Follow by Email

Sunday, January 11, 2015

**JANUARY 19TH M C

From the Lafayette Gazette of January 19th, 1901:



A PROSPEROUS INSTITUTION.


The First National Bank of Lafayette Elects Officers - Brief Review of the Bank's History by President Moss.

 At a special meeting held last Tuesday the newly elected board of directors of the First National Bank of Lafayette organized for the management of the bank during the ensuing year by electing N. P. Moss president, J. G. Parkerson vice president, S. R. Parkerson cashier, F. V. Mouton assistant cashier, C. D. Caffery attorney, and Judge O. C. Mouton notary.

 In a brief review of the history of the bank on this occasion, President Moss said in part:   "This institution first opened its doors for business on the 9th day September, 1891, under the title of the People's State bank, with a capital stock of $25,000, of which only $4,350 was then paid up. Four years later (in 1895) the infant bank was converted into a national banking association, to secure to its customers and the public the well-known advantages guaranteed by the national banking laws of the United States.

 "The institution successfully overcame the adverse conditions that all pioneer banks commonly encounter during the early years of their career, and has gradually developed into one of the most stalwart country financial institutions in the State.

 "The unbroken record of prosperity of this bank during the one decade of its existence is best told by the unbiased figures that have kept a faithful account of its business year by year."

 President Moss then read a statement prepared from the books of the institution showing the steady growth of the business until the deposits, starting with December 31, 1891, at $16,151.07, had crept up to $229,767.68 on December 31, 1900, and the resources of the bank from a modest beginning of $35,584.77 on December 31, 1891, now rolled up to the handsome figure of $348,071.75.

 Continuing along the same line, the president said:   "An increase of over 1400 per cent, in deposits and nearly 1000 per cent, in resources in less than ten years is a record of which it is the institution may well feel proud, and these figures speak with greater eloquence than words of the remarkable success that has attended the business career of this bank.

 "Since 1891 we have seen the years come and go, each an improvement on the one preceding it. This uninterrupted record of successful effort is not the result alone of the work of those in the immediate charge of the the affairs of the bank, but representing the interested co-operation of officers, directors and customers, to each of whom is due this acknowledgement."

 President Moss concluded his remarks with the statement that never in the history of Lafayette have the prospects for business been so encouraging as at this time, and he gave the assurance in the future, as in the past, the First National Bank would be an important factor in the commercial life of this section of the country. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.




A SYRUP MILL.
New Industry Near Lafayette.

 Some days ago Mr. Alfred Hebert, of Lafayette, bought the Torian plantation, on Pin Hook lane. Mr. Hebert has since sold half of the place to Mr. Desire Hebert, of Lake Arthur. It is the intention of these gentlemen to go into the manufacture of syrup on a large scale. They will put up a syrup mill with a daily capacity of about twenty-five barrels. Should the venture prove successful it is the intention to increase the capacity of the mill.

 Louisiana syrup is the best made. It is unquestionably superior to any other served in the hotels and restaurants throughout the country, and it is not surprising that the demand for it is growing larger every year. Whenever shipped to the North it has given the utmost satisfaction.

 It seem strange that notwithstanding the superiority of the home product retail dealers have been compelled to get their supply of syrup from the Eastern States, and that right here in the very sugar-bowl of Louisiana the people have often been obliged to use the unpalatable stuff manufactured and canned by our more enterprising Yankee friends and labeled syrup. If there is one thing that should be made in Louisiana it is enough cane syrup for home consumption.

 The Gazette is pleased to note the establishment of this new industry in this vicinity, and hopes that it will prove a great success. 
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.





Real Estate Stir.
 During the last thirty days there has been quite a stir in real estate transfers. Since the 1st of January the number of land sales recorded in the clerk's office has exceeded seventy. In several cases large tracts of land have changed hands, and in every instance the price paid has been unusually high, showing a marked increase in real estate values.

 The largest sale effected during the past week was that of the Beausejour plantation, which was sold by Mr. W. V. Nicholson to Mr. J. A. Roy. The plantation contains about 166 acres of land and sold for $11,400, but of this amount $1,400 was implements and other movable property. Mr. Nicholson had bought the place two years ago for $6,000.
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.



 To Improve the Bayou. - F. F. Axten, civil engineer in the employ of the United States government, was here this week for the purpose of inspecting bayou Vermilion with a view of ascertaining what kind of work is needed to make that stream navigable. Through the efforts of Congressman Broussard an appropriation of $10,000 has been recommended and will no doubt be made for the improvement of this bayou. It is believed this appropriation will be sufficient to complete the work begun last year. 
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.



 A Case of Small-pox. - A young son of Mr. John Hopkins has a mild case of small-pox. There be no cause for alarm as every precaution has been taken to prevent the spread of the disease. The authorities have already taken action in the matter, and, with the assistance of the family of the patient, their efforts to prevent an epidemic can not fail to be successful.  
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.





Died. - Mrs. Lucien Roy, aged 30 years, died in this town Thursday night. The death of this estimable lady is rendered unusually sad by the fact that she was the mother of several children, the youngest of whom is only a few weeks old. The death of Mrs. Roy. is greatly deplored, not only by her family but by a large number of people who esteemed her highly because of the many Christian virtues which characterized her life as a dutiful wife and mother.

 Impelled by a sense of fraternal sympathy for Mrs. Roy, who is a member of the order, the Knights of Pythias attended the funeral of the deceased lady.
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.








Schlitz is the name of the beer that has made Milwaukee famous and Pellerin Bros.' bar popular. It is reputed to be the purest beer that has ever brewed. Sold by Pellerin Bros. Laf. Gazette 1/19/1901.






OFFICERS ELECTED.

To Look After the Affairs of the Lafayette Building Association.

 The board of directors of the Lafayette Building Association met in the First National bank building last Thursday night and elected officers to serve during the ensuing year. The following gentlemen were placed in nomination and elected without opposition: Chas. O. Mouton, president; A. B. Denbo, vice-president; S. R. Parkerson, treasurer; D. Schwartz, secretary; O. C. Mouton, attorney; Chas. D. Caffery, notary.  The following are the members of the board: B. N. Coronna, A. B. Denbo, B. J. Pellerin, Louis Lacoste, C. D. Caffery, C. O. Mouton, Julian Mouton.

 The association is in a prosperous condition. It has grown in popularity and usefulness since its organization and there is every reason to believe that it will be the means of procuring homes for a large number of families. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.



A "C" Social.

 Christian Endeavor will give a "C" social on the 31st of this month. An admission of 10 cents will be charged for the entertainment and excellent meals and refreshments will be served at reasonable prices. The Gazette is blissfully ignorant of what a "C" social consists, but suffice to say that the charming young ladies in charge of the arrangements have authorized us to state that it is a most interesting affair. In the next issue of this paper the program will be printed.

 The money to be realized by the entertainment will be employed toward the promotion of a most worthy cause. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.  


Christian Endeavors.
 The Christian Endeavor Society of the Presbyterian church was delightfully entertained at the hospitable home home of the Misses Sprole on Monday evening. A very interesting game was played in which all the senses were tested. Mr. Sterling Mudd won the prize, which was presented by Miss Edna Sprole. Miss Laidlaw, of South Dakota, favored the society with a beautiful song, and Mr. Adams' imitation of a phonograph was fine. After music and another enjoyable game, refreshments were served, consisting of cake, chocolate and fruits. Altogether, it was one of the most enjoyable socials of the season, and all went home feeling glad that they were members of this society.

 The Christian Endeavors hold their prayer meeting every Wednesday evening at 7:30, at the Presbyterian church. Everybody invited. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901. 






Children Engage in a Good Cause.

 It is announced that a number of the children of the town, ranging in age from 7 to 12 years, are preparing to give a benefit for the Home Charity Association. The program will consist of vocal and instrumental music, recitations and dialogues. In their effort to help the worthy cause of charity these little men and women are deserving of the highest praise and encouragement, and The Gazette hopes that a "crowded house" will greet the happy little faces at the rising of the curtain. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.


Evidence of Progress.
 Mr. Ed Vordenbaumen, formerly of this town, but now of Shreveport, was in Lafayette this week on business connected with his lumber yard. Mr. Vordenbaumen was pleased to note the many evidences of progress in Lafayette. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.


   
Capt. Lucas' Big Luck.

 Capt. Lucas, the lucky man who discovered the now world-famous oil well near Beaumont, Texas, is well-known in Lafayette. He directed the boring of wells at L'Anse la Butte, between here and Breaux Bridge, in the hope of finding oil. It will be remembered that at a depth of four or five hundred feet oil in small quantities oil was found, but for some reason or other the work was discontinued. There seem to be unmistakable evidences of the existence of oil at L' Anse la Butte and it is to be hoped that the boring will be resumed. Some of the enterprising citizens of the town should become interested in the matter, because it is not improbable that there exists an immense lake of the precious stuff somewhere in that neighborhood. At any rate, it's worth another trial.   Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.





Butcher-Mouton. - 
Miss Alida Mouton and Mr. Frank Butcher were married at the Catholic church in Carencro Wednesday evening. After the ceremony at the church the friends of the young couple, who are very popular, assembled at the home of the bride's father, Mr. F. E. Mouton, where a most enjoyable reception was held. The popularity of the contracting parties was shown by the many handsome presents of which they were the recipients. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.


Selected News Notes (Gazette) 1/19/1901.
 Teachers desirous of applying for the position of second assistant in the Lafayette High School will take notice that a competitive examination will be held for that purpose Thursday, Jan. 31, 1901, at 3 o'clock p. m. at the Lafayette Primary School. - H. C. Wallis, Supt.

