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Tuesday, January 13, 2015

**NOVEMBER 27th - M C



 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 27th, 1908:

NEW BAPTIST CHURCH.

 The new Baptist Church which will soon be erected at the corner of Oak Lane and Lee Avenue will prove quite an addition to the material improvement of the city and the architectural improvement of the city and the architectural effect in that neighborhood. Plans for the building have been adopted and show provision for very excellent appointment throughout. The church will cost about $6,000, have a capacity in main auditorium of 275, with class rooms for Sunday School accomodating 125 children. There will be seven class rooms, two robing rooms, chair space and baptistery.

 The building committee will soon meet to let the bid and ground will probably be broken some time next month.

 Rev. J. L. Kendrick, the pastor, who has labored faithfully here for four years feels much satisfaction over the prospect of worshipping, in the near future, in a house consecrated to the purpose.

 The congregation has for years conducted services in the Masonic Hall, but both church and Sunday school have grown too large and desire a building of their own for devotional exercises. The Advertiser trusts that in a short time to be able to chronicle the completion of the new church and the fact of its formal dedication. Lafayette Advertiser 11/27/1908.



PROSPEROUS CHURCH.

 The Methodist Episcopal Church in charge of Rev. C. C. Miller, for the last year, has enjoyed a period of unexampled prosperity. At the close of the pastoral year the membership numbers 160, there having been 30 accessions during the past twelve months. The Sunday School has also grown correspondingly, the enrollment now being 125 and 40 in the Home Mission department. Besides meeting all incidental expenses the church has contributed about $900.00 to the pastor's salary, about $800.00 to the various stated, benevolent causes and supports an orphan in the Methodist Orphanage at Ruston. The Home Mission Society, composed of the ladies of the church, has done a most excellent work and aided materially in all financial undertakings, having raised some $600 or $800 for charitable causes.

 Rev. Miller leaves Dec. 7 to attend the Annual Conference to be held at Leesville Dec. 7, when all the ministers will be reappointed for next year's work. Mr. Miller is on the committee to examine candidates for the ministry and therefore leaves in time to attend to this duty. The acceptable manner with which Rev. Miller has served his people makes it practically certain that he will be returned to Lafayette, and The Advertiser feels sure it voices the sentiments of the general public in expressing a sincere desire that this earnest and consecrated pastor may be permitted another year at least to continue his labor of love in the community. Lafayette Advertiser 12/2/1908.



BANK EXCITEMENT.

 Quite an excitement occurred Tuesday afternoon at the First National Bank by a lot of enthusiastic youngsters who crowded into the bank in order each to secure one of the beautiful Nickel Pocket Savings Bank just received for free distribution. So eager were the boys that bank operations had to be stopped and from President Moss down the entire force was busy until the last prize had been handed over the prospective financial magnates of the town and parish. The banks are really works of art, can be carried in the pocket without discomfort and will hold from $2 to $10 in coin. In order to stimulate our embryo Rockefellers in amassing large fortunes we give the following to show the result of small savings; 5c per day for 5 year $92.12; 10c per day for 5 years $198.24; 25c for same time $495.60; $1 for same time $1,982.40. If somebody dosen't get rich pretty quick it will not be the fault of the boys for 75 banks went out and many of them are now well filled with nickels and dimes. Lafayette Advertiser 11/27/1908.      

          

    



   











 From the Lafayette Gazette of November 27th, 1897:

THE ISSUE.

 In this campaign for the election of delegates to the constitutional convention every white man should show his colors. It is not the time for the straggler, the trimmer and the coward.

 The slogan is: white men to the front.

 The Democratic party proposed to reform the suffrage and purify the ballot. Time for action has come and he who fails to see it is blind, wants to be blind.

  Those who stand back and cry "Fosterism," and tell you that they are in favor of an intelligent vote and fair count, are hypocrites. They know, or they ought to know, that such a reform is impossible so long as the negroes have the balance of power. If they were honest in their professions they would not oppose the convention, whose main object is to disfranchise as many blacks as possible. Their opposition to a "limited" convention is a subterfuge, pure and simple.

