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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

***EARLY LAFAYETTE POLITICS (LOCAL)

JUST A WORD.

An election to choose delegates to the constitutional convention, which is to meet in February to change the organic law of the State, will be held in January. As regards to the nomination of Hon. Clemile Landry as the delegate from Lafayette parish, it is useless to further disclose his merits, as all elements have concurred in the wisdom of the Democracy's choice. But we wish to say a word in reference to to the thirty-six delegates at large. Those chosen by the Democratic party are men well known throughout the State. We find among them eminent jurists, business men and farmers. They are able and patriotic citizens, who could have no object to frame a constitution hurtful to the interests of our State. These men stand for a reformation of the judiciary, electorate, and educational system. They want the negro out of politics. Whom do we see apposed to them? Nineteen Republicans, among them are C. B. Darrell and A. T. Wimberly, and the balance Populists, who have joined hands with the nigger-loving black and tan, in the attempt to make the negro vote and use that vote, compose that opposition. Voters of Lafayette where will you cast your ballots? The issue is clear and not to be misunderstood. There are only two sets from which to select. The Democracy offers you as standard bearers, men the very name of whom, assure Louisiana that her interests will be as well conserved as they have been in the past decade. Some of the self-same men have economically administered the public affairs of our State within the past few years, have advanced your educational system facilities, have diminished the public debt, and have shed a lustre of the groom where was cast by the Republican party in the dark days of its misrule.

You cannot hesitate. Do not listen to the cry of reform from the lips of Populists who shout that every man twenty-one years of age, should enjoy the sacred privileges of a suffragan, be he a negro, dago or what you will. Do not listen to the wild cries of "boss-rule," when the most boss-ridden crew that ever managed the ship of State are endeavoring to shape the destinies of Louisiana, whose fair name was most blackened by these political cormorants.

Lafayette Gazette 1/1/1898.





Melancon Appointed Assessor. - Marcel Melancon has been appointed assessor for Lafayette parish by Governor Blanchard. Mr. Melancon served as assessor a number of years ago, and has been acting assessor since the resignation of Mr. A. M. Martin some months past.Lafayette Advertiser 1/4/1905.





THE NIGGER ON TOP.


The Republican State Central Committee has issued an address to
the people of Louisiana.  The Gazette.
has always -contended that
Louisiana Republicanism did not
and could not mean anything but
negro supremacy. There are, no
doubt, many white Republicans -- a
few of whom are excellent gentlemen
living in this parish -- who are
opposed to the supremacy of the
black race, who are adherents to
that party because they believe in
its doctrines of protection and centralization, but, unfortunately, those men have little or no influence in
the councils of the party, a fact
which is made clear by the character
of the address of the State Central
Committee.





 We have read this Republican address
to "the people of Louisiana" and we dare say that for rank impudence
and as an appeal calculated
to arouse the passions and prejudices
of the negro, it will compare
favorably with any address ever issued
by the Radicals during the
palmiest days of reconstruction.
This remarkable address is full of
nigger. It is nigger here, nigger
there, nigger everywhere. There
isn't a word about the white man in
this whole niggery document. I:
should be read by every white man
in Louisiana, for it will show, better
than anything else what we are to
expect of the Republican party
should it get control of the State
government. It should convince the
most skeptical that a white man has
no business in the Republican party
as it is constituted in Louisiana today.
It is for the nigger first, last
and always. In short, it is in favor
of putting the black man on top and
the white man under.



 The outraging of white women by
negro brutes is one of the themes
that the committee dwells upon. It
denounces, in bitterest terms, the
good white people for lynching the
black monsters who are guilty of
the most horrible of all crimes. The
Republican party of Louisiana is
guilty of many things to be ashamed
of, but taking up the cudgel for the
dusky ravisher is the most villainous
of all its infamies. According to
this address it would be their policy
to hang or send to the penitentiary
every white man who would dare lay
his hands on a black ravisher of a
white woman.





 There is in the parish prison of
Orleans a negro under sentence of
death for the deliberate and unprovoked assassination of a white policeman. This negro is the notorious "Greasy Jim," who would have been hung years ago had justice been meted out to him. Because this red-handed murderer is a negro and his victim is a white man the interference of the federal courts in his behalf is warmly endorsed. The Republican committee
is not satisfied with defending negro
ravishers of white women, but it
volunteers its assistance to negro
murderers of white men.



 The committee is also especially
desirous of compelling white ladies
and white men to ride in the same
cars with negroes, regardless of the
odoriferous qualities of the African
lily and the mid-summer he-coon on
a warm July day. The anti-miscegenation law is denounced and the inter-marriage of the two races is approved.




The suffrage amendment, whose
adoption means the disfranchisement
of the bulk of the negro voters,
is fiercely attacked. The right of
the negro to vote is held sacred,
when it is an established fact that
with a pint of rot-gut whisky the average
negro voter can be bought
half a dozen times.



  With such principles enunciated
by the recognized representatives
of the Republican party in Louisiana,
will the white suffragans hesitate
to make a choice between Republicanism and Democracy? They did not hesitate in the past and they will not in the in the future. They will 'never swallow such a pill of "nigger," though coated with Lily White Republicanism on one side and Populism on the other. Even with a drink of "Dissatisfied Democracy" as a mouth-washer such a pill will god own their throats. Lafayette Gazette 1/4/1896.




POOR CONSOLATION.
The primary last Saturday did not give the results expected to the leaders of the faction that ordered them. The one who expected to receive the most votes came out last on the list.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/11/1904.


 If Bro. Van der Cruyssen can draw any consolation from the results
of the primaries of the 14th of December he is certainly entitled
to it all. In 1892, after the hottest campaign

in the history of Louisiana, the vote received by both Foster
and McEnery was 1628. It is conceded that a full vote was polled. Adding the 40 votes cast for Breaux and Leonard the vote in 1892 amounts to 1668. Allowing an increase of say 75 voters we have in this parish to-day 1743 voters. On
the 14th of December both candidates for clerk received 1189 votes,
leaving 554 ballots uncast. Believing  every one of the 1189 persons who voted is a Dcmocrat and will vote the straight Democratic ticket in April, (as The Gazette will not insult those who voted at the primaries by questioning their party fealty) and believing that at least one-half of the 554 who did not vote on the 14th, and who are all Democrats with the exception of the 40 who voted for Breaux and Leonard, will cast their votes for the regular nominees of the party, thus leaving to The Advertiser's friends 277 voters as the maximum of their following in this parish. Reasoning on this basis, which is a fair demonstration of the results in April, the majority of the regular nominees will be 962.



 And in the face of these figures The Advertiser is feeling jubilant! Your philosophy, Bro. Van der Cruyssen, is superb. It is only equalled by that of the man who had only one shirt. This man, we are told, had hung his shirt on the fence to dry. Suddenly his little boy ran in the house and said in an excited manner: "Papa, the cow has eaten your shirt!"  With stoic indifference he replied: "Nothing my son, a man who has property must expect to lose some." A man who has votes must expect to lose them, thinks The Advertiser. Lafayette Gazette 1/4/1896.



LAFAYETTE DELEGATION ON THE SUFFRAGE AMENDMENT.

 The Suffrage amendment had been fully discussed by the delegation in chambers at Shreveport, and it was agreed that the best policy to pursue was to leave it to the people to decide pro or con at the general election. Pursuant to this view which was ably advocated, Dr. Mayer offered the following amendment to the minority report, brought in by Mr. Dupre of St. Landry to wit:


 "That the Suffrage amendment be left to the individual voter to determine on election day, tickets to be printed for and against."


 The chairman, Mr. Gurley, of Orleans, after having recognized Dr. Mayer, the moment he found out what he was after, ruled him out of order, thereby denying his parliamentary right to amend, whereupon he appealed from the decision decision of the chair; the house, in order to cut short the proceedings, sustained the ruling of the chair, Congressman Robertson having applied the congressional gag of the of the "previous question," which choked off further debate. When the roll of parishes was called and Lafayette reached, Dr. Mayer arose and sarcastically asked the chair to instruct him how to vote intelligently; that having been arbitrarily denied his parliamentary right to amend and being under instructions, he could not vote for either the majority nor the minority report, as neither report was in harmony with the instructions. The chair, doubtless realizing that it had erred in its ruling, offered no solution, and Lafayette was voted blank. Lafayette Gazette 1/4/1896.





From the Lafayette Gazette of January 5th, 1901:


THE POLL TAX.

The Sheriff's Books Show a Considerable Increase Over Former Years.

 The result of the first year's operation of the law requiring voters to pay their poll tax has been followed by far better conditions in this parish than was generally expected. It was feared that the majority of the voters of the parish would fail to pay the tax and thereby become disfranchised, but, as is shown by the figures furnished The Gazette by Sheriff Broussard, much less than one-third of the registered voters of the parish will be temporarily deprived of the franchise by reason of their failure to pay the tax. The registered vote of the parish at the election last November was 2,300. As may be seen by the figures printed below, 1,708 whites paid the poll tax during 1900. Taking the registration as a basis, there are 525 voters who did not pay the tax. Among the latter must no doubt be a considerable number of men who are exempted from the payment of the tax because of age.


 It should not be overlooked that this law is new, this being the first time that it is enforced. Of course many deserving citizens may be for a time disfranchised, but we believe that the results so far are encouraging.


 The law was passed principally to promote the cause of public education. It should be given a fair trial. If it fails to do the good it was intended to do, the Legislature of 1908 is authorized by the constitution to repeal it, but it is to be hoped that the people will recognize its merits and that its abrogation will be deemed inadvisable. Lafayette Gazette 1/5/1901.


 THE BLANCHARD MEETING.

Judge N. C. Blanchard will Address the Democrats of Lafayette To-morrow, Jan. 7.


Judge N. C. Blanchard will address the Democrats of Lafayette to-morrow, Jan. 7, at the court-house. Hon. Omer Villere, of Orleans will also deliver an address in French. The speaking will begin about 12 o'clock. A cordial invitation is extended to the Democracy of Lafayette to be present, and the ladies are also included in the invitation. Lafayette Advertiser 1/6/1894.




OUR CHOICE.

 As an independent Democratic journal, having no other interest than that of the general welfare of the Parish and State in the competition for public office now going on between rival camps in the Democratic party, The Advertiser has purposely refrained from aligning itself with either one of the two factions as such.

In pursuing the main line of duty which makes the interests of individuals subordinate or subservient to the common good, to which policy this paper is irrevocably committed, it has seemed to us to be the proper course to hold ourselves aloof from a spirit of narrow partisanship in the wholesome rivalry for control of government now prevailing within party ranks.

The Advertiser realizes that there is "good timber" in both of the opposing camps in this contest - democrats and staunch Friends of Education, of equal recognition - and in our simple desire to promote the best interests of the people of our parish and the State at large, we have determined to give our loyal support to the candidates whose names we publish below.

The Advertiser strongly advocates the re-election of Mr. I. A. Broussard to the office of sheriff, because of the very efficient manner in which he has discharged the responsible duties of that office during the sixteen years of his incumbency. In our opinion he is the best fitted man for the serious and important duties of the office of sheriff available in Lafayette parish to-day, and his highly creditable record as criminal officer entitles him to first consideration at the hands of the electorate of Lafayette parish. It is always an advantage to the public to retain in office, whenever possible, and able and experienced man.

And it is like reasons we decidedly favor the re-election of Mr. E. G. Voorhies as clerk of court, for he also has given eminent satisfaction as a public officer in an important position.

And so throughout the entire list of candidates we commend to the favorable consideration of the voters of Lafayette parish, who, like ourselves, believe in recognizing ability and rewarding merit, we have been actuated by no other desire than to secure the election of a set of State and parish officers in whose hands we honestly believe the highest welfare of the people will be properly safe-guarded, and under whose influence and personality we may reasonably expect an active and sustained interest in all matters appertaining to the moral and material advancement of the country.

As the Police Jury plays such as active and essential part in the happiness and prosperity of our HOME life, with relation to good roads and good schools, which together form the basis of material and intellectual development. The Advertiser recommends with all the earnestness at its command that only progressive and trustworthy men be chosen as members of the Police Jury, and on this subject we shall specifically announce our position in our next issue.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/6/1904




THE ADVERTISER'S TICKET.

For Governor, NEWTON C. BLANCHARD, of Caddo.

For Lieutenant Governor, J. Y. SANDERS, of St. Mary.

For Secretary of State, JNO. T. MICHEL, of Orleans.

For State Auditor, W. S. FRAZEE, of St. Landry.

For State Treasurer, W. A. STEIDLEY, of Calcasieu.

For Attorney General, ROBERT R. REID, of Tangipahoce.

For Superintendent of Public Education, J. B. ASWELL, of Lincoln.

For United States Senator, MURPHY J. FOSTER, of St. Mary.

For State Senator, JOHN. A. McILHENNY, of Iberia.

For representatives, P. L. DECLOUET, J. GILBERT ST. JULIEN.

For Sherrif, I. A. BROUSSARD.

For Clerk of Court, Ed. G. VOORHIES.

For Coroner, Dr. G. A. MARTIN.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/6/1904




ANNOUNCEMENTS.

FELLOW DEMOCRATS OF THE PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.


 We respectfully submit our respective candidacies to the white Democratic primaries to be held January 19, 1904 upon the following declaration of principles:

 We pledge ourselves unqualifiedly  to the platform of principles adopted at the Beausejour Democratic Mass Meeting.

 We favor the election of all officers by the people. If entrusted with the administration of affairs in the Parish, we pledge ourselves in accordance with the principles declared by General Leon Jastremski, candidate for Governor, that all appointive officers, Assessors and Members of School Boards shall be selected by primary election.

 We favor the enactment of laws returning to the hands of the people the power of election in accordance with true democratic doctrine.

 We favor the repeal of the poll tax as a suffrage qualification, particularly as applied to primaries and nominating conventions.

 We favor and will advocate increased appropriations for the construction and maintenance of the primary grades of Public Schools.

 We believe that the time has come when the people of Louisiana should turn their backs up on the old conditions under which the immense appointive power of the Governor combined with the convention method of nominating candidates placed the absolute control of the destinies of this commonwealth in the hands of a single individual.

 Upon these principles we respectfully solicit your suffrages.

LOUIS LACOSTE, Candidate for Sheriff.

Ed. G. VOORHIES, Candidate for Clerk of Court.

 P. L. DECLOUET, J. GILBERT ST> JULIEN, Candidates for Representatives.

J. F. MOUTON, M. D., Candidate for Coroner.

 We are authorized to announce the names of CROW GIRARD, of Lafayette, and JOS. A. PROVOST, of Iberia, as candidates for the office of State Senator subject to the action of the Democratic primaries to be held Jan. 19, 1904. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.

  


Our Next Sheriff.


 The question of who is going to occupy the important position of sheriff in Lafayette parish for the next four years is a question which deeply concerns the whole people. The duties and responsibilities of the office are of a serious and difficult nature, and for their proper fulfillment require a high degree of courage and fearlessness, in addition to the qualities of intelligence and honesty.

 The safety and protection of individuals and of whole communities are thrown upon the sheriff with such great suddenness and force at times as to completely daze the ordinary man. Under those circumstances, unless the sheriff be a very cool-minded and courageous man of undoubted bravery, murderers and law-breakers escape arrest and punishment, and many lives may be uselessly sacrificed.

 Also, in discharging the multifarious and grave responsibilities connected with the office of sheriff and the tax collector, the quality of EXPERIENCE is one of very great value in just the same way that an extended experience in the practice of law, of medicine or any other line of work is counted to be of material advantage. It is because of their want of experience that the services of very young doctors and lawyers are always appraised lower than the services of the older members of the profession who have been adding to their store of knowledge for a longer term of years. And for the same reason much weight and importance is attached to the views and conclusions of persons of wide experience in any field of work in the world.

 The correctness of the conditions and qualifications we have laid down can not be disputed, as being very essential to a proper and satisfactory discharge of the duties of the office of sheriff and tax collector. These are the facts of the case and we believe there is not one fair minded man in the whole parish of Lafayette, except he be blinded by prejudice, who will not cordially admit that Sheriff Broussard fully measures up to the standard laid down by us for the office of sheriff and tax collector.

 It is upon this ground, and no other, that The Advertiser advocates the re-election of Mr. I. A. Broussard, and we predict his re-election in the full confidence that a large majority of the fathers and sons and mothers and daughters in Lafayette parish look upon this question with unbiased minds and only from the standpoint of the public interest, and that they will cheerfully and lend their influence to secure the re-election of sheriff Broussard, because he has served the people of the parish so creditably and so faithfully in the past. Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.





THE POLICE JURY.

In a few days the people of Lafayette will be called upon to register at the ballot box their choice of those whom they wish to fill the responsible position of police jurors. And it would be well, if between now and the day of election, each one of us would carefully and thoughtfully consider the duties and functions of the Police Jury and its relations to the people, that having a clear understanding, we may make the best selection possible. The object of the primary is to give the people  a free choice of their officers and we should certainly use this opportunity wisely for our own good by placing in office only men whom we believe capable and conscientious, and whose RECORDS upon questions of vital moment, such as good roads and public schools, give assurance that the highest welfare of the parish will be safe in their hands.

 Lafayette is entertaining upon a period of progress and development, and it is at this time of the highest importance that our Police Jury should be composed of broad-minded progressive men who will not alone be content with the routine of their office, but will generously give of their time and talents in furthering every public improvement or assisting in any forward movement for the betterment and upbuilding of the town and parish.

 In casting our votes we should keep these things steadily in view, and as far as possible REALIZE THEM IN MAKING OUR SELECTION. Pursuing this course, we have placed upon The Advertiser's ticket the names of a number of gentlemen from the different wards as our choice for police jurors. These gentlemen, we believe, will constitute a strong, progressive Police Jury, sound on the vital questions of GOOD ROADS and EDUCATION; and having in view the best interests of the parish, at large we submit their names to the favorable consideration of the electorate of Lafayette parish. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.


 
How Old is Ann?

To the Advertiser.

If the Pin-Hook bridge is in need of an overhauling, then how old is Ann?

 In the issue of The Advertiser of Dec. 30, the bombastic and irresponsible "Harmachis" of Pilette fame, informs us that the Pin-Hook bridge stands in need of some repairs and then, with amazing SANG FROID,  he gratuitously proceeds to lay all the blame for the unsafe condition of the bridge on the worthy sheriff of Lafayette parish.

 Now, I will venture to say that no sane man can possibly see any logical connection between Sheriff Broussard and the condition of Pin-Hook bridge described by "Harnachis." Everybody knows that it is the duty of the Police Jury to keep that bridge in good repair, and the weak attempt of the Pilette correspondent of The Advertiser to foist the responsibility on the shoulders of Ike Broussard, is on a par with the other reckless efforts of the Lacoste-Voorhies faction to detract from the wide popularity of Ike Broussard by blaming him for the poll tax, the boll weevil, charbon and the great scarcity of chickens and eggs throughout the country.

 If Ike Broussard is responsible for broken bridges, bad weather, chicken lice and such things, it would only be fair to credit him also with "14-cent" cotton and other good things in our land, for it is a mighty poor rule that won't work in both ways. Who knows but what cotton will bring 28 cents a pound within one year of Ike Broussard's re-election?

 To be driven to such extremes in order to bolster up a following for the office hungry ones is but a confession of the weakness of the Lacoste-Voorhies faction in the present political campaign. Such "tommyrot" is the acknowledged weapon of the desperate politician, and is ill-advised and will have no effect on the big majority that will be rolled up for Sheriff Broussard and his ticket on election day.

 Ike Broussard has done fine work in breaking up lawlessness in Lafayette parish, and now, as always in the past, he commands the highest respect and fear of the vicious element in our midst. The people know this to be true, and that is the kind of a sheriff the people want and are going to have if I know anything about human nature and the people of Lafayette. 
                          A COUNTRYMAN.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.





THE BLANCHARD MEETING.

 Judge Blanchard, Hon. Omer Villere and Others Addressed a Large and Enthusiastic Meeting.

 The Blanchard meeting last Thursday was a large and enthusiastic one. The court house was packed and almost entirely by people from different parts of the country, very few of the townspeople being present as most were too busy to attend. The Sontag Military band furnished music for the occasion.

 The meeting was called to order by Mr. Jerome Mouton, who requested District Attorney Wm. Campbell to act as chairman, Messrs. A. M. Martin and C. F. Latiolais were appointed secretary, and a large number of vice-presidents were named.

 Mr. Campbell introduced in a few well chosen words Mr. Omer Villere, of New Orleans who made an eloquent address in French. He pointed out the inconsistencies of Gen. Jastremski and refuted his charges as to Blanchard and the bosses. His speech was interspersed with witticisms and evoked much laughter.

 Chairman Campbell then introduced Judge Blanchard as our next governor. Judge Blanchard was suffering with his throat and owing to his being quite unwell after his speech in New Iberia was unable to leave on the train with his party and had to drive twenty-five miles Thursday morning to be present. Nevertheless he spoke for over forty minutes. He thoroughly replied to the charges made against him by Gen. Jastremski and said that he had hoped that only measures and policies would have been discussed and that the campaign would be conducted on a high plane commensurate with the dignity of the honor sought. He stated that if elected governor, he alone would be governor. As to Gen. Jastremski's charge that the people had lost their rights under the appointive system and that his candidacy is a move to draw them out of bondage, that the government was in the hands of political tricksters -- such talk ill becomes a man who has filled appointive positions for twenty-five years, and is calculated to injure the State. Under the democratic government of the State had done well, they had taken the State out of the mire of carpetbaggism and to-day its finances were in splendid condition and its credit most excellent.

 Judge Blanchard said that he believes the appointive power of the governor should be curtailed and declared  that when he made a statement it did not conflict with his record, that if the people would elect officers to make the change in the appointive power he would sign the bills.

 Judge Blanchard then stated the things he stood for and began by emphatically declaring himself for education. He stood for the levee system, for law and order, and for the material development of the State. He closed with a beautiful tribute to Louisiana.

 He was followed by Messrs. Martin Berhman, W. A. Steidly and O. B. Steele candidates for minor officers, who made short addresses in the interest of their candidacies. Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.




Mr. Girard's Candidacy.

 We present this morning for the consideration of the electorate of Lafayette the name of Mr. Crow Girard as State Senator from the senatorial district comprising the parishes of Lafayette, St. Martin and New Iberia. We have placed Mr. Girard's name upon The Advertiser's ticket, because, we believe that he will represent the district well and ably. He is a gentleman of high character, ability and aggressive personality, and we feel convinced that he will be a man of weight  and influence in the State Legislature. And at this time, when more than ever before, our parish needs a strong man in the State Senate to care for her interests, her public schools, and the South West Louisiana Industrial Institute, we should elect just such a man as Mr. Girard, who, we know from his past record, has both the ability and inclination to do so. In regard to Mr. Girard's candidacy we should all be united and give him the solid support of the parish.

 In this matter of representation in the State Legislature, we should act from the standpoint of the best interests of the parish, and give Mr. Girard our support regardless of factional feeling or personal prejudice, if there be any.

 Besides, he is one of us, he belongs to Lafayette parish, and  for that reason also, knowing that he is in every way perfectly competent to represent us, we should, for the honor of the parish, give him our solid support. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.





Jno. A. McIlhenny.

 The question of greatest moment to the people of Lafayette at present is undoubtedly the school question, and in choosing our representatives and State senators, care should be exercised to elect men thoroughly identified with the school interests who have the ability, weight and influence to accomplish something for the schools. With this in view The Advertiser  has given its support to Mr. Jno. A. McIlhenny of Iberia and the voters of this parish will consult their own interests of their children by casting their votes for him. The district is entitled to two senators, and with Crow Girard of Lafayette and Jno. A. McIlhenny of Iberia in the State Senate Lafayette will be ably represented. Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.





A Valuable Officer.

The clerk's office bears a most important relation to the people of the parish, and its proper administration is of vital concern to each and every one, and in especial to owners of land and business men. Here are taken care of, recorded, or preserved deeds, mortgages and records of business transactions involving thousands of dollars belonging to individuals, and here business methods are of supreme importance. Order, method, and accuracy are of the highest necessity, and when the opportunity is presented us to retain in office a man who has through a service of eight years demonstrated that he possesses these valuable essentials, the part of wisdom would be to do so. Mr. E. G. Voorhies has given the people of Lafayette a thorough business administration. His office has been well kept, and he has been uniformly courteous and obliging to all having business with the office. He is a valuable officer whose services we should gladly avail ourselves of, and on the 19th of January show our appreciation of his splendid record by a re-election. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.




The Advertiser's Platform.

Our political platform is composed of just two planks - good school and good roads, and this makes it broad enough for any candidate to stand upon it in perfect safety.

Good schools and good roads are the twin handmaids of prosperity and contentment for the whole people, and these we can and should have by adopting a broad public policy.

Let all good citizens stand together on this platform.


Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1904.

 





ADVERTISER'S PICK'S.

FELLOW DEMOCRATS OF THE PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.


We respectfully submit our respective candidacies subject to the white Democratic primaries to be held January 19th, 1904, upon the following declaration of principles. We pledge ourselves unqualifiedly to the platform of principles adopted at the Beausejour Democratic Mass Meeting.

We favor the election of all officers by the people. If entrusted with the administration of affairs in the Parish, we pledge ourselves in accordance with the principles declared by General Leon Jastremski, candidate for Governor, that all appointive officers, Assessors and Members of School Boards shall be selected by primary election.

We favor the enactment of laws returning to the hands of the people the power of election in accordance with true democratic doctrine.

We favor the repeal of the poll tax as a suffrage qualification, particularly as applied to primaries and nominating conventions.

We favor and will advocate increased appropriations for the construction and maintenance of the primary grades of Public Schools.

We believe that the time has cone when the people of Louisiana should turn their backs up on the old conditions under which the immense appointive power of the Governor combined with the convention method of nominating candidates placed the absolute control of the destinies of this commonwealth in the hands of a single individual.








Upon these principles we respectfully solicit your suffrages.



LOUIS LACOSTE, Candidate for Sheriff.

ED. G. VOORHIES, Candidate for Clerk of Court.

P. L. DECLOUET, J. GILBERT ST. JULIEN, Candidates for Representatives.

J. F. MOUTON, M. D., Candidate for Coroner.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1904.





AN EXPLANATION.

In Regard to the Rules Governing the Voting.


There will be three boxes, one for parish and ward officers, one for State officers, and one for United States Senators.

Vote for parish and ward officers first.

Each voter may prepare his ballot for parish and ward officers before going to the polls, if he so desires.

For State officers and United States Senators, he must secure his ticket from the election commissioners. To assist in preparing his State ticket, he may call upon the election commissioners or may have the assistance of a friend. Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1904.




Well Fitted For the Office. - Different people have different gifts as we all know. Some are best fitted for one thing, others for another, and each along his natural inclination is capable of achieving greater success than along any other line. This fact is thoroughly understood and appreciated in the business world, and as far as may be special talent is always employed in the various departments; for upon rightly securing this special talent depends the success or failure of an enterprise. This is true in every case where labor is employed, each individual prefers to employ those who have a decided fitness for the work to be done. Now as this is correct and proper in private affairs, why isn't it equally as correct in public affairs? We all recognize the fact that certain things better than others, and that for certain public offices some men are more adapted than others, and in choosing our officers we should bear this in mind and make our selection from a strictly business standpoint. Now as a case in point, Mr. I. A. Broussard has served the people of Lafayette as sheriff for sixteen years. During that time not only has he shown his particular fitness for the office, but his record has demonstrated that he is a born officer of the law, and joined to this natural aptitude is honesty and a fearless discharge of his duty on all occasions. A convincing testimony to his worth and efficiency is the wholesale fear with which he is regarded by the criminal classes, and a most valuable attribute this is in an officer, inasmuch as it means safety and security for the citizens of the parish and their families.

Looking at Mr. Broussard's candidacy from the view point of securing a man of special fitness to fill a position of the highest importance, involving the proper protection of ourselves, our families and property, the conclusion seems self-evident that his election would be a matter of good business policy.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1904.




Choosing Officers Not Friends.

If friendship was the unalterable rule governing the choice of public servants, the cause of good government would be made to suffer often times.

The selection of public officers calls for the exercises of a high patriotic duty, and the right of suffrage should be lightly regarded. The progress of a country is measured largely by the class of citizens at the helm of the ship of state, and every man has an interest and a responsibility in determining into whose keeping the reins of government shall be given.

We hope there will come a strong realization of this fact to the voters in Lafayette parish, to the end that each one will allow the claim of the public welfare to determine him in a choice of public officers, rather than be influenced by personal considerations or unreasonable prejudices. Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1904.







THE ELECTION IN THE PARISH.

As there was no opposition made to the Democratic nominee, the adherents of that party felt safe in absenting themselves from the polls, and having perfect confidence that the utter demoralization of the over present "agin" element in this parish, they showed an excusable lukewarmness and indifference to an election, the result of which was a foregoing conclusion, at least in this parish, owing to the complete disorganization of the time-honored local combine of the Republicans and Populists.

 At the precincts throughout the parish still less interest was taken, yet they all report a majority for the Democratic delegates and the representative delegate, Mr. R. C. Landry. The convention was carried by a large majority of the votes cast at every box. 

 At the court-house booth, there was a slight difference in the vote. The supporters of C. B. Darrall and the other Republicans, busied themselves to poll a full vote. Carriages were driven through the precincts, soliciting voters and driving them to the polls; that feature only of the old time election was present.
  

 Yet notwithstanding their interest, the result showed the convention carried and the Democratic delegates elected by just about the same proportion that the municipal candidates of the same party received at the last municipal election. At that election all parties took a lively interest, and the recent returns show the increasing strength of the Democracy and the corresponding decrease in the ranks of the opposition forces. A casual notice by those who saw the votes counted showed beyond the slightest doubt, that few, if any, Populist votes were cast, and that he who voted against the convention also cast his vote for Darrall and his political friends, with few exceptions.
 


 It had become a most difficult matter to locate the average local People's Partyite. It was quite an arduous task to know who was who, whether he be a Republican, Populist, or Democrat. But now, unless there was a number of the members of the g. o. p. hiding their lights under bushels, it truly looks as if there is a distinction without a difference. At least no other inference can be drawn from the results of Tuesday's election, when the proportion of the Democratic majority is the same as that which they had over the People's Party ticket in the last municipal election.

 Lafayette Gazette 1/15/1898.





ELECTION RETURNS.

LACOSTE, SHERIFF;


VOORHIES, CLERK.


