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Monday, January 12, 2015

**OCTOBER 31ST - M C

                                                                
                   All Hallow E'en
  


                                                            

      Tonight is  All Hallow E'en.  On this night legendary lore has it that the most occult and mystical happenings are possible. In olden times the eerie doings of elves and goblins were firmly rooted in the minds of men. There is no country on the face of the globe but what has its tales of folk lore in which the spirits and Elvin things figure most conspicuously. In this age of matter of fact reason, the customs of past ages are engaged in only as an amusement, and on All Hallow E'en, the minds of men and women revert from the things of today and revel in the mysticism of the past.

 Old and quaint customs for the foretelling of the future are engaged in by the most prosaic of persons, and much amusement is elicited from the various customs resurrected from out of the misty past, when the world was younger and more credulous. In the old moss grown well the maid may see her lover's face and features reflected by the water, if inquiry is made at the opportune moment: in the looking glass the same much sought for revelation may be secured, if the room is dark and the candle properly placed. The peanut shells and their candle freight will float and betoken the longevity of the launcher, and many other strange things may be brought to pass at Hallow E'en/ Even to the old, who have lost all their sense of the romantic, it is sweet to turn and enjoy once more the pass-time of youth at Hallow E'en. To the young, the casual occurences of plainly natural phenomena are often construed into another link in the lengthening chain of Love.   


From the Baton Rouge Times and re-printed in the Lafayette Advertiser.                                                      



Halloween As A Communal Celebration

By the 1900s, the focus had shifted from a religious holiday to a more communal celebration. “Guising” was actually a practice dating back to the middle ages, when the poor would go around asking for food or money. Borrowing from the English and Irish traditions, children adopted the practice of guising and would dress up in costumes, but there are only isolated references to children actually going door to door asking for food or money during Halloween. Instead parties were held and had a more festive atmosphere with colorful costumes. The frightening and superstitious aspects of Halloween had diminished somewhat, and Halloween in America was slowly shedding some of the old European traditions favoring more light-hearted celebrations. From the website "Deliriums Realm.-Essays on Good and Evil."


Here's an example of "Communal Celebration" in Lafayette in the year 1913:

Presbyterian Missionary Society.

 A delightful meeting of the Presbyterian Missionary Society was held Wednesday afternoon with Mrs. Harold Demanade as hostess. The meeting was called to order and after a few minutes were devoted to routine business a very interesting program was rendered. The Bible less, the last fifteen chapters was rendered. The Bible lesson, the last fifteen chapters of psalms, was conducted by Mrs. Morgan, and the missionary lesson was led by Mrs. Harold Demanade. Miss Maxim Beraud then favored the society with a beautiful piano selection and Miss Claudia Upton rendered a very difficult and pleasing violin selection accompanied on the piano by Miss Sadie Robinson. The meet adjourned and the hostess led the way into the dining room decorated in Hallowe'en attire. Upon the long table was a great big jack o' lantern, surrounded by apples, oranges and nuts. The electrolier (electric chandelier) was covered with crimson tissue paper casting just enough light so that the numerous jack o'lanterns dotted her and there looked so hideous and weird that one could not help thinking of spooks and such like.

 The spell was broken only when the hostess served a delicious hallowe'en salad course. The next meeting will be held Nov. 12 with Mrs. Cairnes as hostess. The bible lesson, Proverbs, chapter 1-15, leader Miss Qunitilla Morgan; the missionary lesson will be conducted by Mrs. Morgan. The guests of the afternoon were Misses Sadie Robinson, Maxim Beraud, Claudia Upton, Edna Sprole, Mrs. Leo Alpha and Mrs. LeRosen. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1913.







 From the Lafayette Gazette of October 31st, 1903:

Educational Rally Held at Courthouse.

 The meeting called to endorse the candidacy of Prof. James B. Aswell for State Superintendent of Education was held at the courthouse.

The audience present was very large and the greatest enthusiasm prevailed. The educational institutions of the town were well represented by the school children and many ladies were in attendance. The exercises were enlivened by the singing of patriotic songs by choruses from the Industrial Institute and the public schools. The Sontag Band had volunteered their services for the occasion, but could not play on account of the absence of some members.

 Seldom has there been extended a more cordial welcome to anyone by the people of Lafayette than greeted Prof. Aswell Saturday. Though a candidate for public office, and seeking the suffrage of the people of the State therefore, our citizens, with almost unanimous opinion, consider Prof. Aswell's motives pure and his endeavors to promote the cause of education earnest, and expressed their endorsement of his candidacy.

 Dr. E. L. Stephens called the meeting to order and requested Judge Mouton to preside.

 Rev. C. C. Kramer was the first speaker. His address was brief and eloquent. So often has he addressed home audiences to lend his aid in good causes, the people of Lafayette welcome him as though he were one of their own. Mr. Kramer endorsed Prof. Aswell's candidacy and urged the people to support one who is fitted in every way to discharge the important duties of the office of superintendent.

 Judge Mouton introduced Prof. Aswell as one who represented no political faction, but who was recognized by all as eminently qualified for the office to which he aspired. The chairman paid a tribute to the personal character and worth of Prof. Aswell.

 Prof. Aswell made education his theme, and said in part:

 "It is the greatest issue because it involves the greatest questions of the hour. It involves our happiness.

 "We love our State, we love to hear of the fertility of its soils, the vastness of its territory, the advantages of its climate, the greatness of its people. We love to know that ours is a State unsurpassed for comfortable and joyous living, where limitless forests of immeasurable wealth and boundless fields of exquisite beauty belong to a people of chivalrous parentage, inspired with a dauntless courage, impelled by motives unattainable by ignoble passions, fired by feelings of family devotion and loyalty to duty that if cherished and wisely directed will culminate among all our children in the highest type of patriot's love. 