 Let the white men of Lafayette parish bear in mind that this in not a factional fight. The result of the approaching election means more than the ascendancy or defeat of a mere faction. The so-called leader who would infuse local animosities into this election is a demagogue of the worst kind, an enemy to white rule and a traitor to his race.

 There will be an effort made to make Louisiana a white State. Not through bulldozing, ballot-box stuffing or deception, but by legal means within constitutional bounds of the State and nation. Only the fellow who depends upon ignorance and venality for success, can be against this.

 We hope that the voters will not be deluded by those loud-mouthed demagogues who, while pretending all these years to be Democrats, have never missed an opportunity to thrust the stiletto of treachery into the party's back. These may tell you that the convention will be controlled by Foster, but remember if they were in charge of the affairs of this State the convention would be controlled not by Foster, but by Warmoth, by Herwig, by Demas.

 Under the board principles laid down by the Democratic executive committee every voter who will pledge himself to support the nominees of the party can join in the good fight under the white banner of Democracy. Let the laggards crawl into their holes if they will, and a few chronic kickers howl themselves hoarse about "Fosterism," but let the bone and sinew of the country unite and in one grand effort, help to redeem our State from the maelstrom of political corruption and disorder into which she will sooner or later be plunged by ignorance and venality.

 Some well informed men are of opinion that with the elimination  of the negro vote the white people will divide on economic questions and the Republican party will be placed in power. As much as we would hate to see the downfall of of Democracy in this State, we say, let it be so.

 But for the good name of our State and the honor of those who will come after us, let the men of to-day settle this matter, upon which rests well-being a people, in a manner that will reflect everlasting credit upon themselves and insure peace and prosperity to their descendants.

 Men of Lafayette, the issue is clear; white rule vs. negro rule; intelligence vs. ignorance; honesty vs. corruption.

 Under which flag will you fight?
Lafayette Gazette 11/27/1897.



DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE
And Delegates to the Baton Rouge Convention to be selected December 4.

 The Democrats of the various wards in this parish will hold mass meetings next Wednesday, Dec. 1, to elect delegates to a parish convention which will be held in the court-house in this town the following Saturday, Dec. 4, for the purpose of nominating a Democrat for the constitutional convention and to choose delegates to represent the Democracy of this parish at the State convention which will meet at Baton Rouge on the 9th of December where and when the thirty-six candidates for delegates at large will be nominated.

 According to resolutions of the executive committee all Democrats who pledge themselves to support the nominees of the party will be entitled to participate in the meeting. The Gazette hopes that the Democrats of this parish will respond to the call of the executive committee and take a hand in the selection of a suitable candidate for the constitutional convention and of proper persons to represent the parish Democracy at Baton Rouge.

 All voters who desire the ascendancy of the Democratic party, should attend the meetings in the various wards ordered to be held by the regular organization. All over the State the issue is being fought on Democratic lines and Lafayette cannot afford to be backward. In the past she has always made a good showing and in this instance she should be true to her colors.

 In the proceedings of the committee's meeting published last week the following meetings were announced:

 ------------------p. 1----------------

 Lafayette Gazette 11/27/1897.







FREE PASSES.

 While the suffrage question is the most important of the present campaign, it is not only one which should be considered by the people in the selection of delegates to the constitutional convention. There appears to be a very strong sentiment among the people, against the gift by railroad companies of free passes to the public officials. In the platform of the Caddo Democracy, there is a plank condemning this practice and pledging the support of the nominees of the party to a measure which will put an end to the free pass business.

 The Gazette believes that gentlemen holding the judicial and legislative positions, should not be permitted to receive passes from railroad companies.

 We do not advocate the niggardly policy of the Populists who would give us cheap legislators and cheap judged, but we believe the salaries of these officials should be ample to enable them to pay for a railroad transportation.

 The giving away of passes to public officials by railroad companies has long been a source of annoyance, if not of corruption, and it is high time that it should be stopped. The Gazette does not charge that any public official in Louisiana is influenced by the paltry consideration of a pass, nevertheless it is an ominous fact that the railroads give away every year a large number of passes to men holding judicial and legislative positions. As we are assured by an eminent legal authority that a corporation "has no soul to be damned and no body to be kicked" we must conclude that in their generous distribution of passes the railroads act from selfish motives only. It is not likely that representatives of the various roads go to Baton Rouge and establish headquarters there, merely to show in what high esteem they hold our State Solons? Nor is it impossible that the railroads have such an overwhelming admiration for our judiciary that they offer to the judges the free use of their cars?

