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Tuesday, January 13, 2015

**NOVEMBER 9TH - M C

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 9th, 1909:


SOUTHERN PACIFIC BUYS RIGHT-OF-WAY   



...To Connect Baton Rouge and Alexandria Branches - Indicates New Depot at Present Site...

 The Morgan Louisiana and Texas Railroad and Steamship Company have purchased through J. C. Nickerson, the real estate man, a right-of-way from Mr. J. A. Roy through the brick yard property for $3,250, a right of way from Dr. T. B. Hopkins for $1,000, and a right of way from Mrs. J. C. Buchanan for $1,175. The right-of-way extends from Baton Rouge and connects with the Alexandria branch just back of the Waters-Pierce oil house and is evidently for a passenger train switch, which indicates with practical certainty that the new depot will be located at the present site. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1909.



Eunice, Lafayette and Abbeville Road a Certainty.
[From the Eunice Gall.]

 We have been informed by Mr. Jas. J. Lewis, president of the above named road, that he has received information from a Chicago trust company that the road had been financed and that the only thing remaining to be carried out was the voting of the tax for that purpose at Abbeville, all the other places having voted their pro rata of said tax. We feel almost certain that the people of Abbeville and vicinity who appreciate the benefits to be derived by having this road pass through their territory and giving them an outlet to the great Northern markets, in competition with the road they now have, will vote the tax by an overwhelming majority. This accomplished, President Lewis will then go to Chicago, sign up the papers and work will commence thereon at once. From the Eunice Gall and in the Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1909.

  



TWO NEGROES KILLED.

Crazy Young Mullatto Woman Without Warning Shoots Negro Man and Woman Sunday Night.

Sunday night (Baulste?-difficult to read first name) Stupid (that was his real name) and Cora Belden, both colored, were shot and killed about 9 o'clock in front of Mr. Charles Mouton's residence at the corner of Vermilion street and Lee avenue by a crazy young negro woman by the name of Nellie Stiver. Policeman Geo. Domengeaux, hearing the shots, came up quickly and arrested the woman and locked her up.

The young woman who committed the deed is a bright mulatto about 18 or 19 years of age. According to her sister, Mary, who was with her at the time of the tragedy, she had been suffering greatly from nervousness, declaring that men were trying to look in the window at her. Finally she grabbed up the pistol, a .44 Smith & Wesson six-shooter, and forced her sister to go along with her, starting out to go to the doctor, saying, however, she was going to shoot the first man she met. Stupid and his wife and sister-in-law were coming from church. They were eating grapes when they met the two sisters. The crazy girl without warning began firing on them. The man fell at the first shot, a bullet having entered his mouth as he opened it either to speak or to eat grapes, and plowed its way through the head, stopping in the base of the brain. The wound was fatal. Nellie shot him once more in the leg after he was down. The two women ran and the crazed girl shot at them and struck Cora Belden in the back, the ball passing through her body and coming out the front of her throat. She ran after being shot around Mr. Mouton's house. Her body was not found until 1 o'clock in the morning when a (unreadable words) not having reached home. The sister says that she tried to prevent the tragedy but she had her baby in her arms and her sister threatened to kill her and did strike her with the pistol.

Dr. Clark, deputy coroner, held inquests over both bodies and the verdict was in accordance with the above facts. The crazy girl has been quite violent ever since her incarceration.

Sheriff Lacoste is trying to get an order of court to place for her where she can get proper treatment, as the jail is no place for her in her raving condition. Her insanity seems to have been brought on from her illness and more than likely is only of a temporary character and can be cured.

Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1909 



NEW MANAGER.

 Fernand Sladous, manager for the Cumberland Telephone Company at Ruston, has been transferred to Lafayette as manager to replace L. B. Samuels. Mr. and Mrs. Sladous arrived Sunday night.

 Traveling Auditor C. C. Todd came Monday to check out Mr. Samuels and will finish probably by Thursday.

Mr. Samuels expects to leave for Kentucky Friday. During his stay here Mr. Samuels has made a number of warm friends who regret to see him leave.

The new manager, Mr. Sladous, began his connection with the company here, was promoted to the managership at Ruston and now comes back home in charge of the office under which he started. His many friends are glad to see him home again.

Furnand Sladous Transferred to Lafayette Telephone Exchange to Replace L. B. Samuels. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1909





CITY COUNCIL
Lafayette, La., Nov. 4, 1909.

 A special meeting of the City Council was held this day with Mayor G. A. Martin presiding and the following members present: Caffery, Pederkorn, Broussard, Cunningham, Ducroce, Doucet and Montgomery.

The mayor stated that the purpose of this meeting was to consider what steps should be taken against Mr. C. Girard for persisting in placing his cement sidewalk in front of his residence below the hill or cliff instead of building it on the top thereof (where the present plank walk is) as ordered by the Council.

On motion duly recorded the following resolution was adopted:

Be it resolved by the City Council of Lafayette that the mayor is hereby authorized to stop the building of the current sidewalk by Mr. Crow Girard on Industrial avenue in front of his residence for the reason that the same in the street proper and not in the established sidewalk along said avenue, and if necessary, in the name of this Council, to stop the same; that Mr. Girard be notified of the adoption of this resolution.

There being no further business, the Council adjourned to Monday, Nov. 6, 1909.

G. A. MARTIN, MAYOR
DAN DEBAILLON, Secretary


Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1909.




 From the Lafayette Gazette of November 9th, 1901:


AT THE INSTITUTE.
Getting Ready for the Institute Next Monday Night - Attendance Continues to Increase.

 The important topic of discussion at the Industrial Institute this week is the Elliot entertainment, to be held in the auditorium next Monday night at eight o'clock. This is to be the first of a series of lectures and entertainments to be given at the Institute during the winter, which, it is hoped and expected, will be well attended by the people of the town. Mr. Elliot has great talent as an impersonator and reader, and comes to us well recommended from the other institutions and towns of the State.

 It will be the effort of the management of the Institute lecture course to afford a series of bright, entertaining and instructive lectures, and literary and musical programs, at a very small cost to the students of the Institute and the young people of Lafayette, the intention being merely to cover the cost and expense of having the lecturers and concert companies come here. For the present lecture a rate of fifty cents for grown people has been decided upon, and fifteen cents for the students of the Institute and for children fourteen years of age or younger.

 The cold snap at the beginning of the week found the steam heat plant ready for business and in good working order. The first real test of the heating system in the main building proved very satisfactory, and there remains no fear that the entire building will not be quite comfortable during the winter.

 The first meeting of the literary society last Saturday was enthusiastic and successful and gave promise of a strong, active organization. The second meeting takes place to-night in the auditorium. The president-elect, Miss Irma Voorhies, shows the greatest interest in the success of the Society and has been stimulating all her committees to active preparation for the next program.

 The attendance of the Institute is steadily increasing, several more good students having been added to the roll during the week. The classes are growing larger and are beginning to show class-spirit through organization. Each class has been holding meetings, electing officers, adopting mottoes, colors, and plans for the best interest of the class of the Institute.

 The foot ball team improves gradually, and is now becoming a very hopeful organization. The glee club is doing well, and is expecting an enthusiastic to-night just before the meeting of the Literary Society. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.



PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Opened in the Various Wards - Small Attendance Reported.

 The following schools were opened Monday Nov. 4:

-----------------p. 1-----------------

 As the attendance at nearly all the schools has been very small, Superintendent Alleman has notified that if the daily attendance by Nov. 11 is less than the required number (12), the schools must be closed until Dec. 2.

