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Tuesday, January 13, 2015

**DECEMBER 27TH M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of December 27th, 1905:



THE LAFAYETTE SANITARIUM.

 


 Saturday afternoon subscribers in the proposed sanitarium met in the office of Judge O. C. Mouton and organized a charter, which appears in another column. Sufficient stock, over $14,000 of the $25,000 capital stock, has been subscribed for, which makes it possible to begin construction as soon as possible to begin construction as soon as plans and specifications can be decided upon.

The addition of this new institution to Lafayette is another step along the road of progress. Home capital is in back of it, which shows that home people have confidence in the future of the town and are willing to show their faith by their works.

The acquisition of a sanitarium such as this will be modern in every respect and thoroughly abreast with the latest in medicine and surgery, is not only a great gain that will add importance to Lafayette, but will be a great boon to this entire section.

As an investment it offers encouraging promises of returns. The advantageous location at Lafayette with such large territory readily and quickly accessible, make a large patronage an assured success, and it will be only a question of a short time before sanitarium stock will be above par.
 

Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.




Outsiders Want Stock. - In speaking of the sanitarium, which will shortly be built here, one of the promoters stated to an Advertiser reporter that requests of stock had been made by parties from a distance showing that as a business proposition it was considered a good investment by people not residents of the parish. He added, however, that it was decidedly the preference and strong desire of all connected with the enterprise to see the stock taken at home. There is stock still remaining and those who have not yet subscribed should promptly do so. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.






THE LAFAYETTE SANITARIUM ASSOCIATION.
State of Louisiana.
Parish of Lafayette.




Be it know that before me, Orther C. Mouton, a notary public personally came and appeared Felix Demanade, Dr. Frederick R. Tolson, Dr. Joseph Louis Duhart, Dr. N. P. Moss, Dr. G. Armand Martin, J. Raoul Jeanmard, Dr. John Tolson, Dr. L. O. Clark, W. Alexander LeRosen, Ashby Woodson, and Dr. J. Franklin Mouton, John C. Nickerson and Lorne D. Nickerson herein represented by John C. Nickerson, all residents of said parish and State, who severally declared that availing themselves of the powers, rights and privileges conferred by the laws of Louisiana relative to corporations, and particularly those conferred by Act number 36 of eighteen hundred and eighty-eight they do by this act and instrument of writing form themselves into and constitute a corporation as follows:

ARTICLE I. - The name and style of this corporation shall be "THE LAFAYETTE SANITARIUM ASSOCIATION, LIMITED," and it's domicile shall be at Lafayette, Lafayette Parish, State of Louisiana.

ARTICLE II. - This corporation shall have power and authority to have and enjoy succession by their corporate name for a period of ninety-nine years; to contract, sue and be sued, in their corporate name; to make and to use a corporate seal; to hold, receive, purchase, convey, under their corporate name, property, both real and personal; to name and to appoint such managers, directors and officers. as their interest and convenience may require; and to make and establish such by-laws and regulation for the affairs of the corporation as may be necessary and proper.

ARTICLE III. - The purpose and object for which this corporation is formed are hereby declared to be to establish and maintain a sanitarium for the treatment of disease and the care of invalids, under rules and regulations commonly governing such institutions and to do all things necessary for the complete and successful operation of a modern sanitarium.

ARTICLE IV. - All citations or process of law shall be served on the Chairman of the Board of Directors or on the treasurer of the association.

ARTICLE V. - The capitol stock of this corporation is hereby fixed at twenty-five thousand dollars, divided into two hundred and fifty shares of one hundred dollars each; stock to be issued only for labor done or money or property actually received, and the corporation to begin business when ten thousand dollars shall have been subscribed, the stock being payable in four equal installments of 25 per cent -- Subject to the call of the Board of Directors at intervals of thirty days, or longer.

ARTICLE VI. - The affairs of this corporation shall be under the management and control of a Board of Directors to be composed of five shareholders. three of whom shall constitute a quorum; it shall have power to appoint all necessary officers and employees to conduct the business of said corporation and fix their compensation; to make all contracts, directly of by its officers or employees, establish by-laws and regulations for the proper conduct of the affairs and business of said association, and fill all vacancies in the Board of Directors which may be occasioned by death of resignation. Said Board of Directors shall be elected by the stockholders at the annual meeting of stockholders on the first Thursday of January of each year beginning with the first Thursday of January nineteen hundred and seven. The following shareholders shall constitute the first Board of Directors and shall hold office until the first Thursday of January nineteen hundred and seven until their successors are elected and qualified, to-with: J. Franklin Mouton, Frederick R. Tolson, Lambert . Clark, A. Emile Mouton and Nathaniel P. Moss.


ARTICLE VII. -
There shall be a meeting of stockholders on the First Thursday of January, nineteen hundred and seven, and annually thereafter, to elect a Board of Directors and consider such other matters which may require their attention; and special meetings of stockholders shall be called by the Chairman of the Board of Directors upon resolution of the Board, or on the demand of stockholders representing or holding twenty-five per cent of the stock issued. Notice of special meetings shall be given by ten days notice by mail addressed to each stockholder at his post office address, and notice of annual meetings shall be published in a local newspaper thirty days in advance of the date of the meeting. Each stockholder shall be entitled to one vote for each share of stock held by him to be voted by each stockholder in person or by proxy.

ARTICLE VIII. - Members of the Board of Directors shall have the power to vote by proxy at any meeting of the Board of Directors; and all meetings of stockholders and of the Board of Directors shall be held in the office of the corporation. The failure or omission to elect officers as provided for shall in no manner affect the business of the corporation.

ARTICLE IX. - No stockholder shall be held personally liable for the fault of the corporation. Nor shall any stockholder be liable to any greater extent that the unpaid balance due on the stock purchased by him. No informality in organization shall affect the liability of stockholders or render the charter null.

ARTICLE X. - This act of incorporation can be changed, modified or altered or the corporation be dissolved with the consent of three-fourths of the capital stock represented at any general meeting of the stockholders, convened for such purpose, after thirty days previous notice shall be given of such meeting, by publication in a newspaper at Lafayette, La.

ARTICLE XI. - When this corporation is dissolved either by limitation or otherwise, its affairs shall be liquidated by three commissioners to be appointed by the stockholders for that purpose; a meeting of the stockholders to be called in the same manner as provided for in Article VII of this charter. The said commissioners shall remain in office until the affairs of the corporation are liquidated, and in case of death or resignation the remaining ones or the one shall elect the other. No stockholder shall have power to transfer stock of this corporation to third persons without first tendering it to the stockholders through the Board of Directors at prevailing market price.


ARTICLE XII - No transfer of stock shall bind this corporation unless said transfer is entered on the books of this corporation; and the original subscription fort the purpose of organizing this corporation is hereto annexed and herewith identified.

Thus done and passed at the Parish of Lafayette, La., on this twenty-third of December, Anno Domini, nineteen hundred and five, in presence of Messrs. Chas. H. Mouton and Daniel Debaillon, competent witnesses who sign with appearers and me, notary, after due reading.
Witnesses:C. H. MOUTON.
DAN DEBAILON.
(Signed)
F. DEMANADE.
F. R. TOLSON.
J. L. DUHART.
A. J. MOSS.
G. A. MARTIN, J. R. JEANMARD.
JOHN TOLSON.
J. C. NICKERSON.
L. D. NICKERSON, per J. C. N.
L. O. CLARK.
W. A. LEROSEN.
ASHBY WOODSON.
J. FRANKLIN MOUTON.
Notary Public.

STOCK SUBSCRIPTION LIST. - Recognizing the great value of such an institution to the medical profession and the public, we, the undersigned, hereby subscribe for the number of shares of stock we have written opposite our names, in a limited stock company to be organized for the establishment of a modern sanitarium in the town of Lafayette, La.