 Therefore, why all these passes?
Lafayette Gazette 11/27/1897.


 Thanksgiving Day.

 Thanksgiving day was duly observed in Lafayette. Our people have special reason to be thankful to the Almighty. They have escaped the yellow fever and for that alone they should not fail to congratulate themselves upon their good fortune and to thank a kind of Providence for being so favored. While the recent craze has considerable injured the commerce of this town, our people have accepted the inevitable in a philosophical manner and are not all disheartened by the setback caused by the fever. Of course our farmers have no reason to feel particularly cheerful over the price of cotton, but few among them are in debt and their condition, while affording no brilliant outlook, is far better than that of their brothers in other sections of the country.

 Our merchants seem to be doing well. They are not giving evidence of their prosperity by large advertisements in The Gazette, yet we are pleased to state their failure to do so is not due to any financial inability on their part. Some day when they become rich, let us hope that they will grow wiser and will discover the error of their way. In the meantime The Gazette hopes that they will continue to "prosper and not grow less." Lafayette Gazette 11/27/1897.



 Races at Carencro.

 On Dupleix Breaux's race track at Carencro on Sunday, Dec. 5, there will be horse and bicycle races. A trotting race will be a special feature of the day's entertainment. The first race will be run by Don Louise Herpin's horse. Barlow, and LeDenois' Bessie June; the second race by horses belonging to A. and D. Cormier. August Verges and Leon Gatipon will be the contestants in the bicycle race. Lafayette Gazette 11/27/1897.

  

 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 11/27/1897.

 Edmond Fournet, son of State Treasurer Fournet, spent Wednesday and Thursday in Lafayette. Mr. Fournet was on his way to St. Martinville where he will remain until the holidays, after which will return to Baton Rouge to resume his work in the treasurer's office.

 Wilson Mathews left last Monday for New Orleans, where he will be the coach for the Tulane football team.

 Alexis Andrus is the name of a negro who registered this week at the St. Thomas House. He is charged with shooting with intent to kill another darky named Booth. The shooting took place last Saturday at a ball near Carencro.

 Judge O. C. Mouton went to Crowley Monday on legal business. He was accompanied by Joseph Broussard.

 Alcide Judice of Scott, registered at the Denechaud hotel in New Orleans last Monday.

 Fred Mouton, of Sunset, was in Lafayette this week.

 The Railroad Exchange Shaving Parlor is doing a rushing business. Mr. Patureau is a skillful artist and his customers are pleased with his work. Try him and you will be sure to go back.

 Andrew McBride and Ovey Herpin, of this parish, will leave Monday to enter the State University at Baton Rouge.
Lafayette Gazette 11/27/1897.


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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 27th, 1897:



THE CENTURY CLUB.

 At a meeting of the Century Club held last Wednesday Mr. Felix Mouton was elected secretary to succeed Mr. R. W. Elliot. The Club decided to purchase another billiard table at once to meet the growing desire of members to indulge in the interesting pastime of wielding the cue. The Club has in view other innovations for the enjoyment of members. Lafayette Advertiser 11/27/1897.




 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 11/27/1897.

 The members of Ideal Lodge, No. 25, are requested to be present at the meeting to be held at Falk's Opera House, Thursday, Dec. 2nd 1897 at 7:30 p. m.

 Miss Lizzie Parkerson entertained the Ladies Club, Thursday afternoon.

 The mite meeting at the Methodist parsonage Thanksgiving day was well attended.

 The yellow fever being virtually extinguished in New Orleans the Board of Health felt the necessity existed no longer for issuing daily bulletins and so have discontinued them since the 27th instant.

 Last Tuesday on old deaf colored man from Scott was walking on the track, near the depot, when the switch engine struck him knocking him down. He was badly hurt about the left eye and was immediately attended to by Dr. F. R. Tolson.

 The "drummers" have swooped down the town in perfect swarms within the past forty-eight hours - and its truly refreshing to have them among us once more.

