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Monday, January 12, 2015

**NOVEMBER 4TH - M C



 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 4th, 1903:

BOLD ROBBERY.

 Show Window of L. F. Salles' Store Broken and a Number of Articles Taken.

 At an early hour Sunday morning someone broke the large plate glass in the show of L. F. Salles' store on Vermilion street and stole a watch, two pair of fine shoes a number of small articles. The robbery was discovered by Bill Lewis, who runs a hack. He immediately notified officer Campbell, who promptly visited the scene of the robbery and notified Mr. Salles. An examination of the premises disclosed no clue to the robbery; but a beer bottle on the walk near the window with bruised marks on the side close to the bottom edge, showed the instrument which was used in breaking the glass. Next morning one of the shoes split with a knife was found in Dr. Mouton's yard, and another in Vic Levy's yard. The shoes found were both for the left foot, which is probably the reason the robber threw them away; but out of pure meanness cut them so as to ruin them.

 The robbery was a very bold one as Mr. Salles had left all the lights burning with the curtains up, so that it was almost as light as day in the store. Evidently the robber worked in a hurry as he took only one watch and there were six in the window.

 Mr. Salles is inclined to suspect a negro who was in the store late Saturday evening, and who acted in a very suspicious manner. The negro admired the very pair of shoes which were in the show window and afterwards stolen. He wanted to buy the shoes, but did not have money enough. He hung around some time before leaving. The negro was dressed in blue overalls and had his pants' legs stuffed in his socks. The officers are on the look out for the fellow. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.

   


 Cleaning Out Vermilion Bayou.
 


 Friday an Advertiser reporter went out to Vermilion bayou where the government boat was working, cleaning out the logs and obstructions to navigation. This work has been in progress about a year, the last session of Congress having appropriated $10,000 for the purpose.

The work which is in charge of Mr. Albert Krohn, was begun at the mouth of the bayou and was finished Saturday, stopping at the railroad bridge near Beausejour Park.

The work has been done thoroughly and now there is water transportation from Lafayette to the gulf, which will be of considerable importance. Within a short time a boat will be put in to run from Lafayette to the gulf.

Lester Alexander, government inspector was here nearly all of last week, inspecting the work. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.

Cane Train Ditched on the Arnaudville Branch.


 (Special to the Picayune.)

       St. Martinville, La., Oct. 29.
  The cane train on the Arnaudville branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad ran over a cow at Parks Station, this morning, at 9:30 o'clock and was derailed. Two cane cars piled on top of the engine, which was smashed to pieces.

 Engineer Mike Gallagher had one of his legs broken in two places. Fireman Herman Olivier has his chest mashed and sustained a blow behind the left ear. He will probably die. Both of the injured men were taken to Breaux Bridge for medical attention. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.


Death of Mrs. J. G. Parkerson.


 Died at her residence in the town of Lafayette Sunday, Nov. 1, 1903 at 9 a. m., Mrs. J. G. Parkerson; aged 74 years and 9 months.

 Mrs. Parkerson had been in failing health for some time; bu no immediately fatal termination was expected, and her death came as a great shock to her large circle of friends. She possessed in a high degree those qualities which adorn womanhood and beautify motherhood. And it was as a mother that her splendid character and noble mould of mind showed most clearly. To her, home was was everything, her entire heart was wrapped up in husband and children, and her loving guidance was well and wisely used. Mrs. Parkerson had the happy faculty of winning fine and loving friends, by a wide circle of whom her loss will be deeply felt.

Judge and Mrs. Parkerson moved from Franklin to Lafayette about 25 years ago and have made this their home continuously since. Mrs. Parkerson was the mother of nine children, eight of whom, with her husband survive her. Mrs. N. P. Moss, Mrs. E. P. Mills, Miss Lizzie Parkerson, Mrs. C. D. Caffery, and Messrs. W. S. Parkerson, of New Orleans, Jas. Parkerson, S. R. Parkerson and Chas. Parkerson.

Funeral services which were attended by a large number of friends, were held in the Episcopal church at 10 a. m., Monday. The remains were laid to rest in the Protestant cemetery. 