The capital of this company is to be fixed at twenty-five thousand dollars divided into two hundred and fifty shares of the par value of one hundred dollars, and payable in four equal installments of 25 per cent - subject to the call of the Board of Directors at intervals of thirty days, or longer, at the discretion of the Board.
The sanitarium is to be opened to all reputable physicians and surgeons upon equal terms, for the treatment of their patients in accordance with recognized professional ethics,

Names & Number of Shares:
Dr. J. Franklin 25
Dr. . O. Mouton 25
John Tolson 15
G. A. Martin 2
J. L. Duhart 3
Z. J. Francez 2
A. R. Trahan 2
N. P. Moss 25
Dr. L. A. Prejean,
per L. O. Clark 5
Nickerson Brothers 2
S. Begnaud 1
A. E. Mouton 5
Ashby Wodson 2
J. R. Jeanmard 2
F. Demanade 2
A. B. Denbo 1
Lafayette Advertiser,
(LeRosen & Alpha) 2
W. J. Avery 1
Dr. A. O. Clark 5
"Ne Varietur"
For identification with an act passed before me this 23rd day of Dec. A. D. 1905.

(Signed) ORTHER C. MOUTON,
Notary Public.
Filed and recorded Dec. 26, 1905,
in book Miscellaneous Act E3, page
..........
(Signed) F. K. HOPKINS,
Deputy Clerk of Courts.

STATE OF LOUISIANA,
Parish of Lafayette.

I hereby certify the above and foregoing to be a true and correct copy of the original on file and of record in my office.

Witness my hand and seal at Lafayette, La., Dec. 26, 1905.
(Signed) F. K. Hopkins,
Deputy Clerk of Court.

Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.







THE NEW YEAR. - Before another issue of this paper the old year with its record of good or ill, will be a thing of the past and our faces will be turned to the future which another year will unroll. What that future may have in store for us, none of us may know; but knowing or not, we may all begin the new year with larger and better purposes than ruled our lives in the past. And though accomplishment may not crown our efforts, neither will failure be our portion; for having striven nobler than in the past, is in it self success, success that we sincerely hope may be written into the lives of each of our readers, to whom we wish a Happy New Year.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.




Christmas Day - Christmas was very quietly observed in Lafayette, very few fireworks being in evidence. Torpedoes had been considerable vogue among the small boys some days before Christmas and Christmas, but the obnoxious canon cracker was absent. The day was a beautiful one, bright with sunshine and just cool enough to be exhilarating.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.







CHRISTMAS EXERCISE
Held in All the Town Schools.

 Friday morning all the town's public schools held appropriate Christmas exercises, both interesting and entertaining. At the High School two of the rooms combined, Misses Faulk and Dickson's, and in addition to exercises had a presentation of gifts which afforded the children lots of pleasure and amusement. In Mr. Foote's room an interesting feature was an excellent debate by four pupils, as to whether gifts should be done away with at Christmas. The affirmative which argued against gifts argued well, but the negative argued just a little better, and it was unanimously decided that gifts are the proper thing at Christmas, of which decision old Santa Claus no doubt took notice, and accordingly paid every boy and girl in Mr. Foote's room a welcome visit. In Mr. Avery's room two girls and two boys discussed the question as to which was the more enjoyable Christmas or Easter Sunday and had a fine program all the way through.

 The programs at the High School were:



 Lafayette Advertiser 12/21/1905.





The Stage. - Thursday night the Herald Square Opera Co., played a return engagement at the Jefferson, presenting "The Mascot". As on its previous appearance here the company gave a very satisfactory performance. All members of the cast played their parts well though possibly some criticism may justly be made as to Mr. Pache's interpretation of the Character of Pippo, and to the rather strong horseplay of Ricco and the prince. Miss Watson, as the princess, was a success. She has a fine voice and her singing captured the audience. Mr. Pache also has a splendid voice. Miss Highlands as Bettina, the Mascot, was decidedly pleasing and scored a hit. Altogether the rendition of the play was good and deserved the liberal patronage it received.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.    





Wedding Bells.

Fuller - Martin

 Wednesday morning at 11 a. m. Miss Aimee Martin and Mr. J. C. Fuller were married at St. John's Catholic Church, Rev. Father Charles officiating. The wedding was a quiet one only relatives and a few intimate friends being present. Miss Martin and one of the most charming and popular young ladies of this city. Mr. Fuller was at one time a resident of this place, but moved to Sulphur, La., several years ago. The bride was becomingly dressed in Alice blue silk poplin, hand embroidered, and the maid of honor, Miss Cessa Fuller, in blue silk. The best man was Mr. J. Nusz. (Nuez?) Mr. and Mrs. Fuller received a large number of beautiful presents. They left on the afternoon train for Sulphur, La., which will be there future home. Among those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Fuller, parents of the groom, and Miss Cessa Fuller, his sister, Capt. T. L. Morse and daughter, Miss Emma, Dr. Tom Conrad, of New Iberia, Maj. J. M. Lee, and Mr. Walter House, of Sulphur.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.






WALLIS-HEARD.

 Yesterday Mr. Hugh Wallis accompanied by his best man, Mr. Alex Whittington, left for Evergreen, La., to marry Miss Virgie Heard of that place. The ceremony will take place today and the newly wedded couple will leave for Lafayette on the first train. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.




Labors Nearly Finished - The Right of Way Committee (for the Laf.-B. Rouge line) have nearly completed their labors. The deeds to the entire right of way in this parish, are ready to be turned over to the Southern Pacific. Maj. J. M. Lee is expected here to-day or to-tomorrow to receive them. construction of the road promised to begin early in January.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.








Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 12/27/1905.




 LOST - Between Catholic church and depot, ladies' gold watch with photographs in back. Finder will receive reward by returning to the office.

Fineness of material, most desirable style, beautiful trimmings, as well as lowest prices on record, characterize the offerings of our sales. - Vehicles. - Denbo & Nicholson Co., Ltd.




 The home of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Phillips was made happier Monday by the arrival of a sweet baby girl.

 Pay your poll tax and be qualified to vote. Every good citizen values his franchise.

Miss Edith Dupre spent a few days with relatives in Opelousas.

A few dolls left, to close them out, we offer them very cheap.- Lafayette Drug Company.



 Fresh oysters, vegetables of all kinds, at Bunts.


 The Falk Mercantile Co. are prepared to take charge of funerals and attend to all graveyard work. A fine rubber-tired hearse in stock.

Good things for a New Year's dinner at Bunt's. Ring him up and place your order early.

Sidney and Leo Alpha visited Franklin Sunday.



 Herbert Lusted spent Sunday in New Iberia.


 Misses Laurence Broussard and Yolande Breaux, of this city, after spending a jolly Christmas in Scott at the home of Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Mouton, accompanied by Mr. Alex Mouton.


 Tricycles at cost at Rene Delhomme's.

 Friday Miss Dickson, Mr. W. J. Avery and Mr. Ernest Jones left for New Orleans to spend the holidays. Mr. Irving P. Foote also left for Morgan City. The other teachers remained in Lafayette.

Dudley Campbell, who is employed at Calumet, came to Lafayette Saturday to spend Christmas with his folks. He will return today.




Judge Edmond Voorhies and Alexis Guidry, of Carencro, were pleasant visitors to our office Friday.


Miss Callie Alpha left Saturday to spend a week at the home of her sister in Franklin, Mrs. Chas. May.

Adonis and Alphe LeBlanc went to Jeanerette Sunday.

Chas. A. Boudreaux, of Scott, paid our office a welcome visit yesterday.




 A fine line of laces and fancy work, suitable for a gift or to decorate your own home, at the Specialty Store.



 Wm. Lopez, of New Iberia, spent Sunday and Monday at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. A. C. Campbell.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1905.










 From the Lafayette Gazette of December 27th, 1902:


BOARD AND LODGING.

 For Boys Attending the Industrial Institute a Matter of Supreme Importance to the School and the Community.

 The Gazette is informed that the boys attending the Industrial Institute meet with considerable difficulty in finding places to board. Unless this difficulty is overcome, it will prove a serious impediment to the success of the Institute. Without adequate accommodations for the students the school can not hope to increase its attendance to what it will be if the proper inducements are offered. The State has not yet been able to provide the means necessary to build a dormitory for the boys, and those coming here to attend the Institute must find lodging and board in the homes of townspeople or else they are unable to remain. Quite a number of young men will be here to enter the Institute after the holidays and it is to be hoped they will find places to board.