Such is the Verdict of Tuesday's Election.
Returns Given by Wards Showing the Vote for Each Candidate.

The election Tuesday passed off quietly and orderly. Intense interest was shown in this election, and brought out a large vote. The results of the election follows:


FOR SHERIFF.
Ward 1. Lacoste 137, Broussard 54.
Ward 2. Lacoste, 161, Broussard 152.
Ward 3. Court House Lacoste 225, Broussard 180.
Ward 3. Mouton Switch Lacoste 52, Broussard 20.
Ward 4. Lacoste 138, Broussard 85.
Ward 5. Lacoste 78, Broussard 61.
Ward 6. Carencro Lacoste 142 (majority.)
Ward 6. Limoneaux's Lacoste 101, Broussard 31.
Ward 7. Lacoste, 62, Broussard 30
Ward 8. Lacoste 114, Broussard 33.

Lacoste's majority 584.

FOR CLERK OF COURT.

Ward 1. Voorhies 172, Scranton 389
Ward 2. Voorhies 183, Scranton 133.
Ward 3. Court House Voorhies 268, Scranton 136
Ward 3. Mouton Switch Voorhies 61, Scranton 9
Ward 4. Voorhies 117, Cranton 95.
Ward 5. Voorhies 83, Cranton
Ward 6. Carencro Voorhies 142 (majority)
Ward 6. Simoneaux's Voorhies 100, Cranton 33.
Ward 7. Voorhies 64, Scranton 28.
Ward 8. Voorhies 129, Scranton 17.

Voorhies majority, 773.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.




Vigneaux Heading to Washington. - Ex-Marshal John Vigneaux left this week for Washington, D. C. The friends of Mr. Vigneaux, headed by Judge Alex Boarman, are pressing his claims upon the party to have him appointed United States marshal, for this, the western district of Louisiana. Tom Brooks, of St. Landry, is said to be slated for this position, but the slate is alleged to be still in a formative state. Mr. Vigneaux was United States marshal under Harrison. Lafayette Gazette 1/21/1899.




The CAMPAIGN is OPENED.


Mass Meeting at Court House Thursday Night. Over Two Hundred Present and Much Enthusiasm Displayed.

The Ticket: Mayor, C. O. Mouton; Councilmen, Gus Schmulen, C. D. Boudreaux, O. B. Hopkins, P. Krauss, Simeon Begnaud, F. E. Girard, A. R. Trahan.



The Municipal Campaign is now on. Thursday night in response to a numerously signed call for a mass meeting to select candidates for mayor and councilmen, between 200 and 250 people assembled at the court house. Dr. J. D. Trahan called the meeting to order and after a few words explanatory, in the course of which he stated that it was the purpose "to select men who would be servants of the people and not their bosses," he called for nominations for chairman. Maj. P. L. DeClouet was unanimously chosen, and made a brief talk which was enthusiastically cheered. Joe Colomb was proposed for secretary by E. G. Voorhies and his popularity was demonstrated with great applause and unanimous election.


E. G. Voorhies then stated the object of the meeting to be to select candidates for a municipal offices to be submitted to primaries to be ordered later, and moved that nominations be made, the nomination of mayor to be first. Seconded by R. H. Broussard. The motion carried with applause.


Jno. L. Kennedy then in a somewhat extended speech which evoked frequent and enthusiastic applause, nominated C. O. Mouton for mayor. He said in part, that this meeting marked a new era, as it was the first instance in which the voters had been called into consultation and given voice in the nomination of officers. It had been the custom in the past for a few men to formulate and put out a ticket as the choice of the people. This meeting exemplified the sentiment that the people must govern. The mass meeting had been called by 84 voters or signers, citizens of the town, and every citizen was entitled to speak. An effort had been made to discredit the meeting by dodgers distributed about town. Believed the circular was by people who desired to be candidates and people who desired to be candidates and people will not elect them. C. O. Mouton was selected two years ago, and sentiment was crystallized. The circular took advantage of this knowledge of public sentiment to make it appear that the meeting was "cut and dried." He closed by nominating C. O. Mouton for mayor in a few brief but excellently chosen words. The nomination was received with enthusiastic applause. It was seconded by E. G. Voorhies. The chairman then called for further nominations. None being made the vote was taken and C. O. Mouton was unanimously nominated for mayor.

E. G. Voorhies then moved that the ticket for city councilmen be submitted as a whole.

Seconded by Louis Lacoste and carried.

Mr. Voorhies then said in part, that it was necessary to select men of ability, integrity and impartiality, and that the names he would present were suggested by capable and disinterested parties, that the men he would nominate were worthy of the hearty support of all the people of Lafayette and would give a business administration without favor or partiality that he himself was not wedded to any particular men, but would support those chosen by the meeting. Let those who objected, do so in open meeting and not like politicians in star chamber sessions. He then named C. D. Boudreaux, O. B. Hopkins, F. E. Girard, Simeon Begnaud, A. R. Trahan, Gus Schmulen and P. Krauss.

The nominations were seconded by L. Lacoste. The Chairman DeClouet called for further nominations being made the vote was then put and the City Council nominated, but not with the enthusiasm displayed in regard to the mayor; far from it.

Mr. Voohries offered the following set of resolutions, which were adopted, and the meeting adjourned.


RESOLUTIONS
Resolved, That we favor a white Democratic primary election for the nomination of Democratic candidates for Mayor and Members of the Town Council.


Resolved, That we demand a strict business and progressive administration, without favor of partiality; and that the affairs of this town be administered with strict economy, with justice to all.


Resolved, That we demand a more thorough system of drainage and maintenance of public streets. We demand a more thorough and efficient service of water and light, distributed to the use and benefit of all tax-payers alike, without favor or partiality.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/25/1905.




The Election.

The election for mayor and councilmen in Lafayette will not take place until next April; but the municipal campaign was formally opened last Thursday night at the court house at a mass meeting of citizens called for the purpose of placing a ticket in the field. A full report of the meeting is published in our columns to-day.


In view of the past factional differences in our local politics, is to be regretted that those having the common welfare honestly at heart should not have made an earnest effort in a patriotic spirit to obliterate factional lines with its obstructive tendency by uniting on a single ticket composed of good men without reference to past political differences, thereby ensuring to the municipality a progressive business administration free from the blighting influences of partisan politics. Such a consummation should always be possible with right thinking men, and they alone ought to be the ones entrusted with the control of public affairs.
As it is we understand there will be two tickets in the field, if not three, with the attendant scrimmages for spoils and supremacy, which unfortunately too often overshadows all other considerations in a heated political campaign, and it only remains for those who are concerned more with the promotion of the public welfare than they are interested in the success of individual members of the community, to exert their influence towards securing the ablest and best fitted men for those offices, whether they be of one faction or another.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/25/1905.




NEGRO POLITICIANS.

 T. Paddio and Joe Porter, two negro politicians formerly of this parish, but more recently inhabitants of the Crescent City, were reported to be in Lafayette lately. Between now and next April the climate of this parish will not be healthy for negro politicians. Lafayette Gazette 1/25/1896.

 

PROMULGATION OF RETURNS

Primary, Jan. 19, by Parish Democratic Executive Committee.

Second Primary Ordered Tuesday, Feb. 9, 1904, in Several Wards.

Court-house, Lafayette, La., Friday, January 21, 1904 - The Democratic Parish Executive Committee for the Parish of Lafayette met at the court-house, said parish, on this date for the purpose of canvassing and tabulating the returns of the primary election held on January 19, 19o4.

John Hahn, chairman, called the meeting to order.

The following members of the Committee were present: Jean Begnaud by proxy to H. Begnaud, Elias Spell, John Hahn, P. L. DeClouet, Moise Brasseux, Albert Guidry, and R. H. Broussard. Absent: John Whittington, R. O. Young and J. O. Girouard.

Chairman John Hahn called on anyone present from any faction who desire to witness the canvass of the vote. The Committee then proceeded to open the canvass and the returns, and declare the result of said primary.

From the official returns of the commissioners of election of said primary election from every ward and precinct of the parish, the following named candidates for parish and ward officers, and the candidates for members of the Democratic State Central Committee and for members of the Democratic Parish Executive Committee were shown to to have received the votes set opposite their respective names.

Sheriff.
Louis Lacoste ... 1189
I. A. Broussard ... 686

Louis Lacoste Majority ... 503


Clerk of Court.
Ed. G. Voorhies ... 1285
Dr. G. W. Scranton ... 588

Ed. G. Voorhies Majority ... 697


For Representatives.

Paul L. DeClouet ... 1172
J. Gilbert St. Julien ... 1240
Dr. J. P. Francez ... 589
Harrison Theall ... 576

Paul L. DeClouet's Majority 596
J. Gilbert St. Julien's Majority ... 576

Coroner.
Dr. J. F. Mouton ... 1208
Dr. G. A. Martin ... 660

Dr. J. F. Mouton ... 548
Lafayette Advertiser 1/27/1904.



 Democratic State Ticket.

For Governor,
W. W. HEARD,
of Union.

For Lieut. Governor,
ALBERT ESTOPINAL,
of St. Bernard.

For Secretary of State,
JOHN T. MICHEL,
of New Orleans.

For Attorney General,
WALTER GUION,
of Assumption.

For State Treasurer,
LEDOUX SMITH,
of Rapides.

For Auditor,
W. S. FRAZEE,
of St. Lsndry.

For Supt. of Education,
J. V. CALHOUN,
of New Orleans.

PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.

For Judge 18th District,
C. DEBAILLON;

For District Attorney 18th District,
WM. CAMPBELL;

For Sheriff,
I. A. BROUSSARD;

For Clerk of Court,
E. G. VOORHIES;

For Representatives,
OVERTON CADE,
HOMER DURIO.

For Coroner,
Dr. J. F. MOUTON.
Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1900.





The Republicans.
The following call signed by Mr. Vigneaux, chairman of the local Republican committee, would indicate that the Republicans will put out State, senatorial and judicial tickets. It will be noticed that nothing is said in the call about the nomination of a parish ticket. The call reads:

MASS MEETING.

Lafayette, La., January 24, 1900. -- In compliance with the call issued by P. F. Herwig, chairman of the State committee, all Republicans of Lafayette parish are requested to assemble on the 3rd day of February, 1900, at 12 o'clock noon, in the town of Lafayette, in A. Bacque's hall, above Vidrine's saloon, for the purpose of selecting delegates to represent the parish at the State nominating convention, to be held in the city of Alexandria, on the 7th day of February, 1900, at 12 o'clock noon. The same delegates elected to the State convention to be accredited to represent Lafayette parish at the convention called to meet in the city of New Orleans, La., on Monday, April 30, at 12 o'clock noon. And same delegates to be elected to represent this parish at the State, senatorial and judicial conventions, date and place to be hereafter set. All qualified voters of this parish who wish a government of the people, are cordially invited.
JOHN VIGNEAUX,
Chairman Parish Executive Committee.
Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1901.




 Clerk of Court E. G. Voorhies has again added quite an improvement to his office in the shape of blank books in which to record notorial acts and other papers of a public nature. He now furnishes blanks to the several notaries throughout the parish. This method adds greatly to the convenience in looking up the records and much more uniformity in the recording of public documents. Mr. Voorhies will certainly receive the thanks of all those concerned for having established this orderly system in his office. Lafayette Gazette 1/29/1898.




The Campaign Progressing. - Under the designation of "Young Men's Ticket" we publish in another column the personnel of a second ticket which has been formed to enter the contest for the control of the municipal government of Lafayette for the next two years. Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1905.




The Young Men's Ticket. - The Young Men's Ticket contains some good material for a successful business administration of the affairs of the town, and will no doubt command a strong support in the community at the primary election to be held on the fourth of March. Under our republican form of government it is the in inherent right of every citizen to serve his country as a public officer, provided his services prove acceptable to the people, so that it is a narrow and un-American spirit which would cause one man to feel angered of unkind toward another man who may happen to aspire to the same office with himself. The Advertiser hopes that there will be no such unreasonable feeling displayed in the present municipal campaign. Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1905.




YOUNG MEN'S TICKET.

FOR MAYOR.
Felix H. Mouton.

 FOR COUNCILMEN.
 Dr. G. A. Martin, Felix O. Broussard, Felix H. Landry, Archie A. Morgan, Pierrec gerac, L,. F. Rigues, J. F. Tanner.

FOR CHIEF OF POLICE.
A. Edwin Chargois.

FOR SECRETARY.
L. D. Nickerson.

FOR TREASURER.
D. V. Gardebled.

FOR TAX COLLECTOR.
H. H. Hohorst.

FOR JAILOR.
Abraham Hirsch.

FOR DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
Judge Julian Mouton, Wm. Campbell, Alfred Hebert, Henry Church, W. P. Bracken. Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1905.     
 



"Pap" Republicans.

 Yes, and as long as such men as Fontelieu, Wimberly and their class of "pap" Republicans continue to control patronage in Louisiana, so long the party will be plunged to defeat in this State. No self-respecting white man can be a Republican with Wimberly at the head, and should this latter "nigger lover" be reappointed next March (which no doubt her will), there will not be enough white Republicans left in Lafayette to form a corporal's guard. Lafayette Advertiser 2/2/1901. 






From the Lafayette Gazette of February 4th, 1899:

PARISH LEGISLATORS

Meet in Regular Session and Attend to the Public Business.

 The Police Jury held its regular monthly meeting Thursday afternoon. The following members were present: Hon. R. C. Landry, president; Messrs. Alonzo Lacy, Ben Avant, Alfred Hebert, J. E. Primeaux, M. Billeaud, Jr., C. C. Brown and Jno. Whittington, Jr.

 The Jury resolved to meet informally at Darmas Broussard's, Feb. 22, to investigate the condition of said bridge and determine what disposition shall be made of the road and bridge.

 The Jury examined plans and specifications for a bridge at Jno. Whittington, Jr., submitted by the New Jersey Steel and Iron Company. No action, however, was taken toward accepting bids for said bridge, or advertising for same.

 Judge Mouton appeared and addressed the body in regard to the Darmas Broussard bridge, arguing in favor of retaining said bridge in the interest of the inhabitants on either side of the stream.

 One thousand dollars was authorized issued to School Board out of amount now due. Pin Hook Bridge was relet to S. Bernard at $39 per annum.

 A petition from the citizens of Broussard and vicinity, praying for the reopening of the Bernard and St. Julien public road, was read and a committee consisting of Messrs. M. Billeaud and R. C. Greig, was appointed to ascertain whether said road has ever been abandoned by the parish or not.

 Mr. Primeaux reported having contracted with Jean Denise for the keeping of Olidon Broussard's bridge at $115 per annum, half defrayed by Vermilion. Approved.

 By motion Assessor A. M. Martin was authorized and instructed to place on the special road tax assessment list of all vehicles, etc., within the corporate limits of the town of Lafayette. Some doubt exists as to the right of the Jury in this respect. The sum of $12.50 each was granted unto Lessin Gaspar and wife, Mr. Therence Guidry, Mrs. S. Mathieu, Mrs. E. Bonin indigents.

 A petition from the citizens of Carencro and vicinity, praying for the widening of a public road north of that town, and adjoining the property of R. Francez, was read and Hon. C. C. Brown authorized to comply with said prayer, provided the cost does not exceed $60 said amount to be taken from the special road fund of the 6th ward.

 A petition from the citizens of the 8th ward also asking for the widening of the public road between the properties of Dr. Girard, Mrs. M. A. Thompson, A. Judice and I. Cayret, was read and laid over. Mr. Whittington refusing to consent to the use of the special road fund, in securing such additional width.

 The president and secretary of the Board of Health were allowed $50 each per annum for services.

 A committee consisting of Messrs. Alf. Hebert and R. C. Greig was appointed to advertise for bids to paint the court-house.

 Mr. Primeaux was authorized to purchase about 2000 feet of lumber for his ward.

 The Jury discussed at some length what system should be adopted for the application of the special road tax now being collected, but reached no definite conclusion in the matter. The amount available under this tax is yet an unknown quantity and until that is ascertained at least approximately nothing can be done intelligently. There seems to be a disposition on the part of certain members, however, to maintain the various ward funds separate, each Police Juror determining as to the manner or purpose of expenditure, etc.

 The Jury extended the time for payment of the special road tax until March 1st, up to which date no costs will accrue.

 The committee appointed to settle with the treasurer reported, finding the office satisfactory and quietus granted the treasurer, J. E. Martin. A cash balance of $1940.73 in favor of the parish was shown tallying with the treasurer's report filed.

 Polls collected by Clerk of Court to the number of 161 were ordered transferred to the School Board.

 The official proceedings will appear in our next issue. Lafayette Gazette 2/4/1899.





Democratic Executive Committee Meeting.

 Lafayette, La., January 30, 1903.
   Pursuant to a call the Democratic Executive Committee of the town of Lafayette, La., met his day for the purpose of devising method for the selection of candidates for mayor and councilmen of said town; absent I. A. Broussard, and Henry Church.

 The committee was duly organized by the selection of Hon. Judge Julian Mouton as chairman, and Ed. G. Voorhies as secretary.

 The following resolution was unanimously adopted:

 Resolved, that a Democratic Primary Election be and is hereby called for the nomination of candidates by direct vote for a Mayor and seven Councilmen for the town of Lafayette. The primary shall be held at the court-house in the said town of Lafayette, on Wednesday the fourth day of March, 1903, and shall be conducted according to law.

 The polls shall be opened at seven o'clock a. m. and shall be closed at five o'clock p. m.

 The following named persons are hereby appointed as Commissioners of election for said primary, viz: R. C. Greig, Jos. Ducote and D. V. Gardebled, and Galbert Comeau, clerk of election.

 None but qualified electors under the constitution and election laws of the State, and who are white Democrats, shall be entitled to vote at said primary.

 Notice of the voting of this primary election shall contain a copy of this resolution, and be signed by the secretary of this committee, and shall be published in a newspaper of this town, at least two weeks prior to the time fixed herein for the primary.

 The returns of this primary election shall be made in sealed packages to the chairman of this committee, in accordance with provisions of Act 133 of 1900.

 At said primary five Democrats shall be elected to constitute the Democratic Executive Committee of this town.

 JULIAN MOUTON, chairman; A. R. TRAHAN, M. D; ED. G. VOORHIES, secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 2/7/1903.





NOT VERY WHITE. 

 The Gazette has always contended that the Republican party and the negro were political twins, that one could not live without the other. We do not say that there are not good men in the Republican party, for right here, in Lafayette parish, a few good citizens believe in the economic policy of that party and are conscientious and consistent Republicans. We desire it distinctly understood that we are speaking of the party and not of individuals; but we must look at the Republican party as it really is, and not as a few white Republicans would wish it to be. We have been told several times that hereafter the Republican party in Louisiana would be a political body composed of white men only and the nigger would not be admitted in it. In this parish, a number of men joined the old-timers and effected an organization. Some of them were doubtless actuated by honest motives, while others, it must be admitted, are after federal pap, in the event a Republican is elected president next November. Some people were good enough to believe that the new infusion of respectability in the Republican party would purify it of its objectionable odor; but you might as well try to make a limped stream of the Red River by throwing it a few drops of artesian water as to attempt to whiten the Republican party with the accession to its ranks of a few white men. One is as much a physical impossibility as the other.
 
Most of our readers must have heard of the Republican State convention held in New Orleans the other day. It was called to order by Tom Cage, a nigger from Terrebone, and presided over by Bob Guichard of the same race. In fact all the prominent members of that convention were negroes. The parish of Lafayette was represented in that body of distinguished men by the Honorable Telsimare Paddio, and we believe the Honorable Joe Porter was a conspicuous figure that brilliant gathering of dusky statesmen. That mod - it was nothing but a mob - nominated or endorsed the Pharr ticket and elected delegates to the National Republican convention. Paddio, who was a shining light in that convention, was voted for the delegate to represent the Republican party of Louisiana at St. Louis, but it appears that he was deceived by Kellogg and defeated, though receiving over 200 votes.
 
In last Wednesday's Times-Democrat the negro H. Thurman Blunt, president of the Louisiana Republican League, gives to the public the names composing the "State committee of the Republican League Clubs of this State."
 
Among the names published we find those of L. F. Suthon candidate for attorney-general on the Pharr-Rep-Peoples' party ticket, H. P. Kernochan candidate for auditor, H. C. Warmoth, Jno. F. Patty (nigger), Dave Young (nigger), R. F. Guichard (nigger), Douglas Burrell (nigger), C. C. Wilson (nigger), Mose Green (nigger), James Wilkinson, H. C. Minor, Andrew Hero, and many others of both colors.
 
Lafayette is represented on that committee by Mr. F. Otto of this town, and the Honorable Telismare Paddio.
 
Is this the white Republican party we have heard so much about? The white people of this parish know the Honorable Mister Paddio and we do not think they can be led to support anything with which he is connected. There may be some dis-satisfied politicians who will support the Pharr ticket, but we feel confident that very few - yes, very, very few - white men in Lafayette parish will vote the Republican ticket despite the refusal of some local leaders to show their colors.


 Lafayette Gazette 2/8/1896.




Good Words.

 Believing they would prove interesting to your readers, we have selected a few from the many notices given Mr. W. B. Bailey, on his appointment as Clerk of Court, by the state press of Louisiana. It must certainly be gratifying to Gov. Foster, as well as to Mr. Bailey, to see that the selection has met with such universal approval.


EDITOR BAILEY TAKES THE PLUM.

 Truth is extremely gratified to learn the news of the appointment to the position of clerk of court for the parish of Lafayette of that worthy veteran soldier and journalist, W. B. Bailey, formerly editor of the Lafayette ADVERTISER. Mr. Bailey came here on Sunday evening last and left for home on Monday, carrying his commission, which was obtained upon petitions of the best citizens of the parish of Lafayette, where Bailey is quite popular. In making a clerk of court of Bro. Bailey is quite popular. In making a clerk of court of Bro. Bailey, the press of the State loses a most valuable member, nevertheless we believe we can safely assert that there is not a member of the Louisiana Press Association who will not rejoice at the good fortune of this most worthy and popular pencil pusher who will not join us in wishing our worthy confrere of many a year the most abundant prosperity. - Weekly Truth.  

A MASTERLY SELECTION.

 Gov. Foster has made another masterly appointment. The position of Clerk of the Court for Lafayette parish becoming vacant by the death of the incumbent, Mr. Emile Creighton. Gov. Foster, upon the recommendation of the leading business men of Lafayette, appointed to that position Mr. W. B. Bailey, the late veteran of the Lafayette ADVERTISER.

 Only two weeks ago Bro. Bailey retired from the editorial control of the ADVERTISER after having conducted it ever since his return from the surrender at Appomattox.

 Brother Bailey is one of the old landmarks in Louisiana journalism, a charter member of the State Press Association, and has always been true to his State and to the principles of the Democratic party.

 During the dark days of radical oppression his paper held aloft the white banners of Democracy and his pen and tongue never faltered in the discharge of every faltered in the discharge of every duty incumbent upon him. In later days when his services were needed in behalf of this State's honor he never failed to respond to the calls of duty, and remained poor and honest rather than "bend the pregnant hinges of the knee that thrift might follow fawning."

 Governor Foster, this is one of the best appointments you have ever made, and the press of Louisiana congratulates you upon your deserved recognition of a brave and true hearted old veteran - a member of the Fourth Estate.

 Bro. Bailey, we salute you.
Baton Rouge Advocate.


  By the death of the clerk of the district court of Lafayette parish that office was recently made vacant, and has just been filled by the appointment of our esteemed confrere, Capt. W. B. Bailey, late editor of the ADVERTISER. Ever ready to do justice where justice is due, as well as to criticize when it believes criticism proper. The Item desires to compliment Gov. Foster on this selection. No truer man lives than W. B. Bailey and he is fully competent for the duty assigned him. - Baton Rouge Capital Item.

 Gov. Foster has made an appointment which will not only meet with the unanimous endorsement of the people of the parish in which the appointee resides, but with that of the entire press of the state as well. The clerk of the parish of Lafayette having been removed from the active theater of life by grim visaged death, the Governor has filled the vacancy thus created by the appointment of Mr. W. B. Bailey, late editor of the ADVERTISER of that parish. For the past 28 years he fought the hard battles of the Democracy, and in the recent campaign he was a fine supporter of Governor Foster and the cause he represented. No better man than brother Bailey could have been selected for the position, and none more worthy or deserving could have been found within the limits of the parish. We congratulate him on his good luck and hope he will live long to enjoy the fruits of it. -- Plaquemine Daily Journal.


 Governor Foster, last Monday, appointed Mr. W. B. Bailey clerk of the court for the parish of Lafayette, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. Creighton. Mr. Bailey, for many years, was editor of the Lafayette ADVERTISER and no knight of the quill has fought more zealously and consistently the battles of Democracy than he. Mr. Bailey was also a gallant Confederate artilleryman in Virginia. His appointment is a merited compliment to a gallant Democratic editor and it will meet with the general approbation of the fraternity. The editor of the Review heartily congratulates his old schoolmate, army companion and confrere upon this recognition of his abilities and of the life he has spent in serving the State. - Louisiana Review, New Orleans.


 The Governor has appointed Mr. W. B. Bailey, late editor of the Lafayette ADVERTISER, to fill the vacancy in the clerk's office of Lafayette parish caused by the death of Emile Creighton. Governor Foster, accept our humble congratulations on your selection ;  and to our venerable old friend, Bro. Bailey, we say hurrah for you -- may your new trust afford you more satisfaction and prove more lucrative than journalism. - St. Charles Clarion.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/11/1893.



Our Answer.  - In our advocacy of the principles for which the young men's movement stands in the pending municipal campaign, we are entirely sincere, and in our discussion of those principles we shall not engage in any argument with our esteemed confrere of the Gazette over a matter of individual opinion, or because he may not be able the consistency of our position. We shall merely confine ourselves to the simple statement that we are distinctly and positively advocating the entrusting at this particular time (which we consider a critical time in the history of the town) the direction of municipal affairs in the hands of the young men. The Advertiser, as an independent journal, and exercising its undoubted right, without intending any disparagement or disrespect whatever to any candidate or candidates, has selected its own individual ticket, appearing in another column under the caption Our Ticket, which is composed entirely of young men, whom we feel confident will give Lafayette a splendid administration, and we earnestly hope and have very strong reasons to believe that a majority of the voters will agree with us.

As to the Young Men's Ticket, the claim is advanced, and it is the declaration made over the names of the candidates themselves as men of veracity, in a signed statement published in both the local papers, that the movement did not have its origin among partisan politicians, and does not represent the interest of any political faction. And, we submit, that it is not a disproof of this claim, but rather a flattering and valuable endorsement of the movement, if the Young Men's Ticket includes in its following a large body of representative citizens, who for reasons of their own, have declined in the past political leadership of the promoters of the mass meeting which nominated the C. O. Mouton ticket.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1905.



A Hopeful Sign. -  We wish to reiterate the views expressed in our last issue regarding the commendable disposition shown by a group of the younger men of the town to take an active part in public affairs. The young men's movement in the present municipal campaign should receive the glad hand, and it may be turned to a good account with the proper kind of encouragement. It is the testimony of history that the progress of the human race is under heavy tribute to the energy and enthusiasm of the young men of every generation.

In public service there is an unbounded field of usefulness open to worthy young men imbued with the spirit of liberty and independence, and who have a fine sense of their obligations to their country and to society in general, and it is to the public interest to encourage and induce young men to bear a full share in the councils and government of their country. 

Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1905. 
 



LAFAYETTE REPUBLICANS.

Hold a Mass Meeting Saturday, Adopt Resolutions Endorsing President Roosevelt's' Administration And Advocate the Elimination of the Negro from Politics Committees and Delegates Appointed.

 Pursuant to a call ordered by the Republicans of the Parish of Lafayette met in mass meeting in the town of Lafayette, La., Saturday, February 13, 1904, and proceeded to elect delegates to the State Nominating Convention to be held in New Orleans, La., February 17, 1904, also delegates to the Congressional nominating convention where two each delegates and alternates will be elected to the National Convention to be held in the City of St. Louis, Mo. The mass meeting also elected a Parish Executive Committee to serve for the next four years, as also a member of the State Central Committee. Mr. Joseph A. Chargois was Chairman of the meeting with J. R. Domengeaux as Secretary. A committee on resolutions was appointed, consisting of Louis Dubernard, John Vigneaux, J. Nugent, J. U. Broussard, J. M. Jones. J. R. Domengeaux submitted the following which was unanimously adopted, to-wit:

Be it resolved that we deplore the present condition of affairs existing in our parish, whereby a large number of our Republican friends participated in the last Democratic Primary, assisting the anti-administration in defeating the ring-Democracy; these conditions we fear having a tendency to set us back in the good work we have in view.

Resolved further that we believe that all affairs pertaining to the best interests of the Republican Party in the State of Louisiana should be brought direct to the State Central Committee whereby the whole Committee should have a voice in the deliberations, instead, as matters now stand, by decisions by sub-committees.

Resolved further that we disapprove the methods adopted by some of the leading Republicans in dealing with general matters affecting the party. We believe that in every parish, where an organization exists, that all local issues are to be settled by that organization, and its recommendations respected.

Resolved, that we approve the resolutions adopted by the State Central Committee at its meeting in New Orleans, La., January 26, 1904. We heartily endorse President Roosevelt's administration, and especially his action in the Panama Canal question. We endorse the efforts of the good people of New Orleans in their fight for the maintenance of the Mint in their midst.

We endorse empathetically this paragraph of the State Central Committee resolutions, stating that this is a WHITE MAN'S COUNTRY AND NEGROES MUST NOW AND AT ALL TIMES BE ELIMINATED FROM POLITICS.

Be it further resolved that we favor the repeal of the present election law as being a menace to the freedom and liberties of a large majority of the white voters of this parish, and we would propose the enactment of such laws as would give all white men twenty one years of age the right to elect their officers from judges of the Supreme Court to ward constables. In conclusion we tender an invitation to all white men in the Parish of Lafayette to join us in this the only real opposition to the State ring Democracy.

The mass meeting then elected the following top compose the Parish Executive Committee for four years; 2nd ward, John Nugent; 3rd ward, John Vigneaux; 4th ward, A. Primeaux; 5th ward, (not available); 6th ward, J. M. Jones; 7th ward, J. U. Broussard; 8th ward, August Arnaudt. At large, J. A. Chargois, J. R. Domengeaux, T. J. Breaux, Gus. A. Breaux, Jos. Lazaro, F. H. Gregory and H. Hutchinson. The committee met and elected Jos. A. Chargois as Chairman and J. R. Domengeaux as Secretary.