 The Ridge, Louis Bonin and Duson schools were opened on Oct. 14, but were closed on account of small attendance, They were reopened on Nov. 4.

 We are informed that during the past week the schools were poorly attended, in many cases the children having been kept at home to pick cotton. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.

  



The Lafayette "Reubs."

To the Lafayette Gazette: -- Would you please be kind enough to publish the following account in your paper of the 9th, instant:

  The young boys of our town have organized a football team known as the "The Lafayette Reubs," and are willing to meet any team in the State of equal strength. If is their firm intention to meet the team of the Industrial Institute at an early date, after a few practice games. We beseech the good people of our town to aid us in this undertaking by all the means in their power, and we will strive with all our energy to make for Lafayette an illustrious name, by snatching from all teams the laurels of victory and administering to them ignominious defeat.

 The team held its primary meeting Thursday evening at the city hall, which proved a complete success. They adopted crimson and white as their colors, and every member is supposed to wear the colors, and we should also ask that our sisters and sweethearts wear them and thereby display their love for the game. The first practice game will take place Sunday at 8:30 a. m., at Oak Avenue Park. The line-up of the team is as follows: L. Guerre, full back; J. Tolson, right half back; A. Martin, left half back; J. Tierney, quarter back; D. Mudd, centre; G. Debaillon, left guard; L. Broussard, right guard; R. Mills, left tackle; J. Lacoste, right tackle; R. Tierney, left end; C. Guidry, right end.
                   L. GUERRE, Captain.
    J. TIERNEY, Manager.     Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.






LIVING BEAST MONSTROSITY

Will be Exhibited Here on Tuesday, November 19.






 Great curiosity is being aroused over the coming to Lafayette with Sells and Gray's United Shows of the strange and indigenous jungle-beast called the Bovolopus. The first authentic information that natural history gives of this fearful beast is found in the life of Explorer Livingstone, who, in his history of "Explorations in Africa," mentions "a hideous monster, dreaded by the natives of the upper Nile more than death since it pursues its enemy and prey alike, not only on the earth, but into the very depths of lagoons or the boiling surf on the isolated shores of this sun burned Africa." The next heard of it was when Stanley mentioned "the unusual havoc a strange, and to him heretofore unknown mammoth or Leviathan, he could hardly decide which (since it was seen as frequently in the water as upon the land) was creating by its annual visits from the jungles into the more settled regions. On page 357 of volume 2, "Stanley in Africa," we find that he calls it "that monster monstrosity, the Bovolopus, as big as an elephant, as fierce as a jungle tiger, fearfully horned and of cloven hoofs," again demoralizing his bushmen by its periodical excursions.  Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901. 











 The Campbells Are Coming. - The greatest of all circus performances with a rare collection of wild beasts will be exhibited in our city on Nov. 16. Remember the day and date and take a day off and come to town. The street parade and free out-door exhibitions will be particularly interesting. A lesson to children and a curiosity to old people.
 Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.


 Big Circus and Menagerie. - Campbell Bros.' big circus and menagerie is dated for two performances in our city, afternoon and night, on Nov. 16. Our people will now have the pleasure of witnessing a clean, pure circus performance, known throughout the entire country to be the biggest railroad circus traveling. Exhibiting a larger collection of wild beasts, and carrying more high salaried performers than any other circus on the road. Besides freaks of nature, Japanese family, trained elephants, ponies, dogs and monkeys. Educated birds and beasts. Positively giving two exhibitions on day and date mentioned.
Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.


 Steam Calliope. - Campbell Bros.' new calliope heads the big street parade that takes place in Lafayette on Nov. 16. It can be heard for miles and is drawn by a string of elegantly decorated horses, amusing to everybody, and a new feature of the big show unquestionably interesting. The only opportunity to see anything of the kind this season. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.


 Plenty of Music. - Besides the steam Calliope, Campbell Bros.' Rail Road Shows have three big brass bands and a drum corps. Lovers of good music and a gay time should come to town on the day of the show. Don't forget the date, Nov. 16th.
Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.




Card of Thanks.

 The family of the late Benjamin Falk are profoundly grateful to the people of the town for the many evidences of sympathy manifested during their recent bereavement. The generous expressions of condolence, conveyed by kind words and helpful acts, have been a source of consolation to them in their hour of affliction. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.





LEASE OF SCHOOL LANDS.

 The Parish Treasurer in conjunction with the Board of School Directors, Parish of Lafayette, will offer for lease, not exceeding four years, at the front door of the court house, Lafayette, La. at 11 a. m. on November 16,1901.

 All, or any part, of the following described Public School Lands, to-with:

 ----------------------p. 4---------------------

 Also 5,8 acres of land near the Whittington school in eighth ward.

 The right to reject any and all bids is reserved.
J. E. MARTIN, Parish Treasurer.
Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.




CIRCUIT COURT.

Renders Three Decisions.

The Suit of Peck vs. the City Council.


 The circuit court convened here last Monday with Judges Mouton and Gordy on the bench. Three cases appealed from this parish were decided. In the suit of Crow Girard vs. Southern Pacific Company the judgement of the district court was affirmed, allowing damages in the sum of $150 caused by the killing of a horse. In the suit of August Faltron vs. F. Lobard, the judgement of the district court was amended, allowing plaintiff a portion of the claim.

 Judge Mouton having recused himself in the case of Alphonse Peck vs. The Council of Lafayette, Mr. Jos. A Chargois sat with Judge Gordy. The decision of the district court, Mr. R. W. Elliot,m judge ad hoc, was reversed.

 It will be remembered that this suit grew out of the contention of former Chief of Police Peck to the office of tax-collector and the subsequent action of the Council declaring the office of chief of police vacant. The decision of the circuit court is to the effect that the action of the Council declaring the office vacant was illegal, but it does not settle the question of whether or not the marshalship was disconnected from the office of collector.

 We are informed that the attorneys of the town will ask for a rehearing.

 Should the decision of the court stand as it is the matter will be was just prior to the resolution of the Council, declaring the office of marshal vacant, with the question of the collectorship unsettled. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.





City Council.
 Meeting of Nov. 4, 1901.


Among other business....


 ..."Moved by G. A. DeBlanc, seconded by F. Demanade, that waterworks and electric light committee be authorized to contract with Southern Pacific Railroad Company for supply of water.
Carried.


 "Moved and duly seconded that waterworks and electric light committee be authorized to reduce the light rates from 12 cents to 8 cents per 1000 watts and to refund difference of 4 cents per 1000 watts to consumers who had paid at the rate of 12 cents.
Adopted.


 Moved and duly seconded that the committee be also authorized to contract with Industrial Institute for light and water.
Adopted."

Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.







 POLICE JURY
Meets in Regular Session and Attends to Public Business.

 The Police Jury met last Thursday in regular session with all the members present.

 Mr. Whittington, on behalf of the committee appointed to confer with the Vermilion authorities relative to the rebuilding of the Olidon Broussard Bridge, reported that a conference had been held, but no agreement reached as to location. The old site was insisted upon by the Vermilion committee as it had been surveyed and approved by the United States engineer, but the Lafayette committee considered a point above Harvey's canal as more suitable. Finally the Lafayette committee agreed to the old site provided the Vermilion authorities pledged themselves to pay one half of the expense of erecting and maintaining the 800-foot causeway on the Lafayette side of the bayou, or in the alternative the bridge to be built near Harvey's canal and Lafayette parish to pay one half of the expense of erecting and maintaining the 600-foot causeway on Vermilion side. Messrs. J. N. Williams and A. Picard, representing the Vermilion Police Jury, refusing to accede to either proposition the committee representing Lafayette, consisting of Messrs. Overton Cade, John Whittington and J. O. Blanchet, declared negotiations off and reported for further instruction. The Police Jury unanimously approved the action of the committee and resolved to continue the committee with instruction to insist upon a fair and just settlement of the point in dispute. The Vermilion Jury has decided to abandon the ferry at the bridge on Dec. 31, unless Lafayette agrees to rebuild the old site.