Mr. Ed. Vordenbaumen, formerly of this town, but now of Shreveport, was in Lafayette this week on business connected with his lumber yard. Mr. Vordenbaumen was pleased to note the many evidences of progress in Lafayette.

 Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Blake, with their little son, James, and Miss Mary Littell, left her Monday for Orange, Texas, to visit relatives.

Mrs. Pearsall, of Corsicana, Texas, was a guest of Mrs. Hahn at the Crescent Hotel this week.

To the Public. - This is to certify that I have received from Lafayette Lodge No. 3194, K. of H., the sum of $2,000 in full payment of the death benefit of my late husband, Chet. LeBlanc, Jr. - Mrs. Clet. LeBlanc, Jr.
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901.







 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 19th, 1901:


L. B. A. in Second Year.
 The shareholders of the Lafayette Building Association elected directors for the current year, last evening. There was a good attendance at the meeting and a spirited contest over the election, the count of votes developing the fact that no less than sixteen candidates were in the field. The following named persons having received a majority over all other competitors were declared to be duly elected to compose the Board of Directors:  B. N. Coronna, Julian Mouton and Louis Lacoste.

 The Directors-elect held a meeting subsequently and appointed the following officers for the current year: Chas. O. Mouton, president; A. B. Denbo, vice-president; D. Schwartz, secretary; S. R. Parkerson, treasurer.

 This Association is now entering its second year of existence and bids fair to become one of Lafayette's most powerful adjuncts in extending the spirit of progress and development with which our people (unreadable words) impregnated.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.


ELECTION OF BANK OFFICERS.
 The Board of Directors of the First National Bank of Lafayette effected organization for the ensuing year by re-electing the following officers, on the 15th., inst: N. P.Moss, president; J. G. Parkerson, vice-president; S. R. Parkerson, cashier; F. V. Mouton, assistant cashier; C. D. Caffery, attorney; O. C. Mouton, notary.

 Each successive statement of the condition of its business shows a steady upward growth of the First National Bank under the conservative management that has always characterized the control of its business affair. Good banking facilities are of the utmost advantage to the development of every community and the First National Bank with its extensive clientele has has ever been an active and influential factor in all matter affecting the material welfare of Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.    

      
Thoughtful Little People.

 The Advertiser has learned with pleasure of the intention of a number of little boys and girls in this community, to give an entertainment in the near future for the benefit of the Home Charity Association. The Advertiser has been informed that the idea originated with the children, themselves, and it is certainly a beautiful idea to carry out - that of extending a helping hand by the young to fellow human beings in sickness and distress. Charity is the noblest of all virtues and it is an inspiring incident to see this grand virtue budding forth in young and tender hearts not yet acquainted with the hardships of the world.

 We hope to be able to publish at an early date the program of the entertainment to be given by these little friends of the poor, and we bespeak for the project a cheerful and substantial support on the part of the public. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.   





Rigues Hotel Re-Opened. - This famous South-West La., hostelry has been re-opened and will be managed by the proprietress, Mrs. M. F. Rigues. The traveling public will receive with approval such good news as with Mrs. Rigues again as manager is an assurance of the excellence of the cuisine and a thorough management of a first class hotel.   Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901. 




Movin' On Up. 
[From N. Iberia Enterprise] 

 Mr. Henry Guidry, the popular young mixologist and caterer, who for several years had been in the employ of Mr. C. P. Moss, a few days ago purchased from that gentleman a one-half interest in his saloon restaurant business. In this transaction Mr. Moss gives evidence of appreciation of the services of a worthy employee and the confidence he reposes in him. We wish the firm continued prosperity. - 

  Advertiser's Reply..."Mr. Guidry has many friends in Lafayette who are pleased to wish him good luck in this new venture."
 Laf. Adv. 1/19/1901.    




 Publication for Teachers.

 And now a message from "The School Moderator," which I believe might be sort of a trade publication for teachers at that time. (Possibly put out by a university or school district somewhere and shared with teachers around the country.) "The school demands the best of a teacher's life for ten or twenty of the choicest years. No competent teacher in this state should be teaching for less than $40 per month and the average should be $50, at the very lowest." 

From The School Moderator and in the Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.   





 Butcher - Mouton Nuptials. - Miss Alida Mouton was married Monday to Mr. Frank Butcher at Carencro. Miss Rose, sister to the bride acted as bridesmaid, and Mr. W. Butcher was best man. The bride is a daughter of Mr. F. Emile Mouton and is a most accomplished young lady. Numerous and beautiful presents were given the happy young people. The Advertiser is pleased to extend congratulations.  Laf. Adv. 1/19/1901.
 




Miss Gladu & the Tea Club.

Miss Lea Gladu entertained that charming circle, the Tea Club, at a Madelson evening last Tuesday, from four to six. The program consisted as follows:

 "Song Without Words," by Miss Mudd; "Life of Mendelson" by Miss Ramsey; "Morning Song" by Mrs. Davis; and "Spring Song" by Miss Gladu. At five o'clock a delightful lunch was served by the hostess. The club will meet next with Mrs. Lerosen. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.




Prisoner of Algiers. - At the Opera House.," "The Prisoner of Algiers," advertised for the 24th. inst. to occupy the boards at the Opera House comes to this town very highly recommended. From the Press clippings, it is a very good show.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.

Resigning from Lafayette High School. - There will be a vacancy in the corps of teachers of the Lafayette High School on account of the resignation of the second assistant, Miss Lizzie Mudd. See notice of the Superintendent of Public Education in this issue of the Advertiser. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.



Christian Social.
Christian Endeavor Society of Presbyterian Church held another of their delightful socials Monday evening at the hospitable home of the Misses Sprole.

 After a very interesting game it was found that Mr. Sterling Mudd had won the prize which was presented to him by Miss Edna Sprole, Miss Laidlaw of Dakota delighted the crowd by her sweet singing while Mr. Adams was very entertaining in his phonograph imitation. Refreshments were served and another laughable game and more music enjoyed, after which good night had to be said and everyone left feeling proud to be a member of a society that is so solicitous of their enjoyment. The Christian Endeavors hold their prayer meeting every Wednesday evening at the Presbyterian Church. Everybody is invited. Lafayette Advertiser 2/19/1901.



Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 1/19/1901.

Notice. - Teachers desirous of applying for the position of Second Assistant in the Lafayette High School will take notice that a competitive examination will be held for that purpose Thursday Jan. 31st, 1901, at 3 o'clock p. m, at the Lafayette Primary School. H. C. Wallis, Supt.

 "Other People's Money" at Falk's Opera House, Wednesday Jan. 23rd.

"Prisoner of Algiers" at Falk's Opera House, by Chas. Tolson Co., on Thursday night Jan 24th inst.

 The very favorable grinding season at Carencro will necessitate more derricks and will force us to enlarge our plant for next year's crop, so says Mr. Jules Jeanmard, of the Carencro Sugar Refinery Co.


Mardi Gras Ball. - There will be grand masquerade hall at Falk's Opera House on Mardi Gras.

Mr. J. A. Roy has purchased the Nicholson farm near town for $11,400. This estate formerly known as "Beau Sejour" and is a very valuable tract of land.

 Mrs. Crow Girard entertained the Epworth League Friday evening. The program consisting in songs, recitations and reading.

 Rev. T. K. Funt Le Roy, of Opelousas, will occupy the pulpit at the Methodist Church Sunday in the morning and in the evening.

 There will be a vacancy in the corps of teachers of the Lafayette High School on account of the resignation of the second assistant Miss Lizzie Mudd. See notice of the Superintendent of Public Education in this issue of the Advertiser. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.





 From the Lafayette Gazette of January 19th, 1895:


TIME FOR ACTION.

That Lafayette should have one or two refineries it is clearly evident to all all who appreciate the serious predicament in which many of our cane-growers are at the present time. The great loss, (and in some cases the total loss) sustained by the cane-growers shows most conclusively that no one can plant cane with any degree of safety unless there is a refinery in close proximity to his field. During the last year two or three movements were on foot to build a refinery in or near Lafayette, but due to some cause or other, they were not carried to a successful termination. But because we failed last year should not prevent a more determined effort this year. Now that the people, the merchants and business men of the town as well as the farmers, have been forcibly impressed with the necessity of a refinery, it is hoped that every person whose success depends upon the prosperity of the whole community, will be more than willing to do his share, however small that may be. The situation is indeed serious and unless the people get together and decide upon some plan of action to build a refinery, the fact is painfully apparent that cane growing in Lafayette will have to be considerably decreased if not entirely abandoned. The loss in cane alone this year, we believe, would be nearly enough to build a refinery, and yet a movement last year having that purpose in view met with very little encouragement. Another loss like the one sustained would cause irreaparable injury to the general trade. Our merchants and other business men should concentrate all their energies to secure the capital to build a central refinery in or near Lafayette - it matters not on whose lot. In the language of the street, "get a move on yourselves," gentlemen. The time is ripe for action. You must do something to help the farmers, and by helping them yourselves. Their prosperity means your prosperity. Their ruin means your ruin.  Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.





THE POULTRY INDUSTRY.
 The poultry business is the only one which has not suffered this year, and considering the unsatisfactory results of all other farm industries, we may reasonably expect to see more chickens raised in Lafayette parish this year than in any preceding one. In this business, unlike cane, chickens and eggs will always find a ready market. Our people can find buyers at home, or if they prefer, they may make shipments to New Orleans, where the market prices are always good. There is no branch of the livestock interest which has received a larger share of success in proportion to the capital invested and the time given to the work. The truth of the matter is, the man who goes at the poultry business in a common sense way and puts business into it the same as he would into any line of business that requires forethought, good common sense, planning, energy and economy in conducting, will make a success of it. There are dismal failures in the business, it is true, and so there are in all kinds of business; the inevitable results of poor management or no management. The farmer who has been keeping 25 to 50 hens and keeps on the even tenor of his way year after year, will make money on fowls, and then keeping large flocks applying similar principles in their care, will reap benefit in proportion.
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.