Colonel Gustave A. Breaux was re-elected to represent the parish on the State Central Committee.

The meeting moved that all vacancies existing on the Committee during the next four years be filled by the chairman without calling an election or mass meeting.

The following delegates were elected to cast the vote of Lafayette in the State Nominating Convention in New Orleans, La. Wednesday, Feb. 17, J. A. Chargois, John Vigneaux, J. R. Domengeaux, John Nugent, A. Arnaudt, J. M. Jones, Joseph Falcon, E. Judice, Mr. Pellisier, J. U. Broussard, Gus. A. Breaux, T. J. Breaux, Zack Domengeaux, F. H. Gregory, Jos. Lazaro and Louis Dubernard.

The following delegates were elected to the convention to be called when delegates to the National Convention will be elected: A. Arnaudt, J. A. Chargois, J. M. Jones, J. R. Domengeaux, J. U. Broussard and J. Nugent. The meeting then adjourned.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/17/1904.  
  

 

Social Democrats Organize.

 On Wednesday, February 10, the Social Democrats of Lafayette met and formed a temporary organization and elected the following officers:  F. C. Triay, Chairman; L. Levert, Recording Secretary; J. Falcon, Financial Secretary; H. J. Church, Organizer; J. B. Coumes, Literature Agent.

 The application for a charter was signed by twenty-three members and upon receipt of same, a permanent organization will be formed and permanent officers elected. Laf. Advertiser 2/17/1904.



Voters Must Register.

 Registrar Martin informs us that as soon as he receives the necessary books he will open the registration office. Everybody who wants to vote must register. No exception is to be made in the case of those who registered under section five. They too must register. Laf. Gazette 2/18/1899.




DEMOCRATIC TICKET.

 STATE OFFICERS.

GOVERNOR, Murphy J. Foster, of St. Mary.

Lt. Governor, Robert S. Snyder, of Tensas.

 SECRETARY OF STATE, John T. Michel, of Orleans.

 STATE TREASURER, A. V. Fournet, of St. Martin.

STATE AUDITOR,  W. W. Heard, of Union.

 ATTORNEY GENERAL, M. J. Cunningham, of Natchitoches.

 SUPT. OF PUBLIC EDUCATION, Prof. J. V. Calhoun, of Orleans.


DISTRICT OFFICERS.

JUDGE, Julian Mouton.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY, Minos T. Gordy.

PARISH OFFICERS.

REPRESENTATIVE, J. O. Broussard.

CLERK OF COURT, E. G. Voorhies.

 SHERIFF, I. A. Broussard.

CORONER, Dr. A. R. Trahan.
Lafayette Gazette 2/29/1896.

  



An Address.
Lafayette, La., Feb. 24, 1896.

To the Democrats of Lafayette Parish:

The delegates selected at the Democratic Mass meeting held at the Court-house of this parish on the 21st instant to represent you at the Democratic Senatorial convention at New Iberia on the 22nd instant nominate a candidate for senator, have, in view of what transpired at said convention, appointed us, the undersigned members, as a special committee to make a statement of the position taken by the delegation showing thereby the manner in which they have carried out your instructions:

 At the mass meeting at which the delegation was selected, the following resolutions were passed:

 "Resolved, That we, the Democracy of Lafayette parish in mass meeting assembled, are unalterably opposed to the adoption of the Constitutional amendment on the qualification of the right of suffrage, and appeal to join us in defeating it at the polls at the election in April, 1896; and we hereby instruct the delegates to said amendment."

 "Be it further resolved, that we are in favor of the free and unlimited coinage of silver at sixteen to one, independently and without the concurrence of any other nation; and hereby positively instruct our delegates this day chosen to not vote for any one as nominee for the Senate unless in favor of this principle, and further that he vote for a United States Senator in favor or the free and unlimited coinage of silver at said ratio, free and independent of the other nations."

 Constructing the above resolutions as positive and mandatory, your delegation, in whose hands the trust was confided, with an eye single to the sacredness of their mission as the servants or agents of their constituents, after consultation, determined that their first duty was to carry out your instructions, regardless of other considerations.

 The following, omitting details, is a correct statement of what took place:

 Of the thirty-one delegates selected to represent the parish, twenty-eight were present.

 The permanent organization of the convention being effected, Judge Fred L. Gates, of Iberia, and James Simon, Esq., of St. Martin, were placed in nomination having been effected, Mr. Simon's name was withdrawn. The fourth ballot being ordered, and Judge Fred L. Gates, a strong adherent, being the only one before the convention for the nomination, the chairman of the delegation, that being instructed not to vote for any one favoring the amendment, and knowing that Judge Gates favored it, the delegates were bound under their instructions to retire from the convention, the result of which would leave the Democrats free to vote as each thought proper.
And we retired.

 Of the six delegates from St. Martin, two of them, although not instructed as your delegation had been, but voicing the sentiments of their people, also retired from said convention.

 As apprehended, we heard that those who remained in the convention nominated Judge Gates for the senate after we had retired.

 Thus we have acted, and submit same as the manner in which which we have executed your instructions.
          Respectively, ORTHER C. MOUTON, A. M. MARTIN, JOS. DUCOTE, Committee.
Lafayette Gazette 2/29/1896. 

 














































THE PEOPLE'S MUNICIPAL TICKET

For Mayor: 
Crow Girard.

For Councilmen:Wm, Campbell, M. Rosenfield, Chas. H. Lusted, J. P. Revillon, John O. Mouton, Louis Lacoste, L. F. Salles. 
Don't forget to register. The new law requires a new registration, do not put it off, go to-day. Your vote may be the deciding one.
 
 
What's the matter with the old town, we don't seem "to be in it" on the so called "pure" ticket (?) Somebody had better anchor the City Hall or there will be a grab made for that next.
We hear there was an obituary in a local paper last week that we think "went off before it was loaded."

 We do not remember the exact pedigree of Mr. Randolf's mule but taking our contemporary's statement as correct, we need refer to no more remote date than last April to disclose the fact that former forecaster of the same nature proved to be endowed with the eccentricities of a boomerang. Our friend in his super exuberance of zeal "for the good of the cause" is prone to mistake some other noise for a call to prophesy, and if he has been led astray by the mouthings of some blatant ass with a political pedigree co-extensive with the long eared property of Mr. Randolph he may yet regret his premature bid for a front seat among the faithful.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/20/1897


 

From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 21st, 1891:

Who Shall Be Candidates?

 The question as to who shall be candidates for election as mayor and aldermen of our town, at the election which will occur the first Monday in May next, is now somewhat agitated by our citizens. We believe the most satisfactory plan will be to have a primary election by the white citizens for choice of candidates, the result of which all should feel bound to abide by. This is the true Democratic principle.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891. 








From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 22nd, 1905:

 THE DUTIES OF CITIZENSHIP.

 It has been suggested that all the young men in Lafayette parish, who have attained their majority within the past year, be invited to take a distinctive part in the exercises for convocation day of the public schools. The suggestion is a good one, and it is to be hoped that it will be carried out.

 An impressive address on the duties of citizenship to young men about to exercise the right of suffrage for the first time, and who for the most part have had no opportunity earlier in life to receive a proper and lucid explanation of the duties and responsibilities of American citizenship, will undoubtedly be productive of great good.

 A clearer conception among the masses of civic duties and kindred matters relating to government by the people, is one of the greatest needs of our country, as it is upon a proper understanding of this subject that a republic depends for its continued existence.

 An enlightened electorate offers the assurance of securing the equal rights of man and the happiness of every individual, which is recognized to the only legitimate objects of governments; and, as has been aptly said by a noted statesman, "modern times have discovered the only device by which these rights can be secured, to wit: government by the people, acting not in person, but by representatives chosen by themselves; that is to say, by every man of ripe years and sound mind, who contributes either by his purse or person to the support of his country." Lafayette Advertiser 3/22/1905.





REPUBLICAN MEETING.

Gen. W. J. Behan, Judge Hunter and Hon. L. P. Bryant Address the Meeting.

A Complete Synopsis of Gen. Behan's Address Given. Fair Crowd in Attendance.


 Thursday evening the date for the Republican mass meeting proved to be a most disagreeable night. Before night clouds came up and when dark came on it was black darkness pierced by the fitful lightning, threatening a heavy downpour of rain any moment yet, notwithstanding, the weather, a fair crowd all white men, estimated at between 200 and 250, assembled to hear the issues of the day discussed from a Republican standpoint. About 7:30 the Sontag Military Band, which furnished delightful music for the occasion began playing. At 8 o'clock Mr. A. J. Chargois called the meeting to order and requested Col. G. A. Breaux to act as chairman, who appointed Mr. Mike Crouchet as secretary.


 Col. Breaux opened the meeting with a few words explaining its object and then in a graceful manner introduced Gen. W. J. Behan, postmaster at New Orleans, and Republican candidate for governor.


 Gen. Behan began by reporting progress of the party as demonstrated to him on his tour over twelve or fifteen parishes. He stated that the main difference principles Republicanism were growing and that many DEMOCRATS are independent and ready to cast their lot with the Republican party. He then outlined the policies of the party stating that the main difference between Democracy and Republicanism was a question of free trade or protection. Here he showed the advantage of protection to the rice, cane and lumber industries of Louisiana, recalling the disastrous result of Clevendism and Democracy by contrasting the crises of 1893, due to free trade doctrines, and the following depression in 1894, when marches armies of unemployed advanced on Washington clamoring for work or bread. So great was the financial disturbances that President Cleveland himself compelled to send United States troops to quell riots in Chicago which were some of the consequences following the doctrines of free trade.


 Gen. Behan next enumerated the benefits to the whole country in connection with another great policy of the Republican party - that the internal improvements, embracing levies, harbor improvement and public buildings, the money for which was furnished by protection, and which gave employment to thousands of locality or party affiliations.


 He called special attention to the enterprise of the present administration and the diplomatic sagacity of President Roosevelt in securing the property and control of the Panama canal which, while is would be of great benefit to our nation, would yield its richest returns upon Louisiana and its metropolis, New Orleans and provide an opening for its young men to realize their future success.


 Leaving general topics the speaker then touched particularly upon State matters pointing out that while assessments have been going higher and higher no reduction in the tax rate ensued explained by the fact that as the revenues increased so did the number of officials, new boards and commissions with their numerous accessories of employees and expenditures. He alluded to the excessive appointing power of the governor which reaches the enormous number of about 1000 showing the necessity of withdrawing such power from the hands of one man as it led to the enslavement of the independence of the individual.


 He pronounced himself in favor of the largest extension of the public school system. The schools at present were not sufficient for the population and the terms were too short. He believed in more schools and better schools.


 Here he thanked the young men, of whom there were a considerable number in the audience, for their presence and urged upon them to assert their independence and align themselves with the Republican party, saying that the Democratic party would make an effort to hold those who participated in the primary to vote for the nominees. Under fair conditions their claim would be good, but as there was much fraud in the primary those claims will have no force or standing, because fraud vitiates all contracts; and for further authority quoted Wm. J. Bryan who lays down the doctrine that if any man were obliged to follow his party, whether he agreed with it or not, party slavery would be the worst form of slavery.


 He then addressed himself to the old confederates and their friends calling attention to the outrageous treatment accorded those loyal democrats, Gen. Jastremski and Judge Barksdale in the recent primary. These two prominent citizens undertook to bring about some reforms for better government, and how by the machine which now controls the Democratic party and the State? The treatment accorded the carpet baggers and scallawags of the reconstruction era; yet these two men were gallant Confederate Veterans, both having shed their blood on the battle fields of Virginia.


 He closed with an appeal to all good people to come forward on April 19 and vote the Republican ticket.


 After a selection by the band, Col. Breaux introduced Judge Hunter of Alexandria who spoke briefly along lines pertaining to the Republican party. He was followed by Hon. L. P. Bryant, who dealt with Republicanism strictly from this view point of its relation to this State.


 The addresses of all the speakers were received with marked attention and often evoked applause.

The speakers left Friday for Crowley where they were advertised to address a meeting. Lafayette Advertiser 3/23/1904.



THE REPUBLICAN MEETING.
(A Different View of the Same Meeting)

 The Republican meeting held here Thursday evening considered as a Republican meeting might fairly be denominated a success, and yet it would take an optimist of the Mark Tapley order to draw any prognostication from it that the Republican candidates will develop any strength in this parish. There were possibly two-hundred people present but the majority were Democrats who went to hear "both sides of the question," but lacked a whole lot of being convinced that the Republican party had anything to offer to recompense a desertion of Democratic principles. And it wasn't the fault of the speakers, for they did their best to make the Republican party attractive. Gen. Behan in particular tried to show what a munificent government the Republicans had given us, in the way of levee construction, a few harbor improvements and an occasional public building, but he neglected signally to say a word about the inequalities of protection which he seems to look upon as the "only thing," how it builds up one section at the expense of another, and worst of all is the father of the robber trusts which , like monsters, are devouring the substance of the people and crushing them down into industrial slavery. He forgot all about the trusts, and he forgot to mention that Attorney Gen. Knox, had failed to prosecute them under the Sherman anti-trust law and that when he was finally pushed by the governor of Minnesota into a prosecution in the Northern Pacific Merger case, that he hastened to assure the trusts that the government wasn't going to "run amuck." Indeed, Gen. Behan couldn't afford to touch the trusts to whom the Republicans are committed; and he never mentioned a word about the notorious Post-office frauds, nor the $100,000,000 expense saddled on the taxpayers in the Philippines, and the attempt now pending in Congress to fasten an additional $11,000,000 to the already $150,000,000 pension fund as a vote getter for the people to pay. No, Gen. Behan didn't allude to these things, nor a few others that could be mentioned, because, you see, they might have spoiled the pretty picture he was trying to draw.

 However, there is one that Gen. Behan does deserve credit for, and that is his desire to eliminate the negro from the Republican party; but it is such a Don Quixote notion that it can hardly be taken seriously. As long as the negro has a vote he will be Republican and a menace to the South, and it is useless for a Southern man to blind himself to that stubborn fact. Promise nor persuasive argument can alter the reality, and until the fifteenth amendment is repealed the chivalry of the South will have to cling together and fight the party that invites the negro vote, regardless of all other considerations.

 What may be in the future no one knows, but to-day the Republican party is the friend and champion of the negro.  Men high in the party to offer him political and social equality. A Republican president who will be the nominee of his party at the November election, had dined a negro in the White House,  has forced a negro collector upon the people of Charleston, has deprived the people of Indianola, Miss., of mail privileges for a year, because they would not submit to a negro postmistress, has appointed negroes in various parts of the South against the protests of the South against the protests of the white people, and his course in the past is a guide to the future. With such a man dominating the party, who will do these things outraging the sensibilities of Southern people to catch the negro vote in the North, imagine to what lengths he and his party would go to carry their banner to victory, did the negro hold the balance in a Southern State.

 No, indeed; the people of the South and especially of Louisiana, who still have a horrible memory of Republicanism in the past, can not afford to lay down their guard and embrace the Republican party - and they will not.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/23/1904.





Vote Against It. - The suffrage amendment may do away with ballot box stuffing, but will never abolish bribery as long as the power of money remains. Consequently it will not purify the ballot. Vote against it. It may render future race disturbances unlikely, but it will do so by the sacrifice of the rights of deserving white men. Vote against it.

 It may insure an intelligent administration of public affairs, but it will disfranchise two good white men to disqualify a single bad one. Vote against it.

 It cannot remove fears of negro domination when such fears do not exist. Ninety thousand negroes cannot control the affairs of the state and no one believes that they ever will. Vote against it.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/28/1896.





White Supremacist Rally.
(communicated-ie. letter to editor)
 Scott, La. March 25th, 1896.

 A "white supremacist" rally at Carencro, made up largely of an important audience. Three car loads of Democrats listened to the same old sickening talk of "negro domination" last Sunday at the above place, the audience being made up principally of persons attracted tither by the free ride from Lafayette to Carencro and back.

 In the number and intelligence of its hearers, the meeting was beyond a doubt, quite a success, no less than 700 persons being present.

 It looks unfair to say of a white man that, because he will not submit to white Democratic primaries, neither vote for the Democratic candidate for Governor, that he is sailing under the black or African flag, yet, such we understand to have been the impression made upon his hearers, by J. O. Broussard Esq. during his speech  at the above meeting, when with a theatrical flourish he exhibited a white and a black handkerchief.

 Now, don't you know friend Omere that, though we differ with you in politics, still we are as much opposed to having a negro in office as ever you were?

 Better qualify that ungenerous language, or you may find out you have been playing with a two edged Sword.
   B. T. P.
   Published in the Lafayette Advertiser of March 28, 1896.
 

 

Communication

Lafayette, La., Jan. 27, 1905.
To The Lafayette Advertiser.

 As a citizen interested in the good government of the town, and a life-long Democrat free from factional and partisan influences, it strikes me that the methods employed BEFORE and at the mass meeting held on the 19th, and the charges made by inferences to be drawn from the resolutions adopted, and those specifically made by the orators of the occasion, have a tendency to hamper the Mayor and Council to be elected at the ensuing election in their efforts to obtain the support of the people in the measures that will necessarily arise in a progressive administration, to the injury of the town, and array the Democrats in factional ranks to the discredit of the party.

 Had the leaders of the movement not been imbued with prejudice growing out of factional feelings, their better judgment would have prevailed, and better results to the town, if not to themselves, assured.

 Why is it, that with the exception of the Secretary of the present City Council, the call for the mass meeting was not signed by any of the members of the present Council or its officers, but signed by any members of the present Council or its officers, but signed by all those selected as candidates at the meeting?

 Why is it, that all the candidates were selected from the signers of the call only?

 Why was the charge made that the candidate selected at the meeting for Mayor two years ago bu counted out, even were it true?

 Why was it stated that it had been the custom in the past for a few men to formulate and put out a ticket as the choice of the people, but that the meeting marked a new era as it was the first instance in which the voters had been called into consultation and given voice in the nomination of officers, even if it were true?

 And as if to destroy the force of the preceding declaration, why was it stated that the name presented at the meeting as candidates for councilmen HAD BEEN SUGGESTED by "capable and disinterested parties"?

 Has the outgoing Council's administration been so unbusinesslike, unprogressive, extravagant and partial as to justify a demand FOR THE REVERSE in the resolutions adopted? Even if it were true the outgoing Council has been guilty, bu inference, of all this, would not the adoption of the resolutions as a platform for the candidates have been of better avail, rather than in its form as an arraignment, perhaps undeserved, of the outgoing Council? Nothing could have been added to this move to more effectually divide the people into factional ranks. It is a pity that some one did not attempt to stem the tide of factional spirit pervading the minds of the leaders of the movement.

 In truth, the method of selecting candidates of the party can only be done under sanction of the party organization. The leaders of the movement recognize this as the candidates selected by them are to be submitted to the primary.

 The action of the meeting can be justified only on the theory that a faction of the party has the right to call upon those favoring their side to meet in mass meeting to select candidates for the primary with the view of binding all their friends and those who unwittingly participate, and thus solidify its ranks; but this is undemocratic, in that it deprives each individual of the hope of advancement without its first consulting the leaders of the faction, and is an attempt to forestall the free and unbiased selection of public servants according to the merits of the candidates by those who allow themselves to be be guided by factional strife and prejudice.

 To have a bunch of candidates selected by a set of men, however "capable   and disinterested", or by a mass meeting after only twenty-four hours notice to select a ticket in opposition to the "bunch" is just an objectionable and undemocratic as any method yet devised.

 The ticket selected at the mass meeting is composed of good and honest men; it is a pity that they were not better protected from their friends. With the united support of the people and the good will of all so necessary to the success of any administration; it would however be ludicrous, if not foolish, to state that they are the sum total of good and honest men in this community.

 The old council is composed of good and honest men, who have strove to do, and did do (unreadable words) the material progress of the (unreadable word) the statement of politician to the contrary notwithstanding.

 The rumors have it that another ticket will be placed before the people at the primary. This is the natural (unreadable word) from the actions of the leaders and orators, for whom (unreadable word) must own. I havew a good feeling and some admiration.

 Under the circumstances the thing for us voters to do is to select from the "bunch" and from those who present themselves in opposition, or from one or the other side only, without regard to the political aspirations of the leaders, or because we were inveigled to attend the meeting, but with an eye singel to secure the best men to guide our political destiny and educational and material progress.

 Thanking you for the space allowed, I remain,
                 Yours truly,
                    CITIZEN-TAXPAYER.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1905.        

  

THE "DEMOCRATIC VOTER" AND THE GAZETTE. 
 
 In the last issue of The Advertiser " ' Democratic Voter' informs us that the "People's Ticket" simply signifies candidates chosen by white Democratic voters in meeting assembled, but not by a few politicians, office-holders or ring.' " This definition is as ludicrous as it is absurd. Everybody knows that the parish executive committee ordered white Democratic primaries on the 14th of December when two-thirds of the white voters of this parish expressed their choice at the polls and nominated the ticket printed at the head of this paper, and everyone is aware of the fact that the so-called "People's Ticket" is the choice of that acrobatic institution known as "the committee" the leading members of which are not office-holders, but inveterate office-seekers whose insatiate desire to serve their country their country is painfully evident. When "Democratic Voter" intimates that the regular Democratic ticket has been chosen by a "few politicians, office-holders or ring' " he is simply declaring through his old hat. Such a statement sounds so much like a joke and is so absolutely at variance with the facts that it needs no refutation. Had our anonymous friend said the "People's Ticket" was patched together by a handful of would-be politicians, used-to-be bossed and office-seekers, he would have hit the nail squarely on the head.
 
If the Democratic ticket was chosen by politicians and office-holders" as intimated The Advertiser's correspondent, their must be a very large number of office-holders in this parish (1200 out of the 1700 voters nominated that ticket) and with so many officers to be filled, our esteemed friends, the Googoos, must be terribly unpopular that they have not yet succeeded in being elected to any of them. It is surely not because they don't try, for like the patriots of old they were never known to anwer to their country's call.
 
We are told that the gentlemen forming the "People's Ticket" have always been true and tried Democrats from their infancy." If they were baptized with the holy water of Democracy, it is high time for their political godfathers to be doing something. If they have been Democrats for so long a time greater is the crime is the crime they are committing against Democracy by running on a ticket which is neither "fish nor foul."
 
They were probably Democrats "before the young editor of The Gazette saw the light of the sun." There is nothing strange about that. But having been Democrats so many years, they should be acquainted with the duties of a Democrat and the principle of Democracy and not allow their names to appear on a so-called "People's Ticket" especially at a time when all the enemies of Democracy and white supremacy have combined for the sole purpose of defeating a Democratic governor and electing in his stead a Republican.
 
If they were young and unacquainted with the political history of this State since the war and had not "been true and tried Democrats since their infancy," their undemocratic course by utterly disregarding Democratic authority, might be excused on account of their age, but having been Democrats "before the young editor of The Gazette saw the light of the sun" and having actually grown grey in the service of the grand old party, their action to-day in leading an independent movement is inexcusable and incrompehensible.
 
We repeat we have the utmost respect for those gentlemen and appreciate the fact they are men of honor, but when we think of their many good qualities both of mind and heart, their suicidal politics and great inconsistency appear to us exceedingly deplorable.

Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1896.
 



THE DEMOCRATIC TICKET.

STATE OFFICERS:
GOVERNOR:
Murphy J. Foster, of St. Mary.

 LT. GOVERNOR:
Robt. B. Snyder, of Tensas.

SECRETARY OF STATE:
John T. Michel, of Orleans.

STATE TREASURER:
A. V. Fournet, of St. Martin.

STATE AUDITOR:
W. W. Heard, of Union.

ATTORNEY GENERAL:
M. J. Cunningham, of Natchitoches.

 SUPT. OF PUBLIC EDUCATION:
Prof. J. V. Calhoun, of Orleans.

DISTRICT OFFICERS;
JUDGE:
Julian Mouton.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY:
Minos T. Gordy.

PARISH OFFICERS:
Representative:
J. O. Broussard.

CLERK OF COURT:
E. G. Voorhies.

SHERIFF:
I. A. Broussard.

Coroner:
Dr. A. R. Trahan.
Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1896.




THAT CIRCULAR.  

 We have been shown a circular which is being distributed among the voters to show the position taken by Mr. Julian Mouton on the suffrage question when a member of the House of Representatives. The circular shows, as stated in the Elam letter, that Mr. Mouton voted with 73 other members of the House to submit the question to the people and that 9 members voted against submission. This shows exactly what Mr. Mouton has said:
 

That he believed it was a question to be decided by the people alone;
 

That they should be consulted about a law that concerned them so much;
 

That they had a right to express their opinion in the matter;
 

That they had a right to be heard and say if they did not want qualification of the suffrage.
 
Mr. Mouton did not vote for the amendment, but, despite all that has been said, he voted to submit the question to the people.  

 We do not think that anything could have been done by the friends of Mr. Mouton to strengthen that gentleman with the people, for in a republic it has never been considered a crime to submit any question to the people for solution. We believe that Jefferson, the father of American Democracy, had unlimited confidence in the virtue and intelligence of the voters and Jackson always trusted the masses, but according to the "latter day saints" in Lafayette parish the sage of Monticello and Old Hickory were wrong, for owing to the political bible of our Googoo friends, our representative, Mr. Mouton, commited a serious crime because he voted to submit the question of suffrage to the people.
 
It may not be out of order to state, however, that Mr. Mouton succeeded in killing the Benoit election bill by which it was intended to impose an educational qualification on the voter. If that bill had passed the General Assembly a man who cannot read or write would not have been able to vote in April. It seems to us that our representative should not be blamed for having killed a bill which would have disfranchised about 40 per cent, of our people.

Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1896.
 
 



The Republicans.

 The Gazette published the following to keep its leaders posted about Republican politics in this parish:

LAFAYETTE, LA.., Jan. 25, 1896.

On this day and pursuant to previous understanding, the Republicans of the Parish of Lafayette met for the purpose of organization. Meeting was held in the town of Lafayette and was called to order by Mr. John Vigneaux, who stated the objects of the meeting.

 On motion of Mr. Judice, seconded, Mr. J. M. Jones, of Carencro, was made chair man, and on motion of Mr. John Vigneaux Dr. H. D. Guidry was made secretary.

 On motion the following gentlemen were elected vice-presidents: Octave Bertrand, J. A. Delhomme, Jacques Doucet.

 On motion made and duly seconded the following committee on resolutions was appointed by the chair, viz: Andrew Cayard, John Vigneaux and B. F. Flanders, Jr.

 Pending the report of the commitee on resolutions the meeting proceeded to the election of delegates to the State convention, to be held in the city of New Orleans Jan. 27, 1896. The following named gentlemen were B. F. Flanders, Jr., F. Otto, Andrew Cayard, J. M. Jones, E. McDaniel, J. A. Delhomme, Albert Comus, John Nugent, R. H. Rand, Phil Crouchet, August Micaud, Raoul Gentil.

 The committee on resolutions having returned, made known their readiness to report, which was accordingly received as follows:

 Resolved, That we, the Republicans of the parish of Lafayette in mass meeting assembled, for the purpose of electing delegates to the State convention (Republican), to be held in the city of New Orleans, and headed by the Hon. Gen. Behan, and for the purpose of organizing a parish Republican Executive committee and a Congressional District committee to serve the parish for the next ensuing term.

 Resolved, furthermore, That we pledge our fealty to the Republican party and denouncing the suffrage amendment.

 Resolved, further, That the delegates to the State convention are hereby instructed to vote as a unit, and that the chairman of the delegation be authorized to cast the twelve votes of the parish at said convention. It is furthermore resolved that in the case of the absence of the chairman of the delegation that the delegates present appoint one of their members to cast said vote.

 Resolved, further, That we proceed to organize into ward clubs as protectionists, and that each and every one of us pledge our earnest support to the promotion of the cause of protection of all American industries.

 Said resolutions as reported and read, and on motion made and seconded, were unanimously adopted as a whole.

 On motion made, seconded and adopted the following, the following named gentlemen were appointed members to represent the parish of Lafayette on the Republican Congressional committee of the 3rd district: Dr. H. D. Guidry, Emile Romero, John Nugent and R. S. Rand.

 On motion the names of Messrs. John Vigneaux and B. F. Flanders, Jr., wre suggested, and the delgates to the State convention urged to have these gentlemen appointed on the State Central committee.

 On motion made, seconded and adopted, the following named gentlemen were appointed and are hereafter to be known as the regular organization of the Republican party of the parish of Lafayette, and are to be known as the Republican Parish Executive committee of said parish.

  1st Ward - Edwin Smith, Jules Dubernard.

 2nd Ward - Hugh Hutchinson, Girard Foreman.

 3rd Ward - E. McDaniel, F. Otto.

 4th Ward - Blank.

 5th Ward - Blank.

 6th Ward - August Micaud, Paul Martin.

 7th Ward - Andrew Cayard, S. Sonier.
 8th Ward - Octave Bertand, August Arnold.

 At Large - Edgar Delas, Odillion Broussard, Paul Castel, Leonard Guidry, D. McDaniel.

 On motion the meeting stood adjourned sinc die.
    J. M. JONES, Chairman.
      H. D. GUIDRY, Secretary.

 The meeting was held at the home of Mr. F. Otto in this town.
    Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1896.





The Gazette is thankful to Louisiana's distinguished senior senator, Hon. Don Caffery, for valuable documents. No public man has more admirers and friends in Lafayette than Senator Caffery and it is with extreme pleasure that they note the enviable reputation he is making for himself in Congress. Laf. Gaz. 2/1/1896.




Democratic State Ticket.

For Governor, W. W. HEARD, of Union.

For Lieut. Governor, ALBERT ESTOPINAL, of St. Bernard.

For Secretary of State, JOHN T. MICHEL, of New Orleans.

For Attorney General, WALTER GUION, of Assumption.

For State Treasurer, LEDOUX SMITH, of Rapides.

For Auditor, W. S. FRAZEE, of St. Landry.

For Supt. of Education, J. V. CALHOUN, of New Orleans.


PARISH OF LAFAYETE.

For Judge 18th District, WM. CAMPBELL;

For Sheriff, I. A. Broussard;

For Clerk of Court, E. G. VOORHIES;

For Represntatives, OVERTON CADE, HOMER DURIO;

For Coroner, DR. J. F. MOUTON.
Lafayette Gazette 2/3/1900.





Have Put Out A Ticket.
The Socialists of Acadia parish held a convention last week and put out a full parish ticket with Mr. L. H. Thompson for sheriff. Mr. Thompson is well known here, having charge of the removal of the buildings on Pierce and Jefferson streets. Laf. Adv. 2/3/1904.