 Mr. Arthur Voorhies, representing the large firm of A. M. Hellman & Co. of St. Louis, is in town for a few days. The above firm is renowned for its best brands of whiskey.

 Grand Ball to-night at Falk's Opera House.

 Judge Lewis of Opelousas was here Tuesday.

 Champion Bicycle rider Gilbert Bonin of Abbeville was visiting his numerous friends in Lafayette last Sunday.

 Miss Nellie Cornay returned to Baton Rouge last Sunday, after a stay of several weeks in Lafayette.

 During next month, (the Christmas month,) the Advertiser will mostly be devoted to Christmas and New Years advertisements.

 All trains are running regularly on same schedule as before the quarantine.

 The Teche and Vermilion Telephone Line is now connected with Opelousas.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/27/1897.









 From the Lafayette Gazette of November 27th, 1897:


The Slogan Is: "White Men to the Front."



 In this campaign for the election of delegates to the constitutional convention every white man should show his colors. It is not the time for the straggler, the trimmer and the coward.


 The slogan is: white men to the front.


 The Democratic party proposes to reform the suffrage and to purify the ballot. Time for action has come and he who fails to see it is blind, or wants to be blind.


 Those who stand back and cry "Fosterism," and tell you that they are in favor of an intelligent vote and a fair count, are hypocrites. They know, or why they aught to know, that such reform is impossible so long as the negroes hold the balance of power. If they were honest in their professions they would not oppose the convention, whose main object is to disfranchise as many blacks as possible. Their opposition to a "limited" convention is a subterfuge, pure and simple.


 Let the white men of Lafayette parish bear in mind that this is not a factional fight. The result of the approaching election means more than the ascendancy or defeat of a mere faction. The so-called leader who would infuse local animosities into this election is a demagogue of the worst kind, an enemy to white rule and a traitor to his white race.


 There will be an effort made to make Louisiana a white State. Not through bulldozing, ballot-box stuffing or deception, but by legal means within constitutional bounds of the State and nation. Only the fellow who depends upon ignorance and venality for success, can be against this.


 We hope that the voters will not be deluded by those loud-mouthed demagogues who, while pretending all these years to be Democrats, have never missed an opportunity to thrust the stiletto of treachery into the party's back. These may tell you that the convention will be controlled by Foster, but remember if they were in charge of the affairs of this State the convention would be controlled not by Foster, but by Warmouth, by Herwig, by Demas.


 Under the board principles laid down by the Democratic executive committee every voter who will pledge himself to support the nominees of the party can join in the good fight under the white banner of Democracy. Let the laggards crawl into their holes if they will, and a few chronic kicker's howl themselves hoarse about " Fosterism," but let the bone and sinew of the country unite, and in one grand effort, help to redeem our State from the maelstrom of political corruption and disorder into which she will sooner or later be plunged by ignorance and venality.


 Some well-informed men are of opinion that with the elimination of the negro vote the white people will divide on economic questions and the Republican party will be placed in power. As much as we would hate to see the downfall of Democracy in this State, we say, let it be so.


 But for the good name of our State and the honor of those who will come after us, let the men of to-day settle this matter, upon which rests our well-being as a people, in a manner that will reflect everlasting credit upon themselves and insure peace and prosperity to their descendants.


 Men of Lafayette, the issue is clear: white rule vs. negro rule; intelligence vs. ignorance; honesty vs. corruption.


 Under which flag will you fight?
        Lafayette Gazette 11/26/1897.






 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 27, 1897: 


Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 11/27/1897.

 Watch for the Racket store's Christmas Advertisement.

 Ride a "Crescent" wheel. Crescents have no superiors and but a few equals. They are guaranteed by the Western Wheel Works - the largest manufacture of bicycles in the world. Price $50. Moss Bros. & Co., agents.

 
Enjoy a gay time to-night at the hall. 


 Miss Lizzie Parkerson entertained the Ladies Club, Thursday afternoon.

 If you want a good stock of Furniture, B. Falk is the only place in town, as he knows how to buy, and what to please his traders. Come one, come all, and give us a call.

 Mrs. Arthur Voorhies and daughter left Sunday for New Orleans, after a few weeks spent in Lafayette.

