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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

***EARLY LAFAYETTE MEDICALCARE/DOCTORS


Sanitarium Association Elects Officers.
 The Lafayette Sanitarium Association organized last week, elected the following gentlemen the compose the first Board of Directors: Dr. F. R. Tolson, Dr. J. F. Mouton, Dr. L. O. Clark, Dr. N. P. Moss, and Mr. A. E. Mouton chairman, and Dr. Moss secretary and treasurer of the Board.


 The site which has been selected for the sanitarium is the vacant lot at the rear of the First National Bank, this lot being owned by Dr. N. P. Moss. The location is a very central one and faces the west side of the Gordon Hotel. The close proximity to the hotel besides being of business advantage will also make it possible for the sanitarium and other valuable conveniences at a much more moderate cost than if these conveniences had to be provided separately for the sanitarium.

 The Board of Directors will lose no time in building, and the work of construction may soon be in the full enjoyment of a modern sanitarium conducted along the most approved lines. Lafayette Advertiser 1/3/1906.


Dr. H. P. Beeler received Wednesday a handsome new dentist's chair.
Laf. Advertiser 1/3/1903.



Moving to Lafayette. - Dr. Henri Ducrocq, of Lafourche Crossing will shortly move to Lafayette and engage in the practice of his profession. Mrs. Ducrocq is now visiting her parents Dr. and Mrs. J. D. Trahan. 
Laf. Gazette 1/3/1906.




The many friends of Dr. H. M. Neblett will be grieved to learn of his suffering from a stroke of paralysis, which has deprived him of speech, and affected his right side. He is at the home of his daughter, Mrs. F. F. Carter.
Laf. Adv. 1/4/1905.



After spending several days in New Orleans, Dr. F. E. Girard returned to Lafayette Thursday. Laf. Gaz. 1/4/1902.

Tuesday night Arthur Martin's right hand was seriously injured by the accidental discharge of a large fire-cracker. Three fingers were completely severed from the hand and it is feared the thumb will have to be amputated. The wound is necessarily very painful. Laf. Gaz. 1/4/1902.


Suicide of Mr. Dees.

 E. H. Dees, of Lake Charles, committed suicide at 7 o'clock yesterday morning in the his room at the Crescent Hotel by shooting himself through the head with a 38 calibre Smith and Wesson. Mr. Dees had been stopping at the hotel since the first of January, having come to Lafayette to perfect arrangements to take charge of the Vordenbaumen lumber yard. At about 7 o'clock the noise of a pistol shot was heard by the people and steps were at once taken to ascertain from which room it emanated. Upon opening the door of Mr. Dees' room a ghastly sight was disclosed. The dead body of Mr. Dees was lying on the bed, partly leaning against the head-board, holding in the right hand a revolver with the finger still on the trigger. The bullet entered just above the right ear and found exit, as near as could be ascertained a little lower on the other side of the head.

 A few minutes before a servant had brought him some coffee which he drank, as was evidenced by an empty cup which was on a table near the bed.

 The people about the hotel had noticed that the unfortunate man was somewhat melancholy and had very little to say, but so sensational an occurrence was not in the least expected. The night before he had sent word that he was unwell and would eat no supper.

 Mr. Dees was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and daughter at Lake Charles. He was about to move to this town with his family. His wife is a Miss Mayo, a daughter of Hon. Thad. Mayo, of Lake Charles. Lafayette Gazette 1/4/1896.   


Dr. Fred Mayer was shaking hands with his Lafayette friends this week.

Laf.  Gaz. 1/4/1896.



Last Wednesday night a party of young people called at the hospitable home of Dr. and Mrs. J. D. Trahan to pay their respects to them and their charming daughters Misses Stella and Haydee and to wish them a most happy and prosperous new year. Among the number were Misses Alix and Louise Judice, Anita Hohorst and Zerelda Bailey, and Messrs. V. D. Gardebled, J. Comeaux, Alfred and Sidney Mouton, Raoul Gentil, J. P. LeBesque, George Richard, Felix Girard, Ned and Felix Mouton. The compliments of the season over, the young folk proceeded to amuse themselves to their hearts content, and only when the hour of midnight was reached did they bid their kind hosts good night, and retired gay and happy. Laf. Adv. 1/4/1890.


 Dr. J. P. Francez and Messrs. Galbert Guilbeau and Saul Broussard, of Carencro, were in town Thursday. Laf. Adv. 1/5/1901.



Dr. C. G. Salles, Specialist of Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. Will treat patients at residence until office if completed. Laf. Advertiser 1/10/1903.





It Was Loaded, Too.

 It was stated last week that young Lilian DeLahoussaye was shot in the face with a toy pistol loaded with a blank cartridge. It has since been ascertained that such was not the case. The cartridge contained birdshot, one of which lodged near the eye, but fortunately caused no serious injury. Children caught shooting loaded cartridges ought to be religiously spanked by their parents. Lafayette Gazette 1/5/1901.


Dr. Fred J. Mayer of the Mississippi quarantine station, was in our town several days this week, where he always finds a hearty welcome.
Laf. Adv. 1/5/1895.


Freight Conductor Tom Hebert received painful injuries to one of his hands one day this week whilst giving an object lesson in car-coupling to an inexperienced brakeman. Dr. Martin dressed his hand and pronounced the injuries not serious. Laf. Adv. 1/5/1895.