 But we recognize that these blessings became worthless, dead things, unless directed by the hand of an intelligent people. We know that an ignorant people not only is, but must be a poor people. Natural advantages will not make a people rich or great. The ignorant pearl diver carries no pearls to his humble family where poverty dwells; the ignorant diamond hunter wears no jewels on his scanty clothing; the ignorant miner digs gold and silver but he enjoys little of the comforts and luxuries that gold can give. The ignorant farmer may grow an abundance of food and clothing material, but his family are thinly clad and poorly fed. Why? Because by some mysterious force, we know not when, we know not how, wealth finds its way into the hands of the intelligent. An ignorant people whatever be its honesty or its energy, is necessarily a poor people; and ignorant nation is a feeble nation; and ignorant man is enslaved. Whether right or wrong, this is a true statement of conditions.

 It was the conception of this tremendous truth that made me willing to leave the happiness of my private life and to sever the sacred ties that bind me to the Louisiana Industrial Institute, to enter upon a new life that I might do more for the education and the elevation of the children of my native State.

 When a boy on the farm in the country, where I was brought into contact with poverty and need, my life was fired with an ambition to carry light and truth to every child within my reach, whether he be in the palace where wealth is found, or in the hut in tattered rags where poverty dwells.

 The purpose of my life has not changed. In becoming a candidate for the office of Superintendent of Public Education I am impelled by no petty or ignoble passion for notoriety or fame, but I am guided by a keen sense of duty to my State and to the cause I have learned so much to love.

 Touched when a child by the pitiable condition of the illiterate poor of this State and encouraged by the possibility of what could be done educationally, I have espoused the cause of the children, and by the help of God I shall not give up the struggle.

 In spite of false reports, or misleading statistics; in spite of criticisms from without and difficulties within, Louisiana, educationally, shall take her proper place, foremost among the States of this Union.

 We have a right to expect this result because the people have been touched by the spirit of educational progress. There are scores of earnest men in every community who are not officially connected with the school work but a sense of duty and philanthropy. They have become conscious of a mighty potential energy ready for expression, a force so great that no man can control or comprehend its power. An unprecedented stimulus is among the people, and so great is the awakening that there are thousands of men and women whose minds have been so quickened and illumined that they can find no rest or contentment until every child has been liberated from ignorance and blessed with the riches of good educational advantages.

 The spirit expressed on every hand gives hope for the future. Those who once believed the free school to be an institution for paupers, those who looked to the secluded private school or the tutor for the education of their children have come to see the need of education all the people. While in some sections our critics point to our limited funds and to the school term of but a few weeks, to our school-houses that are crudely constructed windowless cabins built for convenience near springs and brooks, to the children who attend school when the parents have nothing else for them to do, and to the untrained teachers paid less than the wages of a trained farm hand, yet these are coming to be the exceptional cases for I believe our people are ready to remove every stain of illiteracy from the fair name of our State.

 Our people know that the zones of the earth are measured by the amount of light thrown upon them and that a State is measured by the same standard. We know that the naked ability to read and write is no more an education than a tool is a workman or a telescope an astronomer. We know that the need of the hour is for educational conditions that create good habits, clean living, and high thinking. We know that men are now measured by what they have become as a result of training plus what they can do, and that to make the worthless boy self-supporting is to make a great step into the domain of crime. The people know that the present spirit of progress is lifting the veil of doubt and revealing a gigantic life that the children are to be called to live, and that the medium through which they must go is the school.

 We know that the demand for trained hands and cultured minds is steadily growing. We know that the untrained in State are harmful, that ignorance is the evil that imperils our greatness, that inactivity is the curse of nations and the bane of individuals, and that every child is entitled to such training as will enable him to become an intelligent and effective citizen. We know that mind and hand working harmoniously will hush the wrangling of creeds, crush the jealousies between the rich and the poor, quiet the conflict between labor and capital, lift the children from partisan prejudice, harmonize the conflicting claims of every section and make our State a harmonious part of the nation's life.

 I come asking your suffrage because, with such a magnificent work yet to be accomplished, with such glorious results yet to be obtained, and with the support of a people who are courageous and true, who are sincere and determined, I aspire to be at the head of the public school system of this great State. I have thrown my life into this work because many of our children are enslaved, they are bound by the shackles of ignorance, but they have a right to be free.

 I come to you citizens of the south western parishes, asking the privilege of leading the earnest men and women of Louisiana to a glorious victory that is certain to come in the cause of enlightenment and purity, in the cause of liberty for all children."

 After adjournment many availed themselves of the invitation of the chairman to come forward and shake hands with Prof. Aswell.
Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.




Political.

 Democratic rallies will be held Sunday at Royville just after the celebration of high mass, and at Broussardville at four o'clock in the afternoon. All democrats are cordially invited to attend. The following speakers are announced to address the meetings in French: Judge C. Debaillon, Judge Julian Mouton, Hon. Wm. Campbell, Sheriff Ike Broussard and Dr. G. A. Martin. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.











 THE GREAT SELLS & DOWNS SHOWS.

Those of our readers who appreciate wholesome amusement should plan to spend the day in town where the Sells & Downs Shows will exhibit in Lafayette Nov. 4. 

The Daily X-Rays, of  Charles City, said:

 "The afternoon performance was presented before a tent full of people, who were enthusiastic over every feature. There is an absence of sameness about the Sells & Downs Shows, every part of it being new, novel and artistic. Not a single thing on the bill was omitted, and when the magnificent exhibition ended the great throng
Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.


Show Horses Well Kept.

 If there is one thing above another which is noticeable with this show it is the excellence of the horses. All are well kept, well groomed and well fed. All circuses make a specialty of advertising their "horse fair," but with many of this is mere advertising. With the Sells & Downs show, however, it is a reality. Many an exclamation of surprise and admiration is heard as the beautiful animals pass along the street, or as they unload the cars and haul the heavily loaded circus wagons to the lot. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.



The Floto Shows.
             From the New Orleans Paper.

 The management of the Floto Show, which opened yesterday at Lee Circle, cannot but feel flattered at the very hearty reception given it by the local public on its first visit. An audience which completely filled the tent witnessed last night's performance and exhibited most flattering enthusiasm, attesting the merit of the many features, all of which were heartily applauded. Of course Young America was most in evidence, but a good portion of the big audience was composed of the older folks, who enjoyed the show quite as much as did the juveniles. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903. 

