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Monday, January 12, 2015

**SEPTEMBER 28 M C




 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 28, 1904:


INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE

 Begins its Fourth Annual Session Wednesday With Appropriate Exercises.

 Rev. Abraham Cronbach Delivers an Able and Interesting Address - Changes in the Board of Trustees Announced. - First Day's Enrollment 167.

 Wednesday morning the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute began its fourth annual session. A large number of people were present at the opening exercises which began at 10 o'clock. Rev. J. D. Harper, pastor of the Methodist Church gave the invocation, which was followed by a violin solo by Prof. Sontag, musical director of the school, accompanied by little Miss Eva Mouton, the talented little daughter of Judge Julian Mouton, and one of his pupils. Rev. Abraham Cronbach, of Cincinnati, delivered the address. His subject was The Reign of Law, and he handled it in an original manner. He began by calling attention to a hum drum, every day fact, the fact of repetition, through which it is possible for man to learn and progress, giving many examples to illustrate the ways in which repetition rules life animate and inanimate. Continuing that repetition is the base of all knowledge and is also the inevitable throughout nature. History repeats itself is but the exemplification, which as a fact becomes rule or law. Scientists mean by law nothing more than that things happen over and over again. The law of gravitation simply generalizes that a body unsupported will fall. It is only on the basis of repetition that we can know things and govern ourselves for future exigencies. Developing the thought he showed the identity of all law with repetition and asserted it to be the duty of legislatures, to discover, not make, laws, and that when they failed to do so, the result, citing attempts at prohibition as confirmatory. Reasoning ingeniously that law is repetition or uniformity, and that love is universal, he brought out the connection between law and love and declared that law is love. Then he closed by making application of the truths of repetition, in which he urged upon the pupils methodical, persevering effort; upon the teachers their duty not to make the law for their pupils, but to discover it, that each one might be led onward and upward to find the light.

 His address was entertaining from beginning to close, and while at times verging into the speculative, yet was eminently practical. One of its chief charms was the unique manner in which he treated what he termed a hum drum fact - repetition, displaying it in a light new to his listeners.

 At the close of the address Miss Eva Mouton favored the audience with a fine piano selection from Chopin, after which Dr. Stephens spoke of the growth of the school, stating that each year had been marked by an increase in the attendance, an enlargement of the faculty and the addition of more courses, this year a course in elementary agriculture. He acknowledged and expressed appreciation of the gift by Mr. Scott Heywood of all oil needed by the Institute for the coming session, which amount to a saving of about $250, enabling the Institute to use that sum in purchasing necessary equipment. He also expressed appreciation of the kindness of Maj. P. L. DeClouet in sending his hay press to bale the hay cut from the Institute campus. He mentioned also that the Women's Club of Lafayette, had generously given a scholarship to a worthy young man or woman of the parish at the Institute. He announced changes in the Board of Trustees as follows: Mayor Chas. D. Caffery, of Lafayette, appointed to succeed Dr. Jas. A. Lee of New Iberia, deceased; Col. F. P. Stubbs, Jr., to succeed J. G. Lee, withdrawn; Calvin K. Schwing to succeed Judge Lewis, of Opelousas, resigned. Phanor Breazeale, of Natchitoches, to succeed Jno. K. Overton, Alexandria, resigned.

 There had been one change in the faculty, Prof. E. F. Gayle, principal of the Lake Charles High School, had been selected to fill the place of Prof. V. L. Roy, resigned to accept the superintendency of the Avoyelles public schools. He introduced Prof. Gayle, who in a brief talk expressed his pleasure to work in Lafayette. He closed by making announcements, as chairman of the committee on enrollment and examination, to direct the students. After which the audience was dismissed and the work of enrolling began. The first days enrollment was 167. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.                 







THE POOR MAN'S COURT OF APPEAL. 


How many citizens of this parish or of Louisiana will engage in or be a defendant in a suit involving $2000 or more during the coming year? Hardly very many; but there will be a large number who will have to defend suits for a less amount. Shall these people be denied a right of appeal? Must they be confined to the decision of one court, while their richer and more fortunate fellow citizens have a supreme court provided and paid for out of the money of the whole people, to which to appeal? Shall one class of citizens be given a right refused to another class? Shall a small minority have a precious privilege denied to a large majority? The right of appeal is an essential part of free institutions; if restricted, it is at the expense of liberty, and becomes the entering wedge of tyranny.

 It is charged that a circuit court of appeals is unnecessary. It is the poor man's court of appeal, and if it is unnecessary, then the supreme court, which is the rich man's court of appeal, is unnecessary It is urged that the circuit court of appeals is expensive; so is the supreme court. If the State is too poor and economical  to have a rich man's court of appeal. This is a democratic government and before the law all men are equal. If one man is entitled to a court of appeal, every other is so entitled, and the people of his State will be blind, deaf and dumb to their rights if they fail to vote emphatically for the court of appeals amendment. A principal is involved, the principal of equal privileges to all, special favors to none.

 It may be urged that the constitution provides for a circuit court of appeals. It does; but it is so ingeniously provided, so economically provided, that it is a delusion, a make-believe - it has been tried four years and found wanting. It is a court in appearance only, there is no reality to it. Don't be deceived. Unless the circuit court of appeals amendment is adopted, we will have only the shadow left and lose the substance.

 Vote for the judiciary amendment, Act No. 132 and obtain a poor man's court of appeal that will be real. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.    








A Visit to the Jail.

 Through the kindness of Jailer Broussard a reporter of this paper was through the jail Saturday. 

 A thorough cleaning had just been given the jail. The floors had been scrubbed and all inside whitewashed, giving the jail a clean, neat appearance. Deputy Broussard stated that every week the jail was thoroughly cleaned, the vaults burnt out, and all parts kept as neat as possible.

 The reporter noticed that the iron work of the jail is beginning to rust in some places and needs a goo coat of paint. It would be economy on the part of the Police Jury to have the paint put on as soon as possible.

 He noticed also that the roof leaks, but was told that arrangements had been made for fixing it.

 There is a bathtub in the jail for the use of the prisoners, which is both a convenience and sanitary provision. But the reporter was surprised to find only one as there were both white and black prisoners and often white and black women, and, of course, they can't all use the same bath tub. It would be better for the parish to put in three more, one each for white men, white women and negro women. Then the prisoners can all keep clean, which would assist the jailor in keeping the jail in order.

 There are now twelve prisoners in jail, three white men and nine negroes.     Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.   

    









HIGH SCHOOL BENEFIT.


 Novel Entertainment Devised, Up and Down the Pike. 

 Sontag Band Will Play Lots of Attractions. 


Friday night a novel and delightful entertainment will be given at Parkerson's Grove to raise money to pay off the debt incurred in painting the High School. The Sontag Band, who are ever ready and willing to aid the schools, will lend their services, and render a number of fine selections. 

 The idea of the entertainment has been taken from one of the attractions at the World's Fair, and those who attend will be conducted "Up and down the pike" seeing various things by the way, perchance stopping to wander in Louisiana, inspect the Gordon Hotel, Lafayette's new modern three story enterprise, or make a journey in Japland. A "financial panic" will be one of the sights and experiences of the Pike, and other attractions will be Over and Under the Sea, Creation and a Sure Cure for Love.

 Silver rings will be given away. There will be a dainty Fudge Booth, and refreshments in plenty - gumbo, coffee, ice cream, cake, candy, peanuts, and confetti.

 Mrs. O. T. Ford has kindly donated a handsome sofa pillow to be raffled at the entertainment of the benefit of the High School.

 Parkerson's Grove will be a gay place Friday evening and those present will have a good time.

 Everybody invited.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.

 


 

Bids are Invited. - For lowest offer on contract to do the laundry work for the Industrial Institute to do the laundry work for the Industrial Institute Boarding Departments for the school year. Give rate per month for each student in boys' dormitory and for each student in girls' dormitory separately. Laundry for not less than fifty persons each week guaranteed. Right reserved to reject any and all bids. Apply to E. L. Stephens, President.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.