 We are pleased to state that Louise, Mr. Felix Begnaud's little child who was burned about the chest and face last Friday night, is doing very well and is out of danger. Laf. Gaz. 1/5/1895.



DEADLY TRAIN DE-RAILMENT

 
On Friday afternoon, Dec. 28th, the California express, on the Texas and Pacific railroad, was derailed at a plantation switch a few miles north of Vachere station, about forty-eight miles from New Orleans. The accident was caused by some cold-blooded villain who had broken the switch lock, thrown the switch, and twisted the signal as as to make appear to be right. The engineer, Will Alexander, saw the danger too late to avert the catastrophe, but he had just time to put on the air brakes and reverse the lever before the shock came and he lay prisoner beneath his engine. The baggage and mail coaches were also overturned. Before assistance could be rendered to the struggling engineer the drumhead of the boiler exploded and the poor fellow was literally boiled to death. The baggage master was considerably bruised, but no one else on the train was injured. Mr. Alexander was considered to be the fastest and best engineer on the road, and by his fearlessness while at his post had earned him the sobriquet of Wild Bill. He had been married but little more than a year to a daughter of Col. John C. Dowty, of North Louisiana. He was head of the Division of the Brotherhood of Locomotive engineers of New Orleans.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1889



We regret to learn of an unfortunate shooting affair which occurred at Broussardville the day following Christmas. While engaged in a dispute Mr. Joseph Anselet shot Mr. Nicolas Delahoussaye, of St. Martin parish, through the cheeks. We were glad to hear that Mr. Delahoussaye is in a fair way to recovery. Mr. Anselet, as the wound is not fatal, will undoubtedly be admitted to bail. Laf. Adv. 1/5/1889.



LET US ENTERTAIN THEM.

The State Medical Association, composed of leading physicians from all over the State, paid Lafayette the compliment of selecting it as the next place of meeting, which will take place in May, but information has just been received that the Association has decided not to meet here, having been given to understand that Lafayette is not in a position to entertain them. This is to be regretted, but is not beyond mending, as we are informed that the Association has not yet chosen any other place, and if we choose to make the effort we can still secure it. And we should make the effort, for Lafayette can not afford to let this pass by. Conventions are most excellent things for progressive towns, and their value is realized. New Orleans never permits a convention to pass it by, if it can possibly be secured, and is fast becoming known as the convention city. Lafayette could well pattern after New Orleans in this matter, and should do it, for we are well located, have the railroad facilities, a beautiful hall in the Industrial School auditorium, and a country and town worth showing. Lafayette is rapidly pushing forward, and in order to continue its development, must have outsiders of means and character come in and join in the movement. To accomplish this, we must, among other things, become sociable, invite people here and entertain them, and this is a most excellent opportunity. Besides to entertain such a representative body as the State Medical Association should be considered a high privilege.

And The Advertiser believes that the people here will take pleasure in doing it, and would suggest to the members of the local Medical Association that they appoint a citizen committee to wait upon our citizens at once, for we feel sure they will receive all the encouragement necessary. We just can not afford to let the Association meet elsewhere; it would be a reflection upon our progressiveness and a reproach to our hospitality. Lafayette Advertiser 1/6/1904




Badly Cut.
 Mr. Chas. Lusted, Sr., while returning home from a supper given by the local lodge K. of P. was assaulted by a negro on horseback and dangerously cut Friday morning about 1 o'clock. A few minutes after the occurrence a negro on horseback rode up to Mr. Ben Schmalinski, who was standing on the corner at the Moss Pharmacy, and grabbed his hat. Mr. Schmalinski fired twice at him, but missed. Later the negro was arrested by officer Campbell in Octave Bertrand's plantation, and lodged in jail. The negro is supposed to be the same who cut Mr. Lusted.   Lafayette Advertiser 1/6/1904. 



Dr. H. C. Salles left Sunday for New Orleans with his son, Paul, who will resume his studies at Jefferson College. Laf. Adv. 1/6/1904.


We are glad to state that Master Wartell Salles, who was injured by an explosion of powder Saturday evening, is not hurt much, the injury being trifling. Laf. Adv. 1/6/1904.




Serious Accident.
 On Monday last while returning home from town, Mr. and Mrs. Erqest Olivier, were the victims of a serious accident. They were driving home in a buggy, leading another horse and the latter, in some unaccountable way got one of his feet caught in a wheel, and over went the buggy, resulting in Mrs. Olivier having an arm broken in two places and otherwise bruised, and Mr. Olivier being pretty badly shook up. Dr. Hopkins attended Mrs. Olivier who we hear is progressing reasonably well.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/6/1894.


At their suburban retreat near the brick-yard on Wednesday last a lot of tramps thought to vary the monotony by a little free fight, resulting in one of them being laid out by a brick bat coming in contact with his head. He was attended by Dr. Martin. Lafayette Advertiser 1/6/1894.



Master John Tolson left last week accompanied by his father Dr. F. R. Tolson, to enter the University at Baton Rouge. The young man was admitted after passing a successful examination. Laf. Adv. 1/7/1899.