Daughters of the Confederacy. - Mrs. Thos. B. Pugh, president of the State organizations of the Daughters of the Confederacy, came to Lafayette Wednesday, and at night delivered a patriotic address to the members of the local chapter and a large audience, in the auditorium of the Industrial Institute. Miss Lucille Revillon, Miss Eva Mouton, and Prof. Sontag delighted the audience by the rendering of a very pretty musical program. Judge Julian Mouton also addressed the audience.
Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.

Medical Society Pres. in Laf. - Dr. J. M. Barrier, president of the State Medical Society, was in Lafayette Wednesday and met several of the members of the Parish Medical Society in conference over the next convention to be held here next May. The doctor has been making a tour of Louisiana and reports that the profession throughout the State is looking forward to the meeting with a great deal of pleasure and that it has already advertised Lafayette far and wide in the State. He sincerely appreciates the advantages of having such a convention in their midst, composed of nearly a thousand of the leading medical men of the South, and he anticipates an attendance of from two to three hundred. He further expressed the hope that the business men would co-operate with the medicos in making it a success with the assurance that every dollar expended by them said will return tenfold. He said this had been the experience of the business men of Shreveport.
Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.




Theatrical.

 Wm. A. Brady's production of Way Down East will be presented at the Vendome Opera House in New Iberia on Sunday Nov. 1. Mr. Achille Patin of New Iberia was in Lafayette during the week and he assured our people that the production will be a good one. Reserved seats can be obtained by communicating with Mr. Patin. One half rates will be given by the railroad companies. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1901.



Visited Lafayette.

 Dr. J. M. Barriere, president of the State Medical Society, was in Lafayette Wednesday and met several of the members of the Parish Medical Society in conference over the next convention to be held here next May. The doctor has been making a tour of Louisiana and reports that the profession throughout the State is looking forward to the meeting with a great deal forward to the meeting with a great deal of pleasure and that it has already advertised Lafayette far and wide in the State. He sincerely hopes that the business men of the parish will fully appreciate the advantages of having such a convention in their midst, composed of nearly a thousand of the leading medical men of the South, and he anticipates an attendance of from two to three hundred the hope that the business men would co-operate with the medicos in making it a success with the assurance that every dollar expended by them will return tenfold. He said this had been the experience of the business men of Shreveport. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.



A LOUISIANIAN
Picked Out of the Whole List of Army Officers - To Serve as General Corbin's Aid in New York - Capt. James A. Moss Selected on His Record.

 Captain James Alfred Moss, Twenty-fourth Infantry, has been detailed to serve as Aid-decamp on the staff of Major General Corbin, when the latter assumes command of the Department of the East, next Monday. Captain Moss is a native of Louisiana and was appointed to West Point from that State. The Evening Star, recognized here as the Administration organ, says this evening regarding the appointment in a display article:


"This detail was made by the Secretary of War, at the request of General Corbin, and was based entirely upon the efficiency record of Captain Moss, which is one of the best on file in the Department. General Corbin has no personal acquaintance with Captain Moss beyond a casual meeting on official business, several years ago. Although entitled to three aids, General Corbin has decided to try to get along with one, and for that reason asked for the best one he could find."

 Captain Moss is a native of Louisiana, and was graduated from the Military Academy in the Class of 1894. For four years he was attached to the Twenty-fifth Infantry, and for two years to the Twenty-fourth Infantry. From March, 1900, to February, 1901, he served as Regimental Commissary, and after a few months' service with the Twenty-seventh Infantry he was transferred back to the Twenty-fourth Infantry. In the summer of 1897 he commanded a bicycle expedition from Fort Missoula, Mont., to St. Louis, and in May, 1898, he was on detached service, conveying the first Spanish prisoners of war from Key West to Fort McPherson, Ga.

 He participated in the campaign of Santiago de Cuba, and was recommended for a brevet of Captain or skill, efficiency and bravery at El Caney and throughout the campaign. In the spring of 1899 he was on detached service in command of the troops guarding the Sequoia and the General Grant National Parks, and in the following summer accompanied his regiment to the Philppines, where he served creditably until July, 1902, when he returned to the United States. He was with General Lawton on his last march, and participated in the capture of Arayat. He reached the grade of Captain in February, 1901, and for some time past has served as Adjutant of the Twenty-fourth Infantry. His station is Fort Harrison, Montana, but at present he is engaged with his regiment at the maneuvers at Fort Riley, Kansas.

 The above is clipped from the New Orleans Picayune.

 The friends of Capt. Moss are always glad to learn of his promotions in the army and The Gazette was pleased to learn of the distinguished honor which he has just received. His rise has been a rapid one and he is to be congratulated upon the marked distinction just shown him. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.
















New Connection for Texas. - The Texas and Pacific Railway changed the time of the train passing Shreveport at night, on Sunday October 18th, so that connection is now made with the Queen and Crescent Route train No. 7 which arrives at Shreveport at 10:50 p. m., thus giving two connection daily to all points reached by the T. & P. Railway. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.




Phone Service.

 In its last issue The Lafayette Advertiser refers to the inefficient service given the patrons of the Cumberland Telephone Company by the local exchange. The Gazette believes the complaint well-founded and hopes proper steps will be taken to improve the service. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.






 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 10/31/1903.

 Prof. A. M. Delcambre, principal of the Delcambre Academy, has returned home after a few days spent in Lafayette.

 New goods arriving daily at Biossat's Jewelry Store.

 The People's Pharmacy has removed from the Clegg building near the court-house square to the J. A. Landry building near the Southern Pacific depot.

 Levy Bros. have a full assortment of dry goods.

 The Ladies' Guild at the Episcopal church will meet at the home of Mrs. F. E. Davis, next Tuesday afternoon, November third, at four o'clock. All the members are requested to attend this meeting. Lafayette Gazette 10/31/1903.







 From the Lafayette Advertiser of October 31, 1896:

Tattlers and Busy-Bodies in other Men's Business.