 By motion of Mr. Buchanan the constables of the various wards were instructed to arrest all peddlers without license as provided in regular ordinance of the Jury.

 The account of A. M. Martin for $40 for license list was approved, Mr. Buchanan voting nay.

 The treasurer submitted reports a showing a cash balance in general fund of $862.13 and a balance in the special road fund of $641.76.

 After approval of accounts the Jury adjourned. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.




 City Council Proceedings.

    Lafayette, La., Nov. 4, 1901 - A regular meeting of the City Council was held this day, with Mayor Pro-tem J. O. Mouton in the chair. Members present: J. O. Mouton in the chair. Members present:  A. E. Mouton, F. E. Girard, H. Hohorst, G. A. DeBlanc, F. Demanade.

 Moved and duly seconded that minutes of previous meeting be approved as read. Carried.

 Moved by G. A. DeBlanc, seconded by F. Demanade, that waterworks and electric committee be authorized to contract with Southern Pacific Railroad Company, for supply of water. Carried.

 Moved and duly seconded that waterworks and electric light committee be authorized to reduce the light rates from 12 cents to 8 cents per 1,000 watts and to refund difference of 4 cents per 1,000 watts to consumers who had paid at the rate of 12 cents. Adopted.

 Moved and duly seconded that the committee be also authorized to contract with Industrial Institute for light and water. Adopted.

 The following reports were adopted:

 -----------------------p. 3-----------------

 The collector has collected and paid into the treasury in taxes, licenses, water, light, material and interest, $1,981.16 his commission at 3 per cent. $59.43 for which amount the Council should issue warrant in payment to date.
GEORGE A. DEBLANC, H. H. HOHORST, Finance committee.

 The following bills were approved:

--------------------p. 3-----------------

 Moved and duly seconded that Abraham Hirsch be allowed $5 per month for cleaning town jail. Carried.

 The following was offered and adopted:

 Whereas, Benjamin Falk, member of this Council and citizen of the town, departed this life on October 27, 1901, suddenly and without warning.

 Resolved, That by his death this body loses a useful member and the community a worthy citizen; that we recognize that the deceased by his life, exemplified the commendable attributes of industry, patience and an upright walk before men.

 Resolved, That in token of our regret for the loss which we have sustained by his death, that these resolutions be spread upon the minutes and a copy be forwarded to family of said deceased.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901.



 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 11/9/1901.

 On the night of Wednesday, Nov. 27, there will be a ball at Falk's hall. It will be given under the auspices of the Lafayette Brass Band, which is a guarantee that it will be first-class in every respect.

 Religious services will be conducted by Rev. C. C. Kramer at the Presbyterian church to-morrow evening at half past four o'clock. The public are invited.

Stolen or Strayed. - At Carencro, Saturday, Oct. 26, 1901, one sorrel horse, with white forehead, left eye white. Disappeared with saddle and bridle. Branded on hip.

 Southern Pacific - Sunset Route - will sell tickets from Laf. to Beaumont, and return Nov. 12, 1901, with return limit date of sale, at $2.00 an account of Street Fair and Elks Carnival.

 The cheapest and prettiest line of lamps ever seen in the town are at Clegg's, court-house square. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1901. 




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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 11th, 1901:


THE INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE.

 The Literary and debating society which was set afoot last Monday week, met Thursday afternoon of last week and adopted a constitution and by-laws. On Saturday evening the society held its first regular meeting at which officers were elected and a program rendered. The officers for the ensuing term of two months are Miss Irma Voorhies, president, Mr. Jefferson Caffery, vice-president and Miss Daisy Barbin, of Marksville, secretary.

 An hour before the session of the literary society the glee club held its first rehearsal. This club includes in its membership about thirty of the young ladies and young gentlemen of the school and under the direction of Mr. Florent Sontag gives promise of developing a great spirit and a sweet melody.

 The first cold spell of the season found the Institute armed to the teeth, and thus it failed to bring about the damage and discomfort which it had no doubt mapped out. The sixty horse power boiler has been mounted on her carriage and was belching forth a constant volley of warmth as the enemy made its vain assault.

 But the boiler is ready not only to resist the invasion of the cold north wind, but also to waken to life and stir to activity the Work Shop and its vicinity. With the completion of the building this week a new warmer blood will flow in the veins and arteries of the manual training department - in the shape of red hot steam.

 Regarding the lecture to be given at the Institute next Monday evening, 8 p. m., by Edward P. Elliot, there is nothing new, except that the entertainment will be still better than reported last week. Let no one who can fail to attend and see and hear David Harum as Edward Noyes Westcott saw and heard him when he lay stricken unto death. This entertainment or Mr. Elliot's gives the people of Lafayette an unusual opportunity for enjoyment and improvement, and one of which we should all avail ourselves.

 We are glad to note that the foot ball team is bestirring itself, and that it will soon be ready to file its claim as one of the sturdiest elevens in southwestern Louisiana. Let the boys keep up their good work, thus arousing a proper college spirit, securing the necessary physical exercise, and developing a strong and healthy body a sound body for a sound mind and soul to dwell within.

 The equipping of an institution such as the Institute is not a trivial matter which one man may accomplish in a day or a month. Accordingly, while the equipments for drawing, sewing, typewriting, manual-training for boys singing and for the dormitory were in early, others have been more slow in being completed. The latest additions along these lines are the full equipment for mechanical drawing for boys, and the arrival of the chemical apparatus and chemicals for the laboratory.

 The morning exercises during the past week were conducted by the First year class, who did nobly in doing their best. Some of the nature stories told were interested and instructive. Lafayette Advance 11/9/1901.




A BIG SHOW COMING.
SELLS and GRAY HERE.

 Advance car No. 1 of Sells and Grays United Shows, carrying 30 bill posters, commenced billing here recently. Judging the show from the apperance of their fine car and the swiftly-working men on it doing the work, it indicates something evidently of great magnitude following. The printing now on the boards and in surrounding country is all of special design, elaborate and undoubtedly expensive. Several city newspapers recently at hand published in the cities, where the show has been this season pronounce it not only as big as any in existence, but better and more up to date than any they have had in the past ten years. Advance car No. 1 is under the management of Mr. D. W. Mayon. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.



The Great Eastern Show.







 This enormous aggregation is advertised to exhibit in Lafayette on Nov. 12. Giving two of their imitable performances at 2 and 8 o'clock p. m. Don't miss seeing the beautiful and rare animals and beautiful ponies and positively the greatest trained animal exhibition in the world. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.




Agents in Town.
 The agents of The Great Eastern Show have been in our city arranging for the coming of that ever welcome amusement aggregation, and the small boy will be correspondingly happy and everybody and his best girl will be at Lafayette on circus day. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.




Big Circus and Menagerie.

 Campell Bros.' Big Circus and Menagerie is dated for two performances in our city, afternoon and night on Saturday Nov. 16. Our people will now have the pleasure of witnessing a clean, pure circus performance, known throughout the entire country to be the biggest railroad circus traveling. Exhibiting a larger collection of wild beast, and carrying more high salaries performers than any other circus on the road. Besides freaks of nature, Japanese family, trained elephants, ponies, dogs and monkeys. Educated birds and beasts. Positively giving two exhibitions on day and date mentioned. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.