 The Institute must have the attendance to make the proper showing to secure an appropriation to build a dormitory for boys. In the meantime it devolves upon the citizens of the town to provide the students with homes while pursuing their studies. As this is a most important matter, which not only concerns the welfare of the school but in a large measure affects the prosperity of the town, The Gazette believes it should receive the earnest consideration of all public-spirited citizens. We will take the liberty to suggest that citizens of the town confer with the authorities of the college with a view of arriving at some practical solution of the trouble. If the proper effort is made we believe enough families in this town can be prevailed upon to share the hospitalities of their young men who are coming here to attend the Institute.

 Until the attendance is secured that will justify the State in building a dormitory the citizens of Lafayette should co-operate with the management of the Institute in the matter of providing board and lodging for the boys. Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.




At the Opera-house. - The All-Star Vaudeville Company will begin a two-nights' engagement at Falk's Opera-house, Sunday, December 28. This company, which comes well recommended by the press, consists of a number of specialty artists. Among them are the Kins Ners, equilibrists; Mlle. Anita, fire dancer, who will appear in plastique poses; Delmain and Blewitt, in a comedy sketch; Armand and Aldert, comedians; Miss Knis-Ners, dancing soubrette. A feature of the show will be the moving pictures presented through an electric machine. Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.



A Success. - Through the columns of the press of other cities in which the musical farce "A Wise Woman," has been seen, it would seem that this latest work of Wilfred Clarke's is the greatest success that its brilliant author has ever had. Miss Marie Lamour, who is being featured in the play, has risen to the occasion and made a hit quite as pronounced as the clever comedy.
Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.





An Elegant Reception.

 A most recherché social event of the season was the reception given by Mrs. Geo. Comstock on Tuesday, December the twenty-third, complimentary to her sister, Miss Horn of Keachie. The house was elaborately decorated with palms, ferns, cedar, holly and other evergreens and rare flowers, while beautiful candelabra formed an additional exquisite decoration with its soft glow of candles further enhancing the effective, artistic elegance of the scene.

 The dining room was especially lovely in crimson and white - the holly berries mingling their blushing beauty with the waxen white of our perfect southern flower, the camellia - and here the daintiest of menus was faultlessly served by Misses Torian and Caffery. Mmes. Pellerin and Biossat assisted by the latter's little daughter, Inez, ushered the guests into the reception room, where the hostess, assisted by Miss Parkerson, received each one in a cordial, gracious manner introducing Miss Horn.

 The guests were: Mmes. J. L. Kennedy, A. B. Denbo, T. N. Blake, Minor Meriwether, Crow Girard, J. J. Davidson, P. D. Beraud, I. A. Broussard, F. Demanade, D. Schwartz, C. D. Caffery, R. M. DeLaney, W. A. LeRosen, T. B. Hopkins, Jr., L. J. Alleman, D. H. Mays, Goldsberry, Hulse, Baker, Hawks, J. A. Martin; Misses Lea Gladu, Sallie Torian, Lovinia Torian, Ula Coronna, Margaret Robertson, Eliza Hopkins, Zelia Christian, Clye Mudd, Lizzie Mudd, Viola Young and Fadra Holmes.
Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.




Busy Season. - The Lafayette post-office handled more business during the past few days than at any other time in its history, and the manner in which it was done is very creditable to the young men in charge, George and Louis Debaillon. The large volume of business was transacted without a hitch and to the evident satisfaction of the patrons of the office.
Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.



Christmas Dinner. - Mr. Paul Demanade never lets Christmas pass without treating a number of his friends to dinner. Last Xmas evening, as is his custom, he prepared a feast of viands and salads whose culinary excellence would have done credit to the table of a prince or an archbishop. That the dinner was thoroughly enjoyed goes without say, as there was nothing lacking to please the inner man and to conduce to the conviviality of the guests.   Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902. 



Road Work. - Mr. F. Demanade, of the street committee, has had some good work done on several streets in town. Mr. Demanade engaged the services of Mr. Alfred Hebert who owns a grader and with this instrument it was possible to do a large amount of work at small cost. For less than $100 work was done which, under former methods, would have cost the town at least $300.   Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.



Negro Boy Killed. - Lucien Jones, a negro boy, was accidentally killed by Gilbert Portalis, of the same age and race, on the plantation of Mrs. Gerasin Bernard yesterday morning. It appears that the boys were preparing to go hunting when Portalis aimed the gun at Jones, being under the impression that it was not loaded. The back of Jones' head was completely removed, the shot being fired at very close range. Dr. Mouton held an inquest over the body. Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.




Moss to Montana. - Capt. James A. Moss left last Friday for his post of duty at Fort Harrison, Montana, after a pleasant sojourn of three weeks among relatives and friends in Lafayette. Business of an official character will detain Capt. Moss in Washington and New York for several days en route to his regimental headquarters.  Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.




PRESENTATION TO GEN. MCKIBBIN
At a Luncheon Given by Capt. Jas. A. Moss at the Raleigh, Washington, D. C.
[From the Army and Navy Journal of Dec. 13, 1902.]



 One of the most interesting social events occurring for some time in the military circles of Washington, was the luncheon given by Capt. Jas. A. Moss. adjutant, 24th Infantry, on Dec. 3, at the Raleigh, in honor of Gen. Chambers McKibbin, U. S. A., retired, late colonel of the 24th Infantry. The walls of the luncheon room were most artistically decorated with flags and emblems; palms and ferns were banked at either end of the room, and the long white table was strewn with yellow chrysanthemums and dainty ferns. The luncheon was the charming means of gathering twenty-one Army officers to assist in the presentation to General McKibbin of a beautiful silver tray bearing the inscription:

 "To Gen. Chambers McKibbin, U. S. A., from the officers of his old regiment, the 24th Infantry, to whom he was a good friend, a just colonel. Oct. 2, 1902."

 Special pains had been taken to make the presentation a complete surprise to the general, coming, as it were, like a thunderbolt from a clear sky.

 The presentation was made by General Corbin, as a personal friend of General McKibbin, and as an old officer of the 24th, General Corbin having been appointed a major in the Adjutant General's Department from captain in the 24th Infantry, in which regiment he served eleven years. In his presentation speech the general referred in glowing terms to the splendid history of his old regiment on the frontier, in Cuba and in the Philippines - especially in Cuba, where having lost heavily at the battle of San Juan, the regiment was marched to the pest-ridden yellow fever camps of Siboney, where the men volunteered as nurses, grave diggers, etc. The regiment went to Cuba with 800 able-bodied men and returned with 192 following its flying colors! "A magnificent example of courage, fortitude and bravery - one of the grandest incidents ever recorded in military history!" said the general. He then recalled most feelingly his services with Company C. 24th Infantry, whose morning report he had signed continuously for ten years, and congratulated General McKibbin on his having added one more name to the list of the nineteen general officers who had served in the 24th Infantry, including William R. Shafter, Henry W. Lawton, J. F. Kent, J. C. Gilmore, J. W. Clous, Zenas R. Bliss, Emerson H. Liscum, H. B. Freeman and the immortal MacKenzie, who organized the regiment.

 After referring in flattering terms to General McKibbin's record of a man and soldier, General Corbin said: "McKibbin, although a good soldier should never be taken by surprise, and you have been one for forty years, I am now going to surprise you." Reaching down by his side, picking up and holding in the bright electric light a beautiful silver tray, the general continued. "I have been requested by the officers of our regiment to present you with this a token of the love they bear you - God bless you, McKibbin!" General McKibbin, completely surprised and nonplussed, responded with much feeling, paying a high tribute to the officers and men of his old regiment.