Moreover every incursion of the tittle tattle, into the affairs of others, is a subtraction from one's own time, which detracts from the sum and substance of life of the transgressor himself, and sad to say, too often breaks the repose and peace of many homes. Every man is known to have his own part to act in the world - , to have his own interest to consult, and has affairs of how own to manage, which his neighbor has no cause to scrutinize.

These people who carry their own faults hung in a sack on their backs, while they carry the errors and faults of their neighbors in sack hung in front, have the faculty also of "Seeing the mote that is in their neighbor's eye, while they discern not the beam that is in their own eye; as well they have regard for no virtue on earth, and like a fire that burns and consumes all, honor, fortune and well being, they go from palace to hovel, making inquiry into the business of their neighbors. These hypocrites have unctuous tongues, and wear the side garb of decency - they are like unto white sepulchers, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but within are full of dead men's bones. The more frequent source of this ungainly, ungodly vice is idleness; this latter, never failing to engender many vices. Often jealousy or rivalry in business or otherwise is the basis of research by which these persons are prompted to pry into the business of other people, or their conduct. Often their wish is to find out, and disclose something injurious to their neighbor's character, circumstances and reputation that they may fetch it down to their own darkened nature; they may even effect a friendly concern and offer apology for the blemishes which they bring to light in others. In fine these news-mongers subordinate all else to this ghoulish taste of feeding with delight on the failings of others. We all know of some despicable character such as I half attempted to delineate above. Give them a wide berth! Unlike the man of enlarged views and capacity who is always upright, these tattlers are crafty, and their tattling propensity is only supplemented to their inferior abilities of mind, and vulture like nature of heart. Eschew them as you would a poisoned arrow.


Some folks there be in this world, who take it that they have a right of canvassing at pleasure, the character, behavior, and business of others; - this is a fruitful source of vexation of spirit, and much bad blood between people; these descants upon the character of others, spring from and are generally indexes of weakly, disorderly or pusillanimous minds.


Moreover every incursion of the tittle tattle, into the affairs of others, is a subtraction from one's own time, which detracts from the sum and substance of life of the transgressor himself, and sad to say, too often breaks the repose and peace of many homes. Every man is known to have his own part to act in the world - , to have his own interest to consult, and has affairs of how own to manage, which his neighbor has no cause to scrutinize.

These people who carry their own faults hung in a sack on their backs, while they carry the errors and faults of their neighbors in sack hung in front, have the faculty also of "Seeing the mote that is in their neighbor's eye, while they discern not the beam that is in their own eye; as well they have regard for no virtue on earth, and like a fire that burns and consumes all, honor, fortune and well being, they go from palace to hovel, making inquiry into the business of their neighbors. These hypocrites have unctuous tongues, and wear the side garb of decency - they are like unto white sepulchers, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but within are full of dead men's bones. The more frequent source of this ungainly, ungodly vice is idleness; this latter, never failing to engender many vices. Often jealousy or rivalry in business or otherwise is the basis of research by which these persons are prompted to pry into the business of other people, or their conduct. Often their wish is to find out, and disclose something injurious to their neighbor's character, circumstances and reputation that they may fetch it down to their own darkened nature; they may even effect a friendly concern and offer apology for the blemishes which they bring to light in others. In fine these news-mongers subordinate all else to this goulish taste of feeding with delight on the failings of others. We all know of some despicable character such as I half attempted to delineate above. Give them a wide berth! Unlike the man of enlarged views and capacity who is always upright, these tattlers are crafty, and their tattling propensity is only supplemented to their inferior abilities of mind, and vulture like nature of heart. Eschew them as you would a poisoned arrow.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1896.



 Democratic Meeting

 A large and enthusiastic audience greeted speakers last Sunday at the Court House.


 The meeting was called to order by Wm. Campbell, member at large of the Campaign committee. R. C. Landry was made permanent chairman and E. G. Voohries, Secretary. Judge G. A. Fontenot of Calcasieu was the first speaker introduced to the audience he delivered a clear concise and exhaustive address in french and made plain all the intricacies of the financial question.

Judge Fournet was followed by Mr. C. Wickliff who by his apt illustrations and pithy anecdotes captured the audience as was witnessed by the hearty applause with which the various points of his argument was greeted.

The address of the afternoon was closed by the eloquent appeal of the young Democratic nominee for Congress, R. F. Broussard, in which he exposed the fallacies in the supposed ardent friendship of the Republican party for the sugar planter. And in scathing terms arraigned the plutocrat the representative of the money power. A large and expectant audience again packed the court house in the evening in anticipation of the good things that were about to be uttered by such well known and much admired speakers as Judge Allen, Hon. J. Y. Sanders and Dr. Fred Mayer, whose logical and exhaustive elucidations of the various phrases of the question to be fought out by the ballot on next Tuesday, held the audience in close attention until a late hour.  
LAFAYETTE ADVERTISER 10/31/1896




SPECIAL SESSION.
Lafayette, La. Oct. 19, 1896.


 The council met this evening in special session following members present. Mayor Caffery, T. M. Biossat, Joe Ducote, O. C. Mouton, B. Falk, and Dr. J. D. Trahan.


 Absent J. O. Leblanc and Leo Doucet. The mayor stated this special meeting was called to consider the features of the W. W. and Electric-Lights contract.

Mr. Ferguson was represented by Mr. Walton an attorney of New Orleans.
Following ordinance passed the council.


1. An ordinance appropriating the sum of Fifteen Hundred dollars Annually for the term of ten years, beginning with the year 1896, out of the general revenues of the corporation of Lafayette to the payment of the contract price for the building and erection of a water works and electric light system in said town and setting aside and appropriating the net revenues from said system to said payment of said Contract price.

Be it further ordained that in addition to the five mill Tax voted by the property tax payers of the town of Lafayette on March 23rd, 1896, according to law for a term of ten years., beginning in the year 1896 for the purpose of paying the construction of a system of water works and and electric lights for and in said town, the net revenues derived by said town from said system be and hereby set aside and dedicated to the payment of the contract for the erection and construction of said water works and electric light system.