New Registration. On Jan. 1 the old registration became void, and all those who desire to vote this year must register again. The registration books will be open sixty days beginning Jan. 1. If you have not registered since the first of the year, don't neglect to do so, but do so at once. Nobody is exempt, everybody must register. Laf. Adv. 2/3/1904. 




Honorable R. C. Landry.

The States (New Orleans) makes the following complimentary notice of Lafayette's representative to the convention:

 "One of the venerable and patriarchal-looking members of the convention will be Hon. R. C. Landry, of Lafayette. He has always taken an active interest in the public affairs of his parish and is ever on the alert to advance and promote the interests of his people. He was born in St. Martin parish, February 22, 1824, but has resided in Lafayette ever since he was a year old. His parents originally came from Canada. During the Civil War he served for three years as a member of the Eighteenth Louisiana Regiment, under Captain A. P. Bailey, doing valiant and gallant duty in Louisiana and Arkansas. He is now one of the prominent planters in his section of the State. He has been a member of the police jury of his parish for five terms. He was first appointed immediately after the war; twice by Governor Nicholls, and once by Governor Foster and his intense popularity was proven when the office was made elective by his people electing him again to the office which he had so long filled with such eminent satisfaction to them and their interests. During the past six years he has been the president of the police jury.

 It goes without saying that Mr. Landry, who has always been a Democrat, is a most ardent white supremacist and he was chosen Democratic nominee to the Constitutional Convention without opposition.

 Mr. Landry was married twice. His first wife was Miss Irene Bernard and his second, Miss Felicia Doucet. He is the father of eleven children, three boys and eight girls."

From the New Orleans States and in the Laf. Gazette 2/5/1898.





Democratic Executive Committee Meeting.

 Lafayette, La., January 30, 1903.
   Pursuant to a call the Democratic Executive Committee of the town of Lafayette, La., met his day for the purpose of devising method for the selection of candidates for mayor and councilmen of said town; absent I. A. Broussard, and Henry Church.

 The committee was duly organized by the selection of Hon. Judge Julian Mouton as chairman, and Ed. G. Voorhies as secretary.

 The following resolution was unanimously adopted:

 Resolved, that a Democratic Primary Election be and is hereby called for the nomination of candidates by direct vote for a Mayor and seven Councilmen for the town of Lafayette. The primary shall be held at the court-house in the said town of Lafayette, on Wednesday the fourth day of March, 1903, and shall be conducted according to law.

 The polls shall be opened at seven o'clock a. m. and shall be closed at five o'clock p. m.

 The following named persons are hereby appointed as Commissioners of election for said primary, viz: R. C. Greig, Jos. Ducote and D. V. Gardebled, and Galbert Comeau, clerk of election.

 None but qualified electors under the constitution and election laws of the State, and who are white Democrats, shall be entitled to vote at said primary.

 Notice of the voting of this primary election shall contain a copy of this resolution, and be signed by the secretary of this committee, and shall be published in a newspaper of this town, at least two weeks prior to the time fixed herein for the primary.

 The returns of this primary election shall be made in sealed packages to the chairman of this committee, in accordance with provisions of Act 133 of 1900.

 At said primary five Democrats shall be elected to constitute the Democratic Executive Committee of this town.

 JULIAN MOUTON, chairman; A. R. TRAHAN, M. D; ED. G. VOORHIES, secretary. - Lafayette Gazette 2/7/1903.






THE ADVERTISER'S TICKET.

For Mayor.
Felix H. Mouton.


FOR COUNCILMEN.

Dr. G. A. Martin, Felix O. Broussard, Felix Landry, A. A. Morgan, Jr., Pierre Gerac, J. F. Tanner, O. B. Hopkins.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/8/1905.


 


TO THE PEOPLE AND VOTERS OF CITY OF LAFAYETTE.

We, the undersigned, selected as candidates by Mass Meeting at Court House, Jan. 19, 1905, for various municipal offices subject to primaries called for March 4, respectfully solicit the support to primaries called for March 4, respectfully solicit the support of the people.

If elected, we pledge our earnest and best efforts towards carrying out an economical and progressive administration without favor or partiality.
Respectfully,

FOR MAYOR. Chas. O. Mouton.

FOR COUNCILMEN.
O. B. Hopkins, Simeon Begnaud, C. D. Boudreaux, Dr. F. E. Girard, Gus Schmulen, Dr. A. R. Trahan, P. Kruass.

FOR TOWN CONSTABLE.
D. J. Veazey.

FOR TOWN TAX COLLECTOR.
A. J. Leblanc.

FOR TOWN CLERK.
A. J. Leblanc.

FOR TREASURER TOWN COUNCIL.
A. T. Caillouet.

FOR TOWN JAILOR.
Faustin Vincent.

FOR MEMBERS DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
J. L. Kennedy, Raoul Pellerin, Pink B. Torian, Felix E. Voorhies, Ovey Herpin.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/8/1905.
 
 



ENCOURAGE THE YOUNG MEN.

 In thoughtfully analyzing the conditions confronting the municipality of Lafayette upon the eve of a change of administration, the conclusion is forced on the mind that the Young Men's movement in the present campaign is the natural outgrowth of an impelling desire which has taken hold of our people to effect a change of some kind in our public affairs.

It is not our purpose now to discuss the merits of this status of affairs, but merely point out its existence as an undeniable fact. And this popular trend seems to the controlling influence actuating the young men of Lafayette to embrace an inviting opportunity to personally engage in the duties of public life.


 This is ambition of a worthy sort and it should receive the fullest encouragement, because it will undoubtedly redound to the advantage of the community and country if the minds and energies of our young men should be stimulated and increasingly developed in the theory and practice of government and a higher conception of civic duties.

The administration of public affairs is of the first importance on account of its strong and direct bearing upon the interests of all classes of society. Instead of shrinking from the responsibilities of public life, good men should feel it to be one of their highest duties to actively participate in the administration of the government and constantly interest themselves in improving its standard. And just in proportion as good men come to accept this as the principle of their lives will all the ills and woes which trail behind demagogue politicians, make way for the blessings and advantages of good government under the wise guidance of patriotic statesmanship.

The Young Men's ticket, we believe, stands as the crystallized expression of a popular demand for a halt in the wrangle for supremacy between rival politicians, of which the business public are growing heartily tired. The personnel of the ticket is made up almost entirely of successful young business men of character and standing in the community, who would bring into the public service the valuable business training; and the head of the ticket is a young man whose executive ability and sterling worth are recognized by all. We have reason to believe, therefore, that public interests would be properly guarded and judiciously fostered under the administration of the Young Men's ticket, and The Advertiser earnestly hopes that these young men will be given a fair opportunity to redeem their pledges and show the kind of metal they are made of.

 Lafayette Advertiser 2/8/1905.




Young Men's Ticket.

 We the undersigned candidates for municipal offices as specified below, respectfully submit our names to the public to be voted on at the primary election to be held March 4, 1905.

FOR MAYOR, Felix H. Mouton.

 FOR COUNCILMEN, Dr. G. A. Martin, Felix O. Broussard, Felix H. Landry, A. A. Morgan, Jr., Pierre Gerac, L. F. Rigues, J. F. Tanner.

 FOR TOWN CONSTABLE, A. Edwin Chargois.

 FOR TOWN TAX COLLECTOR, H. H. Hohorst.

FOR TOWN CLERK, L. D. Nickerson.

 FOR TREASURER TOWN COUNCIL, D. V. Gardebled.

FOR TOWN JAILOR, Abraham Hirsch.

 FOR MEMBERS DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, A. E. Mouton, Wm. Campbell, Alfred Hebert, Henry Church, W. P. Bracken. Lafayette Advertiser 2/8/1905.




A REDUCTION OF TAXES.

 In another column of this paper will be seen resolutions adopted by the citizens of the first and second wards at a meeting held at Scott on Saturday last. These resolutions set forth that owing to the low prices of farm products which prevail and the poor prospects of enhancement the assessment for parochial and State taxation, although previously satisfactory, should be lowered so as to allow a reduction of taxes in proportion to the general depression of values. This to our thinking, is fair, and we may add, imperative, under the present conditions. After all, values of land and other taxable property, "rise and fall" according to the financial fluctuations of the hour, and the prices of landed estate are, in a great measure, if not exclusively, dependent upon what its fruits will yield in the market. No one will invest in it unless the revenues assure a reasonable interest on the capital.

 At the present time it takes two and a half bales of cotton to realize what one bale would have sold for two years ago and still the same amount of capital and labor is required to produce one bale now than it did then.

 The same may be said of the values of all things used on the farm such as horses, mules, etc. To-day these necessities of the farm are at least 50 per cent lower than last year. Indeed it would be crying injustice should the assessments be kept at their present figures.

 We note with pleasure that the expenses of the parish for this year, as appears in the report of the budget committee in the Police Jury proceedings published in this paper, have been reduced and are over two thousand dollars less than last year. This shows that our police jurors appreciate the present condition of affairs and are bent upon relieving the people as much as possible. We hope that when they will sit as a board of reviewers after the taking of the assessment, they will act, as is their won't, with equity and justice. We may add, however that we believe the Police Jury will not have occasion to reduce the assessments as the assessor will willingly do so.
Lafayette Gazette 2/9/1895.






DEPENDS ON GOOD SELECTION.

 It sometimes happens that with the very best of intentions, just the opposite result is obtained from that expected or desired. This is equally true of public bodies as of individuals. Success can only be obtained by a very careful consideration of the end which is sought to be obtained. A false start is often made, and experience has demonstrated that it is hard to overcome, for which reason it is much better to make haste slowly.

And it also frequently happens with public bodies as with individuals, that the false start and the mistakes develop through a poor selection of those whom they may choose to serve them.

It is certainly to be hoped that this will not be the case with the recently elected Police Jury, who can be of such great aid and assistance in many ways to the parish. The Advertiser believes that a a fine selection has been made and that as a body we many expect good things from them; but to just what extent, depends largely upon their selections of those who shall serve them. And we think there need be little doubt upon that score, as we feel convinced that the gentlemen of the Police Jury will exercise due care, and let their choice be governed strictly upon fitness and merit. With a good Police Jury and assistants, it remains for the citizens to unite and give them their fullest and heartiest support that we may all together do everything that can be done for the welfare and best interests of the parish.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1904:  

 



No Effect on Local Politics.

 The "address to the voters of the parish of Lafayette" published over the signatures of the defeated candidates of the anti-administration ticket has not caused the mildest ripple in our local politics. The Democrats of this parish participated in the primaries in good faith and it is an insult to their intelligence and honesty to even suspect they will not abide by the results of those primaries. Of course  there are some people who never intended to vote for the Democratic ticket. but the consciences of these do not crave for the soothing balm of absolution so freely given by the signers of this somewhat remarkable address. They esteem the violation of a pledge of this kind an extremely trivial matter and it is a reckless squandering of the holy ointment if they are the ones who are so generously "absolved from any pledge or promise to abide by the result of the primary election." The Democratic voters of this parish know that there was a free, full and fair vote east at the primaries and the defeated candidates had every opportunity to, and did, poll their whole strength, including a large number of voters who had no business to vote in a Democratic primary as is clearly shown by their support of the Republican ticket to-day. We believe that the fair-minded voters of this parish will agree with us that the primaries held last December were eminently fair and that there is absolutely no cause for the ill-advised protest published last Saturday. Lafayette Gazette 2/10/1900.



Mardi Gras Day.

 It was confidently asserted by some, that the persons who occupied positions on the parish roads' flat boat drawn down the streets Mardi Gras day, were members of the Police Jury, the disfiguration of their physiognomies that rendered it impossible for their acquaintances to recognize them, being only a natural transformation of their features consequent on the very severe strain under which their nervous systems are laboring on account of these jurors being compelled to travel the parish roads, like other citizens. Of, course, only a very few people will believe such a story, for it is well known that Police Jury never do dive down into bog holes if they can possibly go around them, and besides this flat boat scene was never intended by the designers to reflect on the members of the Police Jury, but only as a slur on the present most pitiable status of the parish roads. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.




 A scene that proved itself an object of great amusement and one that was particularly appropriate to the purpose in hand, was that presented on our streets Mardi Gras day in the shape of a large flat boat drawn by a pair of mules. Fastened to standards on either side of the boat were pieces of white cloth bearing this inscription: "This is the way we travel Lafayette parish roads," and to emphasize further the significance of the design, a much dilapidate two wheeled vehicle was made to closely follow the flat boat, bearing as an excuse for its badly crippled condition the explanation on canvas "Bad roads did this." The whole affair was certainly a capital 'get off' on the present miserable condition of the parish roads, and citizens of Lafayette are bound to regret that these should ever be in such a state as to furnish just occasion for jest or ridicule of this nature. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.




Good Words.

 Believing they would prove interesting to your readers, we have selected a few from the many notices given Mr. W. B. Bailey, on his appointment as Clerk of Court, by the state press of Louisiana. It must certainly be gratifying to Gov. Foster, as well as to Mr. Bailey, to see that the selection has met with such universal approval.


EDITOR BAILEY TAKES THE PLUM.

 Truth is extremely gratified to learn the news of the appointment to the position of clerk of court for the parish of Lafayette of that worthy veteran soldier and journalist, W. B. Bailey, formerly editor of the Lafayette ADVERTISER. Mr. Bailey came here on Sunday evening last and left for home on Monday, carrying his commission, which was obtained upon petitions of the best citizens of the parish of Lafayette, where Bailey is quite popular. In making a clerk of court of Bro. Bailey is quite popular. In making a clerk of court of Bro. Bailey, the press of the State loses a most valuable member, nevertheless we believe we can safely assert that there is not a member of the Louisiana Press Association who will not rejoice at the good fortune of this most worthy and popular pencil pusher who will not join us in wishing our worthy confrere of many a year the most abundant prosperity. - Weekly Truth.  

A MASTERLY SELECTION.

 Gov. Foster has made another masterly appointment. The position of Clerk of the Court for Lafayette parish becoming vacant by the death of the incumbent, Mr. Emile Creighton. Gov. Foster, upon the recommendation of the leading business men of Lafayette, appointed to that position Mr. W. B. Bailey, the late veteran of the Lafayette ADVERTISER.

 Only two weeks ago Bro. Bailey retired from the editorial control of the ADVERTISER after having conducted it ever since his return from the surrender at Appomattox.

 Brother Bailey is one of the old landmarks in Louisiana journalism, a charter member of the State Press Association, and has always been true to his State and to the principles of the Democratic party.

 During the dark days of radical oppression his paper held aloft the white banners of Democracy and his pen and tongue never faltered in the discharge of every faltered in the discharge of every duty incumbent upon him. In later days when his services were needed in behalf of this State's honor he never failed to respond to the calls of duty, and remained poor and honest rather than "bend the pregnant hinges of the knee that thrift might follow fawning."

 Governor Foster, this is one of the best appointments you have ever made, and the press of Louisiana congratulates you upon your deserved recognition of a brave and true hearted old veteran - a member of the Fourth Estate.

 Bro. Bailey, we salute you.
Baton Rouge Advocate.


  By the death of the clerk of the district court of Lafayette parish that office was recently made vacant, and has just been filled by the appointment of our esteemed confrere, Capt. W. B. Bailey, late editor of the ADVERTISER. Ever ready to do justice where justice is due, as well as to criticize when it believes criticism proper. The Item desires to compliment Gov. Foster on this selection. No truer man lives than W. B. Bailey and he is fully competent for the duty assigned him. - Baton Rouge Capital Item.

 Gov. Foster has made an appointment which will not only meet with the unanimous endorsement of the people of the parish in which the appointee resides, but with that of the entire press of the state as well. The clerk of the parish of Lafayette having been removed from the active theater of life by grim visaged death, the Governor has filled the vacancy thus created by the appointment of Mr. W. B. Bailey, late editor of the ADVERTISER of that parish. For the past 28 years he fought the hard battles of the Democracy, and in the recent campaign he was a fine supporter of Governor Foster and the cause he represented. No better man than brother Bailey could have been selected for the position, and none more worthy or deserving could have been found within the limits of the parish. We congratulate him on his good luck and hope he will live long to enjoy the fruits of it. -- Plaquemine Daily Journal.


 Governor Foster, last Monday, appointed Mr. W. B. Bailey clerk of the court for the parish of Lafayette, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. Creighton. Mr. Bailey, for many years, was editor of the Lafayette ADVERTISER and no knight of the quill has fought more zealously and consistently the battles of Democracy than he. Mr. Bailey was also a gallant Confederate artilleryman in Virginia. His appointment is a merited compliment to a gallant Democratic editor and it will meet with the general approbation of the fraternity. The editor of the Review heartily congratulates his old schoolmate, army companion and confrere upon this recognition of his abilities and of the life he has spent in serving the State. - Louisiana Review, New Orleans.


 The Governor has appointed Mr. W. B. Bailey, late editor of the Lafayette ADVERTISER, to fill the vacancy in the clerk's office of Lafayette parish caused by the death of Emile Creighton. Governor Foster, accept our humble congratulations on your selection ;  and to our venerable old friend, Bro. Bailey, we say hurrah for you -- may your new trust afford you more satisfaction and prove more lucrative than journalism. - St. Charles Clarion.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/11/1893.



POLICE JURY.
Among other business....

 By motion of Mr. Avant the jury of freeholders composed of David Spell and others was discharged and the following jury of freeholders appointed to trace and lay out a public road from lands belonging to David Spell and Jonas Weild to Bayou Queal Tortue to meet the public road traced in Acadia parish: Silas Hoffpauir, Ellis Hoffpauir, Jules Bavoni, Oneal East, Claiborn Avant Joachim Leger. The said road according to law.

 Messrs. Ben Avant, Jno. Whittington, Jr, and Antoine Broussard were appointed to repair the Simeon Cormier bridge.

 Messrs. Chas. D. Caffery, W. B. Torian and Alfred Hebert were appointed to investigate the drainage North of the corporation of Lafayette.

 Messrs. C. Debaillon and E. G. Voorhies were appointed to confer with the City City Council and arrange for securing electric lights for the court room.
Lafayette Gazette 2/12/1898.











THE DEMOCRATIC TICKET.

 The following ticket is submitted to the Democratic voters of the town of Lafayette, in the primary election to be held on March 4, 1903.

For Mayor: CHAS. D. CAFFERY.

For Councilmen: FELIX DEMANADE, A. EMILE MOUTON, GEO. A. DEBLANC, JOHN O. MOUTON, D. V. GARDEBLED, M. ROSENFIELD, H. L. FONTENOT.


Democratic Executive Committee: Wm. CAMPBELL, JULIAN MOUTON, I. A. BROUSSARD, HENRY CHURCH, ALFRED HEBERT.
Lafayette Gazette 2/14/1902.


The following citizens, by request, have consented to serve the corporation of Lafayette for the coming term, as

Mayor: C. O. MOUTON.

Councilmen: PAUL L. DECLOUET, DR. J. D. TRAHAN, DR. F. E. GIRARD, WM. CLEGG, ARTHUR J. LEBLANC, C. D. BOUDREAUX.

 Subject to the approval of the qualified voters at the primaries to be held on March 4, 1903.


 The following to serve as Democratic Executive Committee:

SIMEON BEGNAUD, ED. G. VOORHIES, DR. A. R. TRAHAN, JOHN L. KENNEDY, ROBERT H. BROUSSARD.
Lafayette Gazette 2/14/1903.  





MUNICIPAL CANDIDATES.

 The Gazette publishes in this issue the announcement of the candidacy of Hon. Chas. D. Caffery for mayor, and of Messrs. Felix Demanade, John O. Mouton, Geo. A. DeBlanc, A. E. Mouton, D. V. Gardebled, M. Rosenfield, and Henry L. Fontenot for councilmen of our town. With the exception of the three last named, these gentlemen have served the town in the capacities mentioned during the term about to expire, and believing that they have discharged their duties faithfully and well during their incumbency in office, The Gazette, exercising its right in the choice of public officers, endorses them for re-election. The new candidates are well known citizens of the town, and qualified to assume the duties of councilmen.

 The Gazette gives its support to this ticket for the reason that the affairs of the town have been honestly and economically administered, and also because of the active and personal interest shown by those who stand for re-election, in the substantial welfare of the town, and because of its belief that the new members will serve equally as well and show the same commendable public spirit.  Lafayette Gazette 2/14/1903.





THE ONLY REMEDY.

Last Saturday's Gazette contained a very thoughtful contribution from the pen of Dr. N. P. Moss. Dr. Moss contends with much reason that the failure of hundreds of men to pay their poll tax is attributable to illiteracy, rather than to a lack of patriotism. We believe that Dr. Moss is eminently right. Most of these men who temporarily disfranchise themselves by failing to pay the poll tax are not unpatriotic. When the South called her sons to the defense of constitutional liberty and the crucial test of civic devotion was made on the field of battle, none responded with more alacrity than the citizen who, in time of peace, took little or no interest in the affairs of his government. Men refrain from exercising the right of suffrage because they do not understand its importance. Illiteracy or false education is in a large measure responsible for the lamentable indifference among the people regarding the performance of their duties of citizenship. The apathy evidenced by the nonpayment of the poll tax is an evil which bids fair to undermine our system of government. It naturally prevails in a greater degree among the illiterate people, but unfortunately it is not confined to any class of citizens. Even among the educated there is an inclination to shirk the performance of civic duties. Men of intelligence and education often employ questionable methods to escape the discomforts and responsibility of the jury-room, and they consider the hours devoted to political matters as so much time lost. Many evils grow out of this popular indifference to governmental affairs. One of its legitimate results, and the one which has caused more trouble than all the others, is that abnormal product of modern society known as the political boss, who, after all, merely wields the power of which the people have divested themselves by their own apathy. The boss avails himself of conditions for which he is not responsible, and if he has not grown more powerful it is a tribute to his own moderation, because with so much indifference among the voters there is nothing to prevent him from becoming the absolute master.

 There is something defective in the education or rearing up of a people who care so little for their government. It would seem that the importance of discharging their civic duties has never been properly instilled in the minds of the men of to-day. Both the home and school appear to have been derelict in this respect. The percentage of citizens who are not conversant with the workings of the government is appallingly great. The popular idea seems to be that the government is a thing which will take care of itself and that it is not the citizen's business to take part in its administration.

 The only remedy for this condition of affairs lies in the hands of the State. It is the correct education of the young. That broad education of the child which the State alone is able to give offers the sole cure for this common disease which so seriously affects the body politic. In a country like this where the people are supreme and where the popular will is law, it is important that the voters should have a proper appreciation of their duty to the State. Too much about the government can not be taught in the schools, and it should be impressed upon the mind of every boy that it is a great privilege to be born an American citizen and it is still a greater privilege to be allowed to exercise the rights of American citizenship.
Lafayette Gazette 2/14/1903.





IT BREAKS OUT AGAIN.

 While the South is rationally and earnestly dealing with the negro question the Republicans of the North are doing all in their power to cause trouble not only to the white people of the Southern States but to the negroes of this section. Every time President Roosevelt entertains a negro at the White House the solution of the race problem in the South is rendered more difficult, and whenever some radical measure is proposed in Congress to secure political equality for the Southern negroes the results are disastrous to the very people whose welfare this pernicious kind of legislation pretends to promote.

 If any further evidence is needed to prove that the Republican party is determined to pursue its infamous policy of interference in the affairs of the South that evidence is furnished by the recent action of the Senatorial committee which made a favorable report on Senator McComas' bill to create the "Freedman's Inquiry Commission." The purpose of this bill is to investigate racial conditions in the South and incidentally to make a few soft berths for some of the pets of the g. o. p. who have not yet been provided for.

 The Republican party knows that it can not reverse the social and political conditions in the South. If reconstruction has done one thing it has settled forever the question of racial supremacy in the South. And almost embittered by the bloodiest of civil wars, which had just ended, backed by the civil and military forces of the Federal government, was unable to coerce the South into submission to the rule of an inferior race. The South, weakened and impoverished by war, with its homes destroyed and its fields devastated, was yet mighty in moral strength and unconquerable pride and could not be made to submit to infamous Federal laws. If the South could not be subjugated then, the Republican party knows that it will not submit to force bills to-day.

 These spasmodic outbursts of sectional rancor, as shown by the McComas bill are intended merely to wave the bloody shirt for political reasons. There are enough prejudiced, narrow-minded white people and negroes in the doubtful States to hold the balance of power, and unfortunately among this class the bloody shirt has not lost all its once potent charm. It must be occasionally resurrected to keep the niggers and the meaner whites together to help out the grand old party of moral ideas. Lafayette Gazette 2/12/1903.




CANDIDATE.
For the Convention In the Senatorial District;
EDWARD SIMON, of St. Martin.

For the Convention, For the Parish of Lafayette, M. E. GIRARD.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1879.



















The Negro Question.
[Communicated to the Lafayette Gazette]

To the editor:

 Will you kind enough to allow me space in valuable paper to make a few remarks on the above question. I see by the press that some of our wise men and would-be-lawmakers are advocating a system to have the negroes all colonized in some foreign country, and I see that some of our prominent leading men think it advisable for every city or town to set off a certain portion of land on one side of the city or town and compel all the colored population of the town to go there to live.

 I don't think it possible to carry out either of the above systems under our existing laws, neither do I think it advisable to do so if we could. What would our country look like if all the colored people were banished out of it. It would look as though some terrible scourge had passed over it. Every white woman and man, sick or well, would be compelled to be his or her own servant, for it would be impossible to hire any help to carry on farming or any kind of public works.

 Then again if our town were divided in two sections as proposed, what would be the consequences? Imagine a lot of niggers living in one group. As it is they are scattered over the town under close observation of white people.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

 The planters and other employers get together occasionally and agree upon a scale of wages. Unfortunately the ladies of the town make no similar rules, and they are consequently at the mercy of the negro women. With but few exceptions these servants are dishonest, work irregularly and when remonstrated with become insolent.

 I think it is time for somebody that has energy to come forward and make a move to break up some insolence and impudence and the accursed nigger-cook reign.
                           JUSTICE.
Lafayette Gazette 2/14/1903.

 


THE QUESTION IS SUBMITTED.

On another page of this paper will be found the proceedings of the City Council containing the ordinance ordering the special election to be held on April 3, 1902, to take the sense of the tax-payers of the town relative to the proposition to levy a five-mill tax for a term of twenty-five years. Those who wish to familiarize themselves with the proposition should read that part of the Council proceedings referring to the subject. Briefly stated it is proposed:
 

1. To levy a special tax of one and half mills on the dollar to procure grounds and a high school building, to cost $24,000.
 
2. To levy a tax of one mill on the dollar to enlarge the water and light plant, to cost $14,000.
 
3. To levy a tax of half a mill on the dollar to procure a public market and grounds, to cost $12,000.
 
4. To levy a tax of two mills on the dollar with which to call in the outstanding bonds amounting to $30,000.
 
Proposition No. 4 must first be carried before any one of the others can become operative. Its failure to receive a majority of the votes would mean the defeat of all.
 
The success of this plan for municipal improvements will not increase the present rate of taxation. It is practically an extension of a part or whole of the present 5-mill special tax with the benefits derived from it largely multiplied.
 
Barring the proposition for a public market, The Gazette thinks this plan to secure much needed improvements should receive the endorsement of every progressive citizen. The question is now submitted for the thoughtful consideration of the tax-payers. It is for them to say if they want their town to move along with the other progressive communities of the South.
Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1902.
 
 

WATER AND LIGHT. 
A Large Meeting Held at Falk's Hall - Waterworks and Electric Lights Discussed. 

About 300 persons, among whom were many ladies, assembled at Falk's Opera-house last Monday night to hear discussions by local speakers upon the question of water-works and electric lights. The meeting was not as large as expected, but the 'earnestness visible on all hands and the enthusiasm which prevailed gave unmistakable signs of the popularity of the movement. The audience was of a representative character, a feature which may always be taken as a good omen for the success of any undertaking of this kind.
 
C. O. Mouton, Esq., president of the Business Men's Association, in a brief talk explained the object of meeting and introduced to the audience the Rev. Father E. Forge, who was the first speaker. The reverend gentleman delivered a very sensible address. He dealt at length upon the great necessity of protection from fire. He said that any further procrastination in this matter was little short of criminal on the part of the people of this town. He said he would support the measure with all his energy and would use his influence toward the success of the move just inaugurated. At the conclusion of his address Father Forge handed to the president of the B. M. A. a one hundred-dollar bill to be used for the proposed plant. Short addresses were then made by Messrs. Wm. Campbell, Chas. D. Caffery and Julian Mouton.
 
The speakers explained that petitions would be presented to the tax-payers for their signatures for the purpose of asking the City Council to call an election to see if the required number of people are willing to be taxed 5-mills on the dollar to raise the necessary amount to build the water-works and electric light plant. A number of signatures were obtained before leaving the hall. Well-informed persons are of the opinion that the opponents to the tax will not be sufficiently numerous to defeat the measure and it is hoped when the question will be thoroughly explained there will not be any opposition worth mentioning. Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1896.
 





 
 
DEMOCRATIC TICKET. 

STATE OFFICERS;

Governor, MURPHY J. FOSTER, of St. Mary.

Lieut. Governor, ROBT. S. SNYDER.

Secretary of State, JOHN T. MICHEL, of Orleans.

State Treasurer, A. V. FOURNET, of St. Martins.

State Auditor, W. W. HEARD, of Union.

Attorney General, M. J. CUNNINGHAM, of Natchitoches.

Supt. of Public Educ., PROF. J. V. CALHOUN, of Orleans.


DISTRICT OFFICERS.Judge, JULIAN MOUTON.

Dist. Attorney, MINOS T. GORDY.

PARISH OFFICERS.

Representative, J. O. BROUSSARD.

Clerk of Court, E. G. VOORHIES.

Sheriff, I. A. BROUSSARD.

Coroner, DR. A. R. TRAHAN.
Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1890.

 


Voters Must Register.

 Registrar Martin informs us that as soon as he receives the necessary books he will open the registration office. Everybody who wants to vote must register. No exception is to be made in the case of those who registered under section five. They too must register. Laf. Gazette 2/18/1899.


AVERY A CANDIDATE?