TO THE FARMER, HOME-SEEKER, AND TRAVELER.

 Contemplating a trip West or East, the Southern Pacific Co.'s advantages are worthy of consideration. We can save you time and you can save money by asking any of her representatives  for the information you desire relative to Ticket Rates, Routes, Time, etc. We especially call your attention to the train service, which comprises the latest modern improvements in equipment. Her road-bed is the best in the South, and her facilities for Speed Safety and Comfort assure you of a pleasant journey and safe arrival at your destination. Her trains run through all the largest cities in Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. At New Orleans her trains connect with all Railroad and Steamship Lines for the North and Northeast. Through Pullman Sleepers of the latest design and Pullman Tourist Sleepers between New Orleans, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Her courteous employees will aid the traveler and solicit your patronage. Apply to nearest Southern Agent.

Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.




 Inflicted Injuries. - Last Wednesday evening Deputy H. Billaud arrested and jailed a negro named Bob Alexanders, who, in a fight which occurred on Mr. Billaud's plantation, struck one Willie Brown with a stick inflicting very serious injuries.
 Laf. Gazette 1/19/1895.


Jokester. - A cane planter who likes to crack a joke occasionally offered a dago to exchange four car-loads of cane for a bunch of bananas; but the fruit vendor had probably read one of Ferris' one-dollar-a-ton circulars and he wisely held on to his bananas.
 Laf. Gazette 1/19/1895.


At the Opera House. - Laughter holding both its sides, as old John Milton put it, pervades "Jane" which has been given first place as one of the funniest of the funny comedies of the day. Wherever acted it literally packed the theater in every city where it was produced. "Jane" chases dull care away without an effort. Fretting people laugh at it in spite of themselves, and leave the theater after the final curtain much the better for an evening of unalloyed fun. Unusually strong is the present cast. At the Lafayette Opera House Sunday.
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.


Hard Luck. - The manager of the Caffery refinery telegraphed to parties in Lafayette last week that the machinery of the mill had broken down and that he would not be able to take the cane that he had previously agreed. This was sad news to the sugar planters who had already made preparations to ship the remainder of their crop to the Caffery refinery. Our planters are surely in hard luck. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.




Should Be Stopped. - The Gazette's attention has been called to the way in which the westbound passenger train blockades nearly all the street crossing. This train stops at this station twenty minutes and during that time vehicles are very much inconvenienced. There is no necessity for this practice by the railroad officials; it is simply a piece of carelessness on their part and the town authorities should see that it is stopped. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.




Physician Arrested. - 
Dr. J. R. Hanks, a physician practicing at Garland station, this parish, was arrested by City Marshal Vigneaux, at Lafayette on Tuesday, and lodged in jail here the same day, on an indictment of the late Grand Jury for practicing medicine without a diploma. - Opelousas Clarion & Laf. Gazette 1/19/1895.

 Pellerin Leaving. - The Gazette is informed that Mr. Emmanuel Pellerin, who has been for a number of years in the employ of the late Mr. Edmond Pellerin and of Mr. H. H. Hohorst, has left the service of the latter gentleman. Mr. Pellerin is one of our most popular clerks and wherever he may cast his lines we are sure he will continue to enjoy the esteem of all those with whom he will come in contact. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.


 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 1/19/1895.
 The question now with many planters is, how to get rid of the cane?

 Mr. and Mrs. John Vigneaux made a short visit in Opelousas this week.

 The Gazette received an agreeable call last Saturday evening from M. F. Clark and Mrs. H. P. Koch of Duson.

 F. Lombard, the old-reliable liquor dealer and expert "mixer," is having some improvements made to his saloon.

 Vic Levy went to Orange Tuesday and will remain in that place a couple of weeks.
Last Wednesday evening deputy H. Billaud arrested and jailed a negro named Bob Alexanders, who, in a fight which occurred on Mr. Billaud's plantation, struck one Willie Brown with a stick inflicting very serious injuries.

 C. C. Mabray, the Southern Pacific's hustling assistant agent at this place, will leave on the 21st of this month for his former home near LaGrange, Ga., He will be away for several days.
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.

  







 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 19th, 1895:


A Delusion.


The affair of the Ferris Sugar Manufacturing Company, Limited, would seem to be all on one side and nothing on the other. It is composed from all appearances largely on liabilities, the assets being purely nominal. This thieving institution has pocketed the hard earnings of needy people and sought safety behind laws intended for the protection of the honest but unfortunate debtor. There is something wrong about laws that permit such unblushing rascality perpetrated in this so-called insolvency, and for one thing it looks like the limited liability law should be done away with as soon as possible.

It appears to us, however, very much like obtaining goods or property under false pretenses for a purchaser to refuse to pay for a thing used and disposed of, the possession of which was obtained under the express agreement that the price was to be paid cash. The next grand jury ought to investigate the doings of the Ferris company in this parish. It is very pertinent to inquire, in this connection, what disposition has been made of the product of the 40,000 tons of care that has passed through the hands of this concern this season. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1895.

 


RAIL-ROAD RACKET.

Our aim is to build a branch Rail-Road through this fertile section of the Teche Country and we will not rest until our mission is accomplished, and we hope at no far-off date, we may compliment ourselves in its realization as having contributed in every means possible towards the building of said Branch.

A branch built from here to Lafayette, as we have heretofore maintained, would be more beneficial to us as being a prominent Rail-Road center for going in any direction; but it seems that our our neighbors of Lafayette possess the same dormant spirit as our people, as we have not heard from them since the first article published by the VALLEY OF THE TECHE. We are led to believe that if our good Confreres of the "Gazette" and  "Advertiser" would give us a PULL, that we could by constantly clamoring and calling their attention to this important question, infuse some life into their dormant bodies. We must go at it with vim and force and combine our energies in wrestling vehemently towards the realization of it.

Let our Businessmen call a meeting at once and organize a substantial "Board of Trade" and that this subject be their main object of consideration. "L 'Union fait la Force' ."

We acknowledge the correctness of the charge made by our esteemed contemporary that we are possessed of a "dormant spirit", and but for this fact it is probable the branch for which Breaux Bridge has been opining so much, would have sprung into existence long ago. However, it is to the future we must look for the accomplishment of this much hoped for commercial link, and so let us not think of what might have been, as that would involve only a loss of time, but let us strive to extricate ourselves from the state of lethargy instead, by energizing this same dormant spirit that has proved such a drag to our progress in the past. How do this? By all pulling together in all matters involving the common prosperity of the country. By active cooperation in every single movement having for its object the advancement of the common interest, and certainly, railroad connection with Breaux Bridge deserves a prominent place in this classification. Whilst the present much disturbed condition of the country is bound to offer material opportunities to an immediate enlargement in the undertaking, it should not deter the citizens of the towns desirous of this condition, from entering on preliminary steps leading to the final consummation of more mature plans. We believe Lafayette will do her full part in laying the foundation now, for future work in this regard. Through a body of its citizens, this town showed an earnest disposition to cooperate with citizens of Breaux Bridge, on a former occasion, in a movement contemplating railroad communications between the two localities. The first effort resulted in failure; let us hope a second trial will meet with a more successful (unreadable word.) Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/`1895.

 


Mayor Campbell Recovering.
His numerous friends will be glad to learn that Mayor Campbell has completely recovered from the spell of illness that prostrated him for nearly two weeks. He was well enough to accompany his young daughter, Laurence, to New Orleans, last Tuesday, to resume her studies at the Mount Carmel convent in that city. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1895.

 


JANE.
The result of deception is no better illustrated than in the greatest of all comedies "Jane" which comes to the Lafayette Opera House next Sunday night, January 20. To know that the prodigal protege misrepresents to his guardian that he is married, and that his wife's extravagance causes him to draw heavily on his fortune, while in reality he does it to pay his gambling debts, and the untimely arrival of the guardian, who comes to see the wife, place the young spendthrift in a position that can hardly be acceptable, especially as he desires that the guardian must not know that he has been deceiving him, and to carry out his deception it will be necessary to present his wife and offspring to the guardian. The predicament of the young man can be imagined. But at the last moment, Jane, his pretty housemaid, comes to his assistance and arranges matters so that she will act the part of a wife to him during the stay of the guardian. Jane however is secretly married to her master's valet, who is jealous and irritable that during the visit of the guardian he gives the secret away. Lafayette Advertiser  1/19/1895.



JANE (2)
Frohman's great company appears at the Opera House next Sunday evening Jan. 20 for one night only, presenting the farcical success "Jane." The story tells of the adventure of a young bachelor of prodigal ways, who secures money from the trustee of an estate by representing himself to be married. When the trustee suddenly appears on the scene, the young man, forced to provide a wife for the situation, makes a business arrangement with his housemaid, Jane, and from this plot of the morning, a housemaid becomes the wife of her master at noon, and has to account for two children, their offspring, at evening. The household and neighbors are all turned into base liars and deceivers, all for sordid gain and vain glory all in the morning, noon and night. As a farce comedy, however, it accomplishes its own and creates roars of laughter that are not for between.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1895.





Home Entertainments. -  A series of home entertainments has been a source of endless pleasure to local society of the past two weeks. A coterie of young people had a rendezvous on different occasions at the residences of Mr. W. B. Bailey, Mrs. S. T. Givens, Dr. J. D. Trahan and Mr. Wm. Clegg, and indulged in euchre playing, music and singing to their heart's content. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.