Be it further ordained etc. that to cover any possible deficiency from the special tax of five mills and the operation of said system as above provided these shall be and is hereby appropriated and set aside out of the general revenues of said town the sum of fifteen hundred dollars annually for a term of ten years beginning with the year 1896, said amount being the same now expanded annually to operate the present system of lights in said town.

Be it further ordained etc. that this ordinance will take effect from and after its passage.

Upon the following vote the mayor declared said ordinance adopted.

Yeas. Biossat, Ducote, Falk, Mouton, Dr. Trahan.

Nays. None.

2. Following ordinance offered by Mr. Mouton.

An ordinance instructing the mayor of this town to issue thereby thirty-eight thousand dollars of bonds of the town of Lafayette known as "the water works and electric light bonds" under provision of Act No. 90 of 1986.

Be it ordained by the City Council of the town of Lafayette in legal session assembled, that the Mayor of this town be and is hereby authorized and instructed to sign in his official capacity the lithograph bonds of said corporation known as the water works and electric light bonds to the amount of thirty-eight thousand dollars and to deliver thirty-six thousand dollars, thereof to J. M. Ferguson contractor of the water works. An electric light system for and in the town of Lafayette as provided by his bid for the contract, provided that said of Mr. Ferguson furnish the required security under said act and executed contract with mayor. Be it further ordained that said bonds will be countersigned by the Treasurer of this corporation.

The mayor then announced to the Council that he vetoed said ordinance on the grounds that the act of the legislature authorizing the issuance of said bonds is unconstitutional and that such legislation is prohibited by Article 46.

Moved by Mr. Mouton, that said ordinance be adopted the veto of the mayor not withstanding.

Yeas - Biossat, Ducote, Falk, Mouton, Dr. Trahan.

The mayor declared that a two thirds vote of the council being in favor of the motion. We announced to the Council, that the ordinance is adopted not withstanding the veto.

3. Whereas the mayor has informed the council that in his opinion act 90 of 1896 authorizing the issuance of the bonds for the water works and Electric-Lights is unconstitutional and whereas the question will necessitate, judicial proceedings on the part of the contractor for the erection of the water works and electric lights system of the town of Lafayette therefore.

Be it resolved, that the resolution adopted on Oct. 5th, 1896 granting to Mr. Ferguson until Oct. 20th, 1896 at noon to furnish the required bond and sign his contract under his bid and the same is hereby amended, so as to extend said time of forfeiture until 30 days after the final decision of the question of constitutionality of said act, should said proceedings be instituted.

Yeas - Biossat, Ducote, Falk, Mouton, Dr. Trahan.

Nays-None.

Whereas the question of the constitutionality of the issuance of the Water Works and Electric-Lights system for the town of Lafayette now that same is questioned by his Hon. the Mayor of this town and prominent attorneys at law, is of vital interest to the property and welfare of the inhabitants of said Corporation therefore.

Be it resolved, that all costs of court incurred by the Mayor in obtaining a final decision of the question will be borne. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1896.






Ballots in Advance.

 As is required under the new election law the ballots to be used in next Tuesday's election were forwarded to Mr. P. A. Delhomme, Pres. of the Board of Supervisors of Election this week. Mr. Delhomme is a resident of Scott. Though some oversight on the part of the express company the package was delivered to J. A. Delhomme of Lafayette. Mr. J. A. Delhomme not being cognizant of the formalities surrounding the Australian ballot, opened the box and distributed the tickets among his friends, in consequence of which a great number of the voter on both sides are aware of the form and arrangement of the secret ballot to be used in next Tuesday's election. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1896.


 Nice Fair in Carencro.

 (Published by request.)

 Our little village with its quaint historical name of "Carencro," was enlivened Saturday and Sunday, by the tramps of horses' feet, the rolling of vehicles of every description who came from all parts of the parish to partake of the pleasures afforded by the occasion of a festival given for the benefit of the Catholic Church.

 For weeks past grand preparations were being made and the zealous pastor, Father Leforest spared no expense in making everything for the occasion. Many time in the past three years has the good pastor with the assistance of the chosen members of his congregation entertained such masses of people, and every time has been successful. Saturday the opening day dawned with a brilliant sun. Every one experience an hilarious sensation. Why? Because at other times we had the misfortune of rains and windstorms. How could they have felt otherwise?

 At four o'clock in the afternoon, the edifice being built and which was used for a hall was already filled with a gay crowd anxious to partake of the luxuries to be had.

 The hall itself was a sight to be seen and was worth the money made to have had the pleasure of remaining a few minutes within such a gorgeously decorated place. Everything that the heart could desire was to be had, even pretty girls. A concert both nights given by the Lafayette colored string band and minstrel company was a perfect success, and enjoyed by all. We extend our heartiest thanks to the gentlemen who took part. Sunday such another day as Saturday was the day for everyone. Up to a very late hour crowds were still coming in, and at eleven o'clock there was nothing to be had everything having been sold. Our colored people are to be complimented on their generosity and good behavior, for never was an occasion conducted more gentlemanly and ladylike than that of the 24th and 25th. The proceeds amounted to $640. A better result could not have been hoped for. Thanks to our colored people and to those who aided in making the (af) fair a success. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1896.



Court Doings.

 - State of La. vs. Theus Dugas - stabbing with intent to kill. Not guilty.

 Theus Dugas - rape. Not guilty.

 Jos. Breaux - released on his own recognizance. Bond $25.00.

 Jos. Romero - loud and obscene language, withdraw plea of not guilty and plead guilty. Bond $50.00. Ordered to appear Oct. 31st, for sentence.

 Buddy D. Batiste - striking with intent to murder. Bench warrant issued.

 Dupre Abraham - burglary and larceny. Bench warrant issued.

 Alexis Richard - assault with intent to rape, continued.

 Victor Alemand - larceny, not guilty.

 J. T. Dowdell vs. G. A. Breaux, motion to strike out sustained.

 Damoville Babineaux - bond fixed at $300.