The Show Window of L. F. Salles' Store Broken and a Number of Articles Taken. At an early hour Sunday morning someone broke the large plate glass in the show window of L. F. Salles' store on Vermilion street and stole a watch, two pair of fine shoes and a number of smaller articles. The robbery was discovered by Bill Lewis, who runs a hack. He immediately notified officer Campbell, who promptly visited the scene of the robbery and notified Mr. Salles. An examination of the premises disclosed no clue to the robber; but a beer bottle on the walk near the window with bruised marks on the side close to the bottom edge, showed the instrument which was used in breaking the glass. Next morning one of the shoes split with a knife was found in Dr. Mouton's yard, and another in Vic Levy's yard. The shoes found were both for the left foot, which is probably the reason the robber threw them away; but out of pure meanness cut them as to ruin them.

The robbery was a very bold one as Mr. Salles had left all the lights burning with the curtains up, so that it was almost as light as day in the store. Evidently the robber worked in a hurry as he took only one watch and there were six in the window.

Mr. Salles is inclined to suspect a negro who was in the store late Saturday evening, and who acted in a very suspicious manner. The negro admired the very pair of shoes which were in the show window and afterwards stolen. He wanted to buy the shoes, but did not have money enough. He hung around some time before leaving. The negro was dressed in blue overalls and had his pants' legs stuffed in his socks. The officers are on the look out for the fellow. 

Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.





BOLD ROBBERY.

 The Show Window of L. F. Salles' Store Broken and a Number of Articles Taken.

 At an early hour Sunday morning someone broke the large plate glass in the show window of L. F. Salles' store on Vermilion street and stole a watch, two pair of fine shoes and a number of smaller articles. The robbery was discovered by Bill Lewis, who runs a hack. He immediately notified officer Campbell, who promptly visited the scene of the robbery and notified Mr. Salles. An examination of the premises disclosed no clue to the robber; but a beer bottle on the walk near the window with bruised marks on the side close to the bottom edge, showed the instrument which was used in breaking the glass. Next morning one of the shoes split with a knife was found in Dr. Mouton's yard, and another in Vic Levy's yard. The shoes found were both for the left foot, which is probably the reason the robber threw them away; but out of pure meanness cut them as to ruin them.

The robbery was a very bold one as Mr. Salles had left all the lights burning with the curtains up, so that it was almost as light as day in the store. Evidently the robber worked in a hurry as he took only one watch and there were six in the window.

Mr. Salles is inclined to suspect a negro who was in the store late Saturday evening, and who acted in a very suspicious manner. The negro admired the very pair of shoes which were in the show window and afterwards stolen. He wanted to buy the shoes, but did not have money enough. He hung around some time before leaving. The negro was dressed in blue overalls and had his pants' legs stuffed in his socks. The officers are on the look out for the fellow. 

Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.  
 



 Coming to Falk's Opera House...
 The best of the many rural plays now being presented in the different cities, will be seen at Falk's Opera House for one night, Monday, Nov. 9th. This production is said to be different from all others as it contains much comedy as well as pathos, and the realistic saw mill scene is said to be the most exciting and intense effect ever produced. The scenes of the play are laid in Vermont and New York which gives ample opportunity for portraying the simple rustic characters in country as well as the many incidents that befall simple country folk who visited the metropolis. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.
 

Here is another write-up on this Lafayette bound play.

 There is the fragrant perfume of the apple blossoms and the clover all through the story of "Uncle Josh Spruceby", and one seems to breathe the balmy air of the country as the many interesting scenes are being enjoyed. You must see this play and see how much better you feel after witnessing the scenes of the old farm, and the natural acting of a company of capable actors. You will find the comedy the genuine article, and no matter how mild a theatregoer you may be, you will smile, and smile loudly, at the many clever lines and funny situations with which the play abounds. Falk's Opera House, Monday Nov. 9.

Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903. 


Wedding Bells.
 A quiet home wedding took place yesterday evening at five p. m., at the residence of the bride's uncle, Dr. A. Gladu, when Miss Medora Lindsay, one of Lafayette's charming young ladies, and Mr. Arthur Crooker, of Lauderdale, Miss., were united in wedlock by Rev. Father Forge. After the ceremony a reception was held to which only relatives and intimate friends of the family were invited. Mr. and Mrs. Crooker left on the night train for their future home in Mississippi.

Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.


MARRIED.
Chase-Mudd.

 Sunday evening at six o'clock Miss Clye Mudd and Mr. Edward Chase, were married at the Methodist parsonage by Rev. C. Smith. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.