BAD ACCIDENT.
 Crowley, La. -- The Southern Pacific depot was the scene of a sad and horrible accident about noon Monday. The Gueydan train had just arrived and was discharging its passengers. Among them was Mrs. W. S. Gault and her two little children, from Morse Station. Mrs. Gault had descended with her youngest child and was reaching to lift the oldest one, a little girl Ethel, about four years old, to the ground when the train moved, unbalancing the child and throwing her legs beneath the cars. The wheels passed over her left arm, crushing and severing it below the knee. Fortunately, Drs. J. F. and N. B. Morris were present and gave the little child quick medical attention, and notwithstanding the loss of arm and leg, it is standing the ordeal nobly and doing well. The mother received a slight contusion on the head and was miraculously saved from the greater injury by a bystander, who caught her as she was herself falling between the cars. The train was in charge of Conductor Smith and Engineer Dolan. Lafayette Gazette 1/7/1899.



RECENT MILK INSPECTION.
Moss Pharmacy in Technical Violation.

La. State Health Car Coming to Lafayette in February.

 Dr. Hamilton P. Jones, state food commissioner, who addressed the Farmers' club Saturday on modern dairying methods, especially the sanitary side, in a conversation with an Advertiser reporter spoke of the milk inspection here several weeks ago, and stated that since he had arrived in Lafayette and got full particulars of the taking of the sample of milk from the Moss Pharmacy (Mr. Davis having voluntarily given the inspector a sample with the request to analyze it), that if those particulars had been in his possession at the time the samples were analyzed, no affidavit would probably have been made. While the Moss Pharmacy was guilty of technical violation of the law, and was justly fined for having unadulterated milk in their possession, it is always his practice and desire to prosecute the man who does the adulterating. However, he thought the crusade did much good.

 He also stated that the Health car would be in Lafayette early in February and advised that the town should thoroughly clean up in preparation for the visit, so as to avoid any humiliating exposure, as the officials, would certainly publish the conditions found here. Dr. Jones then complimented Lafayette by saying that it was a nice town. Lafayette Advertiser 1/10/1911.

   
Death of Dr. Neblett.

 Dr. Henry M. Neblett, who has for several years past been a resident of Lafayette, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. F. F. Carter, Wednesday morning in the 67th year of his age.

 Dr. Neblett was born in Petersburg, Va., in 1838. He studied at the University of Virginia and completed his course in medicine at Jefferson College, Philadelphia graduating in 1861. The same year he enlisted in the Confederate service as assistant surgeon of the Ninth Virginia Cavalry. He served throughout the war, was twice wounded and was taken prisoner once, being confined at Johnston Island five weeks. After the war he returned to Virginia where he practiced his profession until 1868, when he moved to St. Martin parish and took charge of his father's plantation. He resided in St. Martin until within a few years ago, when on account of enfeebled health he came here to reside with his daughter, Mrs. F. F. Carter.

 Dr. Neblett was well known to the people of Lafayette and had won the esteem of all those who knew him intimately. He was man of strong character and fine intellect and always took an active part in the material well being of his adopted State and parish. His remains were laid to rest in the Protestant cemetery Wednesday afternoon. Lafayette Advertiser 1/11/1905.


Young Henry Voorhies Better. - We are glad to report that young Henry Voorhies, who was wounded in the eye Christmas, has good chances of having his sight preserved. The young man is still in New Orleans, at the home of his uncle, Dr. Robert Voorhies.   
Laf. Gazette 1/12/1901.


Police Jury 1/3/1901.
Messrs. J. O. Broussard and D. A. Cochrane representing the Board of Health appeared and asked that the Jury engage the services of the president of the Board of Health and parish physician at a stated salary, say $600 per annum; the said parish physician to attend to all cases of contagious or infectious diseases occurring in the parish and performing all other duties incumbent upon such officer by law. Action on the proposition was postponed the Jury reserving the right to accept. Lafayette Gazette 1/12/1901.



 Mr. T. M. Biossat and Dr. F. E. Girard were in New Orleans during the week.
Lafayette Gazette 1/12/1901.

Miss Estelle Mouton has recovered from a slight attack of Lagrippe and is again attending to business at Levy Bros. Laf. Adv. 1/12/1901.



ACCIDENT AT MOUTON SWITCH.

When the east-bound passenger train reached Mouton switch yesterday evening it ran against a young negro boy who was going over the crossing on horseback. Some parties, who saw that the train was dangerously near, told the boy not to cross, but he insisted upon doing so and was struck by the locomotive. He sustained painful injuries and his horse was instantly killed. Conductor Kelley who was in charge of the train, secured the services of Dr. Haas, a passenger, who examined the boy and said that his injuries were not of a serious nature. Witnesses to the accident say that the boy's escape was most miraculous. Lafayette Gazette 1/12/1895.


Mayor Campbell has been confined to his room with sickness for several days, but we learn that is better and will soon be up and about.
Laf. Gaz. 1/12/1895.


Dr. Girard. - The bad state of his health has constrained Dr. Felix Girard to abandon for a time the exactions of professional duties in New Orleans and seek rest and a change of air at the parental home in Lafayette. The Advertiser hopes for a rapid restoration of the young doctor's health. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/12/1895.


Arthur Bonnet was on the sick list one part of this week, but is alright again.
Laf. Adv. 1/12/1895.


Mayor Wm. Campbell was confined to his bed by illness, several days this week.
Laf. Adv. 1/12/1895.



Dr. Geo. W. Scranton and son, Gus., are spending some time in the Crescent City. Laf. Adv. 1/13/1904.




Our Public Roads.
 According to reports the public roads in this parish, with the exception of a stretch from the town to Pin Hook, are in a well nigh passable condition, and if one half the complaints we hear from the people reaches the ears of those charged with the maintenance of the highways the auricular appendages of those persons must tingle to a most painful degree.