 Gen. A. S. Burt, under whom General McKibbin had served as a major in the 25th Infantry, then paid an eloquent tribute to "Chambers McKibbin, my old friend and comrade," after which General Corbin introduced Captain Moss, referring to him as the youngest regimental adjutant in the Army at the time of his appointment. 'Mid cries of "Speech, speech, the captain rose and said a few months ago he had read in some newspaper that officers returning from the Philippines should not talk too much, especially at luncheons - that he had but recently returned from the Philippines and the article in question had made a deep impression on him - so, thanking General Corbin for having thus introduced him, he would sit down before we talked "too much."

 The beautiful private dining room of the Raleigh, seldom, if ever, looked more attractive; the service and the menu were excellent and nearly all present were notable, representative officers, while the surprise feature of the luncheon gave peculiar interest to the occasion. Indeed, the whole affair was a most charming and fitting climax to the retirement of an officer, who, for over forty years, had served his country well and faithfully. Besides General McKibbin, the guest of honor, General Corbin, who made the presentation, and Capt. Moss, who gave the luncheon, the following also were present: Gens. S. B. M. Young and A. S. Burt; General Fitzhugh, of Pittsburg, Pa.; Cols. L. A. Matile, W. P. Hall, H. P. McCain, W. A. Simpson and G. S. Anderson; Majors F. W. Sibbley, F. S. Hodgson, H. A. Greene, James Parker, E. A. Edwards and A. R. Paxton; Capts. W. F. Jackson, J. W. Joyes and C. C. Williams and Lieut. Stanley Howland.

 From the Army and Navy Journal, Dec. 12., and in the  Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.             





Police Jury Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., Dec. 17, 1902. - The Police Jury met this day pursuant to adjournment with the following members present: M. Billeaud, Jr., J. C. Buchanan, F. G. Mouton, John Whittington, Alex M. Broussard, Saul Broussard, Alonzo Lacy, J. A. Labbe and J. O. Blanchet.

 Mr. Mouton called attention to needed repair of the court-house roof and was authorized to attend to same.

 Constable Eck Laughlin, of the second ward, was recognized and his salary fixed at same rate as his predecessor's.

 The Jury proceeded to the consideration of the license ordinance for the year 1903.

 Mr. Buchanan moved to reduce the liquor license to the former amount $200. Lost.

 Mr. Mouton moved as a substitute that the liquor license be maintained at $1,000. and same was adopted.

 The following license ordinance for the year 1903 was adopted:

 AN ORDINANCE to levy, collect and enforce the payment of an annual license tax upon all persons, associations of persons or business, except those expressly excepted from such license tax by Article 229 of the constitution, and prescribing the mode and method in which certain persons, subject to license, shall make report of their business.

 Section. 1 - Be it enacted by the Police Jury of the parish of Lafayette, State of Louisiana, that there is hereby levied an annual license tax for the year A. D. 1903, and for each subsequent year, upon each person, association of persons, or business firms and corporations, pursuing any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, subject to license under Article 229 of the Constitution.

 Section 2. - Be it enacted, etc., that on the second day of January, A. D. 1903, and each subsequent year, the sheriff and tax collector shall begin to collect and shall collect as fast as possible from each of the persons on or business firm, associations of persons, and corporations, pursuing within this parish any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, a license tax hereinafter graduated. All licenses (except as otherwise hereinafter provided) shall be due and collectable during the 1st month of each year, and all unpaid licenses shall become delinquent unless the license is paid within thirty (30) days.

 Section 3. - Be it further enacted, etc., that the annual license for all kinds of business hereinafter named except as afterward provided, shall be graduated in classes.

 MANUFACTURE.

 That for carrying on each business of manufacturing subject to license under article 229 of the constitution, the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of said business as follows:

 Class 1. When the said receipts are $25,000 or more and less than $30,000 the license shall be $19.50.

 Class 2. When the said receipts are less than $25,000 the license shall be $15.

 BANKING.

 That for each business of carrying on bank, banking company, association, corporation or agency they shall be based on the declared or nominal capital and surplus as follows:

 Class. 1. When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $100,000 or more and less than $200,000 the license shall be $150.

 Class 2. When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $50,000 or more and less than $100,000 the license shall be $75.

 Class 3. When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $50,000 or less, the license shall be $50.

 The declared or nominal capital or surplus, as provided in this section, shall be ascertained and based upon the annual statement made in pursuance of existing laws.


MERCANTILE BUSINESS.

 Section 4. Be it further ordained, that for every wholesale mercantile business, whether as principal, agent or commission, by auction, representing foreign merchants or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross annual amounts of sale as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross sales are $250,000 and nor more than $500,000 the license shall be $100.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are $250,000 or less, the license shall be $50.

 Provided, that no person or persons shall be deemed wholesale dealers unless he or they sell by the original or unbroken packages or barrel only; and provided further, that no person or persons shall be deemed wholesale dealers unless he or they sell to dealers for resale. If they sell in less quantities than original and unbroken packages, or barrels, they shall be considered retail dealers, and pay license as such. That for every business or selling at retail whether as principal, agent or commission, or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross annual amount of sales, as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross sales are $40,000 or more and under $50,000, the license shall be $40.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are $30,000 or more and less than $40,000, the license shall be $30.

 Class 3. When the gross sales are $25,000 or more and less than $30,000, the license shall be $25.

 Class 4. When the gross sales are $20,000 or more and less than $25,000 the license shall be $20.

 Class 5. When the gross sales are $15,000 or more and less than $20,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 6. When the gross sales are less than $15,000 and more than $10,000, the license shall be $10.

 Class 7. When the gross sales are $5,000 or less, the license shall be $5.

 Provided, that if any distilled vinous, malt or other kind of mixed liquors be sold in connection with the business or retail merchant grocer, oyster house, confectionery, or in less quantities than five gallons, the license for such additional business shall be as hereinafter provided for, provided further that no license shall issue to sell liquors in less quantities than five gallons, for less than $1,000.

 Provided, that retail drugstores, owned or controlled and managed by a regularly licensed graduate of pharmacy, and selling vinous, spirituous or alcoholic liquors in less quantities than one quart, as drug or medicine only, shall pay the license mentioned in this section and shall not be required to procure the license required for saloons etc., under this act, as retail liquor dealers.

 Provided further, that if drugstores, soda fountains, or other aeriated water dealers offer for sale in connection, with such waters any vinous, spirituous or alcoholic liquors, such drug store fountains or dealers shall be required to take out license as retail liquor dealers, as saloons, barrooms, etc., as provided in section 10 of this act.

 Provided further, that farmers or planters having stores situated on their farms or plantations, and selling or advancing supplies to their employes exclusively, shall not be classed as merchants, nor shall they be required to take out a license under this act.

 Section 5.  Be it further enacted, that for carrying on each business of gas light, electric light, waterworks, shoot-the-chutes, miniature railroad, sawmills employing ten or more hands, telephoning (including local and district telegraph,) express company, cotton compress or ginnery, cotton pickery, slaughter house, distillery and rectifying alcoholic, or malt liquors, brewing ale, beer, porter or other malt liquor, manufacturing tobacco, cigars or cigarette, refining sugar or molasses or either of them, manufacturing cotton seed oil, oil cake or cotton seed meal, that license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of each person, association of persons, business firm or corporation engaged in said business as follows:

 Provided that this section shall not apply to planters and farmers grinding and refining their own sugar or molasses or ginning their own cotton or that of their tenants or manufacturing their own cotton seed into meal, cake or oil, or work by machinery for plantation or farm purposes, provided that no license shall be imposed or collected on cotton gins ginning for lint, not over four hundred bales of cotton per annum and provided further, that this act shall not apply to those planters who granulate syrup for other planters during the rolling season.

 Provided that any agency for any or other establishment, selling by wholesale, ale, beer or other alcoholic or malt liquors in unbroken packages as usually contained in kegs, barrels, etc., shall pay a license based as follows:

 When said gross sales are $5,000 or more the license shall be $500. When the said gross annual receipts are less than $5,000 the license shall be $300.

 Class 1. When the said gross annual receipts are $20,000 or more, the license shall be $50.