   

Prospectors. - In anticipation of the arrival of more prospective settlers in our parish, from the North and West, several land owners have placed on file at The Advertiser office, descriptions and prices of farms for sale or rent that we are authorized to submit for enquirers.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1895.  




Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 1/19/1895.
 Mr. J. I. Bell and family moved into the residence formerly owned by Mr. L. Durham, last week.

 Mrs. John Clegg, of New Orleans, has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Clegg for several days past.

Mr. A. E. Clark who worked for about three months as Engineer on the Raceland Branch, returned home Sunday.

 Engineers Sheely, Scrugg and Lou, who had been transferred for sometime from the L. W. Division, have returned to Houston.

 Mr. W. A. Bonnet, the well known photographer, will arrive from Lake Charles in a few days, and then every body will be able to have a good photograph made of themselves, at a moderate cost.

 Miss Annie Parkerson, of Franklin, and Miss Agnes Carey, of Atlanta, Ga., took leave of Lafayette society last Wednesday, after a specially enjoyable visit in our midst. Miss Carey will remain in Franklin a few days before proceeding on her journey home.

 By engaging in "mud-slinging" simply to gratify a little personal animosity, a local newspaper may greatly impair ots usefulness in a community, as well as forfeit much of the respect and esteem it might otherwise command.

Mr. J. P. Nolan of the Southern Pacific was in town Monday.

Mrs. Geo. Sontag and family of Rayne have moved to our town lately. Mrs. Sontag will succeed Mrs. N. Landry at the Confectionery store on Lincoln Avenue, the latter lady having returned to Breaux Bridge after a stay of several months. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1895. 








 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 19th, 1889:




A Most Gay Ball.
Letter to the Editor:
Laf. Jun. 16, 1889.

Dear Editor, - Here I sit pen in hand and considerably puzzled how to begin to give you and your readers a necessarily short, correct description of last night's ball, or hop, as it was styled by its givers.

By way of introduction I can truthfully say that by your absence you deprived yourself of the exquisite pleasure of witnessing one of the most enlivening balls, private or public, given this season. That's a fact, a solid undeniable fact, with all due respect for and kind recollection of almost every one of its predecessors.

Why, dear editor, it was astonishing, amazing, and gratifying the sight of so much well-clad feminine beauty gliding over the polished surface of the ball-room floor; and the writer gazing at it through his spectacles - the which, by-the-by, lent an air perspective to the gay scene - was forcibly reminded of lively panoramas, and highly colored illustrations from Oriental proceedings read of in that venerable, immortal and veracious book, the "Arabian Night's Entertainment." Ah, yes; dear sir, life is too short that we should permit to pass unnoticed the jolly gathering of Tuesday night . . . . Soe of the dresses indulged in by the ladies who attended this remarkably successful hop were as rich and tasteful as ever it was the luck of the writer to see.

In last week's issue of your paper it was claimed that Mr. J. P. McGee was a "connoisseur" of all that was rich and beautiful in feminine apparel, - well I trust he took notice of those handsome feminine appurtenances worn on the occasion of which I write, and that in some issue of the ADVERTISER he will tell us what he thought of them. When he does so the writer predicts a difficult task for him.

All honor to the "young men of Lafayette;" they worked hard to make their pleasing venture a success and they succeeded. Without putting the names of those who participated in making the hop one to be remembered, the ladies will easily learn whom they have to particulary thank for the pleasure of the evening. J. P. M.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.





Nice Promotion. - Mr. F. R. Davis, Jr., the efficient assistant in the agent's office of the Southern Pacific railroad at this place, has been promoted to the position of night operator at Eola, La. He was succeeded by our popular young friend G. R. Delaureal. Mr. Delaureal only remained a few days, his services being in demand at Algiers. We are sorry that "Georgie" could not stay with us. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.


Moving to Laf. - Mr. Albert Delhomme, of Breaux Bridge, has accepted a position in the office of the Southern Pacific railway at this place. We extend him a hearty welcome. Lafayette is the place for young men of energy and enterprise. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.



Wild Runaway. - Last Thursday afternoon the horses hitched to the hack belonging to Mr. Flanders, son of ex-Gov. Flanders, while left alone on Lafayette street near the post office, became frightened and ran off down Lafayette street in the direction of Mr. Girard's residence at a fearful rate of speed. Opposite the bake-oven, near the Convent, the hack collided with a couple of large white oak trees and was completely demolished. No one was in the hack, and no one on the street was hurt. Fortunately the horses took that direction and not through the business portion of town, else something serious might have occurred. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.





The Cane and Cotton Palace.

 We have received a communication from Mr. Chas. D. Sweet, representing the ladies of New Orleans who have the management of the gorgeous "Cane and Cotton Palace" now being erected on Lafayette square as an exhibition building during the Carnival, stating that the ladies desire to secure from this section as many specimens of agricultural and other products as possible. He says, "An enterprise of this kind is of vital importance to each and every section, which should be creditably represented. In order that others may learn of the inexhaustible resources of this State we must show them her products, that they may be convinced." The carnival will be attended by thousands of visitors from other States, and a creditable display there would be really far more beneficial than at a State fair. We trust that the people of Lafayette will look to their interests and respond liberally to this appeal of the ladies. Address all packages to "Cane and Cotton Palace," New Orleans, La. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.




 Interesting Sight at the Depot.
 Quite a sensation was created among the sight-seers about the depot, last Wednesday morning, by the apperance of two men chained together by the neck, who got off the morning train from Texas for breakfast and "refreshments." We learn that it was the famous train robber, F. E. Bunch, and his companion, who robbed the express and killed a passenger, who was assisting the conductor in a fight with them, at Duck Hill, Miss., a few weeks ago. They had been captured in Texas, and were being conducted back to the scene of their crime. Mr. Bunch was most probably making for Mexico, but if the Duck Hill crime is fastened to upon him, he will take a trip still "further South." Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.


      


When the curtains of night are pinned
back by the stars.

And the beautiful moon leaps to the sky."
When my bosom is racked with a terrible
cough.

The "Certain Cough Cure" I will try.

And I know I shall fall, like an infant to
sleep.

In spite of the winds hollow wails,
Forgetting my pain in a rose-colored
dream.

For "Certain Cough Cure" never fails.
Sold at the Moss Pharmacy.
Laf. Advertiser 1/19/1889.




The Canning Factory.

 The "Canning Factory" meeting, at the City Hall, last Monday afternoon, was well attended, and the discussions evoked showed a warm and growing interest in the enterprise. It was clearly demonstrated that aside from the lateral benefits flowing from such an institution here, it is of itself a good paying investment -- the more extensive the operations the better the returns. It was determined to postpone a permanent organization until last Friday evening, and to raise the number of shares to 250, or more. This factory movement is of vital importance to Lafayette, which we are glad to note is fully appreciation by its enterprising citizens. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.
In-Famous Robber Passes Through Laf.

Quite a sensation was created among the sight-seers about the depot, last Wednesday morning, the appearance of two men chained together by the neck, who got off the morning train from Texas for breakfast and "refreshments." We learn that it was the famous train robber, F. E. Bunch, and his companion, who robbed the express and killed a passenger, who was assisting the conductor in a fight with them, at Duck Hill, Miss., A few weeks ago. They had been captured in Texas, and were being conducted back to the scene of their crime. Mr. Bunch was most probably making for Mexico, but if the Duck Hill crime is fastened upon him, he will take a trip still "further South."

Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.


PROCEEDINGS OF THE CANNING FACTORY MEETING.
LAFAYETTE, La., Jan 11th, 1889.

Pursuant to adjournment a large number of the stock-holders met at the Town Hall at 3 o'clock p. m., W. B. Bailey in the chair.

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

In answer to the president's call for a statement from the committee appointed to solicit further subscriptions, Dr. Beraud reported 27 shares placed by him; Dr. Moss 4; Mr. Kalckstein 12, conditionally; Messrs. Delahoussaye and Landry none, for reasons given; Mr. Vordenbaumen, absent. Making a total of 112 shares subscribed up to date.

On motion of Mr. Clegg, the committee was requested to continue its efforts in that direction until next meeting.

Before presenting their report, Dr. Hopkins, of the committee on charter, asked permission to read comparative estimates of the cost of operating the factory to a given capacity for the term of 60 days.

After a lenghty and intersting discussion on the advisability of organizing permanently at once, or not, it was decided, on motion of Mr. Kalckstein, that the meeting adjourn to 2 o'clock next Friday evening, when this question might be fully and finally considered.

In the meantime everybody present was requested to earnestly canvass the country with a view of doubling, if possible, the amount already subscribed.

W. B. BAILEY, Chairman.

N. P. MOSS, Secretery.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.




Robbers Stop In Lafayette.

Quite a sensation was created among the sight-seers about the depot, last Wednesday morning, by the appearance of two men chained together by the neck, who got off the morning train from Texas for breakfast and "refreshments." We learn it was the famous train robber, F. E. Bunch, and his companion, who robbed the express and killed a passenger, who was assisting the conductor in a fight with them, at Duck Hill, Miss., a few weeks ago. They had been captured in Texas, and were being conducted back to the scene of their crime. Mr. Bunch was most probably making for Mexico, but if the Duck Hill crime is fastened upon him, he will take a trip still "farther South." Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.


 Freakish Colt. - 
 J. B. Cheppert, living in town, is the owner of a strange freak of nature. A few days since one of his mares gave birth to a cold with only three well developed legs and feet. The fourth leg is much shorter than the others, and terminates in a cloven hoof, like that of a cow. The colt is alive, and apparently healthy. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.