 The people have a right to expect good public roads as their just dues, and that these should be permitted to assume their present disgraceful condition reflects in no complimentary way on the gentlemen who have accepted the onerous responsibility of maintaining the roads. As matters stand at present traffic is seriously obstructed and traveling generally, is accomplished only under the greatest difficulty and at considerable risk to limb, if not to life. We have been informed that some of our physicians had felt compelled to refuse calls lately, to go a long distance, on account of the dangerous conditions of the public roads, and the question is asked "How much longer is this going to last?" The situation is truly deplorable and calls for serious consideration. It cannot be possible that it is irremediable !  If not already known, a remedy should be devised and a vigorous application of it made at once. Necessity demands immediate action and THE ADVERTISER hopes to see present means, or better ones, employed without unnecessary delay, to bring about satisfactory correction of this great evil. The task may be an onerous and most ungrateful one, but it must be done. Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1894.

 Dr. Raoul Trahan, who has been "sawing bones" in the "charity hospital" for a month past, we are pleased to note is back at his post.
Laf. Gaz. 1/13/1894.



Dr. Girard Back. - The Gazette is informed that Dr. Felix Girard has rented the office near the bank and will practice his profession in Lafayette. We welcome Dr. Girard back to his old home and wish him much success. Laf. Gazette 1/26/1895. 


 The professional card of Dr. F. E. Girard appears in this issue of THE ADVERTISER. In locating in Lafayette Dr. Girard has yielded to the general desire of his medical friends of this section, and his residency here is to be regarded as a decided acquisition to the community. For a number of years Dr. Girard, filled with distinction, the office of resident physician of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital of New Orleans, and it was a quest of his health he came to this place a few weeks ago. It gives us pleasure to add that the doctor's health has materially improved since his arrival. Lafayette Advertiser 1/26/1895.


Dr. E. J. Chachere and family have lately returned to their former home in Algiers, La., the doctor having determined to resume the practice of his profession at that place. Laf. Adv. 2/3/1894.



Dr. G. A. Martin took his little daughter, Michael, to Grand Coteau Sunday to place her with the sisters to make her first Communion. She will probably remain till the end of the school session. Laf. Adv. 2/4/1904.

Dr. F. E. Girard, will soon have his new office near the court house where Mr. F. Simpson's house used to stand. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Dr. F. E. Girard is just recovering from a spell of lagrippe.
Laf. Adv. 2/8/1905


New received from the hospital at New Orleans is favorable to the complete recovery of B. H. Wilkins, who was sent there some time ago to be treated. Wilkins, it will be remembered, was struck on the head by Dan Keeshen during the month of December of last year. Laf. Adv. 2/8/1896


City Council Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La. Jan. 17th, 1901.
A Special meeting of the City Council was held this day. Mayor Chas. D. Caffery presiding, members present, C. O. Mouton, J. E. Martin, F. E. Girard, G. A. DeBlanc, F. Demanade, absent J. O. Mouton.

 The Resignation of Dr. F. E. Girard,  as health officer and member of Municipal Board of Health was read.

 Moved by G. A. DeBlanc seconded by J. E. Martin, that said resignation be accepted, carried.

 Moved by F. E. Girard seconded by H. Hohorst, that the Mayor appoint a committee of three to take care of a small pox case, adopted.

 Committee appointed by Mayor H. Hohorst, F. E. Girard and F. Demanade.

 Moved by C. O. Mouton seconded by G. A. DeBlanc that said committee be authorized to appoint a Physician to treat said small pox case, and have full power to act, in order to prevent the spread of infection, adopted.

 Moved by C. O. Mouton, seconded by G. A. DeBlanc, that the Council appoint a City Board of Health, adopted.

 The following named gentlemen, were appointed on said Board.

 Messrs. Wm. Clegg, Dr. J. D. Trahan, Dr. G. A. Martin, Dr. F. R. Tolson and Dr. N. P. Moss.

 Moved and duly seconded that a committee of two be appointed to notify the above Board of their appointment, adopted.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
   CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
   LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1901.

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Lafayette City Council.
Feb. 4th, 1901.

 A regular meeting of the City council was held this day.....

and among other business...

 Moved by G. A. DeBlanc, seconded by F. Demanade that the City employ at the rate of $20.00 per month subject to be used for whatever work there may be at hand, carried.

 Mr. C. O. Mouton reported having notified the members of the Board of Health of their appointments and all have refused to act as members of said Board.

 A communication from citizens and Taxpayers asking for an appropriation for a Colored school was presented to the Council.

 Moved and duly seconded that action on above communication be deferred to next regular meeting, carried.

 Moved by G. A. DeBlanc seconded by F. E. Girard, that action of the Council in rejecting Mr. J. C. Nickerson's bill for lumber be reconsidered, and that same be approved and warrant drawn for same Motion carried.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
  CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
  LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
  Laf. Advertiser 2/9/1901.






SUICIDE.
Paul D. St. Julien Takes His Life.

 While laboring under a fit of despondency, Paul D. St. Julien, aged 20 years a promising young medical student ended all of his earthly troubles by shooting himself through the brain with a .38 caliber Smith & Wesson revolver.

 The act was committed in the rear gallery room on the second floor of the boarding-house No. 238 Canal street where he has been boarding since the month of October, 1892, since which time he has been attending the Tulane medical lectures.