 Doucoutre Broussard - bond fixed at $100.

 Isham Brown vs. Carmelite LeBlanc tried submitted and taken under advisement. Wm. Campbell Judge ad hoc.

 J. T. Dowdell vs. G. A. Breaux et als. motion to strike out by plaintiff taken under advisement.

 J. M. Jones et als. vs. South West Bldg. and Loan Assn. supplementary petition by H. L. Provost - fined.

 L. H. Prejean vs. Jean & als. and James Linally tutors. Preliminary default filed.

 O. A. Duvernet vs. M. L. &. T. R. R. & S. P. Co. ordered short and notes of evidence returned to be certified.

 A. L. Brown withdrew plea of not guilty and plead guilty of attempt to burn under section 845.

 J. W. Brown Jr. Nol Pros. Prisoner ordered released.

 Petit Jury discharged finally.

GRAND JURY.

 Geo. Wilson, Larceny True Bill. Submit final report and are dismissed.

 The Brown Case Disposed of.

 The case in which A. L. Brown was held under the charge of arson, and J. W. Brown, Jr., was charged with being accessory before the fact was called up for trial on last Wednesday, the motion of lack of Jurisdiction of the Court not being allowed by the Supreme Court.

 When the case was called Col. Sam Allen, attorney for A. L. Brown withdrew the plea of not guilty and entered a plea of guilty of attempt to burn and in a very eloquent appeal prayed for the mercy of the Court. District Attorney M. T. Gordy accepted the plea and Brown was ordered to appear before the Court for sentence on Saturday.

 The minimum penalty under this charge is five years at hard labor.

 In the case of J. W. Brown, Jr., the District Attorney entered a  nolle prosequi presenting the following reasons for his action:  That while he was convinced that the crime had been concocted between A. Brown and J. W. Brown, that the testimony of the only witness known to the prosecution would show that the concoction or agreement to arson had been countermanded by J. W. Brown, in a letter to which was written just prior to the commission of the act.

 J. W. Brown, Jr., was immediately released from jail and left for Camden, Ark., with his father and his attorneys, on the evening train. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1896.





 Change of Location of Western Union.

 For the greater convenience of the public it has been decided to change the location of the Western Union's commercial telegraph office to a more central point, and the building between the First National Bank and The Gazette office has been selected for the new quarters. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1896.




 City Council Proceedings.

         Lafayette, La., Oct. 19, 1896.

SPECIAL SESSION.

 The council met this evening in special session following members present:

 Mayor Caffery, T. M. Biossat, Jos. Ducote, O. C. Mouton, B. Falk and Dr. J. D. Trahan.

 Absent: J. O. LeBlanc and Leo Doucet. The Mayor stated this special meeting was called to consider the features of the W. W. and Electric-Lights contract.

 Mr. Furguson was represented by Mr. Walton an attorney of New Orleans.

 Following ordinance passed the Council.

  1.  An ordinance appropriating the sum of Fifteen Hundred dollars Annually for the term of ten years, beginning with the year 1896, out of the general revenues of the corporation of Lafayette to the payment of the contract price for the building and erection of a water works and electric light system in said town and setting aside and appropriating the net revenues from said system to said payment of said Contract price.

  Be it further ordained that in addition to the five mill Tax voted by the property tax payers of the town of Lafayette on March 23rd 1896, according to law for a term of ten years, beginning in the year 1896 for the purpose of paying the construction of a system of water works and electric lights for and in said town, the net revenues derived by said town from said system be and are hereby set aside and dedicated to the payment of the contract for the erection and construction of said water works and electric light system.

  Be it further ordained etc., that to cover any possible deficiency from the said special tax of five mills and the operation of said system as above provided these shall be and is hereby appropriated and set aside out of the general revenues of said town the sum of fifteen hundred dollars annually for a term of ten years beginning with the year 1896 said amount being the same now expanded annually to operate the present system of lights in said town.

  Be it further ordained etc., that this ordinance will take effect from and after its passage.

 Yeas: Biossat, Ducote, Falk, Mouton, Dr. Trahan.  Nays:  None.

  2.  Following ordinance offered by Mr. Mouton.

  An ordinance instructing the Mayor o this town to issue thereby thirty-eight thousand dollars of bonds of the town of Lafayette known as "the water works and electric light bonds under provision of Act No. 90 of 1896.

  Be it ordained by the City Council of the town of Lafayette in legal session assembled, that the Mayor of this be and is hereby authorized and instructed to sign in his official capacity the lithograph bonds of said corporation known as the water works and electric light bonds to the amount, of thirty-eight thousand dollars and to deliver thirty-six thousand dollars, thereof to J. M. Ferguson contractor of the water works and electric light system for and in the town of Lafayette as provided by his bid for the contract, provided that said of Mr. Furguson furnish the required security under said act and executed contract with said mayor.

  Be it further ordained that said bonds will be countersigned by the Treasurer of this corporation.

 The mayor then announced to the Council that he vetoed said ordinance on the grounds that the act of the legislature authorizing the issuance of said bonds is unconstitutional and that such legislation is prohibited by Article 46.

 Moved by Mr. Mouton that said ordinance be adopted the veto of the mayor nothwithstanding.

 Yeas: Biossat, Ducote, Falk, Mouton, Dr. Trahan.

 The Mayor declared that a two-thirds vote of the council being in favor of the motion. We announced to the Council that the ordinance is adopted notwithstanding the veto.

  3.  Whereas the mayor has informed the council that in his opinion Act 90 of 1896 authorizing the issuance of the bonds for the water works and electric lights is unconstitutional and whereas the question will necessitate, judicial proceedings on the part of the contractor for the erection of the water works and electric lights system of the town of Lafayette therefore.

  Be it resolved, that the resolution adopted on Oct. 5th, 1896, granting to Mr. Furguson until Oct. 20th, 1896, at noon, to furnish the required bond and sign his contract under his bid and the same is hereby amended, so as to extend said time of forfeiture until 30 days after the final decision of the question of constitutionality of said act, should said proceedings be instituted.