Passed Sentence. - Monday Judge Debaillon passed sentence on the following prisoners, all colored, who had plead guilty.

 Tommie Amond, shooting with intent to kill, six months in the penitentiary.

 Joe Beloney, breaking and entering grand larceny, ten years in the penitentiary.

 John Rice, horse-stealing, two years in the penitentiary.

 Louis Bernard, carrying concealed weapons, $100 and costs or 9 months on the public roads.

 L. E. Breaux, carrying concealed weapons, $100 and costs. He paid the fine. 
Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.



 Charged With Theft. - Deputies Peck and Broussard arrested a negro Wednesday night near Rayne on a charge of having stolen a shot gun and $147 in cash from Mr. Louis Anselet, on whose place he was employed. The stolen property was recovered. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.


 DEMOCRATIC NOMINEES.


  For Judge 18th Judicial District, PHILIP S. PUGH, of Crowley.

 For District Attorney, 18th Judicial District, WM. CAMPBELL, of Lafayette.

 For Judicial First District of the First Circuit, Court of Appeals, JULIAN MOUTON. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1904.




A Coon in Jail.

 There's a coon in jail. He was locked up Thursday. He is not a particularly dangerous looking coon, rather gentle and inclined to be friendly; nevertheless Jailor Broussard has put a chain on him to prevent any liability of his escaping. He is not very large and yet is full grown, and full of cunning ways. That's the reason for the chain. Nothing is known of his antecedents or raising, but it is presumed that he had fairly good training in the things he should do or not do. No special charge has been brought against him as yet. He was found wandering about, acting in a very suspicious manner, and gave the impression that he would as soon steal as not if he found anything which appealed to his taste. Sheriff Lacoste gathered him in and instructed Jailor Broussard to place him on the list of parish boarders. He is now safe behind the bars and likely to stay there for some time to come. It is hardly probable that the grand jury will release him, for he has fully demonstrated that he is a rascal by slyly getting on the good side of the other prisoners. In fact, he is a prime favorite, and affords lots of pleasure and amusement to the inmates of the jail; for, you know, he is a four-legged coon, whose dress parade name is raccoon.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.     



Socialist Lecture. - October 5 and 6, Jno. M. Ray, of Nashville, Tenn., national organizer of the Socialist party will speak on Socialist party will speak on "Socialism vs. Capitalism, Which?" at the courthouse. Mr. Ray is a most entertaining speaker, and those would appreciate and interesting and instructive discourse on this subject should not fail to hear him. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.

Foot Injured.
 Mr. Edmond Cochrane had his painfully injured Saturday night by a torpedo. He was riding on the rear step of the engine, when it ran over a torpedo placed on the track by some mischievous person. The step runs very near the rail and the explosion was so severe as to lacerate his foot, necessitating several stitches. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.



 Negro Killed. Saturday night a negro named Maurice Reuben was shot and killed at a ball near Carencro by another negro. Bertmance Guidry, who in turn was shot in the arm by a third negro, Arthur Minnick. The shooting was caused by a dispute about twenty cents. Both negroes are in jail. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904

           


 New Manager at Cumberland Telephone Co. 

  Mr. F. Thomas, manager of the Cumberland Telephone Exchange in St. Martin has been transferred to Lafayette to replace W. B. Parker resigned. Traveling Auditor Jaireau finished checking Mr. Parker and turned the office over to Mr. Thomas Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Parker leave this week for McComb City, Miss., which will be there future home.

 Mr. Parker has been a citizen of Lafayette scarcely a year, yet during that time by his accommodating spirit and pleasant manners he has won a large number of sincere friends who regret his departure. About three months ago, Mr. Parker wooed and won one of Carencro's most charming and popular girls, Miss Marcelle Blot, and her host of friends doubly regret that Mr. Parker's health necessitates his seeking a different location. Both have hundreds of best wishes for happiness and health in their new home. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904.





Bids Are Invited.

 For lowest offer on contract to do the laundry work or the Industrial Institute Boarding Departments for the school year. Give rate per month for each student in boys' dormitory, and for each student in girls' dormitory separately. Laundry for not less than fifty persons each week guaranteed. Right reserved to reject any and all bids. Apply to E. L. Stephens, President. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1904.



 We Ask Your Attention.

 We invite the special attention of the ladies of the community to our large and varied stock of latest style hats and bonnets, dress fabrics and other fashion novelties. A visit to our Millinery Department will convince the ladies that in point of style, quality and variety we are well prepared to meet all their requirements. High class millinery at moderate prices is the distinguishing feature of our store. Moss & Company. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1904.








 Back From New Orleans.

 Miss Marie Castel has returned from New Orleans, where she went to get all the latest styles in millinery. Her customers will find that her new stock, which has nearly all been received, is all in the very newest designs and is being offered at a very moderate cost. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1904.


 A Curiosity.

 Numa Broussard, who lives near Carencro, brought to this office Wednesday a curiosity in the shape of an ear of corn showing ten well developed ears on one stalk. It has been on exhibition in the office window and has attracted considerable attention. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1904. 








 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/23/1904.

 The Broussard school, Prof. J. W. Faulk, principal, opened Monday last week with an enrollment of nearly of a hundred.

 Mr. Frank Moss and Miss Louise Montagne, who went to New Orleans to get the latest styles in millinery, returned Thursday.

 Mrs. John Ramsay returned Monday from a visit to the World's Fair and relatives in the North.

 Judge C. Debaillon returned Saturday from Crowley, where he as been holding a two weeks term of civil court.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1904.















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 From the Lafayette Gazette of September 28th, 1901:


IT IS NOW AS IT WAS THEN.

  Excepting the eight years of President Cleveland's administrations, the Republican party has held undisputed sway in the political affairs of the Republic since the Civil war. Whether it is the result of too much power or not, it is a fact that the Republicans party has ignored the plain principles embodied in the Federal constitution. Whenever it has become expedient to overstep constitutional barriers, that party did not hesitate to hold the fundamental law in profound contempt. Being a party of opportunists, without any cardinal principles to guide its destinies, Republicanism, has advocated whatever policies suited the popular whims of the day. Recognizing the potent influence of wealth in the elections it has, through class legislation, enlisted the moneyed corporations to fight in battles.

 In 1868 the Republican party was very powerful. It had already allied itself with the corporations and, though quite young in years, it showed a contemptuous disregard of principles. On the Fourth of July, 1868, Samuel J. Tilden, the great exponent of the Jeffersonian idea of government, penned an arraignment of Republicanism as it then existed. That arraignment so thoroughly portrays the Republican party of t0-day and so clearly describes the duty of the Democracy in this critical period of the Republic's existence, that it should be read by every citizen who believes in the simple, honest government of the fathers. Gov. Tilden wrote:

 "The advanced Republican party is a rule unto itself; its opinion of what it is convenient or expedient it should do, is the only limitation of power which it acknowledges; and it is its opinion that it should do pretty much everything, in all places and with respect to everybody.

 "Such a false system of political philosophy does now, as it has all ages, immediately degenerate into selfish rapacity.

 "The most respectable representatives of the prevalent ideas of the Republican party are voting money out of everybody's pockets into their own.

 "In this condition of things, nothing but the principles of the Democratic party as maintained by Jefferson and Jackson can save the country.

 "There is no organized agency that can give effect to these principles except the Democratic party.

 "The Democratic party should pursue a liberal policy, in all its actions, and accept as brethren all who stand with it on the present issue.

 "It is too powerful to be jealous. It has too great a motive for the restoration of its own traditional principles of government to an ascendancy in the councils of the country, which they made great, prosperous and happy, to think of anything less grand or noble."
Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901. 

         





PETITION ALTERED. 

 To Suit the Needs of the Community -- More Money for Plant and School and Less for Market.

 

 It has been decided to alter the proposition to be submitted to the voters of the town toward the building of a rental school house, a public market and the extension of the waterworks and electric light plant.