 Steam Calliope.

 Campbell Bros.' new calliope heads the big street parade that takes place in Lafayette on Saturday, Nov. 16. It can be heard for miles and is drawn by a string of elegantly decorated horses, amusing to everybody, and a new feature of the Big Show unquestionably interesting. The only opportunity to see anything of the kind this season. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901. 







"Ten Nights in a Bar Room." - In placing before the public a first class scenic and dramatic production of "Ten Nights in a Bar Room," Mr. Geo. L. Palmer, has supplied a long felt want. He has given the younger generation a chance to see this great moral drama given by a competent company of artists surrounded with every accessory which is necessary for a first class production. Foremost in the cast is little Verna Marie, one of the greatest of child artists, who portrays Mary Morgan's drunkard child. Other well known artists are Lewis Sutherland, Julia Bennett, Della Harrison and Jas. E. Jackson, all of whom are metropolitan favorites. To be presented at Falk's Opera House, Sunday Nov. 10th.  Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.    


 Bendel in Town. - Last week, Mr. H. Bendell, of New York, paid us a call. Mr. Bendell is one of our Lafayette boys. Several years ago, he moved to New York, and there by close attention to business and a proper amount of enterprise, he has succeeded in building up a paying Manufactory of Pattern hats, and neck-wear, which now employs 125 ladies. Laf. Adv. 11/9/1901.
  



 Church Choir Organized.

 The Catholic church choir met and organized at Rev. Father Forge's last Monday. Twenty-five members constitute the choir. Prof. Sontag is director and Miss Elisabeth Mouton, organist. Mr. Geo. A. DeBlanc was elected secretary and Mr. F. V. Mouton, treasurer. Rev. Forge gave a donation to the treasurer fund of the sum of $50.00. First rehearsal will be to-morrow after high mass. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.




Increased Mail Service.

 An effort will be made at the next meeting of Congress to have the free rural delivery extended. It would be a good idea for our citizens to endeavor to secure delivery in Lafayette parish. It is one of the best parishes in the state for the experiment. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.



 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 11/9/1901.

 At entertainment worth the price at the Institute next Monday night.

 The Century Club at its last meeting decided to give a Thanksgiving supper, and a delightful evening is expected.

 Cards are out announcing the wedding of Miss Carmen Mouton to Mr. Sosthene Martin, to take place Thursday evening, Nov. 21, at 4 o'clock at the Catholic Church.

 If you have no girl, borrow some one else's girl and go to the big show on Tuesday, Nov. 12 at Lafayette. It is the biggest show that has exhibited here.

 Mr. Ed. McBride will open a blacksmith shop very soon in front of Demanade's store. Good work and prompt service will be the motto of the shop.

 The case of Peck vs. the Corporation of Lafayette came before the Circuit Court this week, and a decision was rendered in favor of Mr. Peck.

 The ball that will be given by the newly organized brass band will take place on Nov. 28, the eve of Thanksgiving day.

 Get out of an old rut and come to hear Mr. Elliot next Monday, 8 p. m., in the Auditorium of the Institute.

 Mr. Ike Bendel, lately from New York, will now reside in Lafayette and take charge of B. Falk's establishment.

 Members of Fire Co. No. 1 will please take notice that from now on until April 1st, 1901, the meetings will take place at 7 p. m. instead of 8 p. m.

 Have you not met the genial souled old philosopher David Harum? If not visit the Institute next Monday night. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.








From the Lafayette Gazette of November 9th, 1895:



NOT SO IN LAFAYETTE.

We note in The Shreveport Judge that the newspaperman in that thriving little city is not only more appreciated than in other sections of the country. Though it is principally due to the efforts of the local papers that the next State convention will be held in that city not a single representative of the press appears on the committees of "prominent citizens" appointed to see that proper and suitable arrangements be made for the reception of visitors. We sympathize with our enterprising confreres of Shreveport. We must say, however, that in Lafayette the local newspaperman is strictly in it, and our sympathies go to our ill-treated brothers despite the absence of that "fellow-feeling which makes us so wondrous kind." Lafayette editors have always been great favorites. Since the checkered journalistic existence of Ordway the people of this town have never failed to recognize the services of the local press. No one will dispute the fact that bright but erratic genius was amply rewarded for what he did for the town. He certainly enjoyed the confidence of many people - and no doubt profited by it. His abilities were readily appreciated by the solid business men of the town who attested their esteem in various ways. We believe that he was made secretary of the Business Men's Association and at one time he was decidedly in vogue. Unfortunately he was suddenly called away by the death of a near relative in some western State, but, unlike the cat, he never came back. Since his departure the local press has continued to be recognized. Editorial modesty precludes any reference to ourselves, but there are our friends, Van der Cruyssen and Goolsby. Their names may be frequently seen on subscription and other committees -- to say nothing of the innumerable other honors that are actually thrust upon them ;  such as rear seats to entertainments, etc. We repeat that our sympathy is extended to the Shreveport papers, but we are compelled to say here in Lafayette that lingering commodity known as the country editor is "in it" from the start.

Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.    





WATER WORKS.

To the Editor of the  Gazette: - "At the last session of the City Council a resolution was adopted authorizing the waterworks committee to borrow in behalf of the town $400, an amount deemed necessary to survey and district the corporate territory in order to procure estimates for the proposed works. When it is considered that at best the project is extremely doubtful from the fact that the probable cost of such works will hardly justify the people in consequent taxation, as the area to be be protected renders any limited system out of question. But aside from arguments which arise in mind, it certainly appears strange that just when the city is unable to meet current expenses, when her resources are at the lowest ebb with no immediate prospect of betterment, the Council should jeopardize its sound business policy in such a venture. There is another worthy cause, involving no uncertainty of benefit, which has demanded and was refused assistance on the ground of the city's financial strains -- a cause that stands pre-eminent in any community - Education. Consistency, thou art a jewel indeed."
                              TEACHER.

 With all due respect for "Teacher's" opinion we believe that he is wrong in censuring the Council for its action in this matter. It is granted that at the present time there is no money in the town treasury. That is a fact which we all know, but will "Teacher" set up the contention that the Council must make no move for waterworks until a sufficient amount of cash is on hand to carry the project through? With the present revenues of the town it would probably take fifty years to get waterworks. It is, therefore, necessary that a special tax be levied for the purpose and in order that the question be presented to the tax-payers in an intelligent and comprehensible manner the costs and specifications of the proposed plant must be ascertained, and it is with that end in view that the Council has made the appropriation to which our friend so strenuously objects.

 For heaven's sake, how much longer must we wait if we are going to have waterworks at all? We believe that Lafayette should have waterworks and electric lights, and all good citizens should do their utmost toward getting them as early as practicable, instead of looking around for impediments.

 It is also conceded that "education stands pre-eminent in any community," and it is right that it should be so; but in "any community" where the people are alive to the cause of education a good system of waterworks is one of the things insisted upon.

 If "Teacher" is desirous of promoting the cause of education in this town the best thing for him to do is to exert his energies and to secure waterworks. After that is done the rest will be easy. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.




Obstreperous Young Men.

 Last Saturday Messrs. Alf. and Aristide Etie, two young men working on the refinery, became boisterous and were placed under arrest by Officers Veazey and Bourke and locked up. The charge against Alfred was disturbing the peace, carrying concealed weapon and resisting arrest, and against Aristide carrying concealed weapon and resisting arrest. Monday morning they appeared before the mayor, who fined the former $2.50 and the latter $1.00, both with costs.