Runaway on Lafayette St.
 Last Thursday afternoon the horses hitched to a hack belonging to Mr. Flanders, son of ex-Gov. Flanders, while left alone on Lafayette street, near the post office, became frightened and ran off down Lafayette street in the direction of Mr. Girard's residence at a fearful rate of speed. Opposite the bake-oven, near Convent, the hack collided with a couple of large white oak trees and was completely demolished. No one was in the hack, and no one on the street was hurt. Fortunately the horses took that direction and not through the business portion of town, else something serious might have occurred. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889. 


Broussard Back From B. R.
 Sheriff Isaac A. Broussard returned from his trip to Baton Rouge last Sunday. He was among the first sheriff's of the State to "walk up to the captain's office and settle." He holds receipts as follows:
Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.





SCHOOL BOARD PROCEEDINGS. 
Lafayette, La. Jan. 5th, 1889.

The School Board met his day in regular session with the following members present: President Dr. J. D. Trahan, M. Billaud, Jasper Spell, T. Begnaud and Simonet LeBlanc. Absent, Dr. J. P. Francez and D. Hulin.

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

On motion, duly seconded, the President, appointed the following committee to examine the books, accounts, vouchers, etc., and H. E. Toll.

Mr. Chas. Caffery appeared before the Board and stated that he could not obtain a lessee for the 16th Section known as T. 11 S. R. 5 E. at $2.00 per acre, but thought it could be rented for $1.25 per acre.

On motion, duly seconded, Mr. Chas. Caffery was authorized to rent the 16th Sect. T. 11 S. R. 5 E., for $1.25.

A communication from the State Superintendent was read, in which he refers the Board to the District Attorney for advice in the matter of remitting the 5 per cent penalty due by the sureties of the ex-treasurer J. N. Judice.

Several of the teachers appeared before the Board and asked that they paid for the week that schools were closed between Christmas and New Year.

On motion, duly seconded, and agreeable to the above, the Superintendent was ordered to pay the teachers for the week between Christmas and New Year.

The Superintendent read his annual report respecting the schools in the parish, which was approved and ordered printed.

A communication from the 5th ward asking that Mr. A. J. Johnson, teacher of the colored school of said ward, be removed on account of incompetency and not having the proper number of pupils attending school, and that Mr. A. Hoard, be appointed as teacher of said school.

On motion, duly seconded, and agreeable to the above, Mr. A. J. Johnson was removed, and his removal to take place from this date.

By authority, the President appointed Mr. R. C. Greig, with himself, as a committee to see about having the school house in Lafayette repaired, and to accept bids for the same.

On motion, duly seconded, it was resolved, that the money received from rent of school lands be apportioned to the several wards according to law.

On motion, duly seconded, the Treasurer was requested to collect the 5 per cent penalty, due by the sureties of the ex-treasurer J. N. Judice.

On motion duly seconded, it was resolved, that the LeBlanc school in the 4th ward be and is hereby removed to Royville, and that the Meaux school be removed from its present locality to a place to be designated by the Board later.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.







Police Jury Proceedings.

Lafayette, La., Jan. 7th, 1889.

 The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: Messrs. C. P. Alpha, J. G. St. Julien, C. C. Brown, O. Theriot, Ford Huffpauir and A. A. Delhomme.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 Mr. Alpha, representing the committee appointed to contract for the building of a bridge across Bayou Vermilion, reported that the committee met at Breaux Bridge on the specified date and let the contract to E. H. Vordenbaumen for the sum of $475.00.

 Under suspension of the rules Mr. Delhomme offered the following resolution, which was adopted:

 Be it resolved, That the committee appointed to let the contract for the material and construction of the bridge across Bayou Vermilion be and is hereby authorized to draw upon the Treasury for the undivided half of the contract price, in full payment of Lafayette's indebtedness, when in its judgment the work shall have been satisfactorily performed.

 Mr. Theriot, special committee on the Abbeville road, was granted further time to report.

 Mr. Huffpauir submitted the following report from the 2nd Ward:

PARISH, LAFAYETTE, DEC. 14, 1888.

To the Hon. Police Jury: Your committee on the Coulee de Noix bridge beg to report that they have examined said bridge on its completion, and have found it satisfactory according to contract; but finding it of insufficient length, we have added sixty feet, which makes the entire length two hundred and ten feet. One half of the extension was built by Mr. Bacque for the sum of $14.00, the other half being built by road hands. Trusting that the above  will meet with your approval, and that a warrant be issued to the above contractor for the sum of $42, being one half contract price, we respectfully subscribe.
     (Signed.)  J. T. BROUSSARD, FORD HUFFPAUIR, HOWARD HUFFPAUIR, Committee.

 On motion of Mr. Brown, the report was approved as read.

 The Treasurer submitted the following report:

        LAFAYETTE, LA., Jan. 7, 1889.
 To the Hon. Police Jury: I submit the following statement of receipts and expenditures:

 Aug. 23, 1888, received of J. E. Martin, ex-Treasurer ... $13.37 
  
 Oct. 3, 1888, received of Tax Collector, taxes ... $279.85

 Oct. 3, 1888, received of Tax Collector, licenses ... $78.50.

 Nov. 2, 1888, received of Tax Collector, taxes for Oct. ... $869.02

 Dec. 7, 1888, received of Tax Collector, taxes for Nov. ... $1,948.83.

 Dec. 26, 1888, received of tax Collector, taxes for Dec. ... $4,000.00

 Total receipts ...      $7,189.57
 Paid out as per vouchers ... $3,431.23
 Balance on hand ... $3,758.34.
(Signed) WM CLEGG, Parish Treasurer.

 Mr Theriot

   Mr. Theriot introduced the following:
   Be it resolved, That the Treasurer is hereby authorized to pay, upon maturity, the note held by the King's Bridge Co., of Columbus, O., against the parish, provided there are sufficient funds to meet the obligation.

 On motion of Mr. St. Julien the following committee was appointed to examine the Treasurer's books, count his cash and give him a quietus up to date:  C. C. Brown, Alf. A. Delhomme and R. C. Greig. The committee was also instructed to preserve all vouchers and documents coming into their hands in the court house vault, as part of the archives of the parish.

 Mr. St. Julien introduced the following, under suspension of the rules:

 Be it resolved, That the President of this body, as a committee of one, be empowered to contract for the proper furniture for the police jury room. Adopted.

 The following introduced by Mr. Brown, was adopted:
   Be it resolved, That the license law for 1889 be the same as that fixed by the State to-wit:

PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL OCCUPATIONS.

 Livery Stables ... $5.00
 Grocers and Merchants ... $10.00
 Liquor Dealers ... $50.00

 Every individual or individuals carrying on the business or profession of physician, attorney at law, editor, dentist, occulist, photographer, agency or publications, freight, ticket, claims, patent rights, shall pay a license of $5.00.

AMUSEMENTS.

 No museum, menagerie, circus, or other traveling show shall be permitted to make exhibitions within the parish unless they have first paid a license based on the number of attaches, whether proprietors, performers, or employes, as follows:

 1st Class - When the number of said persons is one hundred, or more, the license shall be five hundred dollars, ($500.)

2nd Class - When the number of said persons is seventy-five, or more, and less than one hundred, the license shall be four hundred dollars. ($400.)

 3rd Class - When the number of said persons is fifty or more, and less than seventy-five, the license shall be three hundred dollars. ($300.)

 4th Class - When the number of said persons is thirty or more and less than fifty, the license shall be two hundred dollars. ($200.)

 5th Class. - When the number of said persons is twenty, or more, and less than thirty, the license shall be two hundred dollars. ($200.)

 6th Class - When the number of said persons is ten, or more, and less than twenty, the license shall be one hundred and fifty dollars ($150.)

 7th Class - When the number of said persons is five, or more, and less than ten, the license shall be one hundred dollars ($100.)

 8th Class - When the number of said persons if four, the license shall be seventy-five dollars ($75.)

 9th Class - When the number of said persons is three the license shall be fifty dollars ($50.)

 10th Class - When the number of said persons is two the license shall be forty dollars ($40.)

 11th Class - When the number of said persons is one the license shall be thirty dollars.

PEDDLERS AND HAWKERS.

 Each and every peddler or hawker shall pay an annual license, graded as follows: When traveling on foot, five dollars, ($5); when traveling on horseback, ten dollars ($10); when traveling in one horse vehicle, fifteen dollars ($15); when traveling in two-horse vehicle, thirty dollars ($30); when traveling on boat, barge or other watercraft, one hundred dollars ($100).

  Under suspension of the rules Mr. St. Julien moved the following resolutions as a supplement to the license law for 1889:
    Be it resolved, That a special tax of of $1.00 be imposed upon every man owning one dog, $2.00 for the second, and $3.00 for the third, and so on in graduation as the number increases.

 2nd - That on complaint lodged by any citizen before any justice of the peace, the owners of dogs shall be compelled to pay the aforesaid tax, and the amount turned over to the Parish Treasurer.

 The petition presented by John Demerit, Marie Granger and Jean Louis, indigents, were acted upon as follows: The sum of $25.00 is hereby ordered to be paid to John Demerit; the sum of $25.00 is hereby ordered to be paid to Syphoria Landry for account of Marie Granger; the sum of $10.00 is ordered to be paid to D. A. Cochrane for account of Jean Louis.

 The petition of Osma Boudreaux, Lucien Judice, and Murphy Robinson, asking the said parties being disabled, it was resolved to grant a free license to each of the aforesaid petitioners for the year 1889.