 The original proposition set aside $20,000 for a public market. It is now proposed to reduce that amount to $12,o00, to increase the allowance for a school building from $20,000 to $24,000, and to use $14,000 instead of $10,000 in the extension of the water and light system. This alteration has been made in deference to the wishes of many advocates of the plan who believe that the proposition in its altered condition will more thoroughly meet the needs of the community. It is thought that $12,000 will be enough for the public market, while $24,000 for the school and $14,000 for the plant will not be too much.

 Of course, the alteration will necessitate a great deal more work on the part of those who have undertaken the task oif securing the required number of signatures, as it becomes necessary to call upon the persons who have signed the original petition; but this work will be greatly facilitated by the fact that the people are as a rule familiar with the merits of the proposition. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.




INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE.


 Increase in Attendance Continues - The Academic Work Well Begun.

 We are pleased to learn the attendance at the Industrial Institute has been gradually increasing each day since the opening on the 18th - and that many fresh applications for admission are coming in.

 The academic work of the school seems to have started off briskly from the first, while the departments of manual training have been somewhat delayed by reason the impossibility of completing the machine shop in time. The work on this building, however, is being actively pushed and will be finished within  a few weeks.

 The permanent schedule of studies will be put into effect next week and by the end of another week it is expected that all the classes will be settled and hard at work.

 The exercise of the day begin with a brief program of a literary and of musical character, lasting fifteen minutes. This is conducted usually by the various classes and sometimes by the teachers.

 The classes in singing have begun there work favorably - and the whole school joins in the morning chorus of the patriotic hymn, "America."

 The dormitory is now finished and is a most thoroughly equipped and furnished boarding place for the young ladies who come from a distance to attend the Institute.

 The most important material improvement now going on the grounds is the setting of the boiler and engine and the connecting up of the steam-heat system in the main building and the dormitory. This will all be accomplished, we trust, before the cold weather sets in.

 Meanwhile the subject of plankwalks deserves to be continually agitated and we earnestly hope that it will not be long before good walks are built from the center of town to the Institute grounds. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1901.


 S. W. La. Ind. Inst.
[From the Washington Enterprise.]

 The Southwestern Industrial Institute at Lafayette, opened its doors on last Wednesday to the pupils of the State. President Stephens, in a recent communication to the writer, says: "I am pleased to inform you that the Institute has opened under very favorably circumstances, and has every prospect for a successful year. One hundred students arrived on the first day." This is an excellent showing and we hope for its every success. From the Washington Enterprise and in the Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.


 New Iberia on S. L. I. I.

 The Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute opened at Lafayette on Wednesday last with upward of one hundred pupils from the several parishes of Southwest Louisiana, Iberia being the conspicuous exception. Surely parents who have children to education and who look to the merits of educational institutions away from home to which to send them, can not afford to overlook the advantages offered by the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial. Here is a magnificently equipped school, where the mental and physical development goes hand in hand, at their very doors, where tuition is absolutely free and the expense of board and lodging at the minimum. A visit to this institution will convince parents that here is the place to educate their boys and girls. From the New Iberia Enterprise and in the Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.  

  




AN EDUCATIONAL BOOM.

 "... There seems to be a genuine educational boom all over the Louisiana. The school have all opened with increased attendance and the young people of both sexes appear to be infected with enthusiasm in the great cause of education. This is encouraging, for these young people are living in an age when education has ceased to be merely ornamental, and is indispensable to any kind of success in any useful avocation. ..." From the Ruston Leader.

During the last five years more progress has been made in the educational development of Louisiana than during any other period of equal length in the State's history. Even here in Southwest Louisiana, where the advocates of public education have had to overcome obstacles of a serious character, there has been marked progress, and everywhere throughout this section evidences of increasing interest in free schools are visible. Those who appreciated the absolute need of better and more public schools, were not only greatly hampered by a lamentable indifference on the part of the people, but by the organized and persistent opposition of a portion of the Catholic clergy. Under the unfavorable conditions, the work of building up the public school system has been a difficult one, rendered still more difficult by the baneful influences of politics. Fortunately the sobered sense of the people has refused to subscribe to the peculiar tenet which would make free government an impossibility, because as was said by Jefferson, "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a State of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." Of course, the public school system may not be completely out of the quagmire of machine politics, and perhaps the festive boss may yet retain his "pull" in some sections of the country, but the signs of the times point to his ultimate elimination from the management of public schools.

 The Leader is no doubt right in stating that there is a genuine educational boom in Louisiana, and well that it is so, for in the future the boy or girl who will not be trained to do something useful will be at a great disadvantage to earn a livelihood. The battle of life is becoming fiercer every day, and it is so written that he who runs may read that hereafter the youth without education or trade will have to take part in a very unequal struggle to say the least.

 But the fight for education is not over. It should go on until the active and zealous support of every fair-minded citizen is enlisted. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1901.



CAPT. LUCAS
To Devote His Attention to Louisiana Fields. - Confident In His Belief of Great Oil Possibilities.

 [New Orleans Picayune, Sept. 23.]

 Captain Lucas, the developer o the Beaumont oil field, passed through New Orleans yesterday on his way back to Beaumont. Captain Lucas did not register at any of the hotels, only a few minutes to spend in the city. During his short stay he gave the following interview to the Picayune: 



  "In regard to the Louisiana oil fields, I can only repeat what I have all along said, as published from time to time in the Picayune. The Louisiana region, if properly handled and developed, will yield oil in enormous quantities. Two years ago, when I was working in Louisiana, I brought in the Anse-La-Butte well, but it did not yield oil in paying quantities. Those who owned the property would not let me go deep enough, and I accordingly went over to Beaumont and eventually brought in the famous gusher. The Texas region is not better than Louisiana. In fact, I believe the latter is superior to the former. The oil I drew at Anse-la-Butte is certainly of a higher grade than the Texas oil and in some respects, better than any oil in the United States. I took a sample from St. Martin and have tested it with the above result.

  This statement does not apply to the oil at Sulphur City. There it is dense and of an inferior grade. The Jennings, Anse-la-Butte and Terrebonne oil, however, is the best I have seen anywhere. Had I remained in Louisiana instead of going to Texas, I believe I would have been as successful here as I was there, for the oil is almost certainly as abundant in the Louisiana region.

  "What do you think of Prof. Caracriti's statement that oil and natural gas exist throughout South Louisiana?"

  "I have not read the interview, but I know Prof. Carascristi, and I know also that you can rely upon everything he says. I do not think he made the statement that oil can be found throughout Louisiana. He probably said throughout St. Martin and Terrebonne parishes. His statement about the natural gas is most probably correct, for I know it exists. The only question heretofore existing in my mind was if it occurred in paying quantities. If it does, Louisiana will certainly prove to be a lucky state. Wherever natural gas is found the surrounding country invariably becomes prosperous, for it furnishes a fuel cheaper than can be had from any other source. In Louisiana it would make the salt mines as valuable as gold mine. We are now annually importing thousands of pounds of soda-ash, caustic soda, bleaching powder, etc., all of which are by products from salt. With cheap fuel, the Louisiana salt mines can furnish all this, besides piping the oil to other localities and selling it a low rate and at an enormous profit.

  "During my trip north, I found that Beaumont, Jennings and other places in Texas and Louisiana are as well known as New York or Boston.


 The whole north and east is talking about the wonderful resources of the south, of Texas and Louisiana. If oil gushers are brought in from Louisiana regions, the lucky places will be as fortunate as Beaumont. I think, in fact, they will be more fortunate for a large part of the boom and speculation seen by us in Texas will be absent from the Louisiana region. The growth of the favored section will be less rapid, maybe, but it will be anchored upon a firm business foundation.

  "I shall be in Beaumont only a few days, after that time I shall enter the Louisiana territory, and see what I can do in the way of developing it. I go to Beaumont to attend my business, which I have left two months ago in good hands." Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.






 Concert on October 1.