 The young man was born and raised at Broussardville, Lafayette parish, and is the son of a well known planter of that place. He was a bright and intelligent gentleman, and expected to graduate and become a doctor next April. When the suicide first came to this city and began his studies he secured as his room mate Mr. Gerasime Richard, of Sunset, St. Landry parish, who is also attending the medical lectures at the same college. As both of them had known each other since childhood, and were now on the verge of manhood and in the same class, they became inseparable friends. A short time ago St. Julien received a letter from his relatives stating that his father, intending coming here, and this seemed to please him very much, but a few days ago he suddenly became desponded, and his room mate quickly noticed the fact. He, however, said nothing to St. Julien about the matter, as he thought the sudden change might have been caused by his studies, but it was easily seen that he was laboring under some mental strain far more severe than his studies. His roommate cheered him up the best he could, but the young man could not be comforted in his troubles, and for three consecutive days he remained in the house. He would go to his meals, but would return without eating anything, and keep secluded in his room, apparently not wishing any consolation.

 On last Sunday Richard's cousin, James Richard, of Jennings, came to the city to participate in the carnival festivities and went to room with his cousin Gerasime. Yesterday evening about 5 o'clock James Richard noticed that St. Julien was acting in a very strange manner, but paid no particular attention to him. As Richard started to leave the room St. Julien called him and asked him if he would come back and Richard replied that he would and walked over to the dressing case where St. Julien was sitting on a chair. The latter then informed him that he was in trouble, but what it was he did not say. Richard advised him to go out and walk around and he would feel better, but this he declined to do.

 His roommate next came into the room and asked him if he was going to see the parade and he answered in the negative. As he complained of being cold, Richard had a fire made for him.

 At 6 o'clock when the supper bell rang St. Julien declined to go down stairs and his companion left the room with his cousin. After partaking of supper they went out to see the parade. After witnessing the procession and walking around the city they returned to the boarding house shortly before midnight and proceeded upstairs to their room.

 The door was partly open, while the lamp on the dressing case was burning dimly. As they attempted to push the door wide open they found that it met with an obstruction. They instantly looked in and were horrified to see young St. Julien lying on the floor at the bed with a pistol clutched in his right hand, and his chest and his face and breast bespattered with blood, while on the floor was a large pool of the crimson fluid.

 The inmates were hastily informed of what had taken place and when James Richard went  to St. Julien's trunk where he had kept his revolver, he discovered that the suicide had taken his weapon and placing the muzzle into his mouth sent a bullet crashing through his brain.


 One of the roomers immediately proceeded to the central station and informed Chief Gaster of the affair and the coroner was then notified. The deceased leaves a mother and brothers. From the N. O. Picayune and in the Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.







Accident.

Last Sunday while Judge Debaillon's boys were amusing themselves in the yard, one of the boys accidentally inflicted with an ax  slight scalp wound on little Paul's head. Dr. Mouton was called and dressed the wound, and Paul is all right again. Laf. Gaz. 2/10/1894.  




Success of a Lafayette Boy.

 Dr. G. E. Salles, formerly of this town and one of our most popular boys, but now a practicing physician of Houston, was in town this week on a visit to his relatives. His many friends here will learn with pleasure that he is meeting with much success in the practice of his chosen profession. The Gazette sincerely wishes him continued prosperity for there are none more deserving of success than Dr. Salles. Lafayette Gazette 2/10/1894.
 
 
 


 


POLICE JURY

By motion duly made the Police Jury proceeding under act 92 of 18823, to provide for the organization of local Boards of Health for the various parishes of the State of Louisiana, resolved into a parish Board of Health as follows:
 
LAFAYETTE, LA., FEB. 6, 1893.
 
By virtue of the powers vested in the Police Juries of the various parishes of the State under act 92, of the session of the State legislature of the year 1882,
 
Be it enacted,
That the President and members of the Police Jury of the Parish of Lafayette do hereby constitute themselves a Board of Health under the following rules and regulations and the officers of the Police Jury are hereby elected to serve in their respective capacities on the Board of Health to-wit: W. B. Torian, President, and R. C. Greig, Secretary.
 

RULES AND REGULATIONS.
 

1st the coroner and parish physician, Dr. A. Gladu, is hereby appointed health officer for the parish of Lafayette, and is hereby empowered and instructed to carry into effect all ordinances, rules and regulations now in force, or that may hereafter be adopted by this Board of Health.
 
2d. It shall be the duty of the health officer to inform himself thoroughly as to the introduction of any and all infectious or contagious diseases into the parish of Lafayette, as to the presence and progress of any such disease or diseases at all points infected, or where an epidemic of any kind is report as prevailing, or where individual cases have occurred or hereafter may occur, and he shall adopt such measures and precautions as the rules of the Board of Health may provide, and in case of an emergency to act for the moment as his judgment may determine.
 
3d. In case of the occurrence of any infectious or contagious disease or diseases, anywhere in the State, the health officer is required to adopt stringent measures of quarantine as may be deemed most effectual for preventing the introduction of any such disease from the affected locality or localities, and to this he shall at the proper time, with the advice and consent of the President of the Board of Health, establish quarantine guards to enforce the rules and regulations of this ordinance.
 
5th. It shall be the duty of the Health officer to carefully investigate all sources of danger to the public health, from collections of filth for other nuisances,  and to adopt prompt and stringent measures for the abatement of such.
 