 A reporter of the Gazette was at the town hall when the prisoners were taken there preparatory to their incarceration, and it is due to the forebearance of Officers Veazey and Bourke that no one was hurt. The prisoners defied the officers and refused to go to jail. At one time it was believed that the officers would be compelled to use their clubs, but thanks to their courage and patience it was not necessary.
Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.



 Walking Around the World. -  Fritz Meyer, aged 25, and Mose Wiessner, aged 20, are presently engaged in going around the world on foot. They left Berlin on the 1st of June and arrived in Lafayette Thursday at 3 p. m. They are not to ask for anything and are allowed to work only when it is absolutely necessary for food. During their stay in Lafayette they were cared for by Mr. Hahn, the hospitable manager of the Star and Crescent. Mose Wiessner is quite an experienced pedestrian, having walked from New York to San Francisco. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895. 






BUSINESS MEN'S ASSOCIATION.

 The Business Men's Association during its brief but no less eventful existence has infused a spirit of progress and improvement into the town of Lafayette that was never before felt. It has roused to sleepy inhabitants from that dull apathy in which they have slumbered for these many years; and has shown them the dawning rays of a new era that is now rising with brightness over their quiet little domains; an era that promises peace and prosperity to the people, and awaken energy and industry in their bosoms.

 Through the determined zeal of his association, whose earnest efforts toward advancement we hail with enthusiasm and applause, Lafayette will soon have a system of water works, an electric plant, and an ice factory.

 We can then lie down at night with that feeling of security and protection - with which a water works system will arm us - from the dread ravages of fire to which we may at any moment be helplessly exposed. In our present condition we would be literally at the mercy of the unpitying flames; and it behooves every citizen in the town, as well for his comfort as for the safety of his home, to bind every aid in his power toward the assistance and maturing of these praiseworthy plans, which the B. M. A. are exposing with so much interest and confidence. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1901.




Circuit Court.

 Although the opinions in regard to the choice of candidates in the coming election, are already formed, aspirants for office still continue unabated in their efforts to turn the popular tide in their direction. Gumbos and public meetings are quite the order of the day now. The ticket remains unchanged, and Stelly of Carencro is the only candidate mentioned thus for representative. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.

  















And from Abbeville...

 "Sheriff Isaac Broussard, of Lafayette, was in town this week. He looks as active and vigilant as ever and is dead sure of being re-elected." -- From the Abbeville Meridional.

 Sheriff Broussard does not only look active and vigilant, but he actually is. In fact he is too much so to suit his political enemies, and is the reason they are after his "scalp." But no official can perform his duty without incurring the enmity of some people.
Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.







 More on Petrified Man.

 The owners of the petrified body, recently discovered near Lafayette let the stone man to Messrs. Petigo & Jackson of Crowley, for $125.00 a month. The latter parties passed through New Orleans a few days ago, enroute for the Atlanta fair, where they will place the curiosity on exhibit. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.


ELECTION  NOTICE.

 Whereas, a petition numerously signed having been presented to the City Council, alleging that a majority of the voters are in favor of amending the Stock Law, and asking that an informal election be called submitting to the whole voters of the town of Lafayette, whether a majority of said voters desire the stock law amended so as to prohibit stock from roaming at large during the night time only.

 And the City Council having authorized the Mayor to issue his proclamation, calling an election and submit to the white qualified voters said question, and to appoint three commissioners to hold said election, at the expense of petitioners;
    Now, therefore, I hereby give notice that an informal election will be held at the Court House, on Saturday, the 9th day of November 1895, during the usual hours, and that J. E. Martin, R. C. Greig and Alf. Hebert are appointed commissioners, who will conduct said election in accordance herewith and make return thereof as in regular elections, to the Mayor. The ticket, must have printed or written on them "For amending the Stock Law."

 Given under my hand officially, this sixteenth day of October 1895.
A. J. MOSS, Mayor.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.




 City Council Proceedings.

           Lafayette, La., Nov. 4th, 1895.
  The City Council met this evening in regular session. The following members were present: Mayor A. J. Moss, Messrs. Jos. Ducote, B. Falk, T. M. Biossat, Leo Doucet and J. O. LeBlanc.  Absent:  Dr. J. D. Trahan and Hon. O. C. Mouton.

 The minutes of special meeting Sept. 10th and minutes of regular meeting were read and approved.

 The committee of five appointed council to act in connection with the Business Men's Association, made the following report, which was upon motion of B. Falk seconded by Jos. Ducote received.

 To the Hon. Mayor and City Council.

 GENTLEMEN: - Your committee on Water Works and Electric Lights, desire to submit their report.

 We have made sufficient investigation to satisfy your committee that, in order to obtain satisfactory information and bids for the consideration of a plant and be able to proceed any further, it will be necessary to make a survey and map of the town, with plans and specifications of what it necessary for a system of Water Works and Electric Lights.

 As this survey cannot be made without funds, we ask your Hon. body to appropriate the sum of four hundred dollars, to be used for this purpose.
      Respectfully yours, T. M. BIOSSAT, Chairman, WM. CAMPBELL, T. B. HOPKINS, JNO. I. BELL, O. C. MOUTON.

 In compliance with request of Business Men's committee the council instructed the finance committee to make arrangements to procure the four hundred dollars and turn over to committee. If any balance remains to revert to council.

 The committee appointed to secure State Agricultural Society to meet at this place, made a report through chairman Biossat and a letter from John Dymond, President La. Agricultural Society was read, in which they accept the invitation tendered. Date of meeting announced through papers late.

 Moved by Joe Ducote second B. Falk that Mayor appoint a committee of five to act in conjunction with the eight appointed by Police Jury and the following gentlemen were appointed: Messrs. R. C. Greig, I. A. Broussard, John Hahn, Wm. Campbell and O. C. Mouton. They are requested to meet said committee of Police Jury at 11 a. m. Saturday Nov. 16th.

 Communication from Miss Greig, Principal of high school in regard to having side walk on Lafleur's property was read and upon motion of Leo Doucet second by Mr. LeBlanc, same was referred to street committee and instructed to see into this at once.
           Lafayette, La., Nov. 4, 1895.

 To the Hon. Mayor and City Council:

 I have collected the following amounts since my last report to-wit:

 ------------------p. 4----------------

   Respectfully submitted,
        D. J. VEAZEY, Con. & Coll.

 TREASURER'S REPORT.

 Lafayette, La., Nov. 4, 1895.

 To the Hon. Mayor and City Council:


----------------p. 4----------------

 The Collector's and Treasurer's reports were accepted and ordered recorded.

 Following Accounts approved:

 --------------------p. 4------------------


 Following Accounts held over:

 --------------p. 4-----------------

 The above accounts will be paid first of next month.

 Upon motion of Leo Doucet second by Joe Ducote, the ordinance in regard to running pipes through roofs be amended and penalty read as follows:  Not exceeding $25.00 or be imprisoned not less than 30 days of both at the discretion of the Mayor.

 Moved by Leo Doucet seconded by T. M. Biossat that the rate of property taxation the same as heretofore - 5 mills on the $.

          Lafayette, La., Nov. 4, 1895.
  To the City Council:
     In compliance with the ordinance of July 23rd, 1884, requiring the Mayor to report in writing any and all his acts under said ordinance, on Oct. 11th, 1895, an officials warning was issued to Jacque D. Delhomme, that if his establishment on Lincoln Avenue should continue disorderly, the said ordinance would be enforced.
       Respectfully,
            A. J. MOSS, Mayor.
  Unanimously adopted.