 Good music, vocal and instrumental, is promised those who will attend the concert to be given next Tuesday evening, in Falk's opera-house, by the pupils of Mrs. Alf. Mouton. An excellent program has been prepared and a real treat is in store for the lovers of music. The concert is given for the benefit of the Sontag Military Band. Admission, 25 cents; reserved seats, 25 cents extra. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.



NECROLOGICAL.
Mrs. M. E. Simpson.

 Mrs. M. E. Simpson, the widow of the late S. F. Thompson, died last Sunday at the home of her son-in-law, T. S. Singleton, in this parish. Mrs. Simpson was a native of Newark, N. J., and was 72 years of age. She was a resident of Lafayette a number of years and held a high place of esteem and affection of a large circle of acquaintances. She possessed in a marked degree the eminent virtues of Christian womanhood and in her life exemplified the highest ideal of the devoted wife and mother. She leaves a number of children and grand-children. The children are: Dr. A. H. Simpson of Arnaudville, O. H. Simpson of New Orleans, Mrs. T. S. Singleton of Lafayette, Mrs. Eudolia Olivier of St. Martin parish. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.



 Capt. Moss Promoted.

 The appended army order will be of interest to the friends of Capt. Moss in Lafayette:

 ---------------p. 1-----------------

 The headquarters of the 24th U. S. Infantry were lately transferred from Tayug to Manila, by order of Gen. Chaffee, and with the change has come higher responsibilities to Capt. Moss as the foregoing army order indicates that he has been appointed Adjutant of the "Post of Manila," the largest post in the army. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.



Oil Prospects.

 There seems to be good reason to believe that before many days evidences of the existence of oil in this section will be disclosed in a manner to convince the most skeptical. It is reported that at Mamou the prospects are very fair. It is stated upon what appears to be good authority that a gusher will be "brought in." Of course, no one can be sure that there will be a gusher at Mamou, but if indications of experienced drillers and experts count for anything, the Mamou gusher will be a reality within the next few days.

 Coming nearer home the prospects are just as good. The Martin-Blackman company is justified in entertaining the hopeful anticipations. Had it not been for the immense gas pressure which temporarily interfered with the operations, we are assured by Dr. Caracristi and other geologists that the Anse la Butte gusher would now be throwing up great quantities of the precious fluid. The Martin-Blackman company has had to overcome a number of serious difficulties, but with commendable energy and unswerving faith in the outcome it has never once thought of abandoning the work. From the start the company has shown that it has the utmost confidence in the Anse la Butte fields and it has been willing to spend a large sum of money. It is certainly to the credit of the stockholders of this company that they refused to be discouraged by unfavorably signs and disastrous accidents. Should they succeed in bringing in a gusher, they will have deserved it. Unlike others, the Martin-Blackman and the Jeanerette companies have not only leased the lands, but they have given tangible proof of their good faith. Those who have gobbled up the lands, without making any efforts toward exploiting them, are carrying out neither the spirit nor the letter of the contracts, but they are depriving the owners of these lands of benefits which may possibly accrue from the discovery of oil. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.   


Jealous Jennings.

 Our jealous little contemporary, the Jennings Times, devotes considerable space telling of the nerve exhibited by Crowley in claiming the Mamou oil field as a Crowley find. Crowley has a company organized, all of the choice lands purchased and the whole field in its hand before the intelligent citizens o that little burg dreamed that such as gas and other oil indications existed this side of Beaumont. Although Jennings has a little the best of us on the distance the enterprising citizens o this place will demonstrate to them that the "nerve" and "gall" the Times credits us with possessing, when mixed with the proper spirit and energy, are might fine things to have. From the Crowley Signal and in the Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901.


A STRANGE MEETING.

 There was a meeting at Dominique Boneaud's in the first ward last Sunday, and from all acounts it was one of the most dismal failures that it has even been our duty as a journalist to chronicle. By what authority it was convened we are unable to say. It was certainly not vested with authority by the parish committee for that honorable body has not yet come together; and it is hardly probable that it has received its powers from a higher authority such as Chairman Wilkinson of the State Central Committee, or Harrity of the National Organization, and we do not believe that even the "Society for the Cremation of Bosses and Dictators" could be guilty of such a breach of Democratic etiquette. Like kings, perhaps the organizers of this singular convention, disregarded all earthly sources for a bestowal of power, and believed themselves designated by divine inspiration to shape the political destinies of the first ward of Lafayette parish.

 The meeting was called to order by a gentleman of pronounced anti-administration proclivities, who proceeded to explain that its purpose was to nominate a candidate for Police Juror of the ward, stating that said candidate would be entitled to the undivided support of the Democratic party. Though this declaration might have emanated from a high authority, few of the gentlemen present would be reconciled to this manner of nominating a candidate. The chairman, who, it seemed, was bent on making ferocious onslaughts on Cushing's parliamentary laws, announced that he would appoint six gentlemen who in turn appoint six others, the twelve to constitute a committee to select a candidate for Police Juror. It was a hard matter to find twelve gentlemen willing to serve on the committee, but finally the required number was secured. The committee then retired and after mature deliberation made a report to the chairman who proclaimed that the result was the nomination o Mr. Alonzo Lacey, a worthy citizen of that ward, for Police Juror. The chairman stated that Mr. Lacey was selected by a majority of one, which, by the way, is quite strange when it is considered that the committee was composed of twelves members. By what process of figuring this remarkable conclusion was reached will probably remain one of the strange features of this very strange meeting.

 The Gazette is reliably informed that the choice of the committee was not submitted to the convention, but it was declared irrevocable and binding. Few will insist that this way on nominating a candidate is in consonance with Democratic usage, but all will concede that is a decided improvement on the jury system. In criminal cases the verdict must be unanimous and in civil suits two-thirds are required to render a judgment, but here we are presented with a case where the majority of one in a jury of twelve settles the point at issue beyond dispute.

 The majority of those present were attracted there through curiosity and looked upon the whole proceedings as a huge joke. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1895.



          








 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 9/23/1901.

 Mr. C. Jeanmard has secured the services of a skillful milliner and hat-trimmer. All work will be in accord with the latest styles.

 Lost. - One small account book, marked Ledger on back. No value except to owner. Will pay reward to anyone finding same. Lafayette Bottling Works.

 A regular jury term of the district court will convene Monday. The docket is quite heavy.

 C. C. McBride has opened a restaurant in the building opposite L. Lacoste's store. He will always have fresh oysters.

 A dance was given at Falk's hall Wednesday night.

 Miss Edith Dupre visited relatives in Opelousas Sunday.

 Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Lusted and children left this week to spend some time with relatives in New Orleans.

 Miss Ella Montgomery, of Crowley is visiting Miss Lizzie Mudd this week.
Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1901.





  

           

 




 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 28th, 1901:


'Captain Lucas' to Devote His Attention to Louisiana Fields.                                                               


Confident in His Belief of Great Oil Possibilities.                                                               

 More Oil in Louisiana than in Texas.                                                                

 Anse-La-Butte Oil is the Best in the United States.

 Salt Mines as Valuable as a Gold Mines.                                                                 

Captain Lucas, the developer of the Beaumont oil field, passed through New Orleans yesterday on his way back to Beaumont. Captain Lucas did not register at any of the hotels, having only a few minutes to spend in the city. During his short stay he gave the following interview to the Picayune: 
  

 "I left Beaumont two months ago because I was overworked and needed rest. I knew that as long as I remained in Texas oil fields I should have to attend to a thousand business affairs, and that I would no relief from the fatigue I then suffered. From Texas I went to Alabama and looked at oil lands in that state. Oil has been found in Alabama but not in paying quantities.

  "From Alabama I went north and east, taking in the Pan-American during the trip. I have since been to Washington, and have come direct from there to New Orleans.