 Mr. Brown offered the following which was adopted:

 Be it Resolved, That as the year 1888 has closed, the parish funds be and hereby thrown into a general fund.

 A communication from the police jury of Vermilion, in reference to establishing a public ferry across Bayou Vermilion at Olidon Broussard's, with a request to appoint a committee of conference on the part of this parish, was read, and the following resolution adopted:

 Be it Resolved, That agreeable to the suggestion of the police jury of Vermilion a committee of three be appointed to act conjointly with a similar committee of Vermilion in ascertaining the cost of establishing and keeping a ferry at Olidon's crossing.

 The President appointed Ford Huffpauir, A. Theall and Overton Cade on said committee.

 Mr Theriot introduced the following, which was adopted:

 Be it Resolved, That I. Falk, J. P, be and is hereby ordered to turn over the full amount of the forfeited band in the case of the State vs. Bergeron.

 The following, introduced by Mr. St. Julien, was laid over under the rules:

 Be it resolved, That in conformity to previous legislation about hogs, it is hereby provided that those animals be shot down without question when committing depredations within a man's closure.

 The resignation of Mr. E. Constantin as road overseer for the 3rd Ward was accepted, and Mr. Alcee Mouton appointed to fill the vacancy.

 The following accounts were laid over:

 Geo. Malagarie, constable fees ... $22.99
 I. Falk, justice fees ... $23.52
 G. Doucet, returning officer ... $100.00

 The following accounts were approved:

 L. Hirsch, constable fees ... $7.80
 T. H. Theriot, constable fees $5.00
 Eustache Comeau ... $5.00
 M. Foote ... $13.05
 W. J. Harson, justice fees ... $10.12
 Cleobule Doucet, com. of elections ... $5.00


 $5.00 for com. of elect. to the following: A. Y. Cormier, Jos. Begnaud, Antoine Guidry, Horace Broussard, J. H. Martin, J. O. Broussard, A. L. Guilbeau, R. S. Thomas, D. L. Herpin.

 Aurelien Olivier, jury commissioner ... $10.00
 Antoine Guidry, jury commissioner ... $10.00
 T. Hebert, jury com, $5.00
 A. M. Martin, jury com, $5.00
 Charles Broussard, cor. jury, $1.60
 Simon Norman, cor. jury, $1.60
 Charles Broussard, cor. jury, $1.60
 Simon Norman, cor. jury, $1.60
 Felix Norman, cor. jury, $1.60
 Dermas Leblanc, cor. jury, $1.60
 Edmond Jean, cor. jury, $1.60
 Onez H. Breaux, road over'r ... $37.50
 E. Constantin, road over'r ... $37.50
 R. C. Smedes, Dist. Atty fees ... $20.00
 Hervilien Simoneau, det. shff. at elect. ... $5.00
 A. Gladu, coroner's fees ... $4.50
 A. Gladu, coroner's fees ... $2.50
 A. M. Martin, affixing seal to elect. returns, $4.50
  I. A. Broussard, one quar. salary, $125.00

 I. A. Broussard, shff. at election ... $5.00
 I. A. Broussard, shff. at election ... $7.00
 Jno. Bronson, repairing road ... $15.00
 August Albarado, rep. bridge ... $4.00
 August Albarado, building bridge ... $42.50
 E. A. Hollister, building ... $63.00
 H. Hebert. hauling ... $3.25
 J. T. Broussard, lumber ... $34.55
 Ford Huffpauir, hauling nails, etc. ... $24.81
 J. S. Whittington, lumber ... $58.38
 E. H. Vordenbaumen, lum., coal ... $7.44
 Antoine Caro, repairing jail ... $4.75
 Leon Plonsky, 5 pc. blankets, etc. $15.00
 Jos. Plonsky, 6 pc. blankets, etc $15.00
 Wm. Clegg, one record book ... $15.50
 Wm. Clegg, nails, glass, etc ... $13.05
 Leopold Hirsch, sal. C. H. keeper ... $50.00
 St. Clair Leblanc, masonry ... $3.00
 E. Constantin, hack hire ... $5.00
 Louis Oueilhe, prisoners' board ... $153.20
 A. A. Delhomme, per diem juror ... $32.00
 C. P. Alpha, per diem juror ... $32.00
 J. G. St. Julien, per diem juror ... $32.00
 C. C. Brown, per diem juror ... $32.00
 O. Theriot, per diem juror ... $32.00
 J. S. Whittington, per diem juror ... $32.00
 Ford Huffpauir, per dim juror ... $28.00
 Wm. Cleff, Treasurer's salary ... $87.50
 R. C. Greig, Clerk's salary ... $75.00

 There being no further business, the police jury adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock on first Monday in February.
C. P. ALPHA, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.


 City Council Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., Jan. 7th, 1889.

 A regular meeting of the City Council was held this day and there were present: Messrs. W. B. Bailey, Mayor, A. J. Moss, F. Lombard, J. O. Mouton, J. G. Parkerson and O. J. Sprole.

 Absent: Messrs. P. Gerac and Ed. Pellerin.

 The minutes of last meeting were read and approved.

 On motion, the council then proceeded to the consideration of licenses for 1889, and adopted the following:

 AN ORDINANCE.

 To levy and enforce payment of an annual license tax upon all persons, associations of persons, or business firms and corporations pursuing any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, except those who are expressly excepted from such license tax by articles 206 and 207 of the Constitution.

 SECTION 1.  Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, La, That there is hereby levied an annual license tax for the year 1889 upon each person, association of persons, or business firms and corporations, pursuing any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, except those expressly exempt from such license tax by Articles 206 and 207 of the Constitution.

 SECTION 2. Be it further ordained, etc., That immediately after the promulgation of this Ordinance the tax collector shall begin to collect, and shall collect as fast as possible, from each of the persons or business firms, association of persons and corporations, pursuing within the limits of said town any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, a license tax as hereinafter graduated. All licenses shall be due and collectible during the first two months of the year, and all unpaid licenses shall become delinquent on the first day of March of said year, and all persons who commence business after that date shall become delinquent unless the license is paid ten days from date of opening.

 SECTION 3. Be it further ordained, etc., That licenses shall be graduated in three classes, except as afterward provided.

 SECTION 4. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every mercantile business of selling at retail, whether as principal, agent, or on commission, or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross amount of sales for the year 1888, as follows:

 First Class - When the gross sales are twenty thousand dollars, or more, the license shall be twenty dollars.

 Second Class - When the gross sales are fifteen thousand dollars, or more, and less than $20,000, the license shall be fifteen dollars.

 Third Class - When the gross sales are less than fifteen thousand dollars, the license shall be ten dollars.

 Provided, that if any distilled, vinous, malt, or other kind of mixed liquors, be sold in connection with the business of retail merchant, grocer, restaurant, oyster house, confectionery or druggist, in less quantities than five gallons, the license for such additional business shall be as hereinafter provided in Section 9 of this ordinance, provided, further, that no liquor license shall issue to sell liquors in less quantities than five dollars for less than fifty dollars.

 SECTION 5. Be it further ordained, etc., That for carrying on each business of telegraphing, telephoning, the license shall be based on gross annual receipts as follows:

 First Class - When the gross annual receipts are over twenty thousand dollars, the license shall be fifteen dollars.

 Second Class - When the gross annual receipts are less than twenty thousand dollars, and more than fifteen thousand dollars, the license shall be ten dollars.

 Third Class - When gross annual receipts are fifteen thousand dollars, or less, the license shall be five dollars.

 SECTION 6. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every business of keeping a theatre, or hall where entertainments are given, the license shall be ten dollars for each one thousand inhabitants of the town, to be paid by the person owning or controlling for rent or hire the building or buildings in which said entertainments are given; provided, that all traveling troupes or shows of any kind using said hall shall pay, in addition, the license imposed by Section (?) of this ordinance. The provisions of this section applying to such halls only when used by local clubs, societies, etc., and not to traveling troupes or shows of any kind using said hall shall pay, in addition, the license imposed by Section (?) of this ordinance. The provisions of this section applying to such halls only when used by local clubs, societies, etc., and not traveling troupes or companies.

 SECTION 7. Be it further ordained, etc., That no museum, menagerie, circus or other traveling show, shall be permitted to make exhibitions within the corporate limits unless they have first of one hundred dollars, said amount being imposed and to be paid before each and every performance; provided, that an additional license for each and every side show of ten dollars for each performance shall be issued and paid before exhibition of same is allowed.

 SECTION 8. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every business of keeping a hotel where lodging and eating are combined the license shall be based on the number of rooms for guests as follows:

 First Class - When said rooms are twelve in number, or more, the license shall be twenty-five dollars.

 Second Class - When said rooms are in number nine, or more, and less than 12, the license shall be seventeen and 50 one-hundredths dollars.

 Third Class - When said rooms are six, or more, and less than nine, the license shall be ten dollar.

 Provided, that for lodging alone the license shall be one half the above rates.

 SECTION 9. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every business of barroom, cabaret, coffee house, beer saloon, liquor exchange, drinking saloon, grog shop, beer garden, or other place where anything to be drunk or eaten on the premises is sold directly, the license shall be based on the gross receipts of said business as follows:

 First Class - When said gross receipts are five thousand dollars; or more, the license shall be one hundred dollars.

 Second Class - When said gross annual receipts are two thousand dollars, or more, and less than five thousand dollars, the license shall be seventy-five dollars.

 Third Class - When said gross receipts are less than two thousand dollars, the license shall be fifty dollars.

 Provided, no license shall be charged for selling refreshments for charitable or religious purposes; and that when any business provided for in this section shall be combined with any business in section 4, the same classification shall be made as prescribed in this section; but the price of the license shall be equal to the license required for each separately.