 Last Tuesday an old deaf colored man from Scott was walking on the track, near the depot, when the switch engine struck him knocking him down. He was badly hurt about the left eye and was immediately attended to by Dr. F. R. Tolson.

 
The "drummers" have swooped down the town in perfect swarms within the past forty eight hours - and its truly refreshing to have them among us once more. 


 Mr. Fred Mouton of Grand Coteau spent a few days in our town during the week.

 Grand Ball to-night at Falk's Opera House.

 Any kind of job work neatly and cheaply done at this office.

 
Champion Bicycle rider Gilbert Bonin of Abbeville was visiting his numerous friends in Lafayette last Sunday. 


 Plenty fun to-night at Falk's Hall.

 Miss Nellie Cornay returned to Baton Rouge last Sunday, after a stay of several weeks in Lafayette.

 Lost or Stolen - One bay horse, 7 years old, white spot on fore-head, white spot on saddle place, brand can be seen at this office.
 One brown sorrel horse, 9 years old, not branded white spot at the collar, cut from fence wire near the neck, the horse is not very high but well built.
 Both horses missing since November 6th. Finder will please apply at this office or to Edgard Doucet, Mauriceville, La.

 Stylish dress goods, in rough effect and latest designs; you can find them at Falk's, the cheap old established store.

 
During next month, (the Christmas month,) the Advertiser will mostly be devoted to Christmas and New Years advertisements. 


 All trains are running regularly on same schedules as before the quarantine.

 The Teche and Vermilion Telephone Line is now connected with Opelousas.

 Miss Inez Rushing, of Alexandria, has come to visit her sister, Mrs. T. M. Biossat.

 At a meeting of the Century Club held last Wednesday Mr. Felix Mouton was elected secretary to succeed Mr. R. W. Elliot. The Club decided to purchase another billiard table at once to meet the growing desire of members to indulge in the interesting pastime of wielding the cue. The Club has in view other innovations for the enjoyment of members.

 For Sale! One gentle, handsome family horse, cheap. Apply at the Advertiser office or at A. Judice at Scott, La.

 Grand Races. - Races at Duplex Breaux Track at Carencro, Sunday Nov. 28th. 1897, (to-morrow) between the "Barlow" belonging to Don Louis Herpin and "Bessie June" belonging to P. Le Danois. Distance 4 arpents. Purse $100.00.

 Bicycle races, one mile, between August Vergez and Leon Gatipon. Purse $20.00.

 Trotting races between a horse belonging to A. Cormier and one belonging to D. Cormier, half mile, two out of three.

 Refreshments of all kinds will be sold at reasonable prices.

 Races will begin at 9:30 sharp with accommodations for ladies and gentlemen. Lafayette Advertiser 11/27/1897.





 S. P. Offers Local Holiday Excursion Rates.

 From and all points on Southern Pacific, December 23rd, 24th, and 25th, 30th and 31st and January 1st. good for return January 1st., good for return January 3rd, 1898, at rate of one and one-third fare for the round trip.Lafayette Advertiser 11/27/1897 





LAGNIAPPE:
Inventor of Matches.

 France is about to honor with a statue the man who did not invent Lucifer matches. In 1830, it seems, M. Nicolet, professor of chemistry at Dole, in the Jura was illustrating before his class the explosive powers of potash, when it struck one of his pupils, Charlea Sauria by name, that a combination of phosphorus with the detonating chemical might furnish a far more satisfactory means of kindling a fire than the old flint and steel. He set to work upon the problem and his experiments and those of his friends were attended success. A year or two afterward M. Nicolet visited Austria and gave the discovery away to German manufacturers. Without wishing to rob Mr. Sauria of the posthumous glory which appears to be the only reward of his ingenuity, patriotism compels us to claim the merit of being the real inventor as being one of our own nation. Mr. Walker, of Stockton, by the use of chloride potash and sulphide of antimony, was making friction matches as early as 1820. Young Sauria very likely never heard of the process but the Germans did, and it was from his original idea that their trade sprang and fructified, until the combination of cheaper wood and labor and of improved machinery drove them out of the market.


 From the London Chronicle and in the Lafayette Advertiser of 11/28/1896.

    

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