  "In regard to the Louisiana oil fields, I can only repeat what I have all along said, as published from time to time in the Picayune. The Louisiana region, if properly handled and developed, will yield oil in enormous quantities. Two years ago, when I was working in Louisiana, I brought in the Anse-La-Butte well, but it did not yield oil in paying quantities. Those who owned the property would not let me go deep enough, and I accordingly went over to Beaumont and eventually brought in the famous gusher. The Texas region is not better than Louisiana. In fact, I believe the latter is superior to the former. The oil I drew at Anse-la-Butte is certainly of a higher grade than the Texas oil and in some respects, better than any oil in the United States. I took a sample from St. Martin and have tested it with the above result.

  (Several unreadable words) not apply to the oil at Sulphur City. There it is dense and of an inferior grade. The Jennings, Anse-la-Butte and Terrebonne oil, however, is the best I have seen anywhere. Had I remained in Louisiana instead of going to Texas, I believe I would have been as successful here as I was there, for the oil is almost certainly as abundant in the Louisiana region.

  "What do you think of Prof. Caracriti's statement that oil and natural gas exist throughout South Louisiana?"

  "I have not read the interview, but I know Prof. Carascristi, and I know also that you can rely upon everything he says. I do not think he made the statement that oil can be found throughout Louisiana. He probably said throughout St. Martin and Terrebonne parishes. His statement about the natural gas is most probably correct, for I know it exists. The only question heretofore existing in my mind was if it occurred in paying quantities. If it does, Louisiana will certainly prove to be a lucky state. Wherever natural gas is found the surrounding country invariably becomes prosperous, for it furnishes a fuel cheaper than can be had from any other source. In Louisiana it would make the salt mines as valuable as gold mine. We are now annually importing thousands of pounds of soda-ash, caustic soda, bleaching powder, etc., all of which are by products from salt. With cheap fuel, the Louisiana salt mines can furnish all this, besides piping the oil to other localities and selling it a low rate and at an enormous profit.

  "During my trip north, I found that Beaumont, Jennings and other places in Texas and Louisiana are as well known as New York or Boston.


 The whole north and east is talking about the wonderful resources of the south, of Texas and Louisiana. If oil gushers are brought in from Louisiana regions, the lucky places will be as fortunate as Beaumont. I think, in fact, they will be more fortunate for a large part of the boom and speculation seen by us in Texas will be absent from the Louisiana region. The growth of the favored section will be less rapid, maybe, but it will be anchored upon a firm business foundation.

  "I shall be in Beaumont only a few days, after that time I shall enter the Louisiana territory, and see what I can do in the way of developing it. I go to Beaumont to attend my business, which I have left two months ago in good hands."

Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901.






Oil in Louisiana.
Capt. Lucas Confident State is Rich in Petroleum.

 Capt. A. F. Lucas, who brought in the first gusher in the Beaumont field, reached New Orleans on one of the early trains from Alabama. He spent only an hour at the Commercial Hotel, and left for Beaumont at night. Capt. Lucas has been prospecting the last two months in Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi. He came here from Pensacola, looking over the grounds in that vicinity, which is reputed to have given indication of oil deposits.

 Capt. Lucas agrees with Manager J. E. McDowell that Sour Lake, Tex., is within the proven oil fields. He is also sanguine that in the course of a short period oil in quantities will be discovered in Louisiana. Louisiana was the first State in the South in which he prospected, before he was obliged to quit work for financial reasons, and he is still particularly sanguine over the rich discoveries in the western and southwestern portions of the Commonwealth.

 It is due in great measure to Captain's insistence in the matter that the Guffey Company is now actively engaged in drilling for oil at Anse la Butte.

 It is only a case of how deep the drill must be sent down in the earth to a sufficient depth. It may be 1,2oo feet an it may be necessary to go down 2,ooo feet, but the Captain is of the opinion that oil will be got in immense quantities some time before the men engaged in boring have completed their work in Louisiana. 

From the New Orleans Times-Democrat and in the Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901.

       




Oil Prospects.

 Prof. Caracristi tells Wonderful Possibilities in Louisiana Fields.

 Gives Assurance of Oil Gushers, Too.

 Prof. C. F. Z. Caracristi, C. E. E. M., the oil expert who has been recently traveling over the Texas and Louisiana oil fields, returned to New Orleans this morning and registered at the St. Charles Hotel. He has prepared an elaborate and illustrated report which will appear in the Manufacturer's Record in the forthcoming issue. It was under the auspices of this paper that he visited the Beaumont section and for that reason he could not speak of the Texas oil situation to-day. He however, felt free to discuss the Louisiana oil fields and the situation in this state in all its details. I am sure that there is still oil in all that portion of Lousiana west of New Orleans, and that there will be a number of gushers brought in that territory in the near future," said the doctor. "When I was here a few weeks ago I explained that there could only be a real oil gusher where there was an oil or cap rock over the oil deposits.

 The States at that time had my interview illustrated. Its publication appeared in the issue of August 8, and if there are any of The States readers who desire to understand fully the correct philosophy of an oil gusher, reference to that article will be the best possible way to attain it.

 "When I was in the city at that time I was under the impression that there would be but little cap rock found in the Louisiana oil territory, and that for the reason there would probably be but few if any real oil gushers brought in. I have just returned from an extensive examination of many of the oil properties being developed in Louisiana and I found that there is a cap rock in the greatest abundance and that there is no doubt of the fact that gushers will be brought in on Louisiana territory.

 "An instance in point is the Anse la Butte well. Let me tell you some of my experience there.

 "I was asked by the officials of the company putting down that well to make an examination of their property, which I did, I found that the drillers had gone through 410 feet of soil, then through 386 feet of the purest and best rock salt I ever saw. Some other formations were then gone through to the extent of several feet, and then the cap rock was struck.

 "The men in charge of the drilling who have been working for some weeks without rest, asked for a vacation and the company granted them this. But while they were away the pressure of the gas beneath the cap rock which was 18 inches thick. was burst through and the well was filled up with coarse gravel, some of which was as big as one's fist. The well would have been all right, but the drillers drew up the pipe for a number of feet before quitting work, and the consequence is that the whole well now has to be drilled over again. But I am sure that there will be a gusher at Anse la Butte as soon as another well can be put it. This will take several weeks.

 "I am now on my way to Alabama to look over some lands there and expect to return to the city within a few days at the farthest and will then go back into the Louisiana field.

 "I have also been over the territory where the reported Jennings gusher is located and I am sure oil will be found in the real gusher fashion. You may say that I prophesied for the southwestern Louisiana district that it will be a great oil producing section before many more months roll by." Lafayette Advertiser  9/28/1901.



Hotels Full.

 The Advertiser is pleased to note that all the hotels are daily filled to their utmost capacity. The proprietors of the leading hotels being interviewed, declare that business has never been so good. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901.


     




    









Robbery at Father Forge's. - Between 12 and 1 o'clock Thursday night, robbers entered Rev. Father Forge's residence and stole his gold watch valued at $100, also a watch belonging to Rev. Father Baulard valued at $35. They also took $35 in money belonging to the church and $3.00 belonging to the cook.   Laf. Advertiser 9/28/1901.


DIED.- Mrs. Mary E. Simpson.

 Died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. T. S. Singleton, at Lafayette, Sunday, Sept. 22nd, at 11:40 a. m., Mrs. Mary E. Simpson, widow of S. F. Simpson, aged 72 years, 3 months and 8 days. Mrs. Simpson was born in Newark, New Jersey, June 14th, 1829. Deceased leaves four children and eight grand children to mourn her loss. She was a resident of Louisiana for over 50 years and of Lafayette for over 20 years. Her surviving children are, Mrs. Eudolia Olivier of Breaux Bridge, Mrs. T. S. Singleton, of Lafayette, Dr. A. H. Simpson of New Orleans. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901.

   


"THE STAR BOARDER"
From the Los Angeles Herald of Dec. 20, 1900.

 The Star Boarder" at the Los Angeles Theatre was given to a large sized house last night. Judging from mirth provoked there was a general satisfaction. The comedy was cleverly presented and the work of Chas. H. Boyle and his excellent company pleased the audience greatly. "The Star Boarder" is fun-provoking from start to finish, full of bright and catchy bits, and up to the times sayings. A bevy of pretty girls did some clever dances and the choruses were very good. A quartet came in for a liberal share of applause and had to respond to seven encores. "The Star Boarder" will be at Falk's Opera House, Oct. 10.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901.  