6th. In case of any danger from the introduction of any infectious or contagious or diseases or if any infected clothing or goods should threaten the public health in any Police Jury ward of this parish, them and in such cases the Police Juror representing such ward, is empowered to act promptly for the suppression or such danger,  and it shall be his duty to report the facts to the Health officers without delay.
 
The President was authorized to confer with the Health officer and to establish if necessary a pest house for the isolation of any person or persons who may be afflicted with any infectious disease or diseases.
 
The President was also empowered to act in conjunction with the authorities of the town of Lafayette, against the introduction of small pox into the parish from any and all infected localities:
 
W. B. TORIAN, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Laf. Adv. 2/11/1893.
 


POLICE JURY: Mr. Mouton also reported renting pest house land to Dr. Rouif for three years at $5 per acre. Laf. Adv. 2/14/1903.


Gladu Visiting Gladu. Father P. Gladu, of Welston, O., is visiting the family of his brother, Dr. A. Gladu, of Lafayette. Father Gladu has just returned from a trip in Mexico. He will remain here about one month.
Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1902.



Pneumonia. - The doctors have been very busy during the past few weeks. We are informed that pneumonia prevails throughout the parish and that in some sections it has almost reached an epidemic form. A number of deaths resulting from this disease have been reported within the last week. Lafayette Gazette 2/16/1901. 


Boy Badly Burned. - Yesterday morning at 11 o'clock the young boy of Mr. John Bowen, Olly, came very near being the victim of a horrible fate. The clothes of the unfortunate little fire from a grate and in less than it takes to tell it, he was enveloped in flames, but fortunately Mrs. Bowen had the presence of mind to carry him to (unreadable word), which she used to put out the fire. Little Olly was pretty badly burned about the legs. Dr. A. R. Trahan attended to the child and did all he could to relieve him. Lafayette Gazette 2/16/1895.


At the Pest House. - Things at the pest-house are getting along very well. Dr. Girard informs us that only a few patients there are from this town. Several cases are from the parish. The town is now free from smallpox, a fact which all will be pleased to know. At the time it looked very much like we were going to have an epidemic, but the intelligent methods adopted by our health officer has saved us from so dreadful a calamity.
Lafayette Gazette 2/17/1900.


 


Board of Health.
LAFAYETTE, LA., Feb. 14, 1900.


 The Board of Health met this day in special session with the following members present:  Drs. Geo. R. Dalaureal, H. D. Guidry, J. P. Francez, and Messrs. L. G. Breaux, D. A. Cochrane, J. O. Broussard, and Jasper Spell.  Absent:  Dr. R. O. Young.

 The president explained the object of the meeting to be the fixing of charges and physicians, nurses and guards etc., in cases of smallpox.

 By motion the following rates were adopted:   Transportation of patients to pesthouse per head, $1.50; diagnosing cases per head, $2.50; guards and nurses per day, $1.00.

 Messrs. D. A. Cochrane and R. C. Greig were appointed to contract for transportation, and Messrs. H. D. Guidry, D. A. Cochrane and R. C. Greig were appointed to appear before the jury and urge approval of above charges.

       GEO. R. DELAUREAL, PRES.,
       R. C. GREIG, Secty.
Lafayette Gazette 2/17/1900.



Dr. G. A. Martin recently purchased from Mrs. J. A. Veazey, a lot of ground on Lincoln ave., measuring 45 x 125 feet, on which he intends building a residence and (unreadable word) at an early date. Laf. Adv. 2/17/1894.



POLICE JURY.
Lafayette, La., Feb. 6, 1893.

Among other business....

The committee appointed to ascertain in regard to the establishment of a potter's field was granted further time to report.

 
By motion duly made the Police Jury proceeding under act 92 of 1882, to provide for the organization of local Boards of Health for the various parishes of the State of Louisiana, resolved into a parish Board of Health as follows:

LAFAYETTE, LA., Feb. 6, 1893.

By virtue of the powers vested in the Police Juries of the various parishes of the State under act 92, of the session of the State legislature of the year 1882,
Be it enacted :

That the President and members of the Police Jury of the Parish of Lafayette do hereby constitute themselves a Board of Health under the following rules and regulations and the officers of the Police Jury are hereby elected to serve in their respective capacities on the Board of Health to-wit : W. B. Torian, President, and R. C. Greig, Secretary.

RULES AND REGULATIONS.

1st. The coroner and parish physician, Dr. A. Gladu, is hereby appointed health officer for the parish of Lafayette, and is hereby empowered and instructed to carry into effect all ordinances, rules and regulations now in force, or that may hereafter be adopted by this Board of Health.

2d. It shall be the duty of the health officer to inform himself thoroughly as to the introduction of any and all infectious or contagious diseases into the parish of Lafayette, as to the presence and progress of any such disease or diseases at all points infected, or where an epidemic of any kind is reported as prevailing, or where individual cases have occurred or may occur, and he shall adopt such measures and precautions as the rules of the Board of Health, may provide, and in case an emergency to act for the moment as his judgment may determine.

3d. In case of the occurrence of any infectious or contagious disease or diseases, anywhere in the State, the health officer is required to adopt stringent measures of quarantine as may be deemed most effectual for preventing the introduction of any such disease from the affected locality or localities, and to this end, he shall, at the proper time, with the advice and consent of the President of the Board of Health, establishing quarantine guards to enforce the rules and regulations of this ordinance.

5th. It shall be the duty of the Health officer, to carefully investigate all sources of danger to the public health, from collections of filth or other nuisances, and to adopt prompt and stringent measures for the abatement of such.