 SECTION 10. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every business of keeping a livery stable, or of persons keeping cabs, hacks, carriages and horses for hire shall be graded as follows:

 First Class - When gross annual receipts exceed two thousand dollars, the license shall be twenty-five dollars.

 Second Class - When gross receipts exceed one thousand dollars, and are less than two thousand dollars, the license shall be twenty dollars.

 Third Class. _ When the gross receipts are seven hundred and fifty dollars, or more, and less than one thousand dollars, the license shall be fifteen dollars.

 Fourth Class - When gross receipts are less than seven hundred and fifty dollars, the license shall be four dollar.

 All persons owning or using drays, wagons or carts for hire and hauling are hereby required to obtain from the Collector a tin plate with a number thereon painted, and have the same nailed on the vehicle in a conspicuous place.

 Section 11. Be it further ordained, etc., That in addition to the graduated system as herein adopted, there shall be a miscellaneous system so as to apply to traffics, trades and professions, vocations, callings, or business of any kind, where the graduated system is not applied, and, not being in conflict therewith, as follows, to-wit:

 From each and every attorney-at-law physician, dentist, editor, photographer,m and oculist, five dollars.

 Each fruit and ice cream dealer, five dollars.

 Each oyster stand, five dollars.
 Each billiard table from which a revenue is derived, five dollars.

 Each auction store, per  month, five dollars.

 Each concert and theatrical performance, each day, five dollars.

 Every lumber yard, five dollars.

 Each horse and mule trader, five dollars.

 Each gun and pistol establishment, five dollars.

 Each small show, ten dollars for each performance.

 Each cigar and tobacco stand, and every person keeping a stand where coffee, chocolate, or cooked food is sold, including lunch houses, five dollars.

 Each soda water stand, five dollars.

 Each shooting gallery, five dollars.

 Each peddler or hawker of clothing, jewelry, notions, cutlery, picture, wares, spectacles, etc., five dollars.

 Each sewing machine agent, or depot where sewing machines are sold, five dollars.

 No license shall issue for less than five dollars, except in cases where the business or object is so trifling the mayor may, if he thinks proper, authorize the Collector to issue a smaller one on such business as may not come under any of the provisions hereof.


 Nothing in this ordinance shall be construed as licensing or permitting any performance which is prohibited by other laws, ordinances, or police regulations.

 Any transfer, or acceptance of a transferable license, or acceptance of a transferable license, without the consent of the mayor shall be null and void.

 SECTION 12. Be it further ordained, etc., That the licenses issued in pursuance of this Ordinance shall commence on the first day of January and end on the 31st day of December, 1889, and said licenses shall be collected in the manner provided by the Charter of the Town, and according to Sections 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24 of Act No. 101 of the General Assembly of 1886.

 SECTION 13. Be if further ordained, etc., That a person, firm or company having more than one place of business shall pay a separate license for each place of business.

 SECTION 14. Be it further ordained, etc., That this Ordinance shall take effect immediately after promulgation.

 The reports of the Collector and Treasurer were received and referred to the Finance Committee.

 The claim of Adolph Martin, for $1.50 taxes paid under an erroneous assessment, was referred to the Finance Committee.

 On motion, the Constable was authorized to have the necessary painting done on the Town Hall; cornice window and door facings, white; doors, grained oak; blinds, green; two coats. The whole not to exceed $35.

 The Constable was also authorized to procure one long table and twelve chairs for the use of the Council.

 The account of J. Vigneaux, for amount expended by him for whitewashing and material for Town and Fire Halls, of $6.50, was approved.
   The Council then adjourned.
W. B. BAILEY, Mayor.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.




Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 1/19/1889.
 Peach trees are in bloom, and nature is beginning to wake up from the torpor of winter.

 Owing to the recent favorable weather many of our farmers have commenced ploughing and getting their places in readiness for, we hope, a fine crop. There is always an advantage in an early start.

 Mr. F. R. Davis, Jr., the efficient assistant to the agent's office of the Southern Pacific railroad at this place, has been promoted to the position of night operator at Eola, La. He was succeeded by our popular young friend G. R. DeLaureal. Mr. DeLaureal only remained a few days, his services being in demand at Algiers. We are sorry that "Georgie" could not stay with us.

 Mr. Albert Delhomme, of Breaux Bridge, has accepted a position in the office of the Southern Pacific railway at this place. We extend him a hearty welcome. Lafayette is the place for young men of energy and enterprise. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.








 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 19th, 1878:

A FEW MILES OF RAILROAD IRON AND CROSSTIES WANTED.

[From the Donaldsonville Chief.]


The Lake Charles Echo of last says : 


"Thos. Kleinpeter, engineer, informs us that he and engineer Barr inspected the railroad bed eastwardly to a point about forty miles east of Vermilionville, and found it in much better condition than they anticipated."

It is a crying shame that the commercial interests of New Orleans should be suffering and declining for want of railroad connection with the prolific agricultural and stock raising regions of the great State of Texas, when all that is necessary to secure this desideratum is a few miles of grading and the laying of a few tons of railroad iron. The extension of our New Orleans and Texas road to the Sabine, opposite the town of Orange, Texas, would connection with the road running from that point towards Houston, and develop a trade that would prove remunerative from the start, and soon make the New Orleans and Texas the best paying railway in the South.

In fact the simple closing of the little gap of a dozen miles between the western terminus of our Donaldsonville section of the New Orleans and Texas, and the eastern bank of the Grand river, would place the line speedily upon a substantial paying basis. This extension would provide connection with steamboats plying the Teche Atchafalya and various other streams throughout the Attakapas region, thus insuring cheap and rapid communication between that productive section and the New Orleans Market. The benefits of such a consummation are obvious, but unfortunately we cannot entertain much hope of their fruition in the near future, as the lack of capital in the South, and the financial depression existing throughout the North, evidenced by the numerous failures daily recorded in the press telegrams, demonstrate that the men who have money to invest are far and few between, and they will naturally be very cautious in their ventures until there is promise of better times and a sounder status ahead. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1878.




The Circus. - The circus came and our money is gone. Those who never saw any other or a better one, seemed to be satisfied. Others were disappointed in many respects. Bad road, cold weather, hard times, in fact, scarcely anything prevents any one from going to a circus.
Laf. Adv. 1/19/1878.





Police Jury Proceedings.
 Parish of Lafayette, Jan. 7th, 1878.

 The Police Jury met at the Court House this day, pursuant to adjournment. Members present: Onez Broussard, M. G. Broussard, Adolphe Comeaux and Aurelien Primeaux.  Absent:  Alfred Peck.

 The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.

 The committee appointed to ascertain what proceedings and rules are necessary to attain an equitable distribution of the funds or money that may come into the parish treasury, among creditors of the parish, made the following report, which was adopted:

 To the Hon. President and Members of the Police Jury of Lafayette Parish.

 "Your committee appointed on the 3rd day of December, 1877, to report "what proceedings and rules are necessary to attain an equitable distribution of the funds or money that may come into the Parish Treasury, among the creditors of the Parish," beg leave to report that on their opinion, to arrive at the end proposed by you, you must necessarily divide the funds collected as taxes and licenses and fines and forfeitures into different special funds in a manner somewhat as follows ;  say For Jurors, - For expenses in criminal cases, - For public roads and bridges, - For salaries of Police Jurors and their officers, - For election fund, - For contingent expenses, For old debts.

 That the Treasurer and Tax Collector be prohibited from receiving warrants in payment of taxes or licenses, and that no monies to the credit of one fund be in any way directed to meet the claims against the funds.

 That the treasurer be required and directed to distribute the monies he receives ratably among all the funds, and that every year all taxes he strictly apportioned to every fund and that any excess of a fund at the end of the year be credited to the old debt fund.

 That the treasurer be required, every month, to distribute ratably what he receives from the collector, for the old debt fund, among all the creditors of that fund whose claims are duly registered in accordance with the resolution of the Police Jury.

 That all fines and forfeitures be credited to the Criminal Expenses fund, and that all licenses be credit to the Old Debt Fund.
      JOHN CLEGG, M. E. GIRARD, ED. EUG. MOUTON, Committee.
    

 The committee appointed to trace and open a road from Olidon's ferry to Royville made their report, and on motion, said report was adopted.

 On motion resolved, that a committee of five be and is hereby appointed and that full power be and is hereby given to said committee to confer with members or a committee appointed by the Police Jury of the Parish of St. Landry for the purpose of making all repairs and other work which in their estimation they may deem necessary to put in traveling order the bridge over bayou Carencro.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Theodule Hebert, Jr., M. G. Broussard, Jean Vigneaux, Ernest Potier and Alfred Peck.

 Resolved, that a copy this resolution he forwarded to the president of the Police Jury of the parish of St.Landry for action thereon by that honorable body.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to make an estimate of the probable expenses of the Parish for the current year, said committee to be guided by report of the committee appointed to draft rules to attain an equitable distributions of the funds of this parish. On said committee were appointed Messrs. Ed. E. Mouton, M. F. Rigues and M. E. Girard.

 On motion resolved, that the president of this Police Jury be and is hereby authorized to draw on the treasurer of this parish, the sum of sixty dollars or as much thereof as necessary, for the purchase of three record books for the Recorder's office.

 On motion resolved, that the president of this Police Jury be and is hereby authorized to draw on the treasurer of this parish, the sum of sixty dollars or as much thereof as necessary, for the purchase of three record books for the Recorder's Office.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to lay out and trace a road leading from the new bridge built on Mine's coulee to the old bridge on Isles des Canes lying near Wm. Guidry's plantation.