Merry-Go-Round - One of the latest improved Merry-Go-Rounds is now located next to the Lafayette Drug Store, and will run every evening at 5 o'clock. Special attention and good care will be taken of children by the management. Give the little ones a nickel each and let them go and enjoy themselves.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901







Day of Atonement.

 A Solemn Fast Day of the Jews.

 What it Signifies to the Israelites.

 Monday evening was the Jewish Day of Atonement, the holiest of all their festival days, the Sabbath of Sabbaths, a day of reconciliation, purification and peace. Israelites all over the world assembled in their respective places of worship to celebrate a solemn fast and to pour out their hearts before Jehovah, acknowledging their failings and asking mercy and forgiveness.

 "And it shall be unto you a statue forever, in the seventh month of the tenth day of the month shall ye afflict yourselves, and no work shall ye do. For on that day he [the high priest' will atone for you to cleanse you ;  from all your sins before the Eternal shall ye be clean." Leviticus, XVIII, 27-28.

 During the days which have intervened between the first day of the Jewish New Year and the Day of Atonement, devout Israelites have been preparing for the proper celebration of this day, which has been spent in fasting and in prayer. Wrongs done to neighbors have been repaired and their pardon secured ;  angry feelings, hatred and jealousy have been removed from their hearts before they approach the Father to ask for forgiveness for the sins of the past year. These days of repentance reparation are commanded. They are simply emphasized at this time of the year with especially rigorous religious ceremonies.

 From Sunday evening at 7 o'clock until Monday at the same hour neither bread nor water passed the lips of those who observed the day according to the strict letter o the law. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901. 

  









Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/28/1901:

 Concert by Mrs. Alf. Mouton's pupils assisted by local talent, for the benefit of Sontag Military Band, Tuesday, Oct, 1st.

 Mr. and Mrs. R. Fiero of Dowagiac, Mich., are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. V. Nicholson. They will locate in Lafayette. Welcome to them.

 The Advertiser is pleased to note that all the hotels are daily filled to their utmost capacity. The proprietors of the leading hotels, being interviewed, declare that business has never before been so good.

 The Advertiser is full of oil this week. We predicted that a gusher would be brought in two weeks ago. It didn't come, but we can offer in excuse that the fault was due to the clogging of the six inch pipe by the strong pressure of the gas. We limit our new prediction for ten days.

 Miss Louise Bendel returned home last week from Lake Charles fully recovered from her late attack of typhoid fever.

 Special agent F. B. Field of the Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York was a guest all the past week of local agent J. R. Domengeaux.

 A parish agriculture fair, the first in our parish will be given at Scott, Oct. 19, under auspices of the State department of agriculture.

 Couret & Patin will remove their furniture store in the store lately occupied by J. J. Mouton, on October 1st.

 Children's Day will be observed at the Methodist church, Sunday, Sept. 29th, at 10:30. The public is invited.

 Mr. P. Krauss contracted with Ames & Alexander or a nice two story residence on Main Street. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1901.





  














From the Lafayette Gazette of September 28th, 1895:

A Good Show Coming.




  We are advised that Pawnee Bill's combined Rail Road Show, Historical Wild West, Indian Museum, Grand Mexican Hippodrome and Exposition of Trained Animals, and Congress of Noted Chiefs and Cow Boys, Vaqueros and a limitless number of special features, will pay us a visit within a short space of time.










 It is under a management which has, in the past twelve years, gained a most enviable reputation for dealing honestly and liberally with the public, and of presenting many features new and startling, and many feats which delight, amaze and amuse.











 Our exchanges speak in the highest terms of both the exceptional merit and high character of this grand combination, and it is the kind of show to which our readers will extend a hearty welcome. Genuine novelties and something new at reasonable prices, in place of empty bombast and brazen extortion, are what people want now, and will liberally patronize.






Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1895.




A STRANGE MEETING.

 There was a meeting at Dominique Boneaud's in the first ward last Sunday, and from all accounts it was one of the most dismal failures that it has ever been our duty as a journalist to chronicle. By what authority it was convened we are unable to say. It was certainly not vested with authority by the parish committee for that honorable body has not yet come together; and it is hardly probable that it has received its powers from a higher authority such as Chairman Wilkinson of the State Central Committee, or Harrity of the National organization, and we do not believe that even the "Society of the Cremation of Bosses and Dictators" could be guilty of such a breach of Democratic etiquette. Like kings, perhaps the organizers of this singular convention, disregarded all earthly sources for a bestowal of power, and believed themselves designated by divine inspiration to shape the political destinies of the first ward of Lafayette parish.


 The meeting was called to order by a gentleman of pronounced anti-administration proclivities, who proceeded to explain that its purpose was to nominate a candidate for Police Juror of the ward, stating that said candidate would be entitled to the undivided support of the Democratic party. Though this declaration might have emanated from a high authority, few of the gentlemen present would be reconciled to this manner of nominating a candidate. The chairman, who, it seemed, was bent on making ferocious onslaughts on Cushing's parliamentary laws, announced that he would in turn appoint six others, the twelve to constitute a committee to select a candidate for Police Juror. It was a hard matter to find twelve gentlemen willing to serve on the committee, but finally the required number was secured. The committee then retired and after mature deliberation made a report to the chairman who proclaimed that the result was the nomination of Mr. Alonzo Lacey, a worthy citizen of that ward, for Police Juror. The chairman stated that Mr. Lacey was selected by a majority of one, which, by the way, is quite strange when it is considered that the committee was composed of twelve members. By what process of figuring this remarkable conclusion was reached will probably remain one of the strange features of this very strange meeting.
The Gazette is reliably informed that the choice of the committee was not submitted to the convention, but it was declared irrevocable and binding. Few will insist that this way of nominating a candidate is in consonance with Democratic usage, but all will concede that is a decided improvement on the jury system. In criminal cases the verdict must be unanimous and in civil suits two-thirds are required to render a judgment, but here we are presented with a case where the majority of one in a jury of twelve sett'es the point at issue beyond dispute.

 The majority of those present were attracted there through curiosity and looked upon the whole proceedings as a huge joke. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1895.
 





For Waterworks.

 The Business Men's Association held a meeting last Monday, C. O. Mouton presided and Jno. L. Bell was at the secretary's desk.

 The question of waterworks was brought up and after a discussion the following resolutions were adopted; 

 Resolved, By the Business Men's Association of Lafayette - That the time has come when the town of Lafayette needs and requires a system of water works and electric lights, and that a special committee of three be appointed to confer and co-operate with the town council of Lafayette with a view of establishing a permanent system of water works and electric lights in the town. Resolved further, That this committee be made a permanent committee to represent this association until the work be accomplished or abandoned, and that they be urged to take immediate steps to accomplish the works.


 Dr. T. B. Hopkins, Messrs. Campbell and J. I. Bell were appointed on a committee to present the above resolutions to the council. A committee was appointed to take the necessary steps to celebrate Thanksgiving Day.

 F. O. Cornay was made a committee of one to solicit signatures to a petition asking the Western Union Telegraph Co. to open an office in the central part of Lafayette.
The Association meets next Monday. Lafayette Gazette 9/26/1895.






NOT SO DARK.

 Things may not be as bright as they used to be, or as they should be, but to the one who has watched closely the actual trend of business, is it not manifest that the tide of prosperity it slowly but surely turning? The mere fact that values have stopped in their declining course, is, in itself a most encouraging indication, there is further fact that they have even started to go up is clear evidence of a decided improvement. The time has been - and it is not so long ago either - the the dark circle of discouragement hung heavy over the whole situation. No one had energy, or confidence, or self-reliance enough to attempt any enterprise, and everybody seemed to apprehend that an absolute collapse was what the near future had in store for us. Now, there is, undoubtedly, a more hopeful feeling. In our own little town, there are indisputable proofs that trade has been steadily improving. A number of large houses have been built, a sugar refinery is in the course of construction, and innumerable other things may be cited to prove that we should not take a too pessimistic view o the present and future.