6th. In case of any danger from the introduction of any infectious, or contagious disease or diseases or if any infected clothing or goods should threaten the public health in any Police Jury ward of this parish, then and and in such cases the Police Juror representing such ward, is empowered to act promptly for the suppression of such danger, and it shall be his duty to report the facts to the Health officer without delay.

The President was authorized to confer with the Health officer and to establish, if necessary, a pest house for the isolation of any person or persons who may be afflicted with any infectious or contagious disease or diseases.

The president was also empowered to act in conjunction with the authorities of the town of Lafayette, against the introduction of small pox into the parish from any and all infected localities:

W. B. TORIAN, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.

Complaints having been made to the Police Jury relative to the bad condition of the public roads under contract, it is hereby resolved that the road contractor, Mr. I. N. Satterfield, be and is hereby instructed to take prompt measures to remedy the matter.

By motion duly made the president of the Police Jury, Mr. W. B. Torian, was appointed as purchasing agent for the parish, and authorized to purchase any and all supplies required in the administration of the parish prison as well as such repairs as may be deemed necessary upon the court house or Clerk's office.

A communication from Dr. F. J. Mayer on the subject of rice culture and the advisability of a of a proper exhibit of the cereal at the Chicago Exposition, was read and owing to the late hour, action thereon deferred.

The following was duly adopted :
Resolved, That the keeper of the parish jail be and is hereby required to keep an account with every prisoner of the blankets, etc., furnished, and if any prisoner shall fail to account for the same, then and in that case the jailer is authorized and required to make affidavit against said prisoner for theft before his liberation.

A communication from Mr. W. B. Bailey, Clerk of Court, calling attention to the unsafe condition of the archives of his office by reason of the loss of a large key by his predecessor in office, and also representing the necessity of a new seal for the Clerk's office, was read and on motion the President was empowered to take such steps as would be deemed essential.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1893. 


 Dr. G. A. Martin, will enlarge his residence, Contractor Anderson will have charge of the work. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.



 

The wind on last Saturday night was very disastrous on Cote Gelee, in this parish. The Royville church, with its high and commanding steeple was leveled to earth, likewise the residence of Dr. Young, the cotton gin of Messrs. Billaud & Pellerin, and several other buildings in the same neighborhood, too numerous to mention. We heartily sympathize with the sufferers. Fortune sometimes repays her frowns with many a smile. Lafayette Advertiser 2/20/1869.



Dr. J. A. Martin's new model dental office is near the First National Bank.
Laf. Adv. 2/22/1905

Dr. J. A. Martin is extracting teeth positively without pain and no ill after effects with his new anesthetic, "The Grace." Laf. Adv. 2/22/1905


Dr. F. E. Girard is having the old building next to his office on the Court House square demolished, and in its stead will erect an up-to-date sanitarium. Laf. Adv. 2/22/1902




Will Practice at Royville. - The Gazette is informed that Dr. Roy Young, who held a very important position in the Houston Hospital, has moved to Royville (now Youngsville), where he will practice his profession in the future. Dr. Young is one of our most promising young men, having always ranked among the first, both at school and among his confreres of the medical profession. Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.



Master Richard Creswell received a painful injury of the hand last Tuesday, while operating a foot-powered (unreadable word) by The Advertiser office. He (unreadable word) himself under the care of Dr. Trahan. Laf. Adv. 2/23/1895



Dr. G. A. Martin, after suffering with Lagrippe for three weeks is well again and ready to attend LaGrippe's sufferers. Laf. Adv. 2/25/1899



Doc Returns. - It is with great pleasure that we chronicle the return to our city of Dr. Thos. B. Hopkins, who arrived yesterday. He expects his family to join him here about April 1st. Dr. Hopkins' return is a direct result of the impetus given our town and school by recent agitation. Every reader of the Advertiser will join us in extending a hearty welcome to the Doctor and his family.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/25/1893.
 

 

Dr. J. A. Martin is moving to-day into his new dental office near The First National Bank. Laf. Advertiser 3/1/1905.





Dr. Voorhies Moving to Lafayette. - Dr. R. D. Voorhies, who has been a practicing physician in New Orleans for a number of years has decided to locate in Lafayette and has opened an office adjoining Wischan & Domengeaux. Dr. Voorhies's family have not arrived yet, but will move here shortly. He is a brother of clerk of court E. G. Voorhies and Mr. F. E. Voorhies. The Advertiser extends him a cordial welcome to Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 3/22/1905.


 Dr. F. R. Tolson is having an addition made to his dwelling that will be of great service.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/24/1894.




It's now "Dr." P. M. Girard. - We are glad to be able to announce the return home this week of our young friend Perey M. Girard, with all the honors of a full-fledged Doctor of Medicine. We offer our congratulations and hope he may be instrumental in relieving many sufferers, - for such is his mission.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/1/1882.




Graduating Medical School. - Announcements have been our for several days for the commencement exercises of the Medical Department of Tulane University, to take place to-day, at the Grand Opera House, at New Orleans. Messrs. F. E. Girard, G. C. Salles and Gaston Gladu represent Lafayette in the graduating class of 1893.
Laf. Advertiser 4/5/1893




Messrs. F. E. Girard and G. Salles returned home Thursday afternoon from Tulane University, bearing with them their diplomas which conferred upon them the degree of M. D. We congratulate both the Doctors and wish them the greatest success in the practice of their profession.
Laf. Adv. 4/8/1893. 