 There being no further business the council adjourned to meet on Dec. 2nd Monday at 4 p. m.
       BAXTER CLEGG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.



Police Jury Proceedings.

           Lafayette, La., Nov. 2nd, 1895.
  The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present:  R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry, H. M. Durke, C. C. Brown and Alfred Hebert. Absent: J. G. St. Julien, Alf. Delhomme and J. W. Broussard.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved:

          Lafayette, La., Nov. 2nd 1895.
   To the Hon. Police Jury:
       Your committee appointed to secure the approaching convention of the La. Agricultural Society of Lafayette, would respectfully report that duty successfully performed. Appended find a letter from Hon. John Dymond, president, notifying of the acceptance of the invitation. Your committee has also secured Mr. J. J. Davidson, agent, a reduction of railroad rates to one fare for round trip for all delegates from all points on the Southern Pacific together with the assurance that the company would assist by advertisement, etc., in promoting the success of the convention. It is respectfully suggested that a representative committee from the various wards be appointed to complete the arrangements, already inaugurated.
T. M. BIOSSAT, Chairman.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.

 By motion, duly made, the following gentlemen were appointed to act in conjunction with a like committee for the city council in perfecting arrangements for the convention and the entertainment of delegates and guests:  1st ward, Alex Delhomme, Sr; 2d ward, Benj. Avant; 3rd ward, J. C. Buchanan; 4th ward, Overton Cade; 5th ward Aurelien Olivier; 6th ward, H. E. Toll; 7th ward, J. O. Broussard; 8th ward, L. G. Breaux. The committee is requested to meet at the Court House Saturday, Nov. 16, at 11 o'clock a. m.

 The President and Secretary were authorized to extend a formal invitation, to the Police Juries of the various parishes in the Convention of the State Agricultural Society to be held in Lafayette, Jan. 1896, by appointment of delegates thereto.

 Messrs. Durke and R. C. Landry were authorized to employ Mr. J. E. Kee to superintend the construction of two certain bridges on the new road recently traced in their respective wards.

 Petitions for the establishment of a public road and the construction of a bridge across Bayou Vermilion at Darmas Broussard's and also counter petitions praying for the location of the road and bridge at some more favorable point, were read and laid on the table.

 At noon the Police Jury adjourned until 2 o'clock p. m. at which hour upon reassembling no quorum was present. By motion the Police Jury adjourned until next regular meeting.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.


 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 11/9/1895.

 Farmers are very much discouraged over the low price of cane, which now yields them only 1.75 ton.


 The Carencro Skating Rink will open next Sunday.

 Aug. Degrez has sold his lumber yard to Emile Mouton.

 Dr. N. P. Moss and T. M. Biossat made a business trip to New Orleans Thursday.

 Miss Ada Moss boarded the train last Monday and will spend a short time in New Orleans.

 Father Forge expects to leave either to-day or Monday, for a few days visit to New Orleans.

 Rev. Father Gasler of Pointe Aux Loops was the guest of Father Forge for a day during the week.

 There have been a great many traveling salesmen in town this week, and they all report a general improvement in business.

 Mrs. Alf. Hebert while driving with another lady, was turned over near the Lafayette depot. Dr. Martin was summoned but found no serious injuries.

 Judge Farrar is said to be a very fine lecturer, and passes from the sublime to the ridiculous with an easy and eloquent grace that never fails of the most attentive effect upon his audience.

 A special meeting of the school board will be held on Nov. 16th. Important business will be transacted and every member is earnestly requested to attend.

 The partnership of P. Le Denois and Aug. Degrez was formally dissolved on Oct. 24th. Mr. Le Danois will continue as sole proprietor of the Lafayette Rice Mill.

 The lecture to be conducted under the auspices of the Ex-Confederate Camp, the proceeds to go to the monumental fund. Admission will be 25 cts.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.



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 From the Lafayette Gazette of November 9th, 1895:

WILL MEET HERE.

 As may be seen in the proceedings of the Police Jury the State Agricultural Society has accepted the invitation to hold its next meeting in Lafayette. This should be good news to the people of the town and parish. The State Agricultural Society is a popular and influential body composed of leading men from different sections of the State. Its members are intelligent, practical men whose meeting in our town will be fraught with many good results. Messrs. Alex Delhomme, Sr., Ben Avant, J. C. Buchanan, Overton Cade, Aurelien Olivier, H. E. Toll, J. O. Broussard and L. G. Breaux have been appointed by the Police Jury to confer with a similar committee from the City Council to make the necessary preparations for the meeting, which will be held some time next January. The time of meeting is yet for off and some people may believe that we are previous in our remarks, but we are of the opinion that the committee should lose no time, so that the people may be enlisted in the work of preparing a reception  benefiting the occasion. We should not let this opportunity escape without taking advantage of it in every possible way. As we have said, we will entertain prominent men from all portions of Louisiana, and is of vital importance that when they return home they will be in a portion to say a good work for Lafayette and its people. There are many other reasons why the people of the town and parish of Lafayette should show to the parish of Lafayette should show to the agricultural society that they keenly appreciate the honor thus conferred upon them. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.


WATER WORKS.

 Editor Gazette: - At the last session of the City Council a resolution was adopted authorizing the waterworks committee to borrow in behalf of the town $400, an amount deemed necessary to survey and district the corporate territory in order to procure estimates for the proposed works. When it is considered that at best the project is extremely doubtful from the fact that the probable cost of such works will hardly justify the people in consequent taxation, as the area to be protected renders any limited system out of the question. But aside from arguments which arise in mind, it certainly appears strange that just when the city is unable to meet current expenses, when her resources are at the lowest ebb with no immediate prospect of betterment, the Council should jeopardize its sound business policy in such a venture. There is another worthy cause, involving no uncertainty of benefit, which has demanded and was refused assistance on the ground of then city's financial straits - a cause that stand preeminent in any community - Education. Consistency, thou art a jewel indeed.
       (Signed) TEACHER.

 With all due respect for "Teacher's" opinion we believe that he is wrong in censuring the Council for its action in this matter. It is granted that at the present time there is no money in the town treasury. That is a fact which we all know, but will "Teacher" set up the contention that the Council must make no move for waterworks until a sufficient amount of cash is on hand to carry the project through? With the present revenues of the town it would probably take fifty years to get waterworks. It is, therefore, necessary that a special tax be levied for the purpose and in order that the question be presented to the tax-payers in an intelligent and comprehensible manner the costs and specifications of the proposed plant must  be ascertained, and it is now with that end in view that the Council has made the appropriation to which our friend so strenuously objects.

 For heaven's sake, how much longer must be wait if we are going to have waterworks at all? We believe that Lafayette should have waterworks and electric lights, and all good citizens should do their utmost toward getting them as early as practicable, instead of looking around for impediments.

 It is also conceded that "education stands pre-eminent in any community," and it is right that it should be so; but in "any community" where the people are alive to the cause of education a good system of waterworks is one of the things insisted upon.

 If "Teacher" is desirous of promoting the cause of education in this town the best thing for him to exert his energies and influence to secure waterworks. After that is done the rest will be easy. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.


NOT SO IN LAFAYETTE.