 When the Wilson tariff bill became a law, the Republican press prophesied all sorts of dire results, but despite all this foreboding there is irrefutable evidence that the general trade of the country is experiencing a healthy growth.

 The instinctive kicker may tell us that we are optimistic and there is no fact on which to base the hope that there are better times ahead. One might as well say that because the sun can not be seen in all its splendor there will no day. The glimmer of light which may be seen above the horizon is a sure sign that before long the sun of prosperity will pierce its way through the vanishing clouds. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1895.


 Traveling for Waters-Pierce.

 Jno I. Bell the hustling agent of the Waters-Pierce Oil Co., has just returned from an extended trip through this and St. Landry parishes. He has informed The Gazette that the people along the road were at work in their fields, and that a fair yield is expected. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1895.



For Waterworks.

 The Business Men's Association held a meeting last Monday. C. O. Mouton presided and Jno. I. Bell was at the secretary's desk.

 The question of waterworks was brought up and after a discussion the following resolutions were adopted;

  Resolved, By the Business Men's Association of Lafayette - That the time has come when the town of Lafayette needs and requires a system of water works and electric lights, and that a special committee of three be appointed to confer and co-operate with the town council of Lafayette with view of establishing a permanent system of water works and electric lights in the town.

 Resolved further, That this committee be made a permanent committee to represent this association until the work be accomplished or abandoned, and that they be urged to take immediate steps to accomplish the work.

 Dr. T. B. Hopkins, Messrs. Wm. Campbell and J. I. Bell were appointed on a committee to present the above resolutions to the council.

 A committee was appointed to take the necessary steps to celebrate Thanksgiving Day.

 F. O. Cornay was made a committee of one to solicit signatures to a petition asking the Western Union Telegraph Co. to open an office in the central part of Lafayette.

 The Association meets next Monday.
Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1895.



Ike Cuts Him Loose.

 The negro, Taylor Francois, arrested by Sheriff Broussard the other day, is wanted at Algiers for assault and battery. As the accusation against him was only of a trifling nature, Superintendent Gaster has written to the sheriff to release Francois. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1895.



NOT SO DARK.

 Things may not be as bright as they used to be, or as they should be, but to the one who has watched closely the actual trend of business, is it not manifest that the tide of prosperity is slowly but surely turning? The mere fact that values have stopped in their declining course, is, in itself a most encouraging indication, but the further fact that they have even started to go up is clear evidence of a declining course, is, in itself a most encouraging indication, but the further fact that they have even started to go up is clear evidence of a decided improvement. The time has been - and it is not so long ago either - that the dark cloud of discouragement hung heavy over the whole situation. No one had energy, or confidence, or self-reliance enough to attempt any enterprise, and everybody seemed to comprehend that an absolute was collapse was what the near future had in store or us. Now, there is, undoubtedly, a more hopeful feeling. In our own little town, there are indisputable proofs that trade has been steadily improving. A number of large houses have been built, a sugar refinery is in the course of construction, and innumerable other things may be cited to prove that we should not take a too pessimistic view o the present and future.

 When the Wilson tariff bill became law, the Republican press prophesied all sorts of dire results, but despite all this foreboding there is irrefutable evidence that the general trade of the country is experiencing a healthy growth.

 The instinctive kicker may tell us that we are optimistic and there is no fact on which to base the hope that there are better times ahead. One might as well say that because the sun can not be seen in all its splendor there will be no day. The glimmer of light which may be seen above the horizon is a sure sign that before long the sun of prosperity will pierce its way through the vanishing clouds. Lafayette Gazette 9/28/1895.             







 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 9/28/1895.

 The stores of our Israelite merchants will remain closed Saturday, it being the day of atonement.

 Judge C. Debaillon and C. O. Mouton, Esq., visited the home of Mr. Jules Mouton at Duchamp last Sunday.

 Alley Sprole and Sterling Mudd went to Opelousas last Saturday and returned Monday.

 Mrs. H. A. Kennedy and Mrs. Dr. Oliphant, of New Orleans, have returned home after a few days' visit to Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Davidson.

 The many friends in Lafayette of Prof. W. A. LeRosen will be pleased to learn that he is enjoying good health and is doing well. The professor is employed as bookkeeper by one of the leading firms of Shreveport.

 Mr. and Mrs. I. A. Broussard, Mr. John Conniff and Mrs. John Hahn went out to the plantation home of Mrs. Nathan Foreman last Tuesday and spent the day there.

 There will be a meeting of the School Directors on the 5th of October. As some business of importance will be up for consideration a full attendance is urgently desired. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1895. 











   
































 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 28th, 1889.


AT THE CANNING CO. 

The Lafayette Canning Co. is still canning okra, which it has been doing for some weeks past. 

 This Company has labored under extraordinary disadvantages this its first year, the long drought, followed by continuous rains, cutting off their tomato supply at least two thirds. But the same causes were disastrous to other canning factories and the price of canned goods is going up. Since it began to can okra it has retrenched somewhat upon its losses and will wind up the season in much better shape than could have been hoped for at one time. They will have few preparatory expenses next year and have assurance from our farmers to furnish all the okra (which is a sure crop) that they can handle. With a good tomato season next year the company has excellent prospects out ahead.  

 Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1889.   




 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/28/1889.


We now expect a bountiful supply of Fall vegetables.


 There will be a meeting of the Ladies' Aid of Society, at the residence of Mrs. W. W. Wall, on Monday, the 30th instant, at the usual hour. 
  Last Wednesday the equinoctial rains reached us, soaking the parched earth bountifully. All vegetation has taken on a new lease of life, and the pastures are again luxuriant. The rain has done an incalculable amount of good to the late cotton, vegetables, potatoes, etc. In fact, it came just when it was needed most and would do the most good. 

 The rains have caused a wonderful improvement in the facial expression of our citizens. Every fellow you meet now doesn't look like a red-eyed terrapin, caused from constantly digging the dust out of his eyes.

 From all sections of the parish we hear good reports of the crops, under the circumstances. The weather has been fine and cotton gathering has progressed rapidly, and all of our gins are run to their fullest capacity. The rice district reports splendid crops and harvesting progress is progressing satisfactorily. Lafayette is not complaining. 
 


 Business is "picking up right smart" as the negroes say, and Lafayette is beginning to assume its wonted air of commercial soundness and prosperity.

 We now expect a bountiful supply of Fall vegetables.

 There will be a meeting of the Ladies' Aid of Society, at the residence of Mrs. W. W. Wall, on Monday, the 30th instant, at the usual hour. 

 Mr. J. D. Davis has returned from Plaquemine, and with that familiar "childlike and bland" smile of his has resumed duty as night telegraph operator at this point. Mr. Ed. Tanner has gone to Baldwin, to assume the position of night telegraph operator at that place.

 Our young friend Mr. Edward Hebert has opened an oyster stand in the rear of John Breaux's saloon, where he is ready to serve first-class oysters in all styles. His oysters are so fat that already all of his shells are engaged to boil down for lard.

 Last Thursday we were favored by Mr. Joseph Ducote with a lot of the finest Japan persimmons we have ever seen. They were grown upon the place of his aunt, Mrs. J. J. Revillon, in the town of Lafayette. We measured two, and found them to be 10 1/2 inches in circumference by 5 1/2 inches in length.

 The Quickstep and the Crapaudville base ball clubs are billed for a match game to-morrow afternoon, at Sportsman's Park, for $15.00 a side; and as both clubs are now in practice a good game may be expected. The ladies are especially invited to attend, as their presence always adds interest and zest to the occasion. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1889.




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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 28th, 1878:



 DEMOCRATIC CONSERVATIVE TICKET.