In considering the question of a Senatorial candidate for this District, we can think of no one more eminently fitted for the place, or more available just at this time, than MR. JOHN M. AVERY, of Iberia, Young, energetic and fired with laudable ambition ; of commanding presence, and gifted with talents of the highest order, he would command attention and respect in any representative assembly. His record is without stain or blame, and he has the confidence of all his constituents, of whatever political party. He is probably the strongest and most popular Democrat in his Parish, and is well known through the District. Altogether, we believe he is the strongest man we could put forward, and we would be truly glad to see the Convention tender him the nomination -- and to have him accept. Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1888.




JUDGE DEBAILLON'S CHARGE.

He Suggests to the Jurors the Propriety of Memorializing the Constitutional Convention.

  After delivering the usual charge to the grand jury Judge Debaillon did what some of his confreres in other districts of the State have done since the election of delegates to the constitutional convention. He stated to the jurors that he believed it his duty to express his opinion on the question of the judiciary and to suggest to them the propriety of formulating a memorial to the convention, which has just assembled in New Orleans. Before giving his views on the judiciary the judge stated the great question of suffrage was already receiving the attention of a committee composed of the best men of the State who would settle that vexed problem well and satisfactorily. Judge Debaillon, then gave his views on the movement to change the judiciary, which, considering his long service on the bench, are entitled to no little weight. He stated that with slight changes the present system would be the best the State has ever had; that the trouble was with the mode of procedure rather than with the system itself. He added that he believed the Supreme, Circuit and District Courts should remain as they are new constituted. He stated that he favored the retention of the justice court, but added that this later tribunal should be vested with more jurisdiction which would empower it to dispose of misdemeanors and cases not necessarily punishable at hard labor. He believed, however, that certain qualifications should be required of the justices of the peace. This is, we believe, the substance of the views of Judge Debaillon as expressed to the grand jury in his charge Monday morning.
Laf. Gazette 2/19/1898.

 THE GRAND JURY.
Request the Police Jury to Investigate a Complaint Against Juror Avant. The grand jury's report was read in court Thursday afternoon. The jurors report the offices of the sheriff, clerk and treasurer in good order and all public documents well kept and public funds correctly accounted for. The attention of the police jury is called to the general condition of the court-house. The building needs to be painted and other repairs are deemed necessary. An inspection of the parish jail showed it be well kept and the prisoners properly cared for. The attention of the Police Jury is called to the unsatisfactory results obtained from the use of the heating process used to do away with the offal.,
 
In regard to the public roads the jury made the following report:
 
"That Mr. Ben Avant, member of the police jury of this parish, who has in his care oxen belonging to the parish, did on the 9th day of this month, refuse to turn over the said oxen to Mr. Foreman who had instructions from the road overseer of that ward to go to Mr. Avant and get the oxen to do some work on the public road. The reason given by Mr. Avant for not turning over the oxen was that they were not strong enough to do public work, while he, on that very same day was using the oxen to break new land for his own benefit. We would further state that Mr. Forman said that he was satisfied that had he got the oxen he would have been able to do the work required on the public road. We, therefore, request the police jury at their first meeting to give this matter a rigid investigation and have Mr. Avant render an account of his action in refusing to comply with the request of Mr. Foreman"
 
The jurors concluded that their report by tendering their deliberations.
Lafayette Gazette 2/19/1898.
 


There are in Lafayette Parish 677 registered white voters of this number 590 can read and write and 87 are illiterate so says the rapport of the Secretary of State presented to the Constitutional Convention. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.


The following ticket is submitted to the Democratic voters of the town of Lafayette, for their consideration, in the primary election to be held on March 4, 1903.

 For Mayor: CHAS. D. CAFFERY.

 For Councilmen: FELIX DEMANADE, A. EMILE MOUTON, GEO. A. DEBLANC, JOHN O. MOUTON, D. V. GARDEBLED, M. ROSENFIELD, H. L. FONTENOT.

 Democratic Executive Committee: WM. CAMPBELL, JULIAN MOUTON, I. A. BROUSSARD, HENRY CHURCH, ALFRED HEBERT.

 The following citizens, by request, have consented to serve the corporation of Lafayette for the coming term, as:

Mayor: C. O. MOUTON.

 Councilmen: PAUL L. DECLOUET, DR. J. D. TRAHAN, DR. F. E. GIRARD, WM. CLEGG, ARTHUR J. LEBLANC, GUS SCHMULEN, C.D. BOUDREAUX.

 Subject to thje approval of the qualified voters at the primaries to be held on March 4, 1903.


 The following to serve as Democratic Executive Committee:

 SIMEON BEGNAUD, ED. G. VOORHIES, DR. A. R. TRAHAN, JOHN. L. KENNEDY, ROBT. H. BROUSSARD.
Lafayette Gazette 2/21/1903.






AN IMPORTANT ELECTION.

To-day, property values are higher than ever before in its history, evidencing a satisfactory progress which is most gratifying to all of its citizens. This agreeable state of affairs is due to a number of causes, having been partly brought about by a proper public spirit uniting all parties on certain notable occasions, as in the case of the Industrial Institute, when the community acted as one man in securing this splendid institution, and partly because of the confidence manifested by certain citizens in investing large sums in a modern hotel and an up-to-date opera house, partly because the present City Council has always manifested commendable zeal for the welfare and improvement of the town, especially in their ready and prompt cooperation with the citizens in widening the principal thoroughfares, partly because of the excellent city public schools, and because of many other causes, each of which has had its due bearing towards the growth and substantiality of the town.

This growth and development, as has been said, is very gratifying to every citizen, and we would all like to see it continue; indeed, we are confident that there is not a single person in Lafayette who would not see the least backward step taken with keen regret. With such a sentiment prevailing, surely it is possible to carry the good work forward, if the sentiment is backed up by intelligent action. And to do this, all the facts in the case must be considered, our limitations defined and the direction of affairs entrusted to those whom we conscientiously believe will accept our trust with the largestr spirit of zeal to accomplish all possible for the best interests of the community, not merely as routine office-fillers, but as broad minded, public spirited citizens, who will gladly avail themselves of the potentialities of their office to push Lafayette forward, never hesitating to lay aside their personal interests when the opportunity for serving the community occurs.

Such men, The Advertiser believes, are those whose names we have placed under the caption, Our Ticket. They are all young men, possessing the estimable qualities of youth, vigor, energy, hopefulness, ambition and capacity for hard work. And they have the added advantage of being sufficiently mature to be sober-minded and fully cognizant of the responsibilities of the office to which they aspire. To this is joined the fact that they are self-made men; what success they have achieved has been achieved by brains and hard work, and we firmly believe that men of such character are the kind of men who should be placed at the head of affairs at this critical time in the life of our little city.


 Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1905.


TO THE PEOPLE AND VOTERS OF CITY OF LAFAYETTE.

 We, the undersigned, selected as candidates by Mass Meeting at Court House, Jan. 19, 1905, for various municipal offices subject to primaries called for March 4, respectfully solicit the support of the people.

 If elected, we pledge our earnest and best efforts towards carrying out an economical and progressive administration, without favor or partiality.

 Respectfully,

FOR MAYOR, Chas. O. Mouton.

 FOR COUNCILMEN, O. B. Hopkins, Simeon Begnaud, C. D. Boudreaux, Dr. F. E. Girard, Gus Schmulen, Dr. A. R. Trahan, P. Krauss.

FOR TOWN CONSTABLE, D. J. Veazey.

FOR TOWN TAX COLLECTOR, A. J. Leblanc.

 FOR TOWN CLERK, J. P. Colomb.

 FOR TREASURER TOWN COUNCIL, A. T. Caillouet.

FOR TOWN JAILOR, Faustin Vincent.

FOR MEMBERS EXECUTIVE DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE, J. L. Kennedy, Raoul Pellerin, Pink B. Torian, Felix E. Voorhies, Ovey Herpin.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1905.


OUR TICKET.

FOR MAYOR, Felix H. Mouton.

FOR COUNCILMEN, Dr. G. A. Martin, Felix O. Broussard, Felix H. Landry, A. A. Morgan, Jr., Pierre Gerac, J. F. Tanner, O. B. Hopkins.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1905.


YOUNG MEN'S TICKET.

 We the undersigned candidates for municipal offices as specified below, respectfully submit our names to the public to be voted on at the primary election to be held March 4, 1905.

FOR MAYOR, Felix H. Mouton.

FOR COUNCILMEN, Dr. G. A. Martin, Felix O. Broussard, Felix H. Landry, A. A. Morgan,  (unreadable name), L. F. Rigues, J. B. Tanner.

FOR TOWN CONSTABLE, A. Edwin Chargois.

FOR TOWN COLLECTOR, H. H. Hohorst.

FOR TOWN CLERK, L. D. Nickerson.

FOR TREASURER TOWN COUNCIL, D. V. Gardebled.

FOR TOWN JAILOR, Abraham Hirsch.

FOR MEMBERS DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, A. E. Mouton, Wm. Campbell, Alfred Hebert, Henry Church, W. P. Bracken.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1905.



CANDIDATES.
 
 

 For the Convention In the Senatorial District, Edward Simon of St. Martin.

For Delegate to the Convention in the 11th Senatorial District, (St. Martin, Iberia and Lafayette) John Clegg, of Lafayette.

For the Convention. For the Parish of Lafayette, M. E. Girard.

The members of the Democratic Parish Committee are requested to meet at the Court House on Monday the 24th inst., at 11 o'clock A. M., for the purpose of transacting important business.

Laf. Adv. 2/22/1879.


 



JOHN CLEGG.


 The gentleman whose name heads this article has consented to become a candidate to represent the 11th Senatorial District, composed of the parishes of St. Martin, Iberia and Lafayette, in the Constitutional Convention.

Among those whose names have been presented or suggested, we find no one more suited for that position than Mr. Clegg. That he is qualified - no one, we think, would undertake to deny. He has shown on more than one instance, that which is most essential to a delegate - a proper understanding of the wishes of the people. Although comparatively a young man, he has had varied experience. Having taken an active interest in the great contests of 1874 and 1876, his record therein will bear the closest scrutiny without suffering. In her darkest hours, the State had no truer friend than John Clegg. He was elected Secretary of the Senate in January, 1877, in times which really "tried men's souls". Their appreciation of his ability was evidenced in his re-election by the present Senate without opposition. Having held that position for three years, his experience during that time has certainly rendered him familiar with the workings of deliberative bodies; and a knowledge of parliamentary law will be quite necessary to a member of the convention, if it is desirous that his labors should have the proper results.
'
We therefore recommend him to the voters of the District, with the assurance that if he be elected, no interests will be more carefully guarded and protected than those of his constituency. Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1879.






LOUISIANA POLITICS.
Cade and Sholars Gracefully Withdraw to Make Room for Don Jr., the Erratic Son of Louisiana's Able Senior Senator.

Cade Will Run for Secretary of State.
 
After a cruel waste of time and breath the Sugar-teats and their allies, the middle-of-the-roadersm gave agreed in the Moses who is to lead them from the wilderness of blasted hopes and withered ambitions. Don Caffery, Jr., who is theoretically a good Democrat, has been selected to make the race for governor; D. M. Sholars, the gentlemen who was nominated for Governor by the Populists, is the candidate for lieutenant-governor; Capt. Taylor Cade, has magnanimously consented to accept the portfolio of secretary of State; O. H. Deshotels, a St. Landry Populist, will stand for auditor; Geo. Hassinger, is the nominee for treasurer; W. G. Wyly, an ex-judge of the supreme court, is the choice for attorney general, and O. B. Staples for superintendent of education.

 
  Mr. Caffery is a Palmer-Buckner single-standard-gold-Democrat; Mr. Sholars is a sixteen-to-one-er; Mr. Cade is not known to have any well-developed ideas of economic questions; Mr. Deshotels is a middle-of-the-roader of the Tom Watson species; Mr. Hessinger is said to be a straight-Republican; Judge Wyly is an old-timer; Mr. Staples is believed to be a Populist.

 

Had some concession been made to the Prohibitionists, this ticket, would, from a standpoint of variety, be a marvel of perfection. The candidates on this ticket agree only on one thing. That is a blind and unreasonable hatred for the Democracy of Louisiana. They are unable to show where they present administration has failed in its duty. They do not offer a single argument against the State government. They have gathered all the enemies of the Democratic party and out of these discordant elements has emerged a ticket that promises to wage a campaign of hate and vilification. It is safe to say that it will meet with the inglorious defeat that it so richly deserves.

Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1900.

 

 



Louisiana Republicans.


 In the present wrangling among the Louisiana Republicans for recognition by the national organization Wimberly seems to have the advantage. The collector of the port embraces the nigger with unblushing indifference to racial distinctions of the old timer and endorses Republicanism as it really is. The other wing audaciously assumes the title of "Lily Whites," advocates negro suffrage, endorses and administration which is notoriously in favor of negro supremacy, admits negroes in its conventions and committees, ignominiously follows the leadership of Henry Clay  warmouth, and coolly announces that it is a white man's party. Away with such arrant hypocrisy! A white Republican party can not be. What would intelligent people think of the man who would propose to organize a black Democratic party? Republicanism is eternally linked to negroism, just as it is wedded to a robber tariff, trusts, imperialism and centralization. Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1900.  




MASS MEETING IN LAFAYETTE.  
 Mr. Heard, Gov. Foster, Senator McEnery and Hon. R. F. Broussard
 

Will Speak to the Democrats of Lafayette.

 
The Issues of the Campaign Will be Thoroughly Discussed.
 

On Thursday March 8, the big guns of the Louisiana Democracy will be in Lafayette. A meeting will take place at the court-house where a number of distinguished Democrats will tell the people why they should stand by the Democratic party.

 
  In common with the other Democrats of the parish we hope that there will be a great outpouring of the people on that day.

 

The Gazette would suggest that the local campaign committee - if there is such an organization - take steps to make the meeting a success worthy of the Lafayette Democracy. Why not secure a larger hall and have a regular old-time gathering of the ever-faithful Democracy of Lafayette. We are sure the ladies will be willing to do their share toward having suitable decorations. There is an abundance of flowers and evergreens which can be procured if the local Democratic authorities will only exert themselves a little bit. Arrangements should be made for a band of music without which a political meeting is a painfully dull affair.

 

The Gazette hopes that the visit of the future governor of Louisiana and the other honored chieftans who will accompany him will be made an occasion of unusual importance. In '96 Lafayette gave the best meeting of the campaign. Why not in 1900?
Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1900. 


 





Louisiana Republicanism.

 If reports in some of the papers in the Southern portion of this State are to be believed quite a number of people will join the Republicans if the Senate fails to put a duty on sugar. We are loathe to believe these reports. No one will regret to see sugar on the free list more than we, as sugar is fast becoming one of the principal industries of this parish, but we cannot conceive how the people of this State can so far forget the past as to vote for a party that has caused them so much turmoil, and which, only a few years ago, made a desperate effort to pass the obnoxious Force Bill, a measure which threatened to re-establish the reign of Sambo, a reign yet fresh in our minds. Eliminate the negro from politics and a division among the whites will follow, but as long as he remains a possible factor in our elections in our elections, the white people will continue to present an unbroken front to the common enemy. Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1894.

"DAMN YOU, LET ME DROWN"!
STAR AND CRESCENT HOUSE,
Lafayette, La., Feb. 20.
 In reading your editorial criticizing Senator McEnery's vote on the ratification of the treaty with Spain, I am reminded like you that "Senator McEnery has saved the Democratic party and the sugar industry so often that we are inclined to think he is overdoing his job." I am also reminded of a good story apropos of that vote. It was told during the session of the last constitutional convention illustrative of the claims put forward the Tensas members. Every time an attempt was made to reform the rotten borough system of representation by which that parish enjoyed almost ten times the strength she should have rightfully had in State conventions, the Tensas members would fall back upon the services of Tensas Democrats in saving the party. An old Creole, so the story goes, somewhere in Southwest Louisiana, on the classic banks of the Vermilion, passing along one summer day happened to be able to save a from drowning a fisherman who had fallen into the stream. This service the rescued man acknowledged with profuse thanks and with an invitation to a drink for himself and friends whenever they would go to town. The gallant old Creole accepted the invitation and not long after bobbed up in company with his numerous friends. The drinks were served, for the whilom fisherman was a man of his word. It did not end here, however. The old man continued to show up with painful regularity. He had found a good thing and had made up his mind to push it along. But, like Senator McEnery, he didn't know when he had enough and he overdid his job. One fine Christmas morning with the spirit of "peace on earth, good will to man," and reminded the townsman that the time for giving presents had come he was sorely in need of a new suit of clothes. This was the hair that broke the camel's back. The reply was : "All right, old man. Come into this store and select the best suit on the shelves, but, hereafter, when you see me about to drown, damn you, let me drown!"

 The reader may make the application of the story.
                             TRAVELER.
Laf. Gazette 2/25/1899.
     



THE PRIMARY ELECTION.

 It may not be generally known that the primary, which is to take place in this town on the 4th of March will be a legal election, held under the laws of this State. The act which legalizes primaries in Louisiana and under which will be conducted imposes certain penalties for the violation of any of its provisions. The law recognizes the right of political parties to make nominations and affords all the protection necessary to enable each party to have an honest and free expression of its choice in the selection of candidates. Necessarily the party holding the primary is offered every opportunity to protect itself against the intrusion of members of the opposite political organization. A primary law which failed to secure to each party its rights and privileges would be a farce.



The primary to be held in this town on March 4 to nominate a municipal ticket should be a Democratic affair at which none but Democrats should vote. The moment that Republicans are allowed to participate in this election it ceases to be a Democratic primary. The nominees of that primary should be the choice of the Democrats, not the Republicans. It is a fact that on several occasions in the past Republicans in this parish voted at Democratic primaries and then did not scruple to vote for their ticket at the general election. That is clearly wrong. Participation in a primary unquestionably imposes certain obligations upon the voter. No Republican should want to vote at a Democratic primary and no Democrat should want to vote at a Republican primary. To dispute this is to encourage political disloyalty and bad faith.



The Gazette appreciates the fact that there are quite a number of Republicans in this town. They were formidable enough a few years ago to carry this precinct for the Republican candidate for congress. They are still here. If any of them have been converted to the Democracy their conversion has not been given publicity. These men, if they are attached to their party because of its principles, will not presume to take part in a primary election in which they can have no possible interest. A spirit of common fairness, if not a sense of party fealty, should cause them to keep out. Of course, if the Democrats avail themselves of their rights under the law legalizing primaries, known Republicans legally can be prevented from voting, but it is to be hoped that that will be unnecessary.


Lafayette Gazette 2/28/1903.






For Whose Advantage?


 In propounding the above question The Advertiser desires to direct the attention of voters in the primaries to be held March 4th., to the communication signed "Cuf Bono" in this issue of the paper.

The question is a pertinent one and our correspondent has evidently been pondering over it, just as a great many other members of the community have been doing. It is reasonably certain, as so many people seem to believe that no advantage is to be gained by voluntarily giving up a set of public servants who have made an excellent record as such, then why propose or risk a change? It certainly could not be considered a judicious move to do so simply for the novelty of the thing.


 On the other hand there is nothing passing strange in the fact that five members of the present City council have expressed a willingness to serve another term together with three others of their fellow townsmen who have joined them in the movement. They have labored long and well for the upbuilding of the community in which they live, and it is a natural and laudable desire on their part to continue their efforts in the same direction ; and theirs is a pardonable pride in wanting to direct to completion certain public improvements projected during their administration in office, and for which they stand. It is a perfectly natural feeling under the circumstances, and there can be no reasonable grounds of objection on that score.


 Truly, their reason for applying for re-election should command the highest consideration of every thoughtful citizen, and the community should be glad of the privilege thus afforded them of retaining in the public service men of intelligence and integrity, who are animated by good motives in their willingness to hold office without compensation.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/28/1903.




THE DEMOCRATIC TICKET.

The following ticket is submitted to the Democratic voters of the town of Lafayette, for their consideration, in the primary election to be held on March 4, 1903.

MAYOR-Chas. D. Caffery.

COUNCILMEN-Felix Demanade, A. Emile Mouton, Geo. A. DeBlanc, John O. Mouton, D. V. Gardebled, M. Rosenfield, H. L. Fontenot.

DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE-Wm. Campbell, Julian Mouton, I. A. Broussard, Henry Church, Alfred Hebert.
Lafayette Gazette 2/28/1903.





SHOULD ALL BE POLITICIANS.

 "There is something defective in the education or rearing up of a people who care so little for their government. It would seem that the importance of discharging their civic duties has never been properly instilled in the minds of the men of to-day. Both the home and school appear to have been derelict in this respect. The percentage of a citizen who are not conversant with the workings of the government is appallingly great. The popular idea seems to be that the government is a thing which will take care of itself and that is not the citizen's business to take part in its administration.

 "The only remedy for this condition of affairs lies in the hands of the State. It is the correct education of the child which the State alone is able to give offers the sole cure for this common disease which so seriously affects the body politic. In a country like this where the people are supreme and where the popular will is law, it is important that the voters should have a proper appreciation of their duty to the State. Too much about the government can not be taught in the schools, and it should be impressed upon the mind of every boy that it is a great privilege to be born an American citizens and it is still a greater privilege to be allowed to exercise the rights of American citizenship." - Lafayette Gazette


...The publication "The Felicianas" responds to the Gazette's article...


 What the Gazette says is true - only too true. But how is the trouble to be remedied? There is not now a text book in existence that will answer requirements, nor is it possible to originate one. A great deal can be accomplished in this direction by text books, but they fall far short of requirement. The solution of this trouble is to be found in newspapers of the better class. One of the metropolitan dailies should comprise a part of the daily course of every school in the land, both as a source of general information and a means of arousing an intelligent, active and patriotic interest not only in this country, but in life itself. The schools of this or any other country could do the world no greater service than make a rule and practice to turn out habitual and methodical newspaper readers. Our government is controlled by this element, and it is entirely too small.  We need more men and women capable of thinking and reasoning intelligently for themselves concerning the living issues of the day, instead of either ignoring them entirely or being led astray by demagogues who delight in coddling their ignorance. The disgrace is not in percentage of illiteracy in the several States, but in the degree of ignorance among those who are not illiterate, concerning the affairs of every day life, particularly of an intelligent conception of the duties of citizenship. We will never have a better class of citizens nor better government until we get a better and more general class of newspaper readers, and this will never be until children are taught at home and at school to make the papers a part of their daily study. Those who are not habitual newspaper readers cannot grasp the full import of this idea, but we beg those who are to ponder it well. It is worthy of serious consideration. To teach of the past and not of the present is to ignore the most important and practical half of history. It is preposterous that the living issues and incidents of the present should not be taught the youth of the land until they became ancient history. Matters educationally have not kept progress with, or availed of, all the facilities afforded by the Art Preservative. -- The Felicianas.


Now The Gazette now summarizes....

 No doubt more newspaper reading by the people would result in a distinct gain along the lines suggested by The Felicianas; but it is in the schoolhouse where the work must be done. It is there the idea of civic duty must be instilled in the mind of the child. The boy must not only be taught that freedom is his birthright, but that he must do something to preserve it; that in order to discharge intelligently the duties of citizenship he should first understand what they are. It is a sad commentary upon the times that there are men of light and leading in this country - teachers, ministers, doctors, lawyers - who do not even vote.

 The education of the young should be directed in a manner to render indifference to civic duties dishonorable in the eyes of the people. Every man should be a politician - not a politician in the modern sense, but in that better sense which means that he is a citizen who takes a proper interest in the administration of public affairs.

 If all men were politicians as they should be, there would be no bosses and there would be no need of reformers with spasmodic attacks of political virtue. Lafayette Gazette 2/28/1903.









The Municipal Contest
To The Advertiser.

I have been trying in vain to find a reasonable explanation for the desire of certain gentlemen in Lafayette to "oust" the present City Council. Even the supporters of the movement themselves are a loss to give any particular reason for doing so, when questioned on the subject. Nobody has been charged with malfeasance in office. It is conceded that the members of the Council now serving, against whom the opposition is being directed, are fully the equal in intelligence, good character and patriotism of any other set of citizens in the town who might be desirous of succeeding them in office ; it is admitted on all sides that they have given the people an honest and economical administration of public affairs. It is recognized that they have acquired experience in office which is bound to count for the advantage of the town in the future conduct of its affairs ; it is known that they have been maturing plans for several months past looking to the establishment of the public school interests of the town on a broad and enlightened basis ; to the end that every child in the community may enjoy the best school advantages that brains and money can provide ; it is acknowledged that it would be contrary to sound public policy to risk any interruption or interference in the good work already in progress, or that are on the eve of being undertaken. Yet, there must be a motive for wanting a change, and perhaps the following incident said to have occurred during President Cleveland's first-term, may supply the information:


 Near the close of a reception held by the President, an important rural looking man entered the East Room, and passing his way quickly through the crowd, stood before the President. Removing his hat with one hand and bestowing a hearty grip with the other, he opened fire at once without dallying over what he doubtless considered useless preliminaries.
"Good morning, Mr. President" he said. "I've come all the way from Alabama to get my place. All you've got to do is just to say the word and I'm fixed, for I've got may papers all drawn up and endorsed." As the fellow drew a formidable pile of papers from the depths of a cavernous pocket in his breeches, the President looked at him with an expression of the blankest astonishment. At last mustering courage, he said :
"You have come all the way from Alabama to get your place you say? I do not quite understand you."
"Why, I want the position of collector of Internal Revenue, of course, in -------", naming a well known part of his State."
"But that place is already filled by a man of whom there has hitherto been no complaint."
"Complaint ! No, indeed, sir - nothing of the kind. He is a competent man in every way, so far as I know, but I want the place all the same and here are my papers."
A curious expression, a cross between a smile and frown flitted across the President's face as he listened to the astonishing reply.

"Then if the present incumbent is a thoroughly capable man" he said, "against whom no complaint can be lodged, I am at a loss to understand the reason for your present application."
The fellow looked the President squarely in the eyes, as he slowly and emphatically replied :
"You want my reason for the application? Well, then, Mr. President, it is the same as that which on last election day made us put Mr. Arthur out of his office and give it to you."
The colloquy ended here, but the man from Alabama went away as empty as he came.,
CUI BONO
Lafayette La, Feb. 23, 1903.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/28/1891.



TO THE PEOPLE AND VOTERS OF CITY OF LAFAYETTE.

 We, the undersigned, selected as candidates by Mass Meeting at Court House, Jan. 19, 1905, for various municipal offices subject to primaries called for March 4, respectfully solicit the support of the people.

 If elected, we pledge our earnest and best efforts towards carrying out an economical and progressive administration, without favor or partiality.
                        Respectfully,

FOR MAYOR: Chas. O. Mouton.

FOR COUNCILMEN: O. B Hopkins, Simeon Begnaud, C. D. Boudreaux, Dr. F. E. Girard, Gus Schmulen, Dr. A. R. Trahan, P. Krauss.

FOR TOWN CONSTABLE: D. J. Veazey.

FOR TOWN TAX COLLECTOR: A. J. Leblanc.

FOR TOWN CLERK: P. J. Colomb.

FOR TREASURER TOWN COUNCIL: A. T. Caillouet.

FOR TOWN JAILOR: Faustin Vincent.

FOR MEMBERS DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: J. L. Kennedy, Raoul Pellerin, Pink R. Torian, Ovey Herpin.

Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.




OUR TICKET. (Advertiser)

FOR MAYOR: Felix H. Mouton.

FOR COUNCILMEN: Dr. G. A. Martin, Felix O. Broussard, Felix H. Landry, A. A. Morgan, Jr., Pierre Gerac, J. F. Tanner, O. B. Hopkins. Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.



Young Mens' Ticket.

 We the undersigned candidates for municipal offices as specified below respectfully submit our names to the public to be voted on at the primary election to be held March 4, 1905.

 FOR MAYOR: Felix H. Mouton.

 FOR COUNCILMEN: Dr. G. A. Martin, Felix O. Broussard, Felix H. Landry, A. A. Morgan, Jr., Pierre Gerac, L. F. Rigues, J. F. Tanner.
FOR TOWN CONSTABLE: A. Edwin Chargois.

 FOR TOWN TAX COLLECTOR: L. D. Nickerson.

 FOR TREASURER TOWN COUNCIL: D. V. Gardebled.

FOR TOWN JAILOR: Abraham Hirsch.
FOR MEMBERS DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: A. E. Mouton, Wm. Campbell, Alfred Hebert, Henry Church, W. P. Bracken. Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.








PARTISAN POLITICS.

 The Advertiser, in its earnest desire to protect the public welfare, strongly opposes the introduction of partisan politics in the management of public affairs. Every citizen who is concerned in the municipal government of Lafayette has a direct personal interest in preventing, as far as possible, the harmful and obstructive influence of partisan politics from entering into the public administration of the affairs of the town. Partisan politics, because it plans and concocts only for individual or for its own advantage, naturally and necessarily exerts a most detrimental influence on the general progress of the country. Business, educational and all other public interests are made to suffer, if needs be, rather than that the beneficiaries of partisan politics should lose their present or prospective grip on salaries and other perquisites of public office. This is a fact too well known to require further elaboration.


 It being true that the primary object and final aim of partisan politics, in the last analysis, is office-getting and perpetuity in office - even at the sacrifice of the public interests whenever occasion demands - it would seem to be part of ordinary wisdom for the public to discountenance and overcome, as far as possible, an influence or agency so dangerous and antagonistic to the welfare of the public.


 It is a strong point in favor of the Young Men's ticket in the present municipal campaign, that it does not represent the ideas or interests of any particular political faction and, consequently, is in a position to deal with public questions free from bias or political pledges or obligations, and purely from a patriotic and disinterested standpoint. This means, in the very nature of things, much greater liberty of action and impartiality in the administration of public affairs than could be possible or practicable under opposite conditions. This is a feature in the composition of the Young Men's ticket which should appeal strongly to, and command the support of the business men of the community and others who feel a greater interest in the general welfare and the up-building of their town, than they do in the individual success of this or that politician, office-holder or seeker after office.


 By all means, for the present and for the future good of our fast growing town, let us eliminate partisan politics, as it lays within our power to do so. And it ought to be very plain to those who are able to reason out things that in the pending municipal election, all circumstances considered, the Young Men's ticket stands pre-eminently for a BUSINESS administration, as against a partisan or factional administration of public affairs. The only way to make sure of a strictly business administration is by cutting out politics, and the surest way to cut out politics this time is to vote the Young Men's ticket on the fourth of March.
 

 Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.




LET US BE JUST.

In the interest of fair play The Advertiser feels constrained to take exception to the harsh and unjust reflections cast upon the administration of Mayor Caffery and his colleagues, in the editorial columns of the last two issues of the Gazette.