 On said committee were appointed John S, Whittington, Jules Guidry, Jules Duhon, Antoine Guidry and Cleobule Doucet.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to trace a road from the bridge lying near Montgomery's plantation leading to the Mermentau river.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Jules Guidry, Ed. Louviere, Dr. Cunningham and Theophile Breaux.

 On motion resolved, a committee be appointed to consider the possibility and to advise the proper means of opening and tracing a public road leading from Vermilionville to Isle Pillette, said road to join the public road southwest of the town near Messrs. H. Eastin and McBride's plantations.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Lessin Guidry, Drozin, I. Broussard, Valery Breaux, H. Eastin, Alcide Judice, Arelien Primeaux and Adolphe Comeaux.

 There being no further business the Police adjourned.
ONES. BROUSSARD, President.
J. N. JUDICE, Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1878.
    


lagniappe:
NEGRO BURNED IN KANSAS.

 Kansas - bleeding Kansas - has burnt a negro at the stake. As is well known, Kansas is the negro's heaven, and the negro is Kansas' particular pet. There the colored brother has all his rights. He votes, serves on juries, rides on the cars with white people, stops at white hotels and eats in white restaurants. It has been the proud boast of Kansas that it accorded the negro not only political, but social equality. Kansas has always been first to raise its voice against the alleged oppression of the negro in the South. The cranks and demagogues of that State have been the most malevolent of the South's haters, and all on account of their professed friendship for the negro. Since the time of old John Brown, Kansas has been shedding crocodile tears for the "victims of Southern mobs," every one of whom has been held up as a sort of martyr to the cause of human rights. That has been Kansas' chief business since the war.

 And it has come to pass that this Kansas - this sobbing daughter of abolition - has had a first-class lynching of her own, accompanied by a heartless cruelty calculated to give poor Miss Clayton Jewett the horrors for the rest of her life.


 Press dispatches convey the information that a negro named Fred Alexander, who had attempted to ravish a white girl and was charged with the murder and ravishing of another white girl, was taken from the Leavenworth jail and burnt to death in the presence of eight thousand citizens of the city.


 Leavenworth was the old home of John Brown. It was the headquarters of the most fanatical advocates of negro emancipation and negro equality.


 Louisiana, in common with the whole South, does not rejoice because of the misfortunes of her sisters north of Mason and Dixon's line. It is more in pity than in anger that allusion is made to them. But we would be derelict in our duty to ourselves if we failed to point out to our former maligners the proof of their injustice. We have always contended that the North, South, East and West, wherever the awful monster of African lust would lay his polluting hands upon the fair brow of a white woman, his fate must be the same - it must not, it cannot, be else than death, swift, terrible and merciless.
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1901. 
 
 



Lagniappe:
POPULAR SCIENCE.

Professor Morse, of Salem, Mass., has devised a simple stove for warming rooms by means of solar heat.

 It consists of a shallow box having a bottom of corrugated iron and a glass top. This device is placed outside the building, so that the sun can shine directly into it. The rays pass through the glass and are absorbed by the metal, heating it to a high temperature and warming the air of the box. The air, which on sunny days rises to a temperature of 90 degrees Fahrenheit, is conveyed into the room.


A ray of light travels 11,160,000 in a minute.


A firm of big bakers in Glasgow and London is baking bread by electricity and saving both labor and expense.


 The voices of American-bred canaries become harsher in each generation. German birds must be constantly imported to preserve a mellow note.

 A German professor says that natural gas is created by the presence of a mass of rock on a bed of peat, and that hydraulic pressure would create the same vapor if sunflowers were used to feed it.


 An English invention is the "center-cycle," having four wheels a foot in diameter and a large wheel in the center. With it the rider is enabled to go up-hill as easily as to go forward on level ground.


 A curious substance similar to the sponge is known as loofah. It is not only valuable as an adjunct of the bath, but is found useful for making inside soles for shoes, and is being applied to the under sides of saddles to keep the horses back cool.

 An Englishman has invented an electric gun. There is a small storage-battery fixed in the stock, from which a current strong enough to explode the cartride is communicated. It is said that one changing of the shell will explode five thousand cartridges.


 Cyanide of potassium will remove all indelible inks whose base is nitrate of silver. But, as the cyanide is a deadly poison, it must be used with great care. A small lump of the size of a bean, dissolved in a half gill of water, will make a solution strong enough to destroy the ink.


 A new submarine torpedo boat has been tried by both France and Russia, and it said to be successful. It is driven by the Edison dynamo, provided with compressed oxygen for use under water, and large pair of scissors projecting from from the prow, in order to cut torpedo wires.


 It was Dr. Quinlan, of Dublin, who claimed to have discovered the curative properties of mullein leaves in consumption. Some of our physicians have experimented with the leaves of this plant in the pre-tubercular stages of pulmonary consumption, but it is not known with what results.


 Soapstone incorporated with oil, after the manner of a paint, is said to be superior to any kind of paint as a preservative. Soapstone is to had in exceedingly fine powdeer, mixes readily with prepared oils for paint use, covers well surfaces of iron, steel, or stone, and is an effectual remedy against rust. It has been known to protect some stonework, such as obelisks, in China, for ages past.


 The microbe causing dysentery has been discovered by German investigators. The lymph-glands, spleen and intestines are the chosen resort of this troublesome invader. Its appetite is not dainty, as it gormandizes on anything, even a picked-up dinner; and its capacity of doubling itself at a rapid rate is simply immense. It does not thrive in acid, so people who have cause to fear an attack had better confine their potations to lemonade with sugar. 
 

 Some physicians have warmly indorsed the suggestion that "massage" as an employment, is particularly suited to the capabilities of the blind, in whom the tactile sense is strongly developed. Indeed, in Japan massage has, for a long period of time, been practiced by blind men, about the streets with a flagellate, drawing attention to themselves and their occupation. It is thought that superintendents of blind asylums will find this a possible avenue to employment for their pupils.

From Popular Science and  in the Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1889.



lagniappe:
OF GENERAL INTEREST.

 - Ex-United States Senator Waitman T. Willey, now clerk of the county court of Monongalia county, W. Va., is hale and hearty, though he is in his eighty-fourth year, and can be found at any hour of the day at his desk.

 - A lunar rainbow was seen recently at Durham, N. C. While a slight shower was falling the moon shone brightly in the east, and outlined against a dark western cloud was seen a silvery bow, very bright and clear, for some minutes. It gradually faded with the disappearance of the cloud.

 - The virtues of coffee were discovered by an Arabian abbot. He learned from the shepherd of the establishment that when the cattle ate the berries of a certain plant they were restless at night. His monks slept altogether too soundly and in order to keep them awake at their devotions he procured some of the berries and made a decoration.

 - Florida is one of the greatest lake states, if the number of its lakes and lakelets entitle it to be so classed. It has a half score of considerable lakes, including Okachobee, with more than six hundred square miles, and many scores of small lakes and ponds scattered over an area forty or fifty miles wide and several hundred miles long.

 - A scientist thinks that agricultural chemistry should teach how to make Florida oranges better. To this end he is now engaged in a chemical analysis of the different varieties grown upon different soils, etc., fed by different fertilizers, with the idea that he can do for oranges what the Frenchmen have done for pears and what the grape growers have done for grapes.

 The difference between rising every morning at and eight, in the course of forty years amounts to twenty-nine thousand, two hundred hours, or three years, one hundred and twenty-one days and sixteen hours, which are equal to eight hours a day for exactly ten years. So that rising at six will be the same as if ten years of life (a weighty consideration) were added wherein we may command eight hours every day for the cultivation of our minds and the dispatch of business.

 - From 1885 to 1892 the net income of the Bell Telephone Co. available for dividends ranged from over 18 to more than 27 per cent on the nominal capital. In five of the years it was over 20 per cent, and only a small part of the capital represented other property than the patent. The capital has been increased from time to time to prevent the dividends from exceeding it. It has grown from $7,350,000 in 1881 to $20,000,000. The average amount of capital was $11,209,035, and the dividends in fourteen years have aggregated $23, 106,096. The average rate of dividend has been 14.73 per cent - N. Y. Journal of Commerce.

 - During the tenth century no woman was allowed to appear at church without a veil, top covering and concealing the features, in order that the prayers and meditations of the men might not be disturbed by the contemplation of feminine loveliness. There was a tradition that the origin of the custom was in an order from a great French saint. When a young man, he met a little girl with features so noble and beautiful that, although he was many years her senior, he immediately fell in love with her, because she resembled a young lady to whom he had been engaged years before, but who died in his arms. The man and the child separated and he became a priest. Many years later he saw her in a congregation just as he was entering the pulpit to preach, and the sight disturbed him to such an extent that his sermon was a failure, and he ordered all the women thence forth to wear veils.

 - Freaks do not draw as well as they formerly did. One reason for it is that when managers could not find anything sufficiently remarkable to excite interest they resorted to all kinds of fake schemes - shaving horses, mutilating animals so that an extra leg could be grafted, fixing roosters so that they could cat and crow at the same time, hiring negroes for Zulus, and fixing Irish girls in costume for Circassian beauties, clamping artificial appliances upon a woman to make her weigh a prodigious amount and compelling her to wear them in the hottest weather. But even now a legitimate freak always makes money. Toci, the Italian double boy, with two heads, four arms, two upper bodies and only one from the waist down, drew tremendous houses while in the United States, and managers coined money from the exhibitions. The public has made been incredulous, and only such freaks as are endorsed as being remarkable by scientific experts can now extract the dimes from the pockets of the people.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1893.

   

No comments:

Post a Comment