 We note in The Shreveport Judge that the newspaperman in that thriving little city is not any more appreciated than in other sections of the country. Though it is principally due to the efforts of the local papers that the next State convention will be held in that city not a single representative of the press appears on the committees of "prominent citizens" appointed to see that proper and suitable arrangements be made with the reception of visitors. We sympathize with our with our enterprising confreres of Shreveport. We must say, however, that in Lafayette the local newspaperman is strictly in it, and our sympathies go to our ill-treated brothers despite the absence of that "fellow-feeling which makes us so wondrous kind." Lafayette editors have always been great favorites. Since the checkered journalistic existence or Ordway, the people of this town have never failed to recognize the services of the local press. No one will dispute the fact that bright but erratic genius was amply rewarded for what he did for the town. He certainly enjoyed the confidence of many people - and no doubt profited by it. His abilities were readily appreciated by the solid business business men of the town who attested their esteem in various ways. We believe that he was made secretary of the Business Men's Association and at one time he was decidedly in vogue. Unfortunately he was suddenly called away by the death of a near relative in some western State, but, unlike the cat, he never came back. Since his departure the local press has continued to to be recognized. Editor modesty precludes any reference to ourselves, but there are our friends Van der Cruyssen and Goolsby. Their names may be frequently seen on subscription and and other committees - to say nothing of the innumerable other honors that are actually thrust upon then, such as rear seats to entertainments, etc. We repeat that our sympathy is extended to the Shreveport papers, but we are compelled to say here in Lafayette that lingering commodity known as the country editor is "in it" from the start. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.


 From the Sugar Cane State to the Golden Gate.

 A ride of Three Thousand Five Hundred Miles (3,500) made in five days in a Pullman Tourist Sleeper through the great States of Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California, to Portland, Oregon, with only one change of cars. This is what the Traveler, Sight-seer or Homeseeker can do. Sights of mountain grandeur, superior in vastness to any in the known world, open upon the vision, changing with kaleidoscopic rapidity from the last beautiful bit of scenery to new ones even more so. The Southern Pacific Railroad is the artery over which the finest trains run over the best track of steel rails in the South, reaching from Gulf to Ocean. Her equipment is modern, her road-bed magnificently ballasted, and her motive power in unequaled South of the Ohio river. All these qualifications are facts. Her employees always courteous. A trip from "The Land of Sugar Cane, to the Pacific Coast is an education in itself never to be regretted. Write for any information to the nearest representative of this great system of railroad and steamship lines, and receive in return your question answered, reliable and to the point. Any of our readers contemplating a trip will do well to inquire of the nearest Southern Pacific System's Agents before buying elsewhere. S. F. B. Morse, General Purchasing and Ticket Agent, New Orleans, La.
Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.



Hannen Doing Better.

 Our venerable townsman, Mr. Jno. Hannen, who has been quite ill, is, we are pleased to say, much better. Mr. Hannen has been under the treatment of Dr. R. B. Raney whose success in Lafayette may well be an object of commendable pride to himself and a source of gratification to a number of friends. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.


Town Finances.

 The present City Council is certainly seriously handicapped by the condition of the town's finances. This year's taxes from the property-holders in the additions will go to the parish treasury as the re-annexation was made too late to entitle the town to collect them. Therefore, the Council is compelled to perform the somewhat difficult feat of running the corporation as it stands to-day with the money from the old town only. Despite this unusual condition of affairs our councilmen have so far done very well, but it us doubtful if they will be able to continue throughout the year without borrowing some money. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.


Not Going to Cuba.

 John Vandergriff, of tonsorial fame, begs The Gazette to state that he would soon leave for Havana to go and fight for Cuban liberty are false and he hopes that his friends will give no credence to such rumors. John will stay at home to serve the people of Lafayette as he has been doing for the last decade. He has the sticking qualities rarely found in barbers and he intends to end his days right here. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.


 Ike in Abbeville.

 Sheriff Isaac Broussard, of Lafayette, was in town this week. He looks as active and vigilant as ever and is dead sure of being re-elected. - Abbeville Meridional.

 Sheriff Broussard does not only look active and vigilant but he actually is. In fact he is too much so to suit his political enemies, and that is the reason they after his "scalp." But, no official can perform his duty without incurring the enmity of some people.
Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.



 "Johnny Reb."

 Judge F. R. Farrar, of Richmond, Va., will deliver his famous lecture, "Johnny Reb," at the court-house in Lafayette, Wedneday night, Nov. 13, under the auspices of the ex-Confederate camp and for the benefit of the Beauregard monument fund. Judge Farrar is said to be one of the best lecturers in the South and no one should fail to hear him. The admission price is only 25 cents. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.


 Freakish Corn.

 A very peculiar freak of nature was brought to our office Thursday afternoon by Mr. Sidney Mouton. It is thirteen well-formed ears of corn covered by one shock, or rather twelve ears encircling one larger ear. It was taken from the field of Mr. Press Benton. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.



 Circuit Court.
Judges Lewis and Blackman held a session of the circuit court here this week. There were three cases on the docket, one from Vermilion, one from Acadia, and the other, from the parish, was the suit of Degrez vs. Breaux; in the latter case the judgment of the district court was affirmed. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.

 Obstreperous Young Men.

 Last Saturday Messrs. Alf. and Aristide Etie, two young men working on the refinery, became boisterous and were placed under arrest by Officers Veazey and Bourke and locked up. The charge against Alfred was disturbing the peace, carrying concealed weapon and resisting arrest. Monday morning they appeared before the mayor, who fined the former $2.50 and the latter $1.00, both with costs.

 A reporter of The Gazette was at the town hall when the prisoners were taken there preparatory to their incarceration, and it is due to the forbearance of Officers Veazey and Bourke that no one was hurt. The prisoners defied the officers and refused to go to jail. At one time it was believed that the officers would be compelled to use their clubs, but thanks to their courage and patience is was not necessary. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.



 Walking Around the World.

 Fritz Meyer, aged 25, and Mose Wiessner, aged 2o, are presently engaged in going around the world on foot. They left Berlin on the 1st of June and arrived in Lafayette Thursday at 3 p. m. They are not allowed to work except only when it is absolutely necessary to procure food. During their stay in Lafayette they were cared for by Mr. Hahn, the hospitable manager of the Star ans Crescent. Mose Weissner is quite an experienced pedestrian, having walked from New York to San Francisco. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.

   



 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 11/9/1895.

 M. Rosenfield, the enterprising young merchant near the depot, went to New Orleans Tuesday to purchase some goods.

 Armand Levy, formerly of this town but now a prosperous young merchant of Lake Charles, was in Lafayette this week. Mr. Levy speaks glowingly of his new home.

 Miss Ada Moss took an eastbound train last Monday with the intention of enjoying a short stay in New Orleans.

 There will be a special meeting of the School Board on Saturday, Nov. 16. A full attendance is desired as business of importance will be transacted.

 Lost. - From Gen. F. F. Myles' place, 1 mile south of Lafayette, a setter bird dot, black, white and tan. Has been lost several days. Liberal reward for her recovery. Lafayette Gazette 11/9/1895.
      







 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 9th, 1889:


ALL SAINTS DAY.

 All Saints day, Friday Nov. 1st., when is observed the beautiful and touching custom of beautifying the graves of the dead, was a scene of unusual activity and attraction in Lafayette. A slight sprinkle of rain in the early morning had mellowed the atmosphere, and the day was ideal Autumn weather. All day long numbers of both sexes, in holiday attire, thronged through the cemetery and the Church square. Both at high mass and in the afternoon an excellent sermon in English was delivered by Rev. Father Begly, of St. Charles College. Those who were so fortunate as to hear the Rev. Father speak in the highest terms of his impressive style and eloquent language.

 Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1889. 