We quote the following expressions from the editorials in question: "Two years ago Mayor Caffery and the present council were elected by the closest vote in the history of the town." * * * "During the past two years there has been still further development of the opposition until it might be said there now exists a general and pronounced demand for a change." * * * "The merits or demerits of the present city administration have not been considered, although in the estimation of many affording a WIDE AND PROLIFIC FIELD FOR EXPLOIT. (capitals ours. * * * "As will be remembered, on January 19, the C. O. Mouton ticket was nominated at a mass meeting held at the court house and a set of resolutions adopted declaring for radical changes in the conduct of city affairs, and pledging administration with favor or partiality." * * * "As is well known, the C. O. Mouton ticket is constituted of men thoroughly antagonistic to the policy pursued by the present council." * * * "The only thing remaining for decision is, how this change shall be effected; which ticket presents the strongest assurance and best response to the popular demand, the one formed of long avowed and open opponents of the city government, or the ticket formed under the auspices and supported by the staunchest friends of the 'POWERS THAT BE' (capitals ours). If the voter desires a perpetuation of present methods and policy, let him vote the Young Men's ticket; if on the other hand, in common with a large majority of the people he desires a change let him vote the C. O. Mouton ticket straight - there is no middle ground for a mugwump in this contest." * * * "It is simply a waste of time to tell any intelligent man who got that ticket up (the Young Men's ticket) and what influences have controlled and will continue to control the policy of the ticket. Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, why hast thou made me thus. Hath not the potter power over the clay? * * * What may be thought when a child is ashamed of its parentage?

The Advertiser submits in all truth that the accentuated insistence of the Gazette on this point of a necessity for a change of administration plainly implies a mismanagement of public affairs not warranted by actual facts, and by direct and strong insinuations places under a black cloud of suspicion the official acts of an enlightened, high-minded and public spirited body of citizens deserving commendation, and not censure, for their distinguished and valuable services to the public.

The resort to a wholesale denouncement of the retiring city council, it is plain enough, was to fire up an array old factional lines and personal hatreds against the Young Men's ticket in the pending municipal campaign, but the grounds upon which the denunciation is based are unwarranted and independent feasible.

Let us weigh the facts.

The bonds originally issued for a water works and electric light plant were not sufficient and could not be expected to provide water and light service for every portion of the wide area included in the corporate limits of the town, all at once. For several years the special tax and the revenues from the waterworks and electric light plant had to be drawn upon for remedying defects and making necessary repairs on account of wear and tear and accident, for which, of course, the city council could not be held responsible. A new boiler and pump, another dynamo and still other new and expensive machinery had to be added to preserve the efficiency of the plant. Another well had to be drilled and the old ones cleaned out and repaired, and a large water reservoir constructed to insure an unfailing supply of water. There came also the imperative demand for furnishing water and light to the Industrial Institute, and afterward an extension of the water mains and electric light service in other directions, justifying the consequent outlay of money which otherwise would have been applied to the payment of the bonds. The improvement of the principal business streets of the town and their maintenance, requiring several thousand dollars worth of oyster shells. The purchase of a large and extremely desirable plot of ground for a suitable public school building, of which our children are in dire need. The widening of Jefferson, Vermilion and Lafayette streets upon the petition of citizens and wish their co-operation, accomplished under difficulties and at great cost, but contributing enormously to the public convenience and advantage. Liberal appropriations for the public schools, the fire department and other worthy objects. And it us highly proper to include the in the mention of their valuable achievements, the opening of a street which very greatly facilitated communication between the town and the Industrial School, and which, at the same time greatly enhanced the value of continuous lands. Also the substitution of substantial and ornamental concrete walks, for objectionable plank walks. These and numerous public improvements of a minor class, all, redounding directly to the public benefit by promoting commerce, and upbuilding the social, educational and industrial interests of the community, could not be accomplished without an expenditure of large sums of money, nor without drawing heavily on the revenues from the special tax, which was levied not only for the purchasing of a waterworks and electric light plant, but also to provide for the maintenance and extension of the plant.

And now, we offer in further support of our contention, the admission of the Gazette itself (Feb. 25) that "the city has made material progress and improvement during the past two years, and due credit should be accorded to the administration therefore," and that, "of course the council could not please everybody," in carrying out all these public measures and improvements. But that the council has reasonably done everything in its power to safeguard the public interests, and has utilized every opportunity and all the resources at its command for the general improvement of the town and the most practicable way that circumstances would permit, is bound to be recognized by all reasonable men in the face of an indisputable public record and a living tangible and ocular evidence.

There is not a man, woman or child in Lafayette to-day, we are certain, who would consent to the obliteration of a single one of the public improvements carried out by the present city council; and now will some one kindly tell us in what other way these same improvements could be carried out, and difficulties overcome, than the way adopted by the gentlemen to whose hands it fell to do the work?

It is easy to criticize and destroy, but very arduous and difficult (and thankless) to build or construct, but good men should not feel discouraged on that account in the performance of duty - to do one's duty honestly and fearlessly is noble.

The old city council has enough good works and unselfish service to its credit to make it a very strained and pitiable act on the part of its political enemies to charge it with the sin of partiality in carrying out public measures and improvements, and the books and the public records are there to show an honest expenditure of every dollar of the public money.

These are the facts and this is the record. Do the people of Lafayette really want a radical and antagonistic change from the enlightened policy and progressive methods of the present city government, that have proven such a powerful factor in building the material property of Lafayette, and pushing forward the educational and industrial development of the community? We can scarcely believe so.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.


Candidates.
For the Convention in the Senatorial District, EDWARD SIMON, of St. Martin.

 FOR DELEGATE TO THE CONVENTION 11th SENATORIAL DISTRICT.

(St. Martin, Iberia and Lafayette.)

JOHN CLEGG, of Lafayette.

FOR THE CONVENTION LAFAYETTE PARISH, M. E. GIRARD.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1879.




To the Voters of Lafayette.

 Considering the shortness of the time within which to call a Parish Convention to select candidates for delegates to the convention ordered to assemble in New Orleans on the 21st of April next, to form a new constitution, which delegates should be chosen by the people at the election on the 18th March, the undersigned have thought it proper and sufficient in the capacity as Democratic Executive Committee of the Democratic Conservative party of the parish of Lafayette, to recommend to the voters of the parish of Lafayette the names of John Clegg for the Senatorial District and M. E. Girard for the parish, and thus dispense with a Parish Convention.

NATHAN FORMAN, J.O. BROUSSARD, V. MARTIN, J. G. ST. JULIEN.

H. M. BAILEY, Secretary Dem. Con. Parish Ex. Com.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1879.

 

Voter Registration. - The Registrar will open his office at the Court House on Monday next for the purpose of registering those who were not registering those who have not been registered in 1878, Those who have not registered should do so at once, so as to be able to vote for delegates to the constitutional convention on the 18th instant.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1879.

ANOTHER BLACK EYE. - Mr. Demarest was confirmed by the Senate as postmaster of Opelousas, vice Judge Gilbert Dupre. This action of the administration is a serious blow to the white wing of the Republican party in Louisiana, and the Advertiser is justified in believing that the Republican party is dead for ever in this State. No white man can conscientiously follow the leadership of Wimberly and his coons.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1901.





















ELECTION NOTICE. 

 Pursuant to a writ or order of election issued by His Excellency, Murphy J. Foster, dated at the city of Baton Rouge, the 13th day of March, 1894, and directed to me, the undersigned authority, the qualified voters of the parish of Lafayette, La., are hereby notified that an election will be held throughout the parish, on Saturday, the 21st day of April, 1894, from seven o'clock in the forenoon, until six o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of electing one representative from the parish of Lafayette, La., to fill the vacancy in the General Assembly of Louisiana, caused by the resignation of Hon. Overton Cade, representative of the parish of Lafayette.
 
The following polls will be opened in each election precinct from the hours of 7 o'clock a. m. to 6 o'clock p. m. on the day mentioned for the purpose of receiving votes of the qualified electors of the parish of Lafayette, to-wit:

 Ward 1, Poll 2. - At Jules Guidry's Hall. 
Commissioners: A. A. Delhomme, Felix Bernard and C. A. Boudreaux.

 Ward 2. Poll 3. - At Ford Hoffpauir's. Commissioners: Alexander Broussard, Hugh Wagner and Ford Hoffpauir.

 Ward 3. Poll 6. - At Court House.  Commissioners: J. Louis Mouton, D. A. Cochrane and Robert C. Greig.

 Ward 3. Poll 10. - At Mouton's Switch.  Commissioners: J. Edmond Mouton, Horace Martin and Paul L. DeClouet.

 Ward 4. Poll 7. - At H. Theall's Warehouse.  Commissioners: Octave Theriot, E. Pellerin and A. Mouchet.

 Ward 5. Poll 9. - Farmer's Alliance Hall.  Commissioners: Aurelien Olivier, Lucien St. Julien and A. A. Labbe.

 Ward 6. Poll 1. - At H. Simoneaux'.  Commissioners: F. A. Broussard, Alfred Cormier and Adolphe Guilbeau.

 Ward 6. Poll 5. - At Guilbeau's Hall.  Commissioners: Ignace Bernard, A. C. Guilbeau and Alcide Broussard.

 Ward 7. Poll 8. -At Isle Pilette Public School-house.  Commisioners: Eloi Bonin, J. S. Broussard and J. Aymar Labbe.

 Ward 8. Poll 4. - At Public School House, near Louis Rhoee'. Commissioners: L. G. Breaux, Cleobule Doucet and Robert Thomas.

 The above named commissioners will make due return to me, the undersigned, according to law.

                ARTHUR GREIG.
Returning officer of the parish of Lafayette, La., March 19, 1894.
                     Lafayette Advertiser 3/31/1894.




A Politician. - "A politician," in the LAFAYETTE GAZETTE of last week thunder at the ADVERTISER  for its cruelty in wishing the politicians be sent to Manila to be exterminated by the natives, and "a politician" remarks that the journalistic field being in a nascent state in this far away country the ADVERTISER could go along. We wish to say that we were surprised to find out that Lafayette harbored a "politician."

 It was far from our mind to include "a politician" in our suggestion.

 We had reference only to the big fishes which under the disguise of friendship for the people, have in the last few years yoked and trodden upon laboring classes and who for the love of office have stabbed their friends in the back.

 We are sorry that Lafayette has "a politician" of that description.

 We were not after the small fishes that are playing at politics. Oh, no.

 As moving to a "nascent journalistic field," we are ready to start just as soon as "a politician" will go with us. 
Lafayette Advertiser 4/1/1899.




WHITE PRIMARIES. 

 Now that an election has been ordered for a District Judge to succeed Hon. C. Debaillon, resigned, it behooves the Democrats of the District to immediately organize and consolidate their forces, secure concert of action with Vermilion parish, and render victory sure. Our Central Committee have already gone actively to work, and should be ably seconded by our political leaders in the several wards. As to the plan of campaign, we are in favor of white primaries, especially as this is an election for a judicial officer; and our candidate should be set above the degrading necessity of a gumbo scrimmage for negro votes, so repulsive to a gentleman possessed of that dignity and refinement of character eminently qualifying him to worthily occupy the bench. Any other plan might deter such a man from entering the canvass. All the leading Democrats with whom we have discussed the question are decidedly in favor of white primaries. We feel assured that this is the plan that will be adopted by the joint central committees. Through it our candidate once nominated, we believe the opposition will acquiesce in the wisdom of our choice and make no effort.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/5/1890.


  In conversation with Orther C. Mouton, Esq., a few days since, we naturally drifted upon the subject of the approaching election. In answer to our inquiry he replied yes, that it is true that he has aspirations, and in all probability will appear before the people as a candidate for the office of District Judge; provided, always, that the question is first submitted to white primaries ;  otherwise, he would never strive to gratify even a laudable ambition at the cost of a rough and tumble harlequin canvass.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/5/1890.




THE DEMOCRATIC RALLY.

 Hon. Jas. Wilkinson the Principal Speaker. Addresses by J. Gilbert, Dr. F. J. Mayer and Wm. Campbell.

 A Large Crowd Present, Many from the Country, Showing That the Voters of Lafayette Are Interested in the Coming Election.

 A good crowd, among them many from the country, was present at the Democratic mass meeting at the court house Monday afternoon, showing that the voters are interested in the coming election. The Sontag Military Band furnished  music for the occasion. Judge Blanchard was unable to attend, being detained in New Orleans.

 The meeting was called to order at 2:30 p. m., by Major DeClouet, chairman of the Parish Executive Committee, who requested Mr. R. C. Landry to preside. A number of vice-presidents were named and Jerome Mouton and W. A. LeRosen appointed secretaries.

 Major Declouet opened the meeting by explaining in a few words the object of the meeting and also pledging his best efforts in the legislature for the welfare of the parish and State. He then introduced Hon. J. Gilbert St. Julien, who made and eloquent talk in French.

 He was followed by Hon. James Wilkinson, of Plaquemines, who after explaining that he came here, not because they had any fear of Republican success, but because simply to ratify the feeling of good will and affection of all Democrats, and congratulate the people of Lafayette upon their noble lot of parish nominees. He then devoted his remarks to the claims of the Republicans who took credit for internal improvements and the Panama canal, showing that without Democratic support they could have done nothing. Most of his speech was concerning the pension system which was, he charged, a gigantic steal. He also touched upon the post office frauds and corruption of the Republican party.

 His remarks were listened to attentively and occasionally evoked applause. He closed by expressing confidence that Lafayette would roll up its usual Democratic majority.

 Judge Lewis of St. Landry, Dr. F. J. Mayer and Hon. Wm. Campbell also made addresses.

 The following resolutions were adopted:

 Be it resolved, that we, the Democracy of Lafayette parish, in mass meeting assembled, do hereby adopt, ratify and affirm the State Platform of principles of the Democratic party and pledge to the party nominees in the coming election our undivided and cordial and hearty support.

 Be it further resolved, that we do hereby protest against the enormous and increasing pension burden imposed by the North up on the South for forty years after the war is over, and we condemn the recent illegal, autocratic and partisan action of the President of the United States in giving away, by an illegal service pension order, enormous sums of the people's money on the event of the approaching Presidential election. Lafayette Advertiser 4/6/1904.
   


Socialist Club Organized. - A socialist club of twenty-three members was organized in Lafayette on March 29. One new member was admitted at their first meeting and several applications have been submitted to act on at the next meeting.

 A meeting will be held every Saturday at 8 p. m. at the residence of Mr. F. C. Triay until a hall can be secured, when they will have lectures by local and and other speakers at least monthly. Lafayette Advertiser 4/6/1904.
 



Lecture On Socialism. - Geo. E. Bigelow, an able exponent of Socialism, will lecture at Falk's Hall on Wednesday and Thursday evening Mr. F. C. Triay will also give a talk on Socialism and Trusts.

 Admission is free and everybody is cordially invited to be present. Lafayette Advertiser 4/6/1904:


 
 
Divided Lafayette?
 The separate government of the original corporation of Lafayette and the Mills, Mouton and McComb additions, as obtains since their severation by the recent discussion of the supreme court, must necessarily militate against the interests of the one as much as the other. The situation is a most unfortunate one and should be relieved at the earliest moment possible. If, as it is represented, the annexation can be made under a law now in force that was framed to meet just such an emergency as Lafayette finds itself placed in, the initial move should be made without delay to bring about a reunion of the old corporation and its lately dismembered additions. The subject calls for immediate action in the interest of all.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/6/1895.


THE NEGRO QUESTION.

 The negro question seems just now to be a more disturbing element in the politics of the Northern States than in the South. In no less than three Northern States are there differences between the Republicans and the negroes, which will assuredly lose the party a large number of votes in November ;  differences that promise to become important and leading issues in the coming campaign of a law passed by the Republicans making it a felony for whites and blacks to inter-marry. In Ohio the last Republican Legislature passed a law prohibiting any but white persons from serving in the militia and disorganizing and dispersing a number of colored companies already formed. In Connecticut ;  the complaint is pretty much the same. A battalion of colored troops was, organized some weeks since. The other day they appealed to the Republican Legislature for incorporation. This has been specifically and emphatically refused them. The negroes are indignant, are carrying around protests for signature and threaten to bolt the Republican nominees at the fall election.

 Another curious circumstance is the fact that Iowa, the strongest Republican State in the Union, the head and front of Radicalism, whose citizens have wept, shouted and screamed for the rights of the negro in the South, only last week, and then thanks to Democratic votes, struck out the word "white" in its constitution and granted the negro the right he has to this day been refused in that State, of election to the Legislature. The other Northern States are as far behind the South in granting the negro his rights as Iowa, which grants the colored man in 1878 a privilege that he has been enjoying and abusing in the South for over ten years. From the N. O. Democrat and in the Lafayette Advertiser of 4/6/1878.







WHO SOWED THAT WIND? 

Our exchanges inform us that the negroes of the parish of Grant have driven all the office-holders out of the parish. Fearing the usual excesses of a mob, many families have fled to other parts for safety.

 The offices were all in the peaceable possession of Republicans, but it seems they were all carpet-baggers and scalawags. The unpleasantness is no doubt a sequel of the proceedings had a large colored meeting in New Orleans not long since, in which they explained that the colored republican vote in the State 70,000 and the white republican 6,000, and yet their more acute and tricky white brothers occupied nearly all the offices.

 We are opposed to violence and mob rule, and sympathize with those families who were forced to leave for safety, but if this fight is between the colored republicans and their white office-holders -- we are not in -- that whirl-wind don't belong to us. Grant parish is not the only one where the colored republicans have just cause of complaint and ought to clean out their carpet-bag and scalawag masters. Lafayette Advertiser 4/12/1873





Parish Politics in 1869:

  All whither are we tending, whither are traveling these were the first expressions that escaped our lips, when we read the pamphlet containing the Testimony and papers in the case of C. H. Darral vs. Adolphe Bailey, 3rd Congressional District, Louisiana. These questions were spontaneous under the impression of the lecture of such a document, and after some reflection we came to the conclusion; what safety is there for life or lib, property, home, honor, when, all these, the sacred rights of a member of a community are left to the tender mercies of low intrigue and perjural scoundrelism ;  and that without any redress, says the strong arm and undeniable right of self defence. Without referring to what transpired in our sister Parishes and which is spoken of in the document alluded to, we will for the time being, notice what testimony has been elicited from certain parties under oath, some residing in our Parish and some strangers to our community, but who were in our midst in the various occupations of Registrars, Freedmen Bureau officers, etc., and who should still be grateful to our community for kind treatment and protection. We will notice the "trooly loil" officiants serialism ;  first is Mr. Michael Casey once a candidate for a seat in the State Legislature, Mr. Casey knows well that when he came to this Parish to procure testimony in the matter of Mr. Judice's seat, there was no intimidation used to prevent a fair hearing. He was not driven away from the Parish and no well behaved citizen white or black was ever known to have been molested or interfered with here. The reign of terror he speaks of, if any there ever existed and (we deny the fact) was brought about by his own infernal and diabolical machinations and hellish workings upon the minds of an ignorant and not badly disposed people ; had it not been for him, the low grovelling well digger and some other Radical leaders our Parish would never have witnessed the scenes that occurred within its limits. Six prominent republicans were killed ? will the gentlemen from Erin, inform us who they were, those six lights of republicanism ? really Mr. Casey, you had better return to our working colored population the money you got from them, and finally in a spirit of Christian forgiveness would give you a piece of advice never to return to the Parish or your colored brethren will be sure to be after you for that money and there is no telling but that you would be the seventh prominent republican good up.

 Then comes Mr. Pierre Toussin, colored, we'll let him pass by.

 Then we have the affidavit of Alexander Raymond Franois jr., who under oath does swear that republicans could not hold meetings in the last Presidential Canvass, we ourselves have attended a meeting of their party in this very Parish, where the exquisite Mr. ---------- and the portly Hon. O. J. Dunn, addressed the crowd without any disturbance. He was not driven off, no threats were made to Mr. Raymond, and nothing but a harrowed conscience could have led him away from the place where his own petty ambitions and wickedness of heart had fomented strife and broils and worked destruction to his own color.

 Next is Mr. Roman Andrez, you stand aside, in the dark with Mr. Toussin. We had intended to notice these different affidavits seriatim but we will for a while pass over that of Mr. Edward C. Wilkins and refer to that of the hon. Fortune Richard, the polite, the exquisite revolution naive from Hayti. This colored gent has the audacity of speaking of secret organization when he himself was the President of a secret organization known as the Loyal League Grand army of the Republic or whatever other name we know not; the distinguished individual must not speak of buckshot as he does on his affidavit, he is now in our midst and is certainly not interfered with, we wish him to know that he owes his existence, but to the generosity of our people.

 We have got through with the colored gents. Now comes the affidavit of the noble member of the Caucasian race Edward C. Wilkins, this document certainly contains the most flagrant and unheard of falsehoods. You, sir, speak of a reign of terror. There were frequent patrols we will admit, dictated by the law of self-preservation; and were you not the constant attendant of those patrols ? were you not the nightly and active companion, nay, instigator of what your affidavit comprises, would call secret armed organizations ?  No Republican Tickets could be distributed or voted ?  Who destroyed or concealed the thousands that were sent to your address ?  We will certainly give you credit for telling the truth once in the course of your affidavit and that is when at its close you say that you would not feel safe to go to that Parish and give this evidence openly, and last though, but  not least, Mr. Wilkins, when about leaving this place and when you were almost naked, who clothed you ?  Who made you a present of a new suit of clothes on the eve of your departure ? that people whom you are slandering and abusing, and misrepresenting. Who advanced you money to pay your passage to the city ? that same people of violence and murder. We dismiss you Mr. Wilkins, you can retire. We shall pass now to the testimony of Mr. Oscar A. Rice, now in New Orleans, the little Freedmen Bureau office man. If memory serves us right you were a regularly initiated K. W. C. during your stay in our Parish ;  if there is a spark of manly feeling left in your competition, let it mantle and fire your cheek with the blush of eternal shame. We are really sorry that we have been compelled to notice this pamphlet, embodying an issue of lies unequaled in brass and audacity by any thing we have ever read ;  but we could not refrain from expressing some of our feelings.

 There were secret organizations in the Parish, they existed in both parties, the Democrats and Republicans. The object of the the republican secret society we do not judge of but by the insolent and overbearing conduct of the negro population and their repeated threats, which were of the most incendiary nature towards the democrats and white population; the secret democratic organization was organized for the purpose of protection to all and especially towards the blind and deluded negro. They were addressed from the stump by known and able orators, in the language of friendly admonition, but under the guidance of their leaders, there minds fired by the most glowing promises of distribution of lands, mules; social equality, some inevitably became the victims of their own presumption and impudence. We hear the question propounded ;  was not the law there to protect your people from danger ?  We will answer. No. There are certain periods in the affairs of communities as well as of men, where the written law cannot reach and give redress to the grievances of a people; there are cases of political peril not provided for by the statutes of the law given and where the citizen must fall back upon his reserved and unalienable rights of self protection. Those reserved right of all communities we did exercise and we must say with the greatest moderation. Parish contesting wish evidence to substantiate fraud and violence in the matter of the late election, which was conducted in the most orderly manner, and without intimidation towards any one ?  We shall favor the gentleman from Brashear with a few affidavits in a few days, from a leading colored republican, more Honorable than Mr. Wilkins or Mr. Rice or the aspiring gent from Hayti ;  leading colored Republicans who voluntarily joined the Democratic Party, and now bless the moment they did so, for now have they plenty and protection and the Democrat and white man has become his friend and protector. We cannot and will not put up with such vile and unwarranted calumny as is intended to be heaped upon us in the affidavits referred to. We have no time or space to do justice to the subject this week but
"ce qui est defferie n'est pas perdu." Lafayette Advertiser 4/17/1869.


News From Vermilionville.

ELECTION. 

 An election for Mayor and seven Councilmen for the town of Vermilionville, will be held at the Court House on Monday the 4th of May next.

 The following ticket has been handed to us for publication :

 For Mayor - A. Monnier.

 For Councilmen - R. L. McBride, L. P. Revillon, H. Landry, F. C. Latiolais, W. B. Lindsay, C. O. Olivier, Wm. Brandt.

Constable - Treville Bernard.
    Lafayette Advertiser 4/18/1874.







 THE PHARR MEETING. 

Last Monday, at the Opera house, was held the first Pharr Political meeting in Lafayette.  Capt. Pharr was accompanied by Hon. Taylor Beattie, Mr., Suthon and other orators and active supporters, and these were received on the arrival of the 3:30 train, by a delegation of citizens carrying a banner bearing the inscription "Protection to our industries." The Pelican brass band was on hand and discoursed music for the occasion. At the opera house a large number of persons of different factions had assembled to hear the speakers, and ladies were also present. Addresses were delivered on the public questions of the day and all was progressing to the entire satisfaction of the promoters of the meeting when an incident took place just as Judge Beattie was closing his discourse, which requires the following explanation  to be better understood:

 Shortly before the meeting, Dr. H. D. Guidry in company with Mr. A. Primeaux happened to be in the neighborhood of the Court House at a time Mr. Harry Durke was offering to bet $200 on the result of the election. Mr. Primeaux proceeded to where Mr. Durke was and asked the latter what had become of the $200 the Police Jury appropriated for drainage purposes in the 4th. (Mr. Durke's) ward ?  when it is intimated to Mr. Primeaux that he should not brook trouble in this manner, Dr. Guidry said to Primeaux "you have the right to question what disposition is made of parish money," and shortly after this both he and Mr. Primeaux took their departure. It transpired afterwards that Durke swore out an affidavit against Dr. Guidry and Primeaux, for defamation of character and it was at the closing of Judge Beattie's address that Dr. Guidry, who was acting as secretary of the meeting, and Mr. Primeaux were placed under arrest. Whilst these two were being conducted to jail by sheriff Broussard, Mr. Octave Bertrand asked Dr. Guidry why the arrest was not deferred until after the meeting as there was no urgent need for executing the warrant. The sheriff replied that was none of his business and pushed Bertand away.

 Bertrand was retracing his steps in the direction of the sheriff when the latter whipped out his pistol striking Bertand on the side of the head inflicting a wound from which the blood flowed freely; the sheriff flourished his pistol in mid air in a threatening manner, all the while holding Dr. Guidry at the throat and warning him, that he, the sheriff, was not going to be bulldozed. Certainly not replied Dr. Guidry, I could not well do so as your prisoner. 

 Messrs. Primeaux and Guidry were placed in prison to await bail. Their friends sent Edward Hebert at once to the home of Judge McFadden to request his presence at his court room, but Hebert was informed by members of Judge McFadden's family that the Judge was not at home, having gone to town. However when the attorneys of the prisoners went in person to look up Judge McFadden, he was seen to come down from the upper story of his house in response to the call of the attorneys.

 Later the two accused were liberated under bonds of $25 each. These are the facts as they have been reported to us by eye witnesses, and we leave it to the public to judge of the true animus of the whole proceeding. As for ourselves we are not surprised at such high handed methods but, on the contrary, have learned to expect them. Time and again we have ourselves as being unalterably opposed to all things savoring of the dictator.

 From the incipiency of the present campaign we have labored to explain the difference between serfdom and liberty, as applied to political bosses, and must leave it to the voters as to whether or not they will submit to the yoke.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/18/1896.




(Communicated) Lafayette Parish, April 13th, 1896: 
Mr. Editor.

 I was in your town last Monday, and witnessed some of the most niggardly tricks ever perpetrated upon a free and white people.

 Mr. H. M. Durke, a public officer, an officer of the law, member of the Police Jury of Lafayette from the 4th. ward, was asked a civil question from Mr. Adam Primeaux, so touching and to the point was the question, that Mr. Durke then flew to his boss, Mr. I. A. Broussard, (another officer of the law, sheriff of this parish) and to that worthy reported all his troubles. The consequences were that Primeaux was arrested and lodged in jail, simply because he demanded of an officer of the law questions relating to the welfare of the 4th. ward. The attestations did not stop here. Whilst the above was in commotion, a Republican meeting was progressing under fair results in Falk's Hall. At least 400 white persons were in attendance, amongst the audience were a large number of ladies and children. Seeing that the Republican orators were speaking too truthfully and exposing Democratic tricks and methods so openly and freely that some of the "Democrats of Lafayette concocted a plan to break the meeting. While Judge Beattie was delivering his masterly address, Dr. Guidry was arrested and taken from the speakers platform. Dr. Guidry was taken downstairs followed by some of the administration's cohorts and a false alarm of "fire! fire! fire! was given so as to confuse and cause disorder and a stampede. Ladies and children were wild with fright, and fortunately, some cool headed gentlemen "saw unto" the trick, and by untiring energy prevented what may have terminated into fatal results. Quietness was again restored and the orators proceeded with their speeches. Whilst Dr. Guidry was being conducted to prison a Mr. O. Bertand asked Dr. Guidry why he was not arrested before the meeting, and the answer he got was 2 or 3 raps on the head, with either a pistol or a brass knuckle in the hands of the sheriff of this parish, Mr. I. A. Broussard.

 Well, Dr. Guidry was landed in jail to keep vigil to Mr. Adam Primeaux, who had a few minutes previous been arrested. Friends of the gentleman were indignant at the unjust treatment their friends had received, and steps were at once taken, so as to get their release. Judge McFadden had been stored so that Messrs. Guidry and Primeaux could not be released on bond that night. Messenger after messenger could not find a trace of his Honor, until Judge Debaillon escorted by Mr. Chargois, drove to McFadden's residence, and by repeated attempts at last located him.

 I may here say that it was freely discussed on the streets that Judge McFadden was hid in his garret, of this I could not vouch. Nevertheless, the Honorable McFadden was found at once wrote out peace bonds, when Messrs. Guidry and Primeaux were again given their liberties. And is this Democracy? it cannot be! Oh! voters of Lafayette scrutinize seriously the personnel of both local tickets, be careful, as Tuesday the 21st instant decides whether justice of injustice will be meted out for 4 coming years. Remember that McFadden and I. A. Broussard are candidates for re-election. Think seriously of the doings of Monday April 18th. and form your own conclusions.

 "Justice to some, injustice to others," is the password of Lafayette Democracy. Down with the ring, away with the vandals. Hannah for Campbell the man of the people, the friend of the poor, the next sheriff of Lafayette.
PESTLE. Lafayette Advertiser 4/18/1896.
 