 Yeas:  Biossat, Ducote, Falk, Mouton, Dr. Trahan.  Nays:  None.

 Whereas the question of the constitutionality of the issuance of the Water Works and Electric Lights system for the town of Lafayette now that the same is questioned by his Hon. the Mayor of this town and prominent attorneys at law, is of vital interest to the property and welfare of the inhabitants of said Corporation therefore.

  Be it resolved, that all costs of court incurred by the Mayor in obtaining a final decision of the question, will be borne by said corporation of Lafayette, and the sum of two hundred dollars or so much thereof that may be necessary, out of the revenues of the year 1896 not otherwise appropriated, be and the same is hereby appropriated for that purpose.

 Yeas:  Biossat, Ducote, Falk, Mouton, Dr. Trahan.  Nays: None.

 The Council then adjourned.
C. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
BAXTER CLEGG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1896.



  

 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 10/31/1896.

 After a prolonged and harmful drought Lafayette is having a surge of rainfall.

 Our genial assessor Mr. A. M. Martin is wearing a broad smile, it's a boy.

 Mr. Cleobule Doucet brought us a fine stalk of cotton this week loaded with bowls of the second cup.

 Gilbert Bonin recently in the employ of H. H. Hohorst, left for Houston Saturday where he has accepted a position with a large retail firm.

 The young ladies are given a fair warning that this leap year is fast drawing to a close, and they should govern themselves accordingly. Four years is a long time to wait, you know.

 Florian Cornay we are glad be able to state is out again looking little the worse for his fall. He went to St. Martinsville last Saturday where he will be engaged for the season boiling sugar at the Levert refinery.

 J. C. Nickerson, Agent for Messrs. Oxnard and Sprague, has erected a derrick and put in new scales for the handling of cane and will pay the highest market price for same. No freight or derrick charges. Near Moss and Mouton's lumber yard. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1896.










 From the Lafayette Advertiser of October 31st, 1891:

WEATHER BAD FOR CANE.


 The continuous dry weather is doing our cane crop no good; but, at the same time our cotton is coming in very well, and is building up our industries by the money it brings in. We believe Lafayette parish will make over a third of an average crop this year. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.   



Death of Mrs. W. S. Parkerson. 

 The sad announcement is made to-day of the death of Mrs. Alice Palfrey Putnam, the wife of Mr. W. S. Parkeson, the well-known lawyer.


Though a long time suffered the death of this estimable lady comes like a pull on the hearts and friends and creates a void in those endearing relations in life which bless and hallow the name of home. Mrs. Parkerson was the daughter of the late Emmet Putnam and Amelia M. Palfrey, and was 29 years of age. A woman in every sense that is womanly, a wife with all the attributes that endear, a mother whose self-sacrificing devotion knew no bounds, and a Christian in all the graces which ennoble the wife and mother, marked her quiet pathway in life full of light and love. She leaves behind a large circle of friends, who will cherish her in fond remembrance and a husband and three little ones, who will long mourn her untimely taking off to the land beyond the skies.

 From the N. O. Picayune and in the Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.





Death of Charles P. Alpha. 

 At his residence in Lafayette, La., on Saturday October 24th, 1891, at 9:45 o'clock a. m., CHARLES P. Alpha, aged 45 years. He was president of the Police Jury of Lafayette Parish at the time. He was born in St. Mary parish, this State. He came to Lafayette parish just after the war, and married a daughter of Thos. J. McBride, and by this issue leaves several children. He was an exemplary citizen, filling his trust, as he might do for the best, and his death leaves a void to public usefulness. He died a public supervisor, and we trust that the Great God, who is kinder than we can imagine, will make his reward. His family have our heartfelt sympathy.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.  






New Dentist Coming.

 Dr. Armand Mary, a competent Dentist of the city of New Orleans, will arrive in Lafayette on the 5th day of November, and will be ready to do all work in that line that is requested of him. His prices are moderate and his work guaranteed. He will be found at Mrs. Sprole's Hotel on the 5th November and following days. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.   




For Clerk of Court.

 EWD. G. VOORHIES.

 Having been earnestly requested by many friends and fellow citizens of the parish of Lafayette, I hereby announce myself as a candidate for Clerk of the 25th Judicial District Court in and for the parish of Lafayette, subject to the decision of White Democratic Primaries.
          Respectfully,
                E. G. VOORHIES.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.



 Enjoyable Party.

 A very enjoyable party was had at the hospitable home of Dr. and Mrs. J. D. Trahan, last Tuesday evening, where the young people had a most delightful time, and were only too sorry when the clock chimed the hour of 12 M., which warned them that the time for departure had arrived and that it was the hour to bid their hosts' au revoir.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.



Accidental Drowning.

 On the afternoon of last Saturday one of our citizens, a painter by occupation, Mr. George Hopkins, was accidentally drowned, while but fishing, on Bayou Vermilion, near what is known as the forks of the bayou, four miles above town. He was of a well-known family and leaves a wife and several children. The generally accepted explanation of the accident is, that while fishing he fell out of the skiff, and hurt himself so that he drowned. He was aged thirty-five years. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.



 Corpse Found.

 On the 24th inst., just after the express due from New Orleans at 10:55 arrived, a horribly mangled corpse of a negro was found on the track near the depot. It was the corpse of Henry Brown, who was raised in this parish, and had for some time been working on a plantation below here. He was probably stealing a ride on the train, and fell in getting off. It was a ghastly sight. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.

 Druggist Hurt.

 Last Thursday afternoon one of our druggists got seriously hurt while putting down a curbing to a well, Mr. E. Delmouly. The curbing fell on him, cutting his head and breaking a rib. We are glad to state that he is doing as well as could be expected, and his injuries are not expected to prove fatal. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.


 To the Police Jury of the Parish of Lafayette.