 Class 2. When the said gross receipts are $15,000 and not over $20,o0o, the license shall be $37.50.

 Class 3. When the said gross receipts are less than $15,000 and over $10,000 the license shall be $20.

 Class 4. When the gross annual receipts are less than $10,000, the license shall be $10.

 AMUSEMENTS.

 Section 6. Be it enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping a theatre, opera-house, ampitheatre, academy of music, museum, menagerie, circus or other traveling show, the license shall be based upon the number of the attaches, whether proprietors, performers, or other employees, as follows:

 Class 1. When the number of said persons is one hundred or more the license shall be $100.

 Class 2. When the number of said persons is seventy-five or more and less than one hundred the license shall be $90.

 Class 3. When the number of said persons is fifty or more and less than seventy-five the license shall be $80.

 Class 4. When the number of said persons is thirty or more and less than fifty the license shall be $70.

 Class 5. When the number of said persons is twenty or more and less than thirty the license shall be $60.

 Class 6. When the number of said persons is ten or more and than twenty the license shall be $50.

 Class 7. When the number of persons is five or more and less than ten, the license shall be $40.

 Class 8. When the number of said persons is four the license shall be $30.

 Class 9. When the number of said persons is three the license shall be $20.

 Class 10. When the number of said persons is tw0 the license shall be $10.

 Class 11. When the number of said persons is one the license shall be $5.

 Provided that the license for every hall or place where public entertainments are given not provided for in this section shall be based upon the seating capacity as follows:

 When the number of seats or spaces number 500 the license shall be $20.

 Provided further that no license shall be required for balls given by private persons or for charitable purposes.

 RAILROAD AGENTS, ETC.

 Section 7. Be it further enacted that each person carrying on the business of calling of selling or dealing in railroad or steamship tickets whether said tickets are sold on the streets in the office of the company he represent, or that of any other company, shall pay an annual license graded upon the number of companies he represents to-wit: One company, $25; two companies, $40; three companies, $50.


PEDDLERS AND HAWKERS.

 Section 8. Be it further enacted, etc., that each and every peddler or hawker shall pay an annual license graded as follows:

 When traveling on foot $5; when traveling on horseback, $10; when traveling in one-horse vehicle, $15; when traveling with two horse vehicle, $25; when traveling on any kind of water craft, $50.

 Provided that, no person shall be allowed to sell goods as clerk or clerks, of any peddler or hawker, but that he or they must pay a license in his or their own name, but that this proviso shall not apply to water craft.

 It is further provided that all parochial and executive officers are hereby empowered and directed to cause all peddlers or hawkers to exhibit their parish license, and that the said peddlers or hawkers failing to produce or exhibit the same, the said officers are directed and empowered by this act to seize said stock of merchandise and turn the same over to any court of competent jurisdiction with due information as in the violation of this act. Provided further that the said executive officers shall be entitled to receive as fees, the sum of $5 in each and every case from any peddler or hawker, clerk or clerks employed by said peddlers or hawkers when peddling without a license in violation of this act. The said amount of $5 to be recovered before any court of competent jurisdiction out of the goods so seized.

 HOTELS, ETC.

 Section 9. Be it further enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping a hotel where lodging and eating are combined the license shall be based upon the number of furnished lodging rooms for guests, as follows:

 Class 1. When the said rooms are forty-five or more and less than seventy-five the license shall be $50.

 Class 2. When the said rooms are thirty or more and less than forty-five the license shall be $40.

 Class 3. When the said rooms are fifteen or more and less than thirty the license shall be $30.

 Class 4. When the said rooms are twelve or more and less than fifteen the license shall be $20.

 Class 5. When the said rooms are nine or more and less than twelve the license shall be $10.

 Class 6. When the number of said rooms is six or more and less than nine the license shall be $5.

 Provided that no license shall be required when the number of said rooms is less than six and that for every business of lodging alone the license shall be estimated on the same basis as for hotels, but graduated at one half rates; provided that boarding houses shall pay sixty per cent of the rates of hotels.


BARROOMS, ETC.

 Section 10. Be it enacted, that for every business of barroom, cabaret, coffee-house, café, beer saloon, liquor exchange, drinking saloon, grogshop, beer house, beer garden or other place, where anything to be drunk or eaten on the premises is sold directly or indirectly the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of said business as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross annual receipts are $7,500 or more the license shall be $3,000.

 Class 2. When the gross annual receipts are $5,000 or more and less than $7,500 the license shall be $2,000.

 Class 3. When the gross annual receipts are less than $5,000 the license shall be $1,000.

 Be it further ordained that no person shall engage in the business of retail liquor dealer as provided in this section without first having paid the license, hereinbefore fixed and any person violating this provision shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall be liable to a fine of not less than $100 nor than $500. In default of payment of fine and costs shall be imprisoned for a term within the discretion of the court.

 Provided, that no license shall be charged for selling refreshments for charitable or religious purposes, and provided further that no establishment, selling or giving away or otherwise disposing of any spirits, wines, alcoholic or malt liquors in less quantities than one pint, shall pay less than $1,000.

 Provided further that whenever any kind of business provided for in this section shall be combined with any other business provided for in Section 8 and 9, the same classification shall be made as provided in this section, but the price for the licenses shall be equal to the price of the license required for each business separately.

 Section 11. Be it enacted etc., that for every business of keeping billiard tables, pigeon holes, jenny linds, pool or bagatelle tables, and ten pin alleys, from which revenue is derived, a license of $5 for each such table or alley shall be required, and paid in addition to any other license due by the establishment in which said tables or alleys may be situated.

 Provided that all persons, association of persons or business firms, and corporations engaged in the sale of soda water, mends, confection, cakes, etc., exclusively, shall be rated as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross annual sales are $3,000 and more than $2,000 the license shall be $10.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are less than $2,000 the license shall be $10.

 Provided, that this provision shall not apply to places where alcoholic, vinous or malt liquors are sold, and provided that druggists selling soda water, mead etc., shall be required to take out a license under this act.

 Section 12. Be it enacted, etc., that for every individual or company carrying on the profession or business agency for steamboats, draying, trucking, keeping cabs, carriages, hacks or horses for hire, undertakers, owner, or lessees of toll bridges and ferries, master builders, stevedores, bill posting or tacking contractors and mechanics who employ assistants, the license shall be graded as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross annual receipts are $1,000 or more the license shall be $20.

 Class 2. When the gross receipts are $750 or more and less than $1,000 the license shall be $15.

 Class 3. When the gross annual receipts are less than $750 the license shall be $5.


PROFESSIONAL.

 Section 13. Be it enacted, that every individual or individuals carrying on the business or profession of physician, attorney-at-law, editor, dentist, oculist, photographer, jeweler and all business not herein provided for shall be graded the same as set forth in section 11 of this act, but graded at one-half rates, and provided that no license shall be issued hereunder for less than $5.

 Section 14. Be it further enacted, that all traveling vendors of stoves, lightning rods and clocks, shall pay a license annually of $100, whether traveling as peddlers or not. For every trading stamp company issuing stamps to merchants, and all other dealers of every kind whatsoever, where the gross annual receipts are less than $5,000 the license shall be $125 and when the gross receipts are above $5,000 the license shall be $250.

 Section 15. Be it further enacted, that for carrying on the business pursuits known as cotton factorage grain and produce commission houses, or any other factorage or commission business, brokerage in stocks, bonds, real estate, produce, sugar, cotton or other brokerage business, whether buying or selling for actual spot or future delivery where the intention of the parties is to make an honest bonafide delivery, the license shall be based on the gross annual commissions and brokerage on sales and purchases as follows:

 Class 1. When the annual gross commissions exceed $5,000 and are not more than $10,000 the license shall be $50.

 Class 2. When the annual gross commissions are $5,000 or less the license shall be $25.

 Section 16. Be it enacted that for every lumber yard, whose gross sales are $2,000 or less the license shall be $10, and when the gross sales exceed $2,000 the license shall be $20.

 Section 17. Be it enacted, that for every sewing machine agent or agency, fruit stand, soda stand, horse and mule trader, cigar and tobacco stand, the license shall be $5.