 Work has begun this week on the new dwelling house of Dr. G. A. Martin, and it is the intention of Contractor Fred Mouton to push the building to a rapid completion. Laf. Adv. 4/7/1894.


Dr. Plough's Burglarized. - On last Thursday evening, in our town Dr. A. L. Plough's room was entered by thieves; he was robbed of the sum of forty dollars in currency, a valuable diamond ring, and other small articles. The Dr. had left his lamp burning, but the audacity and shrewdness of the robbers, seem to have been equal to all emergencies. As we have before remarked, crime is too rife in our midst, and if the law cannot vindicate itself or protect our citizens, the community will take the matter in hand. Lafayette Advertiser 4/17/1896.


Dr. Irion has telephone communications with all towns in the parish. Use the wires to make your dental appointments. Office next to Moss Bros. & Co. Telephone 9-1-3-5.
 Lafayette Advertiser 4/18/1896.

Dr. Felix Girard, left last Sunday for New Orleans where he enters the Eye, Ear Nose and Throat Hospital. It is his intention to make a specialty of treating the diseases of those organs and we trust he will meet with success in his future life. Laf. Adv. 4/19/1893


 A very pleasant gathering of young people occurred at the residence of Dr. and Mrs. A. Gladu on last Saturday night, in honor of the 21st birthday of their son Dr. Gaston Gladu, who had returned from Mermantau, where he is practicing his profession for the occasion. The evening was most thoroughly enjoyed by all, and the time passed rapidly playing cards and listening to sweet music.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/19/1893.



Becoming A Pharmacist. - Communication was received here yesterday from Galveston, Texas, stating that Mr. T. B. Hopkins, Jr., son of Dr. Hopkins, of this place, had passed a splendid examination before the Texas State Board of Pharmacy, and has procured a certificate that allows him to act as a full-fledged druggist anywhere in the state. Of a class of 26 Mr. Hopkins was one of six that passed. Good Tom! Keep on in your honorable profession. Lafayette Advertiser 4/20/1895.



Serious and Difficult Operation. - On Tuesday last, 1st., Dr. G. A. Martin of this place and Dr. Rene Martin of Breaux Bridge performed at the last named place, a very delicate operation upon Mr. Moi e Dupuis of Rayne, which there is reason to believe was most successfully done. The operation consisted of removing a large tumor from the neck, a very difficult and dangerous piece of work. A number of surgeons had refused to attempt the operation, and Mr. Dupuis even sought relief in New Orleans without success. Lafayette Advertiser 5/5/1894.  



Attakapas Medical Association Meeting.
Let's Keep Records!

 Dr. F. J. Mayer, formerly of this parish, introduced a resolution at the Attakapas Medical Association meeting at New Iberia Tuesday, recommending the enactment of laws establishing bureaus in the several parishes of this state to which all births, marriages, and death, must be reported and registered.

 It is hoped that our law makers, soon to assemble in Baton Rouge, will carry out the suggestion embodied in Dr. Mayer's resolution, as an official record as this would furnish would place the parishes and the state is possession of vital and mortuary statistics of great value and capable of important service in determining matters of health and law.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/5/1894.



Dentist Now at Gordon.

 Dr. Smith, the Dental Specialist now at the Gordon Hotel, comes well recommended, having practiced in Southern Louisiana during the winter season for the past five years.
Laf. Adv. 5/10/1905.

Dr. G. A. Martin took possession of his house on Lincoln Avenue during the week. The Doctor's house is a departure from the prevailing style of architecture in this vicinity, and we trust the idea will be followed by others. It costs no more, and evidently has several points of advantage .Lafayette Advertiser 5/26/1894.


On Jefferson Street. - Dr. O. H. Guidry purchased from Mr. Crow Girard recently, the property at the foot of Jefferson street owned and occupied up to a few months ago, by Judge I. Falk. We have heard that it is the intention of the doctor to make some substantial improvements on the lot at an early date. Lafayette Advertiser 5/27/1893.


Stiffed the Advertiser. - Dr. Holbrook, Dentist, who was here lately, had himself advertised in this paper calling public attention to his profession &c., and after a stay of several weeks left without settling the cost of such advertising. Now it may be the Doctor did not intend to beat us out of this little amount, but "at this present moment" it has the appearance right much, and the prospect is, that he will be handed around at the same expense to himself, perhaps. We have been told that he is now in Lake Charles. Look out for him. Lafayette Advertiser 6/3/1882.


Sad Event. - A sad event happened at the depot in this city yesterday. A Mr. McCormick, of Beaumont, Texas, was taking his little six-month-old baby to New Orleans to place it in a hospital for treatment for intussusception.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intussusception_(medical_disorder While enroute the child became worse and at this place Dr. G. A. Martin and Dr. T. B. Hopkins were called, but the little was beyond help of professional skill and expired in a few moments after their arrival. The little body was laid out in one of the rooms of the Crescent Hotel to await the afternoon train for Texas. Lafayette Advertiser 6/8/1895.


Dr. G. A. Martin of this place, with Drs. F. R. Martin and A. C. Durio, were called to Bulliardville, Wednesday and performed a serious operation on a lady in hope of prolonging her life. Laf. Adv. 6/16/1894


Dr. Franklin Mouton is having a neat office built on the corner of Washington and Vermilion streets. The work is being done by Mr. Sarrazin Broussard.
Laf. Adv. 6/20/1891

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