. Thompson, J. W. Clifford, C. C. Mabry, Chas. C. Weir, Marie Julie Mouton, Hyman Plonsky, D. V. Gardebled, Dr. J. L. Duhart, Miss Amelie Guyot, C. H. Lusted, J. M. Cunningham, Raoul Guidry, C. D. Boudreaux, (Mrs.) L. Domengeaux, W. V. Nicholson, J. Nickerson, Mrs. Geo. Babcock (Mrs. M. P. Young), Mrs. Adele Cornay, Mrs. H. Landry, Mrs. S. B. Kahn, (Rose), R. J. Tanner, Paul Castel, A. Mouton, J. B. Coumes, E. P. Broussard, Pierre Guchereau, H. Gankendorff, A. Courtnay, B. J. Donlon, Jules O. Dugas, Mathilde Gardner, C. C. Higginbotham, Jacob Bachert, W. J. Riu, Mouton Bros., R. B. Raney, Mrs. L. F. Rigues, Arthur Couret, O. J. Mouton, L. Turpin, Hector Prejean, Leonce Gladu, Couret & Patin Fur. Co., M. Patin, Mrs. J. Alfred Mouton, A. Degrez, Alicia Dugas, (Mrs. Horace Broussard) Mrs. C. P. Alpha, (Mrs. Alcee) Celimene Mouton, Mrs. Clet LeBlanc, Ed. G. Voorhies, Mme. Paul Castel, C. Trahan, Mrs. O. C. Mouton, M. Mouton.

 Lafayette, La., Feb. 3, 1902. - I, the undersigned, Assessor M. Martin, Assessor of the parish of Lafayette, La., after a careful examination of the assessment rolls of the town of Lafayette, La., of the year 1901, do herby certify that the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette whose names are signed to the foregoing petition constitute more than one third of the property tax-payers of said town.

 Witness my official signature this Feb. 3, 1902.
                       A. M. MARTIN,
                                     Assessor.
Laf. Advertiser 2/15/1902.


 
A number of ladies have already approved the erection of a public market. They reason that their husbands are such poor judges in the culinary art that they will have a chance to buy the necessities and edibles for a good dinner without having to trot all over town and then not get, oftentimes, what they want. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.
























We Need A Market-House. - There should be a market house in Lafayette. It would not only be a great convenience to gardeners, but would encourage this industry. The town people would not have to depend on hucksters for their country produce, fruit, etc., if we had a market, but could go and select what they wish. As it is now is the gardener and farmer does not know what to do with his produce unless he peddles it and the town people never know what they will be able to get until the morning, with its string of peddlers. A building for this purpose would not cost much and could doubtless be rented to a good advantage. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1895.



A PUBLIC FISH AND MEAT MARKET.


 Does Lafayette want to move forward? If we read aright the minds of its citizens they would at all times welcome innovations by the city fathers that could be looked upon as public improvements. If an innovation can be utilized as a source of public revenue at the same time that it contributes to the comfort and convenience of the residents of a community, it is to be regarded as doubly desirable. Can any one deny that a public market-place in Lafayette would prove of inestimable value to the community?


 Aside from the great convenience to the people that would be afforded by a bringing together for their inspection and accommodation the meat and fish intended for their daily consumption, it it not advisable, from a sanitary stand point, to place under police surveillance premises where are kept on sale food matter subjected to composition. Proper regulations to insure the utmost cleanliness would be adopted and enforced to correct the disagreeable and unwholesome odors that almost always emanate from private fish and meat markets scattered indiscriminately about the town, especially during the hot months. We commend to our city council a serious consideration of this subject as it is to be regarded by them not so much in the light of a public convenience as public requirement.    Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.
 

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