PISTOLS.

 Section 18. Be it ordained, etc., That every wholesale dealer in pistols and rifles in this parish shall pay a license tax of $10 and every wholesale dealer in pistol cartridges in this parish shall pay a license tax of $5.

 Section 19. Be it further ordained, That every retail dealer of pistols and rifles in this parish shall pay a license tax of $100 and every retail dealer in pistol cartridges in this parish shall pay a license tax of $50.

 Section 20. Be it further ordained, That whosoever shall sell at wholesale or retail pistols or rifles, or pistol and rifle cartridges without having first obtained the license herein provided for shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall be fixed not less than $50 or imprisoned nor more than thirty days or both at the discretion of the court. Provide that no cartridge of .22 caliber or less shall be considered a rifle or pistol cartridge within the purport of this law.

 Section 21. Be it enacted that when any two or more kinds of business are combined except as herein expressly provided for there shall be a separate license required for each kind of business. Where any company or association shall lease, operate, manage or control the business franchise, property of other corporations, associations or firms, they shall pay a separate license for each business.

 Section 22. Be it enacted, etc., that annual receipts, capital sales, and premium in this act, referred to as basis of license are those for the year for which the license is granted; the standard for their estimation shall be prima facie of the preceding year of the business that has been conducted previously by the same party or parties to whom they claim to be successors. If the firm or company be new, gross sales for the first two months shall be considered as the basis, and six times that amount shall be estimated as the annual receipts of such business.

 Provided that any person commencing business after the first day of July shall pay one-half of the above rates.

 Section 23. Be it enacted, etc., that the business of the previous year, as also the actual condition and results of the business of the current, for the new firms, associations or corporations for the purposes of calculating licenses shall be ascertained by the tax collector in the sworn statement of the person, or persons in interest, his of their duly authorized agent, or officer made before the tax collector or his deputy; provided that if the tax collector be not satisfied with the said sworn statement he shall traverse the same by a rule, taken in proper court. On trial of said rule the boos and written entries, and memoranda of said person or persons, firms, companies, corporations or parties, shall be brought into court, and subjected to inspection and examination of the court, the officer who took the rule, and such experts as he may employ or the court may appoint, provided that this inspection shall not be construed as entailing the defendant to introduce in evidence said books and documents any more than he would have been without such inspection; provided that also that the license shall issue in accordance with said sworn statement, notwithstanding the prospect or pendency of the rule, and the final ratification shall be made as ordered by the court.

 Section 24. Be it further enacted, that if any business shall be conducted without a license in case herein provided, the tax collector shall through the attorney appointed by the State for such purpose, on motion in the proper courts as provided in the Constitution and which shall be without deposit or advance costs, take a rule on the party or parties, doing such business to show cause on the fifth day, exclusive of holidays, after the service thereof, why said party or parties should not pay the amount of license claimed and penalties or be ordered to cease from further pursuit of said business, until after having obtained a license; and in case, said rule is made absolute order therein shall be considered a judgment in favor of the parish for the amount decreed to be due by defendant for license, and penalty and costs, heretofore and hereinafter provided for, and shall be executed in the same manner as other judgments. Provided that in addition to the commission allowed the attorney, a penalty of 25 per cent on the amount sued on is hereby fixed and provided, which penalty shall be turned into the general fund of the parish.

 It is hereby expressly provided that each person, association of persons, business firms or corporation, required to take out a license under this ordinance shall be required to post the same in a conspicuous place in his or their place of business under a penalty of not less than $10 nor more than $100 recoverable by the collector before any court of competent jurisdiction and it shall be the duty of the tax collector to visit in person or by deputies the several places of business herein mentioned and ascertain that the provisions of this section are strictly carried out.

 Section 25. Be  it further enacted that the only legal evidence that a license has been paid shall be the appropriate form of license adopted by the Jury and no receipts issued by the tax collector in place of the license itself shall be valid and this clause shall be construed to prevent the tax collector from issuing a receipt in lieu of the appropriate form to any person, association of persons or business corporation; provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed as to exclude oral evidence of lost or destroyed licenses.

 Section 26. Be it further enacted that the tax collector shall prepare and keep a book in which he shall record of file the statements made under oath of all persons, association of persons, business firms or corporations who may apply for license to  pursue any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business under this act.

 Section 27. Be it further enacted that the tax collector is hereby empoweree and required to administer oath to any person, president or proper officer or agent of any association of persons, business firms or corporations applying for license under this act, and any tax collector or ex-officio tax collector who shall sign any jurat or certify to the correctness of any oath without administering the oath in person to the applicant shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction be dealt with in accordance with existing laws, relative to dismissal from office of such officer or officers, and in addition to which they shall be subject to a fine of not less than $100 or more than $1,000. That when the oath is taken before the collector no charge shall be made for the same. Any false swearing as to the gross receipts of any person or persons or corporations through their president or proper officer or agent applying for license shall constitute the crime of perjury, to be punished as directed by existing criminal laws of the State.

 Section 28. Be it enacted that the tax collector is hereby required to keep a license register in which he shall enter the names of every person, association of persons, business firms or corporations with the trade profession, vocation, calling or business pursued, the class and graduation of the same, the amount of the license thereon, and the date of the collection or payment thereof. The collector shall before the end of the year submit to the Jury a full and complete transcript of said register.

 Section 29. Be it enacted that the tax collector or ex-officio tax collector violating any of the provisions of this act or who shall willfully rate any persons, association of persons, business firms and corporation at a less graduation than the law contemplates or who shall issue to any said persons, association of persons, business firms or corporation a license for a less sum than that corresponding to their graduation shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor in office, and shall on conviction, before a competent authority be summarily dismissed therefrom.

 Section 30. Be it enacted that on the 1st day of February of each year the tax collector, or ex-officio tax collector shall deliver to the attorney appointed by the State for the purpose a complete list of all delinquent license-payers together with their location and kind of business, and the attorney shall immediately proceed to collect same in accordance with this act, and if not collected within thirty days from the date of delivery of the lists of the collector of taxes, or ex-officio collector of taxes it shall be the duty of said attorney to render a written report giving the reasons for non-collection to the collector whose duty it shall be to report same to the Jury.

 Section 31. Be it enacted, that in addition to the penalties provided in this ordinance, all unpaid license shall bear interest at the rate of two per cent per month from the first day of February and the payment thereon shall be secured by first mortgage in favor of the parish on the property, movable or immovable, of the delinquent owing the license and the tax collector shall collect and said interest as provided by existing law and provisions of this ordinance.

 Section 32. Be it enacted that a person, firm or company, having more than one place of business shall pay a separate license for  place of business.

 Section 33. Be it enacted that all laws or parts of laws in conflict with this act are hereby repealed.

 Section 34. Be it enacted that the licenses issued in pursuance of this ordinance shall be for the calendar year beginning Jan. 1, 1903, and ending Dec. 31, 1903.

 Section 35. Be it enacted that this ordinance take effect from and after its adoption by the Jury.

 The following account was approved:

 L. Arcenneaux, road work ... $100.00

 By motion the Jury adjourned to meet Saturday, Jan. 3, 1903, the regular meeting day being a legal holiday.
                   M. BILLEAUD, JR., President.
     R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.






   

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of December 27, 1902:


 Southern Pacific vs. Railroad Commission.

 The Louisiana Supreme Court, in the case of the Southern Pacific against the Railroad Commission, yesterday decided that the Railroad Commission has the power and authority to compel a railroad company to establish a station or depot at any point where the Commission deems the interest of the public requires it. The decision is an important one, and definitely settles the power of the commission to establish stations. On and after January 4th, 1903, all Southern Pacific passenger trains will enter and leave Union Depot, Howard Ave. and Southern Rampart streets, New Orleans, jointly with the Illinois Central Railroad. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902.




Southern Pacific Surveying Party.
[From the Baton Rouge Truth.]