Reception at Mt. Carmel. -  Last Thursday, the feast of St. Ernest, in pursuance of their annual custom, the children of Mt. Carmel tendered their pastor, Rev. E. Forge, a reception at the Convent, where each one had some memento to present and receive kindly recognition at his hands.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1899.





Tonight's the Night.

 Remember, that to-night is the time fixed for the grand ball, at Falk's Opera House, given by Lafayette Lodge No. 37, Knights of Hythias, in celebration of the 7th anniversary of their Lodge. It is needless to say that every preparation possible has been made for the pleasure and enjoyment of their guests, and under such auspices the entertainment cannot fail of success. Those who do not attend, where so much real pleasure may be confidently expected, will be sure to regret it. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.


 Relocating to Lafayette.

 Last Tuesday we received a pleasant call from Mr. F. Gueble, of New Orleans, who informed us that he had brought his family to Lafayette, and in the future would make his home on his farm, a few miles north of town. We extend them a hearty welcome to our community. Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1889.


 Circuit Court.

 The Circuit Court of Appeals for Lafayette parish opened last Tuesday morning, Judges Clegg and Perry presiding. The following cases were disposed of:

 Silvania Foreman vs. I. A. Broussard & als., judgment of lower court affirmed.

 The Southern Development Co. vs. G. Bunt & Henry Kaiser, judgment affirmed.

 Jean Bte. Jean Louis vs. Israel Jean Louis, remanded to lower court for trial.

 Succession of Neuville Bazile vs. Leon Plonsky, judgment affirmed.

 Gideon S. Hawley vs. A. Drozin Boudreaux, judgment affirmed.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1889.

Impromptu Wrestling.

 Last Sunday, while a party of gentlemen from Lafayette were visiting Breaux Bridge, an impromptu wrestling match was made between the champion wrestler of Breaux Bridge and "Lule" Veazey. Much to the surprise of Breaux Bridge, "Lule" threw their man the first two falls. "Lule" makes no pretensions to being an athlete, and he must have won by pure grit and strength; or it may have been, because the "old man" was looking on, he knew that he had to "get there." Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.


ASSESSMENT.

 The following, taken from the tax rolls in the hands of the Collector, shows the difference between the assessments of 1888 and 1889:

 ------------------p. 5-------------------

 Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.





Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 11/9/1899.

 Wednesday was an unusually cool and disagreeable day, and overcoats and fire were necessary to comfort.

 This is the time of year to brag on big pumpkins and big sweet potatoes. We would like to brag.

 Reports from over the parish show that the cotton is pretty well picked out, and will average above one-half of a full crop.

 Mr. Charles Deetmar, of New Orleans, was in town during the week, the guest of his mother, Mrs. J. Racke, at the Racke House.

 Notwithstanding the drought, we have seen some very large sweet potatoes, of the finest quality and flavor, raised near town. The crop generally, though, is cut short.

Last Saturday morning Messrs. Frank R. Hopkins and Baxter Clegg, two of our estimable young men, departed for Meridian, Miss., where they will enter the State Business College for a complete commercial and shorthand course. Our best wishes attend them.


 Owing to the rain Tuesday afternoon and night there was but a slim attendance at "The World" performance, at Falk's Opera House. It is an excellent troupe, and deserved to meet with better success. 

 Our esteemed friend, Mr. Arthur Greig, has treated us in quite a piggish manner. Last Monday morning, much to our surprise and delight, he came walking in with as fine a young porker under his arm as you ever saw. Setting the pig down in our back yard, he walked off with the remark that he "hated to have any man about him always looking hungry." The pig was well taken care of.

Last Tuesday afternoon the long hoped for rain came, the famished vegetation lifting itself in grateful recognition of the blessed shower. The rain held on for 6 or 8 hours, and although not sufficient to fulfill all our expectations, went far towards relieving the water famine in town and country.


 Sporting Excursion. - We learn that a small army of sportsmen of Lafayette, under the experienced leadership of Col. W. B. Lindsay, are organizing to make a raid on Vermilion Bay and Southwest Pass early in next month. We will not mention the date, for fear every oyster, crab, fish, and game of all kinds, will take fright and leave just about that time.
Laf. Adv. 11/9/1889.








 Lagniappe:
HANDS GROW OLD.

Men's Age Shows Soonest by the Loss of Dexterity in Their Fingers.


 The actual amount of dexterity in the human hand has been measured with more or less accuracy and its value in mechanical employment traced from youth to age (unreadable number)-(I'm presuming it to be from youth to old to the late 60s) Below the hand grows old gradually losing its skill, has been described by Sir James Chrichton Browne, the British labor student, who has made a long course of investigation in the English rural towns. The high period of skill and endurance this authority says, is from 30 to 40, the hand after that beginning to lose its muscular delicacy and its suppleness.

Between the ages of 17 and 19 the hand of the boy grows into the hand of the man, and first becomes valuable from a commercial point of view. If a workman is temperate and industrious and continues to improve in his trade, his hand dexterity increases until he is 30.

After 40 the muscles do not respond nearly as readily and certainly to the orders of the brain and the quality and quantity of the work done begins to fall off. While a man in especially fine health and one especially dexterous can often keep up his high degree of skill long past the age of 40, such a man is an exception. This comparatively early ageing of the hand us an interesting and remarkable fact, as it is after 40, as a rule, that a carefully used brain becomes the most valuable. Practically no British statesmen of the highest rank are under 40 most of them are above 50, and often ten years older than that. In the trades, on the other hand, the highest paid workmen, with hardly an exception, are under the age of two-score.

The scale of wages in the button trade, for example, is a good indication of this tendency of the hand to grow old so early in life. At his very best, in his prime a skilled button turner can make 6240 ivory buttons a day on his lathe. For this he receives 45 schillings a week or about $11.25. ($286.28 in today's money) At 45 years of age it is only the exceptional man who can make more than 28 schillings a week, or $9.50. When the workman is 65 years of he can seldom make more than 20 schillings, or about $5, this providing that he still enjoys sound health.

Of course this is only the case in the trades where one hand is used continually and systematically. A Sheffield knife forger for instance, strikes something like 28,000 blows with his hammer daily. An enormous amount of muscular and nervous force is required for this, and it is no wonder that the strain on the nerve centers and the muscles becomes visible in a few years. In farming or the seafaring life, or some other vocation in which the energy is more equally distributed over the entire body, the hand does not lose its cunning so early. Often times it retains its skill until the faculties generally commence to give way.

It is the sedentary occupation that tells, and the only remedy for it is such exercise as will divert the nerve current from the already overtaxed hands.


From the New York World and in the Lafayette Advertiser 11/9/1895.  





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A PAGE FOR 11/9/1901....is under 11/2/1901.



Big Circus and Menagerie.

Campbell Bros. Big Circus and Menagerie is dated for two performances in our city, afternoon and night, on Saturday, Nov. 16. Our people will now have the pleasure of witnessing a clean, pure circus performance, known throughout the entire country to be the biggest railroad circus traveling. Exhibiting a larger collection of wild beast, and carrying more high salaries performers than any circus on the road. Besides freaks of nature, a Japanese family, trained elephants, ponies, dogs and monkeys. Educated birds and beasts. Positively giving two exhibitions on day and date mentioned.


Steam Calliope.

Campbell Bros. new calliope heads the big street parade that takes place on Saturday, Nov. 16. It can be heard for miles and is drawn by a string of elegantly decorated horses, amusing to everybody, and a new feature of the big Show. The is your only opportunity to see anything of this kind this season.

Lafayette Advertiser 11/2/1901.

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