   For State Treasurer, E. A. BURKE, Of Orleans
   For Congress - Third District, J. H. ACKLEN, Of St. Mary.
   For State Senator, 11th Senatorial District, C. H. MOUTON, Of St. Martin.
   For Representative, CONRAD DEBAILLON.

   Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.




YELLOW FEVER.
 Special to Lafayette Advertiser.

     NEW ORLEANS, Sept. 21, 1878.
 Board of Health reports to noon to-day 72 new cases and 62 death.

 Baton Rouge - Forty new cases and two deaths in last 24 hours. The fever is spreading into the country.

 Vicksburg - No abatement to-day in new cases - deaths forty.

 Canton - Total cases 460 - and deaths 82. New cases, twenty, and four deaths in last 24 hours.

 Grenada - No deaths - two new cases.

 Memphis - To noon to-day 23 deaths - no getting at new cases. Official reports of deaths during the epidemic 2,240 ;  equal to the number of deaths in New Orleans.

 Great suffering in Greenville - no communication by river or otherwise since August 31st. During last 24 hours 18 deaths.

 Holly Springs - Ten deaths and 18 new cases.

 Cincinnati - Several cases have occurred among Memphis people in this city during the last few days.

 Plaquemine - Over 200 cases ;  number of deaths unknown ;  the fever is abating.

 The fever continues to spread on the plantations below Franklin ;  about 10 deaths have occurred on the Clark and Steele plantation and among them is Mr. Steele.

 Mr. John Tarleton and wife very low. Two deaths are reported on the Weightman plantation.

 Morgan City - Up to noon to-day, total cases 115, and total deaths at 21.

         NEW ORLEANS, Sept. 24, 1878.
  Board of Health reports, Sunday 22nd, new cases 195, deaths 40.

 Monday, 23rd, new cases 135, deaths 44.

 To noon to-day (Tuesday 24th) new cases 139, deaths 58.

 Baton Rouge - Ninety new cases and three deaths in the last 48 hours.

 Vicksburg - Twenty new cases and nine deaths.

 Holly Springs - The fever on the increase ;  45 new cases and five deaths.

 Memphis - The fever increasing ;  about forty deaths to-day.

 Canton - New cases 23 and one death.

 Water Valley, Miss. - Twenty-five cases and 7 deaths since Tuesday.

 Port Gibson - 600 cases to-date - and 105 deaths.

 Grand Junction - Forty cases on hand and three deaths.

 Louisville - Fever patients from points this side of Memphis continue to arrive - three deaths and three cases yesterday - nine deaths during the week - forty cases remain.

 Martin, Tenn. - Two deaths in last 24 hours.

 Thibodaux - Three new cases and one death.

 On the plantations below Franklin - forty cases and fifteen deaths - reported all whites - a large number of blacks reported sick.

 Morgan City - 134 cases 25 deaths.

 Letter from Plaquemine report over 200 cases ;  fever spreading in rear of town causing great distress ;  number of deaths no ascertained. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.






 Fever More General This Year.

 The spread of yellow fever has been more general this season than was ever before known, and in many places the ravages of the disease have been extremely sad and desolating. On lines of communication with infected places, exemption from the scourge has been due to accident, or to the enforcement of strict quarantine regulations.

 Our quarantine measures have been quite rigid and have lately been amended without impairing the effectiveness. The most objectionable features of the quarantine having been modified, it only now remains to enforce the regulations strictly, uniformly and impartially. In view of the spread of yellow fever up the Teche, as our telegraphic dispatches inform us, our authorities should be warned of the importance of renewed vigilance, and if unfortunately the danger continues to approach, an increase of guards should be provided. If the expense is considered too great, there certainly should be sufficient interest felt to double, if necessary, the present station and to fill them by efficient volunteer guards. So far, we have been blessed with unusual good health, and to the end of continuing to exclude from our midst a most devastating and pestiferous disease, let us bear the inconvenience of quarantine a few weeks more.

 Since writing the above, the Council met on last Thursday, to consider a petition signed by a number of citizens, requesting the admission of the U. S. mails under proper restrictions. The proposition was defeated and the Council proceeded to repeal the modifications mentioned above. At this writing, it is confidently expected that the Mayor will refuse his signature to such childish and vacillating proceedings. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.



Genius and Growling.

 In a great measure, we are all the creatures of circumstances. In times of great emergency, talent and genius are discovered and developed. War gives birth to great and distinguished generals ;  Political agitation and revolution begets statesmen equal to the occasion.

 So it is in these times of quarantines. Some of the dormant characteristics of our community have been thrown to the surface. Our little town can boast of prophets, sages, philosophers, alarmists, fault finders, grumblers and growlers. All over the land, critics sprout up and make themselves offensive by their spleenish and supercilious comments. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.



 Our Dormant Characteristics.

 In a great measure, we are all the creatures of circumstances. In times of great emergency, talent and genius are discovered and developed. War gives birth to great and distinguished generals ;  Political agitation and revolution begets statesmen equal to the occasion.

 So it is in these times of quarantines. Some of the dormant characteristics of our community have been thrown to the surface. Our little town can boast of prophets, sages, philosophers, ignoramuses, gossipers, alarmists, fault-finders, grumblers and growlers. All over the land, critics sprout up and make themselves offensive by their spleenish and supercilious comments.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.


 Important Modification.

 By reference to the proceedings of the City Council in another column, it will be seen that an important modification of the quarantine regulations has been made. Hereafter, all persons coming from a neighboring parish will be admitted on producing a clean certificate to the satisfaction of the Police Board. Also, resident physicians and Ministers of the Gospel, who may have gone beyond the limits of the parish will be allowed to re-enter the town, on presenting satisfactory evidence to the Board that they have not been to any infected place.

 Such it the law to-day, to-morrow no man Knoweth what it will be. The public at home and abroad are therefore warned. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.





In the Know?
 A friend of ours says, he may know the law when he leaves his home for a few minutes, but he is always uneasy when he returns, about some change in the law and whether he will be allowed to re-enter the town. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.



 City Council of Vermilionville.

 Special Session, Sept. 24th, 1878.

 Present: J. O. Mouton, Mayor, and Councilmen: Alpha, Ed. McBride, R. L. McBride and Hebert. Absent: Landry, Lindsay and Vigneaux.

 The Mayor stated that the object of the meeting was for the purpose of taking in consideration matters pertaining to the quarantine.

  On motion of Mr. Hebert seconded by R. L. McBride, it was
  Resolved, That all persons coming from a neighboring Parish, will be admitted into this Town on their producing a clear certificate to the satisfaction of the Police Board of said Town, that they have not been to any infected place.

 The vote being taken on this resolution, was as follows:

 Ayes - Hebert, R. L. McBride, 2. - Noes - Alpha, Ed. McBride, 2.

 There being a tie, the Mayor voted aye and the resolution was adopted.

  On motion of R. L. McBride seconded by Mr. Hebert, it was
  Resolved, That all resident Physicians and Ministers of the Gospel, be allowed to enter this Town, although they may have gone beyond the limits of this Parish, on presenting satisfactory evidence to the Police Board that they have not been to any infected place.

 Adopted by the following vote:

 Ayes - Hebert, R. L. McBride, Alpha, 3.

 No - Ed McBride, 1.

 Resolved, That the foregoing resolutions take effect from and after their passage.

 On motion the Council adjourned.
J. O. MOUTON, Mayor.
H. M. BAILEY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.



 DEMOCRATIC CONSERVATIVE TICKET.

   For State Treasurer, E. A. BURKE, Of Orleans
   For Congress - Third District, J. H. ACKLEN, Of St. Mary.
   For State Senator, 11th Senatorial District, C. H. MOUTON, Of St. Martin.
   For Representative, CONRAD DEBAILLON.
   Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.



In the Know?
 A friend of ours says, he may know the law when he leaves his home for a few minutes, but he is always uneasy when he returns, about some change in the law and whether he will be allowed to re-enter the town. Lafayette Advertiser 9/28/1878.

  



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