 We learned from a member of the party that the Southern Pacific surveying party which has been blazing out a right of way for that company, have pitched their camp at Port Allen and have nearly completed the survey of the line from Lafayette to Baton Rouge.

 The gentlemen informs us that while the distance will be but a little over fifty miles it will be necessary to construct eight draw bridges between here and Lafayette.

 Two points - one above the box factory and one near the Valley depot - have been surveyed from which a suitable selection will be made for the building of an incline for a transfer boat at this city.

 Our informant states that the contract for piling, etc., had been let already, and that negotiations are being made with contractors for grading, track laying, etc., and that it will be but a very short while before work on the road proper will begin.

 With this road to Lafayette, connection the Southern Pacific with the Mississippi Valley and the Red River Valley road, Baton Rouge will certainly enjoy a boom and it will have the effect of bringing the Texas and Pacific people to their senses and make them realize that Baton Rouge is on the map. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902.



S. P. in New Orleans. - On and after January 4th, 1903, all Southern Pacific passenger trains will enter and leave Union Depot, Howard Ave and Southern Rampart streets, New Orleans, jointly with Illinois Central Ry. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902.



Grand Ball. -  A grand ball will be given at Falk's Opera House on Wednesday, December 31, for the benefit of the Jewish Ladies Auxiliary Society of Lafayette. A prize will be given to the best lady and gentleman dancer. Admission, 50 cts.     Laf. Adv. 12/27/1902.




RECEPTION. - On Tuesday afternoon Mrs. George C. Comstock was a most charming hostess at a reception given complimentary to her sister, Miss Emmie Horn, of Keachie.

The rooms were prettily decorated with garlands of holly and cedar tied with bows or crimson ribbon. Graceful ferns and palms formed a bower wherein Mrs. Comstock, Miss Horn, and Miss Parkerson stood to receive the guests. Other ladies of the receiving party were Mmes. B. J. Pellerin and T. M. Biossat, assisted by little Inez Biossat who ushered the guests in. The tempting dainties in the dining room were presided over by Misses Jennie Torian and Bessie Caffery. Those who called were; Mmes Felix Demanade, P. Beraud, C. Girard, J. J. Davidson, D. Schwartz, L. J. Alleman, C. D. Caffery, T. B. Hopkins, Jr., R. M. Delaney, A. B. Denbo, T. N. Blake, Minor Merriweather, W. A. LeRosen, D. H. Mays, Goldsberry, Hanks, Hulse, Baker, J. L. Kennedy, J. A. Martin, I. A. Broussard, Misses Lea Gladu, Sallie Torian, Ula Coronna, Anna Hopkins, Zelia Christian, Clye Mudd, Lizzie Mudd, Margaret Robertson, Viola young and Fadra Holmes.

Mrs. Lizzie Parkerson, after a very pleasant trip to her brother, Mr. W. S. Parkerson, in New Orleans, has returned home.

The twenty dollar bill lost by Dr. Mouton as advertised in the last issue of this paper was found and returned to its owner by Mr. F. F. Carter, the photographer. Who says advertising does not pay.

An immense crowd was present at the Catholic church Wednesday night at the celebration of midnight mass. Gounod's beautiful mass was rendered by the choir which consisted of 35 voices, under the leadership of Prof. F. Sontag. The services were deeply impressive.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902.






Woman's Literary Club.

 One of the most entertaining meetings of the Woman's Literary Club was that one held at the residence of Mrs. J. L. Kennedy. In spite of the inclemency of the weather there were quite a number with Misses Horn and Robertson and Mrs. Boykin as delightful guests were present. After the business of the club the following program was rendered.

 "Under the Stars and Stripes."

 From Colony to State ... Mrs. Davis
 Burr or Wilkinson, traitor ... Mrs. Dickson
 A Poem ... Mrs. Denbo
 Jefferson's Purchase ... Miss (Edith) Dupre.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902.


 Biggest Day Yet.

 Mouton & Salles state that they did a much larger business on Christmas eve than ever before during their twelve years career, having served that day more than seven hundred customers as shown by the cash register which is by-the-way the largest and finest machine of its kind made; this certainly speaks volumes for this popular firm and its capable manager the junior member Mr. L. F. Salles. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902.



Benefit at Falk's. -  On Saturday the Ladies of the Episcopal church served dinner & lunches at Falk's Opera House, and sold a great many useful and pretty things, for the benefit of the Episcopal church. In the evening a concert was given, at which Capt. J. A. Moss made an interesting talk on his experiences in the Philippines. During intermission, guessing contests, grab bags, etc. furnished amusement to the crowd. Something over $130 was realized. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902.



New Year's Eve Ball. - On New Year's, Wednesday Dec. 31, the ladies of the Jewish congregation will give a ball at Falk's Opera House for the purpose of raising money to improve their synagogue. It is very seldom that our Jewish citizens ask for assistance in anything, although they are always ready and willing to contribute of their means to any worthy cause affecting the town and for that reason every denomination in Lafayette should cheerfully aid these ladies in their laudable purpose.  
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902. 

   

 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 12/27/1902.

 Mrs. Ambrose Mouton and family thanks the A. O. U. W., the Brotherhood or R. R. Trainmen, the Lafayette Fire Department, the Sontag Military Band and all the friends of the family, for kindness and courtesies shown them in the loss of their son and brother, Mr. Ambroise Mouton. (Morgan City papers please copy.)

 The Christmas tree at the Convent Monday evening furnished joy and happiness to a large number of children.

 A large crowd of parents and friends were present and seemed to get as much pleasure out of the affair as the little ones.

 Last Saturday night in an altercation at True Friends' Hall, Archie Lewis, colored, was shot and dangerously wounded by another colored boy named Paul Comeaux who is about 18 years old. Comeaux was promptly arrested and placed in jail.

 Mr. J. R. Domengeaux the Insurance Agent favored the Advertiser with a useful and artistic calendar from the "Mutual Life Insurance Co, of New York. 

 The Lafayette Clothing House handles the largest and most complete line of clothing in town.

 Mrs. J. H. Jones of Greenville is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Orren B. Hopkins.

Dr. E. L. Stephens and wife are spending holidays in New Orleans.


 Mr. Gus. Lacoste bought the home of Mrs. Theodule Hebert through the J. C. Nickerson real estate agency.
To-night at Falk's Opera House, the Georgia Minstrels. L
Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1902.









 From the Lafayette Advertiser of December 27, 1879:




THE NEW RAILROAD.

 A passenger train on the Teche extension has been running regularly from New Iberia to Berwick and return daily, for nearly two weeks, under charge of Conductor Sim Landry, leaving New Iberia at 8:00 a. m., and arriving at Berwick at 11:45 a. m. ; leaving Berwick at 1:15 p. m., and arriving at New Iberia at 6:00 p. m.

No freight train has yet been put on, but some sugar and molasses have been brought to Morgan City on flat cars attached to the passenger train. The mails are still carried by Capt. Pharr's line of Teche boats, and not over this road - as has been said. Passenger rates are the same as on the old road - five cents a mile. For a new road, its condition is good, the running smooth and not slow.

We append a list of the stations, with distances from Berwick in miles :

To Patterson, ; Bayou Sale, 14 2/3 ; Franklin, 20 ; Sorrell, 29 1/2 ; Jeanerette, 33 1/4 ; New Iberia 44 1/2 ; Vermilionville, 62 1/2.

In counting distances from Algiers, add 80 1/2 miles. -
From the
Morgan City Review and in the Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1879.






Steamboat Schedule.

CENTREPORT - head of low water navigation - Bayou Vermilion.


ARRIVALS:
Steamer Exchange, from New Orleans, Dec. 23,
Steamer Mattie from Morgan City, Dec. 23.

DEPARTURES:
Steamer Mattie for Morgan City Dec. 24,
Steamer Exchange for New Orleans, Dec. 24.
The water in the bayou is falling slowly, and yet in good navigable condition.

Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1879.
 