 In compliance with a resolution of your Honorable Body, I respectfully submit the following report, which will show the total amount of taxes collected on the delinquent rolls of said parish by the different Magistrates entrusted with said collection, as well as the judgments rendered by them respectively against the delinquents. I have annexed to my report the detailed statement made to me by the said Magistrates with a list of those persons reported as delinquents who have exhibited their receipts from the Tax Collector.

----------------p. 2----------------

    Respectfully submitted,
          M. F. RIGUES, Dist. Atty. pro tem.

 We the undersigned committee appointed by the Police Jury of the Parish of Lafayette to examine the foregoing report of the Parish Attorney in regard to the collection of the delinquent taxes of said parish, have found the same correct in every particular.
      R. C. LANDRY, JEAN BERNARD, S. J. MONTGOMERY.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1874.

  


District Court.

 Last Saturday Judge O. C. Mouton passed sentence on the following parties convicted at the recent term of the District Court.

---------------p. 5------------------

 The court then adjourned sine die.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.





   










 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 10/31/1891.

 The cold weather has come upon us in earnest. Frost several days this week. Now look for a degeneration of Summer and Fall weather and fix up the backlog for Winter.

 All Saints Day will be celebrated to-morrow (Sunday) at the Catholic church.

 The City Council will met at the Town Hall next Monday.

 Mr. Walter J. Mouton will please accept our thanks for a fine lot of fresh fish sent us last Friday, 23rd inst.

 On Monday, the 2nd of November, the Police Jury will hold its regular session at the Court House.

 Mr Henry Gerac accompanied by his charming sister, Miss Estelle, visited friends in Grand Coteau last Sunday.

 Miss Louise Judice has returned home after spending a pleasant visit at Royville, La.

 Mrs. John Clegg returned home Monday, after a pleasant and agreeable visit of two or three months in the mountains of Tennessee.

 We are frequently met with the inquiry, have you any lands for sale in your columns?  Yes;  but they are generally grabbed up as soon as a person knows it. If you have land in this parish to sell, it will soon be taken if you put in a notice.

 Sheriff I. A. Broussard left here last Tuesday for Baton Rouge, having in charge Antoine Henry, Arthur Joseph and Lewis Gould, sentenced and convicted at the last term of Court for petty larceny and will lodge them into the penitentiary. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.




 From the Lafayette Advertiser of October 31st, 1911:


NEW ST. JOHN CHURCH.

 Bricks are coming in by tens of thousands on the Catholic church grounds for the new St. John church. Last Sunday Rev. Father Teurlings explained to the congregation the status of preparations. There is about $5,000.00 to be raised this year and the work of constructing will go on without delay. It may take two years to erect and furnish, foundations will be laid this year, the work of construction will go on without interruption so as to have the building completed in the fall of next year, 1912. To complete the canvass of the city and surrounding country, the Financial Committee, consisting of Messrs. Hons. Paul DeClouet, Judge Julian Mouton, Judge Campbell, Dr. Voorhies, F. G. Mouton, Chas. Jeanmard, Eraste Landry, Jno. Keith, Albert Landry, Jules J. Mouton, Edmond Mouton and Edmond Martin are giving to everyone an opportunity to subscribe for the new church, which is to be an edifice of imposing grandeur, the monumental steeple facing the Court House. The dimensions are 160 x 74, the roof rises to a height of 65 feet, the elevation of the old steeple after it lost its spire. Flying buttresses support the upper walls.

 As soon as the $5,000 are raised, the Board of Directors will borrow $10,000.00 which will bring the cash available up to $36,000.00 in the fall of next year, the required sum for the building itself exclusive of the spire and interior finish. The year following another $15,000.00 contribution will complete the structure. Total $51,000.00.

 Catholic Church Fair.

 The fair on Dec. 2 and 3 the object of which is to assist in raising the $5,000.00 needed this year, is in the hands of committees which ensure its success. Mrs. Alfred Mouton presided at the meeting of ladies last Sunday with Miss Stella Roy as secretary. General directors elected were: Mesdames C. O. Mouton, Julien Mouton and U. S. Dugas. Mrs. B. A. Pellerin is chair-lady of the fancy booth, where the guessing contest will take place. The Society for the Blessed Virgin will conduct the amusements of grab bag, fishpond, etc. Mrs. Cornay has charge of the candy booth. Mesdames Jno. Keith, C. O. Mouton and J. C. Nickerson preside at the Punch and other good things. Mrs. Albert Landry conducts the Chocolataria and Cafeteria. Refreshments and complete resaurant are in the able hands of Mesdames Edouard Mouton, O. C. Mouton, Poche and Alfred Mouton. Mrs. Ducrocq organizes the Gypsy Camp, Mrs. Julien Mouton will open a cream and cake parlor.

 The gentlemen of the parish are forming committees on entertainment, reception, press, transportation, excursions and additional attractions. Let all rally to the good cause for the beauty, pride and progress of our growing city.

 St. Paul's Colored Church.

 Father Teurlings, the rector of the, announced last Sunday that work will be resumed on the new church in the first week of November. Bids are asked for the erecting. It is expected that the new church will open for services on Christmas day. The people have been working hard with their pastor and assistant, and success will perch on their banner. Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1911.




LAGNIAPPE:
A Coin-Collecting Cat.

 There's a cross-eyed cat in a certain Main street drug store. Like some other homely creatures, the cat is remarkably intelligent, and the storekeepers have not been slow to turn its sagacity to account. In this, as in other drug stores, the people around the soda fountain are continually dropping their change on the floor. The cat has been trained to skulk about the soda fountain, and to run, catch and swallow all coins dropped by customers before they can pick them up. Of course, the customer can't demand the money of the druggists; indeed, they seem rather amused at the cat's strange appetite for metal, not suspecting any design in it. Every night about 11 o'clock, just before closing for the night, the druggists administer a powerful emetic to the cat, which presently disgorges a quantity of coin, the amount on hot days sometimes reaching $4 or $5, which is credited on profit from loss. There are few cats that can thus earn $25 to $35 a week, and the owners of this cross-eyed animal very naturally value it highly.

 From the Buffalo Courier and in the Lafayette Advertiser 10/31/1891.  

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