The Assessors office will be open next Monday for the registration of voters, and will remain open until the evening of election day. The Assessors office is at the Court House.
 Laf. Adv. 4/18/1893

 Politics are growing warm, and in the language of the philosopher of the Rockies, the "lion roareth and the whang doodle mourneth" in the valley of the Attakapas. Laf. Adv. 4/19/1893


Socialist Lectures. - Fairly large audiences greeted Geo. E. Bigelow the socialist lecturer from Lincoln, Nebraska. Mr. Bigelow is a fluent speaker, and shows a thorough knowledge of his subject which he presented in an attractive form. Mr. F. C. Triay also made an address Thursday night on socialism and the trusts.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/20/1904.



THE PRIMARY ELECTION. - In the primary election on Saturday last Julian Mouton, Esq., being the only candidate, was unanimously chosen as the Democratic nominee for the vacancy in the Legislature caused by the resignation of Hon. Overton Cade. To the nominee The Advertiser gives its unreserved support. It is free to say that it considers him worthy of this preferment at the hands of the people, and has no doubt that he will make a good and useful member. Lafayette Advertiser 4/21/1894. 



It is the duty of all Democrats to go to the polls to-day and vote. 
 Laf. Adv. 4/21/1894





Results of the Election.
For Governor.
Murphy J. Foster - 1509, J. N. Pharr - 654.

Lt. Governor.
R. H. Snyder 1555, J. B. Kleinpeter 674.

For Senator.
Rob. Martin 1176, Fred Gates 657.

 For Representative.
G. W. Scranton 1111, J. O. Broussard 1101.

For District Judge.
Julian Mouton 1227, J. O. Broussard 1101.

Judge Debaillon received 864 votes majority in the parish of Vermilion, which gives him a clear majority of 647 votes in the district.

For District Attorney.
M. T. Gordy 1227, Jos. A. Chargois 957.

We have been informed that in the parish of Vermilion, Mr. Gordy received a majority of 72 votes, but this is not authoritative.

For Sheriff.
I. A. Broussard 1218, Wm. Campbell 1024.

For Clerk of Court.
E. G. Voorhies 1802, W. B. Bailey 942.

For Coroner.
Drs. A. R. Trahan 1164, A. Gladu 1059.

Suffrage Amendment.
For: 45, Against: 1885.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1896.


Election Notice. 
Lafayette April 15th, 1897. 

In Accordance with amendment Five (V.) of the charter of the Town of Lafayette, La. I, the undersigned authority do hereby give public notice that there will be  held an election in the Town of Lafayette, La., at the Court House, on Monday, the 3rd day of May A. D. 1897, for the purpose of electing one Mayor and Seven Councilmen to serve for two years, ending May 1899.

 The polls will be opened at 7 a. m. and closed at 5 p. m., and the election held in accordance with existing state laws. Lafayette Advertiser 5/1/1897



From Washington to Opelousas via Lafayette. 
HON. A. BAILEY, member elect for Congress, in our District passed through our Town last Saturday, en route from Washington City to his home in Opelousas. We had the pleasure of a short interview with him ;  he looks good in health, though fatigued and emaciated by uninterrupted night and day traveling from the Capitol. He confirms the news of the appointment of a committee of investigation in the matter of the frauds alleged in the late Congressional canvass, the Committee consists of three: Stevensen of Ohio, an ultra Radical, Kerr of Indiana, a staunch Democrat, and Burdette of New York, a Conservation Republican. The destination of the Committee is New Orleans, and how far they will penetrate into the interior Parishes we cannot ascertain ;  the citizens of the Parish of Lafayette do invite the committee of investigation to come in their midst, they will give them a cordial reception, and tender them all the generous hospitality, which have always marked the course of southern men and moreover, will afford them all the means of investigating the election frauds alluded to ;  the citizens of the Parish of Lafayette in as much as they are concerned do court investigation, in the matters referred to. 

Lafayette Advertiser 5/1/1869.

THE PRIMARIES.

 Every white Democrat should feel it to be his bounden duty to go to the ballot box next Saturday (May 10th) and express his choice for a man to be elected Judge of the 25th Judicial District. You owe this much to your own convictions, and to party fealty. It has been a long time since the Democratic party in Lafayette has had a thorough, distinct and harmonious organization. This is the opportunity to take the first step towards that end, which is earnestly desired by all who have the best interests of the party at heart. Turn out and let us know our real strength. This done, the remaining steps necessary to thoroughly organize will be easier to take. Lafayette Advertiser 5/3/1893.  




A New Municipal Government 

As was foretold last week the election on last Monday passed off quietly and we now are living under a new municipal government.

  There was no interest in the election as shown by the returns as only one-fifth of the voters exercised their privilege of voting.
  The ticket was elected by the following vote : Wm. Campbell, Mayor, 88 votes; Councilmen : C. O. Mouton, 89; Dr. F. E. Girard, 88; Felix Demanade, 93; H. H. Hohorst, 92; E. Martin, 91; Geo. A. Deblanc, 87.
  Mr. Felix Demanade ran ahead of the ticket. There were 26 tickets scratched.
   Lafayette Advertiser 5/6/1899.





THE ELECTION.


The municipal last Monday was one of the boldest examples of "ring-ism" that has ever been perpetrated on the long suffering people of Lafayette. Bossism stalked forth and without remorse and without remorse and without shame assumed control of the election, and what should have been a voice of the people was by ring manipulations made meat for the Tiger.

The People's party although having gone through all regular formalities required by the State to have their party recognized and placed on the ticket, were refused recognition on the Board of Commissioners. In a petition duly addressed to his Honor the Mayor on the day we call for election was issued, the several members of the People's ticket asked to be allowed the appointing of one commissioner, but were flatly informed that all arrangements had been made, commissioners appointed and they were not in it, or words to that effect, for the elect could run no risks, they were playing a close game, and did not attend that a man of the opposite party should be placed in a position to call the turn on their dirty trick.

The first hope of the faithful was in those sun kissed children of the Orient, the ex-worshipers of Allah, and loyal subjects of the Sick Man of the East, these stood shoulder to shoulder and voted like men (?) or like they had been taught to, and there was not a defaced ticket put in the box by the whole measly outfit. And it would be safe to wager that one in three out of the immortal forty-five could tell whether it was a leaf from the Koran on a bill of fare he put in the ballot box. But this is what politics have come to in this parish, it is under the control of a class of foreigners that are an absolute detriment to any community on which they get their greasy clutches, they are vampires on legitimate commerce, never do an honest days work, but peddle out shyster shed worn goods at an exorbitant profit and divert money from legitimate commerce, and take this business away from our license paying property owning business men who are working to make Lafayette a mercantile center to the territory that is nominally tributary to it. And this is an act perpetrated on the people by that ring of politicians who have the (unreadable word) people so closely at heart.

But they had one scheme that was a sure winner and all that it took to fix one thing was a little man, with accent on the little, and little pencil. Oh ye Gods! seventy odd marked and otherwise defaced tickets. In the parish election last fall there were only seven. Out of these seventy the People's Party had sixty tickets thrown out, every kind of mark went, nothing was too small, flaws in the paper were counted too. It is mighty lucky that it was not fly time or the election would have been a flat failure. The marked ballots showed no uniformity of mark or similarity in position in the markings, showing conclusively that they were not intended as marks of identification, these marks were the vile work of some detestable villain, put there with the deliberate intention of depriving honest men of the right of franchise, this is one of the vilest political tricks ever perpetrated by any man, men or party and shows the depths to which ring ism will will resort to to attain its ends.

This act should in the mind of every honest truth loving citizen sound the death knell to that faction or party guilty of such an outrage on the rights of citizenship.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/8/1897.




Election Time in Vermilionville.

 The election for the town of Vermilionville took place last Monday. Only 91 votes were polled ;  the following is the result:

For Mayor - A. Monnier - 89 votes.

For Councilmen:
R. L. McBride - 91 votes.
H. Landry - 88 votes.
J. A. Chargois - 85 votes.
L. P. Revillon - 56 votes.
J. O. Mouton - 51 votes.
B. A. Salles - 48 votes.
F. Bourges - 45 votes.
Wm. Brandt - 43 votes.
C. O. Olivier - 42 votes.
W. B. Lindsay - 39 votes.
F. C. Latiolais - 38 votes.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/9/1874.




The Primaries.

 Don't neglect to do your duty to-day. Attend the primaries and vote, and see that your name is enrolled as one of the white Democrats of Lafayette parish.
Laf. Adv. 5/10/1890.




Election Attempted.



In connection with the election attempted to be held here last Monday for municipal officers of this town, we desire to give a plain statement of acts.



 During the week preceding the election the town was rife with rumors as to what would be done by the regulators on the day of the election; all, however, culminating in this, that the negro voters of our town would not be allowed to vote. These rumors were not generally created in town, we are satisfied, up to Sunday evening, the 5th inst. all then, 'tis it is to say,'  they were given foundation in act. On that evening, between six and seven o'clock, a body of men armed with Winchester rifles rode into town, and were said to be from St. Martin parish. The arrival of these caused no little commotion among the law-abiding citizens of the town, but barring horsemen riding the streets through the night there was no disturbance of the peace of the town. Monday, however, opened another chapter of  the history of our town. At the break of day a body of an estimated at between fifty and sixty men were assembled in front of the court houise where the poll was to be held, and whom, excepting probably three or four, were non-residents of the town; and many, especially those who seemed to be head or in command, were strangers to the people of the town and non-residents of the parish. These men only carried side arms. At six o'clock promptly the poll was opened in the court house, the place designated (unreadable word) and which for information we will say stands in the middle of a square enclosed by a fence with entrances to the square, one in front and two on either side. At the opening of the polls there were present Sheriff Isaac Broussard, an executive officer; Clerk A. M. Martin as Supervisor, and two commissioners, Wm. Campbell and and Paul Demanade the third, L. Marchan, a colored man failed to appear, Joseph H. Moss was sworn in his stead. A few citizens were also present. In the meantime men with side arms stationed themselves at the entrances to the yard. These men, with the exception of two or three were utter strangers to the town. Sometimes after the opening of the poll. And after fifteen or twenty white men voted, a party of six or eight negroes, well known residents and some of the property owners in the town started to come in by one of the side entrances to the yard, when the man in the lead stopped by one of the St. Martinville men. Marshal Vigneaux, standing nearby told them to go on in and vote. They entered the yard and on into the court house. On going up to vote inside the court house, and right at the ballot box, they were stopped by Pierre Olivier, resident of this town, with revolver in hand, who told them they could not vote. Sheriff Broussard approached him and persuaded him to desist, and led him away some steps; and this party of negroes voted. About the time party of negroes just mentioned reached the court house door, or while they were voting, a signal or whistle was sounded by some one, and the men at the yard entrances left their posts, moved to a building near the court house and in a few minutes re-appeared bearing Winchester rifles, and took their stations as before. Then it was the mayor of the town, with several citizens standing around him called upon the sheriff to disperse the mob (who asked time to see his legal [unreadable word]), and things were brought to a still. Returning in a few minutes the sheriff went to a party of negroes on the outside of the square and asked if any of them wished to vote, and two or three of them replying in the affirmative were invited under the escort of the sheriff to enter the yard, when they were told by several men there with their rifles ready for use not come any further. The negroes drew back, and the sheriff then entered the court house and on consultation directed the commissioners to close the polls, which order was then and there carried into effect. The commissioners thereupon drew up and forwarded to the Governor a statement of the affair, concluding as follows:


 "Therefore we, said the officers, at the request of the sheriff, closed the polls and refused further to proceed with the said election under the demonstrations of armed violence, and we have therefore, after making affidavits for the arrest of the offenders, made this statement in duplicate and signed and sworn to the same."


 Subsequently several parties were arrested, and soon bailed, attended, however, by no little excitement and confusion. After the release of the prisoners it was thought all trouble was over. On Monday night, however, armed men gave no little uneasiness to the citizens of the town by riding through the streets. On Tuesday morning the excitement was intense, owing to the presence of 300 or more men armed with shot guns and rifles being assembled on the North of town within the corporate limits. The following report of their proceedings, sent to the Picayune, is short and we believe is in the main correct:


 "Marshall Vigneaux states that he received yesterday from friends three warnings that his life was in danger, and that he was obliged to take refuge in his room, prepared to defend himself. If such a measure was contemplated, it arose from the rumors that Mr. Vigneaux had purchased a lot of arms and placed them in the hands of negroes in expectation of a conflict. This rumor was generally circulated and given credence to by many.


 "A delegation of regulators, some six in number, called upon Mr. Vigneaux in regard to the matter, whereupon he offered to allow a search for the same provided they would the party or parties who originated the rumor. He did show his personal arms and requested that inventory should be made of the merchants whether he had purchased arms.


 "A proposition was made to submit the election to a white primary  next Monday, but nothing definite has yet been reached, although the opinion prevails that such an agreement was consummated, and Mr. Vigneaux expresses willingness to settle affairs."


 Tuesday Oscar J. Rhodes, a negro justice of the peace, was waited upon and his resignation demanded. He promptly resigned. Michael Foote, a negro constable, who had fled, returned and resigned. Since the occurrences above chronicled we have seen no armed demonstrations nor heard of any disturbances of the peace. We believe the excitement has subsided. We are truly glad that we have no bloodshed to record.


 Attorney General Rogers arrived here on the early Wednesday train. He was met by Sheriff Broussard. During the day he held a consultation with officers and leading citizens. He returned without announcing any formal decision. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1889.





Election Attempted.
In connection with the election attempted to be held here last Monday for municipal officers of this town, we desire to give a plain statement of acts.
During the week preceding the election the town was rife with rumors as to what would be done by the regulators on the day of the election; all, however, culminating in this, that the negro voters of our town would not be allowed to vote. These rumors were not generally created in town, we are satisfied, up to Sunday evening, the 5th inst. all then, 'tis it is to say,'  they were given foundation in act. On that evening, between six and seven o'clock, a body of men armed with Winchester rifles rode into town, and were said to be from St. Martin parish. The arrival of these caused no little commotion among the law-abiding citizens of the town, but barring horsemen riding the streets through the night there was no disturbance of the peace of the town. Monday, however, opened another chapter of  the history of our town. At the break of day a body of an estimated at between fifty and sixty men were assembled in front of the court house where the poll was to be held, and whom, excepting probably three or four, were non-residents of the town; and many, especially those who seemed to be head or in command, were strangers to the people of the town and non-residents of the parish. These men only carried side arms. At six o'clock promptly the poll was opened in the court house, the place designated (unreadable word) and which for information we will say stands in the middle of a square enclosed by a fence with entrances to the square, one in front and two on either side. At the opening of the polls there were present Sheriff Isaac Broussard, an executive officer; Clerk A. M. Martin as Supervisor, and two commissioners, Wm. Campbell and and Paul Demanade the third, L. Marchan, a colored man failed to appear, Joseph H. Moss was sworn in his stead. A few citizens were also present. In the meantime men with side arms stationed themselves at the entrances to the yard. These men, with the exception of two or three were utter strangers to the town. Sometimes after the opening of the poll. And after fifteen or twenty white men voted, a party of six or eight negroes, well known residents and some of the property owners in the town started to come in by one of the side entrances to the yard, when the man in the lead stopped by one of the St. Martinville men. Marshal Vigneaux, standing nearby told them to go on in and vote. They entered the yard and on into the court house. On going up to vote inside the court house, and right at the ballot box, they were stopped by Pierre Olivier, resident of this town, with revolver in hand, who told them they could not vote. Sheriff Broussard approached him and persuaded him to desist, and led him away some steps; and this party of negroes voted. About the time party of negroes just mentioned reached the court house door, or while they were voting, a signal or whistle was sounded by some one, and the men at the yard entrances left their posts, moved to a building near the court house and in a few minutes re-appeared bearing Winchester rifles, and took their stations as before. Then it was the mayor of the town, with several citizens standing around him called upon the sheriff to disperse the mob (who asked time to see his legal [unreadable word]), and things were brought to a still. Returning in a few minutes the sheriff went to a party of negroes on the outside of the square and asked if any of them wished to vote, and two or three of them replying in the affirmative were invited under the escort of the sheriff to enter the yard, when they were told by several men there with their rifles ready for use not to come any further. The negroes drew back, and the sheriff then entered the court house and on consultation directed the commissioners to close the polls, which order was then and there carried into effect. The commissioners thereupon drew up and forwarded to the Governor a statement of the affair, concluding as follows:


 "Therefore we, said the officers, at the request of the sheriff, closed the polls and refused further to proceed with the said election under the demonstrations of armed violence, and we have therefore, after making affidavits for the arrest of the offenders, made this statement in duplicate and signed and sworn to the same."


 Subsequently several parties were arrested, and soon bailed, attended, however, by no little excitement and confusion. After the release of the prisoners it was thought all trouble was over. On Monday night, however, armed men gave no little uneasiness to the citizens of the town by riding through the streets. On Tuesday morning the excitement was intense, owing to the presence of 300 or more men armed with shot guns and rifles being assembled on the North of town within the corporate limits. The following report of their proceedings, sent to the Picayune, is short and we believe is in the main correct:


 "Marshall Vigneaux states that he received yesterday from friends three warnings that his life was in danger, and that he was obliged to take refuge in his room, prepared to defend himself. If such a measure was contemplated, it arose from the rumors that Mr. Vigneaux had purchased a lot of arms and placed them in the hands of negroes in expectation of a conflict. This rumor was generally circulated and given credence to by many.


 "A delegation of regulators, some six in number, called upon Mr. Vigneaux in regard to the matter, whereupon he offered to allow a search for the same provided they would the party or parties who originated the rumor. He did show his personal arms and requested that inventory should be made of the merchants whether he had purchased arms.


 "A proposition was made to submit the election to a white primary  next Monday, but nothing definite has yet been reached, although the opinion prevails that such an agreement was consummated, and Mr. Vigneaux expresses willingness to settle affairs."


 Tuesday Oscar J. Rhodes, a negro justice of the peace, was waited upon and his resignation demanded. He promptly resigned. Michael Foote, a negro constable, who had fled, returned and resigned. Since the occurrences above chronicled we have seen no armed demonstrations nor heard of any disturbances of the peace. We believe the excitement has subsided. We are truly glad that we have no bloodshed to record.


 Attorney General Rogers arrived here on the early Wednesday train. He was met by Sheriff Broussard. During the day he held a consultation with officers and leading citizens. He returned without announcing any formal decision. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1889.


The New City Council. - The new City Council is on the eve of assuming control of the reins of local government, and by their acts the members will reflect honor or discredit on their administration and the community will benefit or suffer, accordingly.

 Ordinarily, the conscience of the individual is a safe monitor in determining between right and wrong, and if the members of the council about to enter upon the duties of their office are capable of rising above selfish interests and the petty machinations of the professional politicians who will stop at no means that will further their personal ends, they will fall into an easy way of managing the affairs of the municipality in a manner satisfactory alike to the taxpayers and themselves.

 If the members of the new council really have at heart the public welfare, they will respect the opinions and sensibilities of their fellow citizens in exercising the appointive power vested in the council by law, and select police and other officers on account of special fitness to discharge the duties and responsibilities of such offices, to the end that every branch of the public service may be elevated to the highest state efficiency.

 The office of alderman carries with it the gravest responsibilities, because so much of the peace, happiness and security of the community depends on his official acts, and unless the alderman be fully impressed with that fact it were far better for the community that he should step aside and make room for another who does realize that "PUBLIC OFFICE is a PUBLIC TRUST.

 The prospects for the town of Lafayette were never more bright (in a relative sense), than now, and a practical and progressive municipal government will go far toward developing those prospects. Let us hope that the members of the new council, individually and collectively, appreciating the seriousness of their responsibilities will show in their deliberations a due regard for the interests of the sovereign people, steering clear of all political intrigues, and thereby assure to the community the blessings of honest municipal government. Lafayette Advertiser 5/13/1899.

Meeting Called at the Parish Court House in Vermilionville. All citizens of Parish of Lafayette Irrespective of Party. At a meeting of all the citizens of the parish of Lafayette irrespective of party, held at the Court House in Vermilionville on Sunday the 9th of May 1869, Wm. Mouton was chosen president and Arthur Greig secretary ;  when the President after a few explanatory remarks as to the object of the meeting, offered the following preamble and resolutions which were unanimously adopted.

 Whereas, Certain charges of fraud and intimidation have been brought against the Democratic portion of the citizens of the Parish of Lafayette in the last Congressional Canvas, and that it has come to our knowledge, that the Sub-Committee of Investigation on the same, have reached the City of New Orleans and intend to visit each Congressional District throughout the State, in the performance of their duties.

 Be it received, That we the citizens of the Parish of Lafayette, do sincerely invite the members of the above Sub-Committee to visit the Parish of Lafayette for the purpose of a full and strict investigation of the above charges against our people.

 Be it resolved, That the Parish of Lafayette being the most central in the 3rd Congressional District, we do suggest the Town of Vermilionville as the most suitable place to be selected as Head Quarters of said Committee, in the transaction of the labors before them.

 Be it resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forthwith sent to the Honorable Members of the Sub-Committee. On motion the meeting adjourned.
    A. Greig, Secretary;  Wm. Mouton, President.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/15/1869.

 
Parish Court. - The Parish Court in session since Monday the 3d instant, adjourned on Wednesday last. This session though not protracted, cleared the Docket of a great number of cases mostly old legal rubbish, some of the cases decided however, were of great importance, and involving questions of vital interests to our people.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/15/1869.
 

 1896 - Lafayette Parish Elections. In a leading editorial in last week's issue, my friend of the "Gazette" cannot understand why our faction (Peoples Ticket) are feeling so jubilant over the results of the last election. T'is strange that he will not admit that we have many reasons for being satisfied. On meeting any "GooGoo" in public or in private and quiz him thus: Hello "GooGoo" are you contented? His answer will be, why not, most assuredly as our fraternity have neatly placed obstructions in the "gang's" pathway. We have grounds to be jubilant as we know the ring's power in this parish is broken. We have admirably well "mixed" the complexion of the next police jury, that august body was heretofore of the same political "Kin and Kith";(native land people) no so to-day. It's no more the "one round," there will be several "chimes" to the several "bells." The great "I am" from upper Lafayette will find it no so easy with out statesmen from the 8th ward in point debate. Our Benjamin "will make matters hum." Keep an eye on him, I digress, let me continue telling our friends how we dug into the flanks of the opponents. The "People's Ticket" elected representatives in every ward of the parish with the exception of the 6th and 7th, well, we expected nothing from those wards, as the seeds of Primary Fanaticism had readily germinated. White Democratic Primaries will only be held in those two wards next four years, other sections of the parish have had enough of wire-pulling.

 The fifth was banner ward of the parish. Our faction, like a mighty cyclone, swept everything before it. Even the "rhetoric roses" of the quarantine, "Hot House" lost its perfume in the roasting march of the victorious GooGoo. In the fourth, we have simply run things to suit ourselves. Hon. O. Cade and his staff made a desperate fight, t'was no use. This reminds me of Harry Drake, Harry is alright, only he has no idea that the science of politics was never analyzed until the "gang" told him that he was a politician. My friend Harry will never be a successful as a politician, take my word for it. Harry expected to carry this box by 90 votes, and using Bagarry's favorite expression, he got it where the "rooster got the ax."

 In the 3rd our ticket came our first best, notwithstanding 42 Syrian votes cast for the opposition. In the first, we elected our Police Juror, we are satisfied, as that ward was one of the Regular's through all. Our side of the local fight had the honor of electing such gentlemen as C. DeBaillon Esq., for District Judge. Hon. Robert Martin, for the senate! Hon. G. W. Scranton, for the Legislature, I consider that in itself a cause for celebration. We have the banana, we cheerfully give the peel.

 The "Gazette" sneers at the name of the People's Ticket. It is an honor to be the followers of such a ticket.

 Out friends are true to their cause, and they would much prefer to follow Campbell in defeat, then other leaders as O. C. Mouton to victory. Both gentlemen are the leaders of the respective factions of the parish. One represents the "People" the other Fosterism. The "People's Ticket" represents the masses; The "Regulars" the classes. The masses demand honest elections, the classes demand the control of the State and parish by a few. To be sincere in politics promises should not be made, such was the policy of the "People's Ticket." The "Regulars" promises were of the pie-crust type, every office was "docked" dozens of times. There you are reader. More anon on this subject in my next.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/16/1896.





A NEW COURTHOUSE IS NEEDED.

The unsuitableness and inconvenience of the present court house buildings have been evident for some time, and there is a growing sentiment that they have served their purpose and should be replaced by a modern structure, which would make ample provision for the conduct of the parish business and at the same time be in keeping with the growth and progress of the town and parish. Some of the defects of the present building are, the lack of arrangements for the comfort and convenience of jurors, for whom special jury rooms ought to be on the second floor, the absence of an office for the judge, which should be furnished with a good law library, no office for the district attorney, none for the coroner or parish surveyors, insufficient accommodations for the police jury and school board and inadequate office room for the sheriff. To this may be added the smallness of the court room which should be more than twice as large to meet the requirements of large public gatherings.

 The fact that the clerk's office has been declared to be in a dangerous conditions makes it all the appropriate that the question of a new court house should be brought up at this time and we believe that a large number of people will learn with gratification that the grand jury which has just closed its session, recommended to the police jury the construction of a modern court house. And it is to be able to take the matter up at an early date. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1905.




 

GRAND JURY REPORT.

- Recommends Construction of New Court House, Finds Roads in Five Wards Generally Bad Without Excuse -

 List of Indictments Returned and Sentences Imposed by Judge Pugh Friday.


 To the Honorable Philip S. Pugh, Judge of the 18th Judicial District Court, Lafayette Parish, La. - After a session of four days and after diligent investigations and the performance of the other duties incumbent upon us, we, the Grand Jury empanelled for the present term of this honorable court, beg leave, through its undersigned foreman, to submit to your honor this report. 

 We have examined the parish jail, and from the questions propounded to and answered by the prisoners, therein confined, we find that they are treated with kindness and properly cared for.

 The jail itself was found in a good sanitary condition, but we urgently recommend that the iron and wood work of the jail be painted at once to preserve it from rust and rot. We also find that several places in the wall need repairs.

 We have examined the offices of the sheriff and clerk of court and found them in a most satisfactory condition; the books of the sheriff showing monthly settlements made with the parish treasurer and auditor of public accounts.

 We, the Grand Jurors, taking in view the progress of our parish and our city, and the present useless and dilapidated condition of the court house, and the dangerous condition of the present office of the clerk of court, and that said court house, is to-day unfit for the purpose for which it was built 45 years ago, would specially recommend to the Police Jury, the construction of a new and modern court house in which the clerk's office should be. The two present structures, the court house and clerk's office, are a shame to our parish and city.

 As to the condition of the public roads throughout the parish with some exceptions, the information we receive shows that the roads are generally bad, especially so in the first ward, second ward, third ward, fourth ward and sixth. The fifth, seventh and eight wards are in good condition.

 There is no excuse for bad roads in the parish of Lafayette, and unless their condition is materially improved within the next three months, it is the intention of this Jury, with the permission of your honor, to hold another session, and make further investigation into this matter.

 Concerning the management of the school lands of this parish, we find that they are all rented and that a satisfactory revenue is derived therefrom.

 The condition of our public schools throughout the parish, from the clear and elaborate statement made to us in writing by Mr. L. J. Alleman, superintendent of public schools, is satisfactory. We feel satisfied that all of said public schools throughout the parish and town are in a most flourishing condition and this is due to the efficiency and work of said superintendent. We would, however, recommend better and larger school houses for the pupils, they being in most of the schools crowded.

 We also favor and recommend centralization of the schools with proper transportation whenever practicable.

 We would also recommend that the Police Jury take immediate steps to remove a slaughter pen on the property of Mr. J. D. Mouton, which is in close proximity to the public road and which is a menace and of great danger to the travelling public.

 After an examination of all the cases brought before us and the finding of 39 true bills and 13 no true bills, we beg to be discharged.

 We also beg to extend to your honor our thanks for the assistance which your intelligent and clear charge, rendered us in the discharge of our duties, and we also desire to express our thanks to the district attorney for his valuable assistance and guidance during our session, and to the officers of the court.

 Respectfully submitted,
       J. O. BROUSSARD,
 Foreman of the Grand Jury May 11, 1905.


The following are the indictments returned by the Jury and sentences imposed by Judge Pugh Friday.

 F. Thiboduax, shooting into house; T. James, embezzlement; Frank Johnson, stabbing to kill; Lizzie George, striking to kill; Joe Dugas, P. James, Henry Alexandre, disturbing peace; Alton Wyat, stabbing to kill; Isaac Broussard (colored) killing horse; Martial Bernard, obscene language; Adam William, R. Sve, Paul William, obscene language; Col. Boudreaux, disturbing peace; Eugene Domingue, assault and battery; J. O. Herpin, man-slaughter - bond $1,000 and furnished; Nicholas Berard, stabbing to kill; Chas. Thomas, contract labor.

 Sentences imposed by the court:

 Antoine and John Conques, Jos. Gondoor, P. H. Mouton, Jules Guilbeau, G. Blot, Pellerin Bros., P. Crouchet, L. F. Salles, Don Louis Herpin, E. Bodenheimer, Simeon Begnaud, Rachid & Kaliste, operating slot machines, each $25 and costs; Robt. Jones, (colored), criminal assault, 2 years pen; Jos. Andress, larceny, 6 months jail; Jos. Gondoor,  Sunday closing law $40 and cost; Richard & Kaliste, selling liquor to minors, $25 fine; Jos. Gondoor, selling liquor to minors, $25 fine; Jean Sonnier, Sunday law, $40 fine; Jos. Guidry, obscene language in public place, $25; Jos. Dugas, disturbing peace, $25 and ten days jail; Ophe Hernandez, concealed weapon, $25 fine; Julien Gallier and Earnest Green, obscene language, $25.

 Court then adjourned until Monday, May 22. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1905.


A NEW COURTHOUSE IS NEEDED.

The unsuitableness and inconvenience of the present court house buildings have been evident for some time, and there is a growing sentiment that they have served their purpose and should be replaced by a modern structure, which would make ample provision for the conduct of the parish business and at the same time be in keeping with the growth and progress of the town and parish. Some of the defects of the present building are, the lack of arrangements for the comfort and convenience of jurors, for whom special jury rooms ought to be on the second floor, the absence of an office for the judge, which should be furnished with a good law library, no office for the district attorney, none for the coroner or parish surveyors, insufficient accommodations for the police jury and school board and inadequate office room for the sheriff. To this may be added the smallness of the court room which should be more than twice as large to meet the requirements of large public gatherings.