M. P. Young & Co. have for sale the largest and most complete stock of general goods ever brought to Vermilionville, such as Drugs, Groceries, Paints, Oils, Glassware, Crockery, Lamps, "General House Furnishing Goods," Books and Stationary, Hardware, Perfumery, Soaps, Garden Seeds, Tobacco, Cigars and Snuff, Cutlery, Silverware, &c., &c. Powder and Shot. A full supply of Christmas Tricks and Presents from 5 cents to 25 cents each. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1879.
 
 
 



 J. D.  Palmer is a Photographist in Vermilionville, - which means to say, that he takes pictures on very short notice and for a very small amount of money. He does first class work - as shown by specimens which he exhibits. A friend of ours says, that he makes a good looking picture of an ugly man, and thinks of going to see if it so. His gallery is situated on Lafayette street near the Court House, and he is ready at all times to wait on those who may favor him with work. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1879.




 M. P. Young & Co. have for sale the largest and most complete stock of general goods ever brought to Vermilionville, such as Drugs, Groceries, Paints, Oils, Glassware, Crockery, Lamps, "General House Furnishing Goods," Books and Stationary, Hardware, Perfumery, Soaps, Garden Seeds, Tobacco, Cigars and Snuff, Cutlery, Silverware, &c., &c. Powder and Shot.
A full supply of Christmas Tricks and Presents from 5 cents to 25 cents each
. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1879.









 From the Lafayette Advertiser of December 27, 1873:

KILLED !!!

 A most sad occurrence took place in this town on Christmas eve, at about 8 o'clock, which resulted in the instant death of Mr. John P. Duffy, a painter, at the hands of a young man named Adrin Breaux, of this parish. The particulars, as we learn them, are as follows: A number of persons were in Mr. Hebert's coffee house, amusing themselves, when a difficulty arose between Breaux and Duffy, which was soon quieted by those present ; nothing more was then thought of the little difficulty until the report of a pistol was heard on the sidewalk and Duffy falling a corpse near the door ; the fatal shot taking effect under the left eye and penetrating the brain. Breaux made his escape and has not been arrested up to the time of going to press ; the officers of the law are in pursuit of him. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1873.




GRAND BALL AT HEBERT'S HALL. - Our energetic and entertaining fellow townsman, T. Hebert, Jr., having just completed his large and elegant Hall, on Main street, will give a grand opening ball of the season therein, on Thursday the 8th day of January next. We anticipate that it will be a grand affair and hope to see the elite of our town and parish assembled there on that occasion. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1873.



From the Lafayette Advertiser of December 27th, 1912:

PARCEL POST INSTRUCTIONS.

 The matter of most importance to the public in connection with the postal affairs at this time is that of becoming familiar with the rules governing parcels post.

 Postmasters say that there are numerous phases of the regulations that are in a degree confusing, if they are are not studied in advance by those who may have occasion to use this new method of sending merchandise through the United States mail, which becomes effective January 1, 1913.

 In brief, the important points in the rules governing parcels post are as follows:

 The United States will be divided into eight zones of distances; within the first, 50 miles, 200 miles, 600 miles, 1,000 miles, 1,400 miles, 1,800 miles, and all over 1,800 miles. In addition to this there will be a local rate and distance.

 After January 1, 1913, all matter now known as fourth class matter and such other matter as may be also designated by the post office department will be known as parcels post matter.

 A distinctive parcels post stamp must be used on all this matter, and ordinary postage stamps will not be accepted for postage on parcels post matter, but such matter bearing ordinary postage stamps will not be treated as held-for-postage matter, and held in the post office subject to parcels post stamps.

 All parcels post parcels must be brought to the post office or such stations as the postmaster may designate, to be weighed and the proper stamps affixed, and will not be forwarded unless so deposited. They can not be mailed in street letter boxes or package boxes. No parcel will be accepted endless it bears the name and address of the sender.

 If a patron of the office desires to send a piece of merchandise after January 1, 1913, it will be necessary for him to properly wrap the same, place thereon his name and address, bring the parcel to the main office or such stations as the postmaster may designate, have the same weighed and the proper parcel post stamp affixed. The map to be furnished by the post office department will designate the distance or zone, and postage will be charged in accordance with the parcel. For instance, a parcel weighing five pounds for Galveston, Texas, will be in the first zone from Houston of 50 miles, and postage will be paid thereon at the rate of prescribed of 5 cents for the first pound and 3 cents for each additional pound.

 The zones and rates being as follows: For city and rural delivery, 5 cents for the first pound and 1 cent for each additional pound, limit of weight 11 pounds, maximum charge 35 cents.

 Second Zone - Within 150 miles, 6 cents for the first pound and 4 cents for each additional pound, limit of weight 11 pounds, maximum charge 46 cents.

 Third Zone - Within 300 miles 7 cents for the first pound and 5 cents for each additional pound, limit of 11 pounds, maximum charge of 57 cents.

 Fourth Zone - Within 600 miles, 8 cents for the first pound and 6 cents for each additional pound, limit of weight 11 pounds, maximum charge 68 cents.

 Fifth Zone - Within 1,000 miles 9 cents for the first pound and 7 cents for each additional pound, limit of weight 11 pounds, maximum charge 79 cents.

 Sixth Zone - Within 1,800 miles, 11 cents for the first pound and 10 cents for each additional pound, limit of weight 11 pounds, maximum charge $1.11.

 Eighth Zone - Over 1,800 miles, 12 cents for the first pound and 12 cents for each additional pound, limit of weight 11 pounds, maximum charge $1.32.

 The postmaster general has made arrangements for the engraving and manufacturing of a series of twelve stamps for the exclusive use of the forwarding of packages by parcels post.

 Under the law recently enacted by congress ordinary stamps cannot be used for that purpose.

 The special parcels post stamps will be larger than the ordinary stamps and will be so distinctive in color and design as to avert any possible confusion with the stamps now in use.

 The new issues will be in three series of design. The first will illustrate modern methods of transporting mail, one stamp showing the mail car on a railway train, another an ocean mail steamship, a third in automobile now in use in the postal service, and the fourth the dispatch of mail by aeroplane.

 The second series will show at work in their several environments the four great classes of postal employees, post office clerks, railway mail clerks, city letter carriers and rural delivery carriers.

 The third series will represent four industrial scenes, showing the principal sources of products that probably will be transported extensively by parcels post. Lafayette Advertiser 12/27/1912.



Lagniappe:

JOHNSON'S APPOINTMENT.

 A charcoal blossom, known to florists as the Johnson flower, now mars the harmony of colors in the garden of the Louisiana Lily Whites. The new bud is profoundly black and has the characteristic fragrance of its kind. The Camellia, which is the emblematic flower of the Lily Whites, is scentless, and it is said that Mark Hanna, with an eye to the eternal fitness of things, has decreed that Southern Republicanism without its traditional hue and fragrance is not to be tolerated by true and tried apostles of the g. o. p. Hence the importation of the Senegambian sprig from the fertile soil of East Carroll to give color and scent to the federal hot-house at New Orleans. While this recent acquisition may jar the esthetician and spoil the color scheme of Mr. Howell it will no doubt greatly strengthen the Lily Whites in the esteem and confidence of the authorities at Washington.

 Johnson is to be deputy internal revenue collector in the office of Mr. Howell, who has been very insistent in his opposition to the negro. He was one of those who would deny any kind of recognition to the colored brother. He was no doubt sincere at first. We believe all the leading Lily Whites started out with the intention of excluding the negroes from participation in the Republican politics of this State. But that was clearly an impossibility. No Republican organization in the South or anywhere else can long exist with "white supremacy" as its shibboleth. That principle is essentially anti-Republican. The time had come to when the Sugar Planters would have to quit the Republican party or embrace the negro in full political fellowship. The negro is a more potent factor than the Lily White in the affairs of the National Republican party, and in the game of practical politics the lesser factor must give way to the greater when there is a conflict of interests.

 The appointment of Johnson by Mr. Howell to be his deputy in the internal revenue office shows that Lily Whites have decided to no longer permit their opposition to the negro to stand between them and the Federal patronage in this State.

Lafayette Gazette 12/27/1902.


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