 The fact that the clerk's office has been declared to be in a dangerous conditions makes it all the appropriate that the question of a new court house should be brought up at this time and we believe that a large number of people will learn with gratification that the grand jury which has just closed its session, recommended to the police jury the construction of a modern court house. And it is to be able to take the matter up at an early date. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1905.




GRAND JURY REPORT.

- Recommends Construction of New Court House, Finds Roads in Five Wards Generally Bad Without Excuse -

 List of Indictments Returned and Sentences Imposed by Judge Pugh Friday.


 To the Honorable Philip S. Pugh, Judge of the 18th Judicial District Court, Lafayette Parish, La. - After a session of four days and after diligent investigations and the performance of the other duties incumbent upon us, we, the Grand Jury empanelled for the present term of this honorable court, beg leave, through its undersigned foreman, to submit to your honor this report. 

 We have examined the parish jail, and from the questions propounded to and answered by the prisoners, therein confined, we find that they are treated with kindness and properly cared for.

 The jail itself was found in a good sanitary condition, but we urgently recommend that the iron and wood work of the jail be painted at once to preserve it from rust and rot. We also find that several places in the wall need repairs.

 We have examined the offices of the sheriff and clerk of court and found them in a most satisfactory condition; the books of the sheriff showing monthly settlements made with the parish treasurer and auditor of public accounts.

 We, the Grand Jurors, taking in view the progress of our parish and our city, and the present useless and dilapidated condition of the court house, and the dangerous condition of the present office of the clerk of court, and that said court house, is to-day unfit for the purpose for which it was built 45 years ago, would specially recommend to the Police Jury, the construction of a new and modern court house in which the clerk's office should be. The two present structures, the court house and clerk's office, are a shame to our parish and city.

 As to the condition of the public roads throughout the parish with some exceptions, the information we receive shows that the roads are generally bad, especially so in the first ward, second ward, third ward, fourth ward and sixth. The fifth, seventh and eight wards are in good condition.

 There is no excuse for bad roads in the parish of Lafayette, and unless their condition is materially improved within the next three months, it is the intention of this Jury, with the permission of your honor, to hold another session, and make further investigation into this matter.

 Concerning the management of the school lands of this parish, we find that they are all rented and that a satisfactory revenue is derived therefrom.

 The condition of our public schools throughout the parish, from the clear and elaborate statement made to us in writing by Mr. L. J. Alleman, superintendent of public schools, is satisfactory. We feel satisfied that all of said public schools throughout the parish and town are in a most flourishing condition and this is due to the efficiency and work of said superintendent. We would, however, recommend better and larger school houses for the pupils, they being in most of the schools crowded.

 We also favor and recommend centralization of the schools with proper transportation whenever practicable.

 We would also recommend that the Police Jury take immediate steps to remove a slaughter pen on the property of Mr. J. D. Mouton, which is in close proximity to the public road and which is a menace and of great danger to the travelling public.

 After an examination of all the cases brought before us and the finding of 39 true bills and 13 no true bills, we beg to be discharged.

 We also beg to extend to your honor our thanks for the assistance which your intelligent and clear charge, rendered us in the discharge of our duties, and we also desire to express our thanks to the district attorney for his valuable assistance and guidance during our session, and to the officers of the court.

 Respectfully submitted,
       J. O. BROUSSARD,
 Foreman of the Grand Jury May 11, 1905.


The following are the indictments returned by the Jury and sentences imposed by Judge Pugh Friday.

 F. Thiboduax, shooting into house; T. James, embezzlement; Frank Johnson, stabbing to kill; Lizzie George, striking to kill; Joe Dugas, P. James, Henry Alexandre, disturbing peace; Alton Wyat, stabbing to kill; Isaac Broussard (colored) killing horse; Martial Bernard, obscene language; Adam William, R. Sve, Paul William, obscene language; Col. Boudreaux, disturbing peace; Eugene Domingue, assault and battery; J. O. Herpin, man-slaughter - bond $1,000 and furnished; Nicholas Berard, stabbing to kill; Chas. Thomas, contract labor.

 Sentences imposed by the court:

 Antoine and John Conques, Jos. Gondoor, P. H. Mouton, Jules Guilbeau, G. Blot, Pellerin Bros., P. Crouchet, L. F. Salles, Don Louis Herpin, E. Bodenheimer, Simeon Begnaud, Rachid & Kaliste, operating slot machines, each $25 and costs; Robt. Jones, (colored), criminal assault, 2 years pen; Jos. Andress, larceny, 6 months jail; Jos. Gondoor,  Sunday closing law $40 and cost; Richard & Kaliste, selling liquor to minors, $25 fine; Jos. Gondoor, selling liquor to minors, $25 fine; Jean Sonnier, Sunday law, $40 fine; Jos. Guidry, obscene language in public place, $25; Jos. Dugas, disturbing peace, $25 and ten days jail; Ophe Hernandez, concealed weapon, $25 fine; Julien Gallier and Earnest Green, obscene language, $25.

 Court then adjourned until Monday, May 22. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1905.


Personal Encounter. - After the adjournment of the Parish Court on last Monday, there was a personal altercation between the rival claimants to the office of District Attorney, growing out of a collateral issue raised in Court, concerning the office. They were separated by friends after a short, close and warm conflict.

 We learn that Badger and his "Modoc Prowlers" will not be called upon to settle the affair. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1873.


Election next Monday.
 Laf. Adv. 5/20/1893.




Before the Election.
[Platform upon which the members of the present City Council of Lafayette were nominated in mass meeting Jan. 19, 1905.]

 "Resolved, That we demand a strict business and progressive administration, without favor or partiality; and that the affairs of this town be administered with strict economy, and with justice to all.

 "Resolved, That we demand a more thorough system of drainage and maintenance of public streets. We demand a more thorough and efficient service of water and light, distributed to the use of all tax-payers alike, without favor or partiality.

 After the Election.

 [Extract from published proceedings of the City Council May 10, 1905.]

 "Moved and duly seconded that Edwin Chargois be and he is hereby appointed Chief of police, with the understanding that he is disconnected with the collectorship of said corporation of Lafayette, La., at a salary of seventy-five dollars per month. Carried.

 "Moved and duly seconded that D. J. Veazey be, and his hereby appointed as assistant chief at a salary of seventy-five dollars per month. Carried.

 Moved and duly seconded that, Jean Breaux be, and he is hereby appointed as deputy marshal at a salary of sixty-five dollars per month. Carried.

 Moved and duly seconded that Andre Hebert be, and he is hereby appointed deputy marshal at a salary of sixty-five dollars per month. Carried."
Lafayette Advertiser 5/24/1905.
 



Mr. MOUTON'S BILL. 
Which Promises to Excite Much Attention.
 
Baton Rouge, May 18 - Mr. Mouton of Lafayette pushes the bill which he has introduced with reference to parochial schools, and he says he will urge it will all the energy of which he is capable, that measure will attract not a small measure of public attention. If the bill passes it will forestall any effort that might be made in the future to have part of the public funds appropriated to the maintenance of the schools of a religious character in Louisiana.

  The bill was introduced yesterday and is brief but emphatic in its provisions. It prohibits school boards of the State from combining the public schools with any private or any other institution of learning under the control or management of any church or religious order of any sect or denomination, and to prohibit them from employing, as professors or teachers in the public schools, any preacher, priest or other minister of religion while in the actual service of any church or religious order as a teacher or minister of religion. The title of the bill is quoted above, and its provisions are fully set forth in the title. The bill will come up to-day on second reading for reference to committee.

  Mr. Mouton is a Catholic, but to those who are familiar with the religious questions of the day it will be evident that the act has special reference to the faith of which the Lafayette representative is a communicant. In other states and cities and notably in Pittsburg, there have been controversies discussed at length in the public prints growing out of the appropriation of funds for the maintenance of religious schools and the employment of teachers wearing the habit of some religious order. The famous Fairbault plan of Archbishop Ireland grew out of an arrangement between the lay authorities whereby a relation was established between the public and parochial schools. Mr. Mouton's act is intended not only to abrogate alleged similar arrangements in certain parishes in this State, notably in Lafayette and St. Martin, but to prevent any such arrangements in the future.

  Mr. Mouton's people have been Catholics for a century but he says they have always been liberal minded and that he believes the enactment of this bill into a law would have tendency to maintain peace between church and state. Mr. Mouton is or was the president of the school board of Lafayette, and in three years established a large number of excellent schools in his parish. He wants these schools operated with absolute freedom from religious interference. The bill is a rather bold one and is not unlikely to provoke considerable discussion upon the floor of the House when it comes back from the committee and is ready for enrollment and passage to third reading.

  Mouton's bill was referred to-day to the committee on education in the House. - From the Baton Rouge States and in the Lafayette Advertiser 5/26/1894.



From Vermilionville City Council Meeting 5/15/1869
Resolved, that a committee of two, be and is hereby appointed to revise and digest all laws of the Corporation passed by previous Councils. Wm. Mouton and W. B. Bailey were appointed on said committee. Laf. Adv. 5/29/1869


THE RAILROAD ELEMENT IN LOCAL POLITICS. 

Until the present time the ADVERTISER has refrained from taking sides with either of the parties who were candidates at the late municipal election. But the events of the last few days have left no option in the matter, and believe it is now our duty to call the attention of our people to the "writing on the wall," that they fully realize the menace to good government contained in the action taken by some of the defeated candidates.

 The official returns of the election showed that those gentlemen who now hold their commissions, were elected, and the defeated candidates should have abided by the returns, and we believe they would have done so had they been governed by unselfish and and patriotic motives and a desire to advance the best interests of the town.

 The great trouble with municipal elections is the present system of voting, which allows a minority faction - the railroad element - to hold the balance of power. Out of 300 voters in round numbers about 80 are railroad men, and they have tried to fill the same position in local politics that New York state has occupied in National affairs, and by forming a ring, have tried to defeat the will of the majority.

 On the defeated ticket were three railroad men, two of whom appear as signers of the petition for a trial contest. 
LAFAYETTE ADVERTISER 5/30/1893.





The assumption of office by a new administration is always a matter of public importance, and their first official acts are and should be a matter of concern, even anxiety, to all good citizens. 

 Should their acts be such as to win approbation, then it is fortunate indeed; but should they merit condemnation, it only remains for the people to know it, and it becomes the unpleasant duty of the newspapers to place the facts before the readers.

 The new City Council has inaugurated its administration by completely ignoring the platform of economy and impartiality to which it stands pledged before the people. The Council has increased the cost of policing the town $1080 a year, without any corresponding advantage to the public in the opinion of many thinking people who are directly interested in the question as taxpayers; and they have given the public printing to the Gazette at $150 a year in preference to accepting the offer of The Advertiser to perform the same service for $74 a year, and this was done in direct violation of the law, which provides that municipal corporations shall let the public printing to the lowest responsible bidder.

 Believing that fair consideration should be accorded our new city administration, The Advertiser purposely refrained from commenting upon the first important act of that body in adding the number and the salaries of the police force. We believed it to be only right to wait for developments before passing judgement; but when they afterward awarded the public printing to the highest bidder for none other than personal reasons, then interpreting their first act, by this last one, The Advertiser considered the matter of such serious import as an index to the possible future acts of the Council, as to deserve publicity and adverse criticism. That was our motive, and were it not, the fact that we had been deprived of our just right under the law regulating the awarding of public printing, would have been sufficient to any fair minded person.

 The business proposition we made to the Gazette does not in any way effect the principle involved in the present contention. It was made a wholly with a view of fostering a friendly relationship of the local press, which is a desideratum; but Editor Greig has unkindly and unjustly placed the proposition before the public in such a light as to reflect upon the editor of this paper.

 Ever since the present proprietors of The Advertiser have owned the paper, a business arrangement has existed with The Gazette under which both papers shared the public printing of the town and parish. When Mr. R. C. Greig purchased a half interest in The Gazette several months ago, we proposed to him a continuance of the arrangement for the good of all concerned, and if he desired to tell the "plain truth", he would have said that Messrs. LeRosen and Alpha made him a proposition to continue the arrangement heretofore existing between the two newspapers as to dividing the public printing, but at the same time specifically stipulating that our joint bid for the city printing (rates for other public printing is fixed by law) should be $200; the same amount as The Gazette bid for itself. Mr. Greig stated to both the proprietors of this paper in the presence of one of our employees that he thought very favorably of the matter, and would talk it over with his partner and give us an answer. Owing to much delay in obtaining an answer and being desirous of continuing a perfectly honorable arrangement and intended solely to conserve friendly relations between the parties thereto, we did not "importune" The Gazette, but made several requests for the promised answer to a proposition considered with open favor by Editor Greig.

 If it be true in the words of The Gazette that "during the past administration The Advertiser and The Gazette have been sucking a fine treat of the old corporation cow to the tune of $200, or $100 apiece," and that "side by side these two stalwart calves have gorged the rich and delicious fluid for years past, and have grown big and fat upon food, to which the meat that Ceaser fed upon was no circumstance," what will be thought of greed of the one calf which wanted for itself alone as much, and no less, than was deemed ample for two stalwart calves heretofore!

 All this, however, has no real bearing on the question and affords no justification for the two official acts of the Council complained of, and which undoubtedly place the administration in an altogether unfavorable light. And this is to be regretted all the more because of the fact that the welfare and progress of Lafayette rests largely in the hands of the City Council, and it were better for all, if their administration had started out on lines broad enough to commend them to the public confidence and support, instead of being allowed to fall into the ways of the partisan politician, which are always obstructive in their influence and subversive of of good government. Lafayette Advertiser 5/31/1905.



Mr. Mouton's bill to repeal the Sunday law was up before the House of Representatives last Monday and was defeated by a large majority.
 Laf. Adv. 6/9/1894.



TO THE WHITE PEOPLE OF THE PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.
FELLOW CITIZENS:  

 Since the termination of the war between the States, the negroes banded together, under the leadership of carpetbaggers and bad men, have acted and have voted as a unit, in all our State and parochial elections. As soon as they were enfranchised, they raised the black banner, rallied under it ;  and notwithstanding the many repeated efforts made by good and prominent white men, to make them understand that their welfare was so closely linked to the welfare of the white people, that it was in their best interest to act with them in the elections for the purpose of putting an end to the corruption and abuses of all sorts, which had crept in the administration of our public affairs under the rule of the adventurers, into whose hands the State Government had fallen, no argument, and no concessions could induce any of them to desert and abandon their cherished black banner. They have refused with scorn the hand extended to them by the Fusionists and afterwards by the Unifiers. They had made the issue, they had formed their League, and they persisted and do now persist in their design to govern the State. Through their influence and their united votes in the elections, the State Government first felt the hands of an adventurer and was at last usurped by another. Those put in power by them, by a multifarious series of bad laws and corrupt Legislation have reduced Louisiana to a state of bankruptcy and her people to a state of poverty, bordering on beggary. Must this state of things continue forever? We say no. We hope not.

 Our brothers of other parishes throughout the State, believing that the time had arrived to make an effort to change the current of events and rid the State of her present polluted Government; and knowing that to combat successfully a political organisation is necessary, have at last raised the white banner in opposition of the black banner. They invite all who belong to Caucasian race to join them in this supreme effort and perhaps the last struggle at the ballot box, to restore our beloved Louisiana to her former prosperity, and her sons to their once proud and fair name. They have formed what is called "THE WHITE LEAGUE" that is a political party of white men, the main object of which is to reform the abuses in our State Government and to place the same under the influence and control of the white people.

 The two banners, white and black are now unfurled. Each banner indicates the principles and objects of their followers.

 The undersigned, following the instinct of their nature and the promptings of Honor, invite you, the white people of the parish of Lafayette, to meet in public assembly at the Court House, on Sunday the 28th day of June 1874, at 11 o'clock A. M., for the purpose of organising and rallying under the white banner, to rid Louisiana of the negro supremacy by which she has been ruined and degraded.

 Whether many or few respond to our call, will have not effect on the course we intend to pursue hereafter in all elections ;  convinced of the righteousness of our intentions and purposes, we will keep together like a band of brothers and will act, with concert, in the accomplishment of our object.


So, how many of your ancestors' names can you spot on this petititon list:


C. H. Mouton, John Caruthers, Valsin Broussard, Euphemon Broussard, F. P. Parent, R. C. Landry, A. C. Kennedy, Paul Mouton, Jean Pierre Domingue, Jacques Bonnemaison, M. Girourd, D. Girard, J. Chabrette, N. D. Young, M. D., O. Cade, G. W. Scranton, M. D., A. L. Dyer, Cleopha Landry, Salvator Morvan, Gustave St. Julien, Martial Billaud, Marel Meloncon, Baptiste Malagari, Ferjus Bernard, Jules Webre, Sevigne Arceneaux, P. Hervillien Broussard, L. C. Lacoste, Adolphe LeBlanc, Gerassin Doucet, P. D. Comeau, Gabriel Broussard, Bazile Sanier, Rosemond Landry, Sosthene Bernard, Onezine Langlinais, Jean Comeau, Eduard Louviere, F. E. Piquette, Bt. Brig., S. D. Brannin, Jos. O. Leblanc, Stanislas Begnaud, Jean Leger, J. S. Mouton, Conrad Debaillon, Hypolite Sanier, Jules Mouton, Livaudais Mouton, Alexandre Maux, Henri Landry, Alcide Bernard, Elize Broussard, Oneziphore Broussard, Robert Rand, D. Saunier, Alexander Beguenaud, Adrienne Cansienne, Edward Jenkins,  Bazile Talbot, Edward Jenkins, J. Clemile Benoit, Hy te Missonnier, F. D. Wilkinson, Charles Alpha, John R. Creighton, Rosemond Dugas, R. L. McBride, A. D. Boudreau, J. A. Veazeym Lazare Dronet, Ed. Claude Broussard, Joseph Theall, F. Emile Mouton, Alf Del' Homme, Horace Broussard, Alexandre Constantine, Felix Guidry, Sosthene Landry, Lessin Guidry, Henri Mouton, Jean Begnaud, Therece Begnaud, Norbert Landry, Theodule Hebert, Jr., Treville Bernard, P. B. Roy, Edouard Mhire, Germain Fabre, P. Riou, J. T. Bernard, D. Landry, J. O. Girouard, N. Morvau, Alcide Landry, Lucieu Duhon, Numa Morvan, A. Girouard, Edmond Landry, Alcide Begueanuad, Edmond Royer, Clairfax Saunier, Pierre I. Mouton, Cyprien Arcenaux, Numa Breaux, J. Louis Mouton, T. P. Comeau, A. E. Bernard, Ignace Bernard, Jean Bernard, St-Clair Kilchrist, Jerome Prejean, Adolphe Comeau, Pierre Bernard, Antheol Bernard, Eugene Saunier, Gustave Prejean, Onezine Babineaux, Joseph D. Breaux, Pierre O. Richard, Sebastian Hernandez, J. Sosthene Breaux, Severin Duhon, Alexandre Broussard, Louis Gustave Breaux, Thiburee, Pierre Dugas, Toledano Beguenaud, Jules Duhon, Felix, Bernard, Jules Guidry, Albert B. Breaux, Louis Kleber Del Homme, Albert Broussard, Theogene Morvan, Lewis Whittington, Oneziphone Melancon, Jean Constantine, Victor Martin, Demas Areceneux, Joachin Dugas, Numa Martin, Alexandre Martin, Gabriel Duhon, Jean Bie Broussard, Emile Prejean, J. D. Babineau, Cyprien Breaux, Valery Breaux, Charles Breaux, Michel Martin, Leonard Constantin, Simeon Begnaud, Severin Janis, Ozeme Louiviere, C. Kossuth Mouton, Alfred Peck, Paulin Arcenenaux, Ovide Comeau.

 Lafayette Advertiser 6/13/1874.        



The Early Closing of Stores. -  In response to a general desire, an agreement is being circulated among our merchants for their signatures, to close the stores at 7 o'clock in the evening, except Saturdays, during the heated term. This is a very sensible custom that prevails to most mercantile communities where store-keepers have a proper appreciation of life and its requirements. For the sake of their health and enjoyment, and that of their employees, the retail merchants of Lafayette can well afford to relax from the fourteen or fifteen hours a day work rule for a few weeks, especially at a season of the year when the business is quiet and when the heat renders the confinement of the merchant's occupation, doubly trying himself and those in his employ. And there is no greater stimulus to the activity of the mind and body than rational relaxation from regular strain; that kind of rest from one's regular occupation that is obtained from diversion and change of habits, and, speaking from our own experience, we know the apparent loss of time in such cases is paid back ten fold in better health, renewed activity and increased interest in one's work. With earlier closing [6 o'clock would be even better than 7] the merchant and the clerk could daily enjoy a little outing that would prove of undoubted benefit to him. They would be enabled to cultivate family and social ties that could not fail to result in good to them, even from a business stand point.

 The other side to this question is the one that concerns the general public. Does early closing operate a serious hardship on the public? Of course not. That the practice should interfere with the convenience of the people must be admitted, but to such a small extent after they have adapted themselves to the new conditions, the people themselves would be the last to object to the inconvenience, in view of the so much greater benefits that result on the other hand. And besides, the early closing continues for a short time only, and an exception is made of Saturdays, on which day stores may be kept open as late as will suit the idea of the merchants. Also, drugstores and saloons are not included in the number of business places to be closed 7 o'clock p. m. Pity it is that the custom should not apply to all business establishments, but, we suppose, that could not be reasonably expected - it might be carrying too far, the idea of reform in this particular.

 The Advertiser hopes the agreement for earlier closing until Sept. 1st. will receive the signatures of all our merchants, being convinced that the success of the movement, will, in reality, redound to the advantage of this class of our citizens without militating against either their pockets or the public convenience to an appreciable extent.
A list of the signers of the agreement will be published in our next issue.

Lafayette Advertiser 6/13/1896.




ELECTION NOTICE.
To Expand Laf. Corp. Limits.

 An election has been ordered by the council of the town of Lafayette and will be held at the Court House Monday the first day of July, 1895, by the qualified electors residing in and upon the lots or lands which are adjacent and contiguous to the territorial corporate limits of said town, the land aforesaid lying and being situated between the territorial corporate limits of said town and the boundaries of said lots or lands established and accurately described by the survey made by Romian Francez, parish surveyor, on the 18th day of May, 1895, and hereafter officially described:

 Boundaries of said lands proposed to be annexed, fixed by said survey of May 18, 1895. Starting at the bridge on the coulee west of town, between the properties of Henry Hohorst and Anita Hohorst wife of Dr. Franklin Mouton, and running from thence along said coulee N 87 1/2, E a small ash 83ft., N 76 E a small 36 ft., thence N 1/2 E 300 ft. in Hohorst's pasture thence N 27 1/2 E 300 ft., thence 12 1/2 E 170 in cemetery 200ft., thence N 15 E 389 ft., thence N 18 1/2 E 110 ft. going from cemetary to Mrs. Judice's place 470 feet thence N 7 1/2 W 800 ft., thence N 20 E 300 ft. to southeast corner of Arthur Greig's property, then N 1/2 E 623 ft. to the big ditch 1600 ft. to public road leading to Scott 2553 ft. to the La. Western Railroad 2653 to the north side of said Railroad, thence E 1024 ft. thence S 77 E 660 ft. to the Morgan Railroad (L W division) 1250 ft. to center of Morgan road 1760 ft to the public road leading to Breaux Bridge 1810 ft. into Dr. Mudd's field 3820 ft. to the southwest corner of Dr. Mudd's garden 3900 ft., south about 75 ft. beyond Dr. Mudd's residence 4300 ft. in Dr. Mudd's back lot, thence S 43 1/2 E. from Dr. Mudd's to the public road leading to Breaux Bridge 940  to Mentor Richard's lot 1050 into Crow Girard's land 1790 ft. to stake thence S 55 degrees W 70 ft. between the properties of Nickseron and D. A. Cochrane 840 ft. to Dowdell's property 864 ft., to stake, thence S 27 W 890 ft. to public road leading to J. A. Chargois 950 ft. to red oak (2 ft. in diameter) thence S 46 W, 1050 ft. to northeast corner round-house yard 1520 ft. to main line of Morgan Railroad 7820 to Mouton addition, thence 29 W 1413 ft. to Oak Lane 2650 to public road leading to Pin Hook thence N 49 W including Pin Hook road and following same 1900 ft. to a coulee in front of the residence of Mrs. M. E. Girard, thence S 54 to the southeast corner of her garden, thence S 76 W in Mrs. Girard's pasture 1000 ft., in Dr. Franklin Mouton's field, thence N 85 W 462 ft. an oak ( 2 ft. in diameter) south of Dr. F. Mouton's barn 500 ft. to a coulee, thence following said coulee to the bridge the original starting point N 1/2 586 ft.

 Territorial corporate limits of the Town of Lafayette. Beginning at a point on the coulee west of town at its intersection with the street running east and west in the Mills addition, between the lots twenty and twenty-three, in the plan made by John Campbell, United States surveyor, March 1856, and running east to the intersection of said street with Jefferson street to Mrs. Charles Mouton's line, and following that line to the western limits of A. Mouton's field, enclosure or ditch, and following that ditch south to its intersection with the line of Third street and its continuation to the coulee west of the Town, and following the middle of the said coulee to the point of beginning.

 To the qualified electors residing in and upon the lots or lands lying and being situated between the limits and boundaries aforesaid, the following proposition is submitted, to be voted on at said election.

 Whether they desire that the foregoing described lands shall be annexed to and included in the territorial corporate limits of the Town of Lafayette, so as to constitute a part thereof, and be subject to the jurisdiction, control, and authority of said Town, as fully and and to all intents and purposes as if the same had been originally included in the territorial corporate limits thereof as fixed by act of the Legislature of 1836, incorporating said Town.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/15/1895.


 

The White League.


The movement in this parish to organize a "White League." has already met with serious opposition.

 It would seem necessary, to insure the least success, that all the white people should be enlisted in the cause. If this cannot be accomplished and its agitation has the effect of dividing the whites, the movement will prove a failure. Many white citizens express the conviction, that the evils complained of might be worse sadly and surely corrected by other means and that the desperate remedy proposed by the League, is very questionable and dangerous. Such questions as these are frequently asked :  Supposing all the whites band together against the Republican party, what can they accomplish? Would that reduce the Republican majorities? Would it secure better local officers in the parishes where the whites are in the minority, or even where they are in the majority? Will not this naturally increase the distrust and estrangement of the blacks towards the white? If the objects of the League, (and its advocates do not deny it) tend to excite and precipitate a war of  races, what would be the horrible consequences of such a calamity?

 As these and other questions and the policy of this movement, we presume, will be fully discussed, our readers will be duly prepared to form an opinion of their own.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/20/1874.

    

TAX CARRIED !!!
Progressive Lafayette
Takes Another Forward Step.

More and Better Schools Assured Throughout the Parish. 

Last Thursday the people of Lafayette again demonstrated that they are progressive and generous and that they mean to retain and increase the enviable reputation of being foremost in the cause of education. Once again they testified that the cause of the children is safe in their hands. Voting $70,000 for the Industrial Institute three years ago, they excited the astonishment and won the admiration of the people of the entire State. Now adding another tax to complete the public school system of the parish, will place Lafayette at the top of the roll of honor of the parishes, and make her a guide and inspiration to others. With such a spirit animating our citizens, the future looks bright indeed for this lovely parish of ours.

  The total vote for the tax was:

  For - 397, with a property valuation of $443,337.

  Against - 262, with a property valuation of $170,071, making a majority of 135 votes and $263,266 for the tax not counting the property valuation in the Simoneaux box, which was returned to the commissioners to have them add up the property valuations.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/20/1903.
 


J. Alfred Mouton Laid to Rest - 2 Articles. 


J. Alfred Mouton, a well known and highly esteemed citizen and prominent merchant, died at his residence in this city at 3 p. m. Sunday, after a lingering illness, aged 39 years. 

 Mr. Mouton was a member of a distinguished family, prominent both in State and local affairs. He was a grandson of Gov. Alexander Mouton and a nephew of Gen. J. Alfred Mouton, for whom he was named. His father was the late Major J. Sosthene Mouton, who did gallant service for the Lost Cause. His brother, C. O. Mouton is the present mayor of Lafayette.

 He was born and raised in this parish and has taken an active part in its affairs. He entered the mercantile business in a small way at first with his brother C. O. Mouton, under the firm name of Mouton Bros. and by careful management and good judgement they built up a business which to-day stands among the first in Lafayette.

 Mr. Mouton was a good man, a splendid citizen and a devoted husband and father. His sterling worth was truly appreciated by his fellow citizens both in the town and parish who admired and esteemed him for his many fine qualities.

 Twelve years ago he was married to Miss Mix Judice, who survives him with five small children. He also leaves his mother, three sisters and five brothers. Funeral services were held at 5 p. m. Monday. The remains were accompanied to the church by the Fire Department, of which he was a member, in uniform, and a large concourse of relatives and friends. Sontag's Lafayette Concert Band preceded the funeral cortege, which was the largest in the history of the town. At the church the solemn impressive services of the dead were read, and then after a tribute to the deceased by Father Charles, the body was borne to the cemetery and consigned to its last resting place.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/21/1905.





Death of J. Alfred Mouton.
From the Home Fire Co.

 Whereas God in his infinite wisdom has taken from us J. Alfred Mouton, a member of the Home Fire Company.

 The members of the Company offer heartfelt sympathies to those in the bereavement of death. To his stricken widow and little children and to others bound to him by life's sweetest ties, is extended the sincere condolence of every member of the Home Fire Company, who had come to love his departed brother for sterling qualities of a true heart.

 To the Company, J. Alfred Mouton always proved a brave and vigilant fireman, but his death means a greater loss, as in the performance of his duties he had won the friendship of all his brother firemen. The deceased held positions of trust in the Company, which he filled with faithful zeal, and to his interest was due in a large measure the maintenance of our organization.

 By Alfred Mouton's death a generous heart and a gentle spirit has gone, and the sorrow wrought by his absence will be soothed by the memories of treasures of friendship and the doing of good deeds enshrined in our hearts.

 To the inscrutable ways of the Master all must bow with Christian resignation, and there remains but these memories of the life of a Christian soul.

 Resolved, that these expressions of sorrow be sent to the bereaved family, that they may be The Lafayette Advertiser and The Lafayette Gazette for publication, and that they be spread on the minutes of the secretary of the Company.

 Dr. J. A. MARTIN, FERNAND MOUTON, JOE E. MOUTON, GUS SCHMULEN, JEROME MOUTON.
      Committee.
Lafayette, La., June 20, 1905.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/21/1905.

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