 Ward & Wade Minstrel.

 The Ward & Wade Minstrel show last night at the Lambert Opera House is the best up-to-date Minstrel that has ever been heard in the City. Their band and orchestra was one feature that is very hard to beat in a traveling minstrel, and all other features were first class. Clean and that was the appearance of the entire Company. They left for Perry this morning where they show to-night. Then back to Guthrie for the second time this week. (Blackwell News, Oct. 1o, 1903.)  Falk's Opera House Sunday Nov. 8. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.


Made Improvements.

 The Vordenbaumen Lumber Co., O. B. Hopkins, manager, has just completed some extensive improvements, among them a large sales room for buggies and surreys, which have been made necessary by their increasing business. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.


High School Notes.
 James Caffery, Editor.

 The basket ball girls of team 1 have started practicing. They now play only at first and last recess, so as to let the girls of team 2 play at noon recess, as their baskets, which have been ordered, have not come yet. When they come team 2 will play on their own grounds. 

 The sixth grade are getting on fine with their experiment in physiology. Their experiments for some time have been mostly with alcohol.

 The pupils in Misses Dickson's and Christian's rooms are doing some pretty work in basketry.

 Lafayette needs better school buildings, but it is ahead of many other parishes in the character of the schools. It needs a high school building of about $50,000. The town pays a high price for a jail, a place to put criminals - but the school buildings!

 The children in Miss Close's room need not go hungry this winter, for there is a good store of food in it; such as, corn, potatoes, etc.

 Lafayette hasn't a very good school building, and it needs one badly; but it isn't the building makes the bright pupil, it is the teachers, and we have a mighty good lot of them. We have the same faculty as last year, except Mr. W. J. Avery has succeeded Mr. W. A. LeRosen as principal and Miss Bagnal has been transferred from the Primary to the High School. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.

  

 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 11/4/1903.

 It is pretty dry now and a good rain would be welcome. A number of cisterns are empty and the water question is becoming serious.

 Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Hopkins and sister, Miss Anna Hopkins, spent several hours in New Iberia Wednesday.


 The People's Pharmacy has moved from the Clegg building on the court house square and is now located on Lincoln avenue one block east of the depot.

 Mrs. J. J. Davidson returned home Saturday, after spending several days in New Orleans.

 L. F. Rigues has added a brick warehouse to the rear of his store.

 The post office was moved into new quarters Saturday night in the brick building next to Leo Doucet's store, on Pierce avenue. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1903.


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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 4th, 1899:


A FIENDISH CRIME

 On last Saturday, two weeks ago, a young girl living with her mother in Cameron's parish lost her life at the hands of an unscrupulous young man who after enticing her by a promise of marriage robbed her of her virtuous womanhood.

 The facts related to us are thus:

 Mr. Arthur Henry, twenty-one years old, son of Hon. S. P. Henry, member of the legislature had been paying attentions for the last five years to a young lady, Miss Alice Chadwell, twenty-five years old, and under a promise of marriage, an undue intimacy had grown between them until the young girl became to be in a critical condition.

 Henry not wishing to keep the promise made to her sought to release himself by doing away with the girl. In this he found an adviser in a chum of his, Sidney Debarge, a former resident of Lafayette parish. This latter one counseled him to poison the girl and offered to procure the poison for committing the crime. To this effect he (Debarge) repaired to Grand Cheniere where he called upon Dr. Brown asking the physician to compound for him a dose of poison. The doctor refused, Debarge entreated him furnish him with the stuff, offering even one hundred and fifty dollars for the stuff, but the doctor was not to be bought and the dose was not furnished.

 The above facts were revealed at the coroner's inquest after the death of the unfortunate girl Miss Alice Caldwell.

 A few days after the visit of Debarge to Dr. Brown, young Henry went to see Miss Caldwell and found her quite sick. She complained of being feverish. Henry then took a capsule from his pocket and offered it to her saying that he very often used it himself while feverish. She took it and told her mother about it, and notwithstanding her mother's advice she swallowed it.

 In thirty minutes she felt a burning sensation in her breast and falling to the floor unconscious.

 Dr. Carter, coroner of the parish and her family physician and Dr. Brown were called in but all of their efforts and skill were without avail.

 She lingered for five days and then died, never having spoken a word.

 An autopsy was held and the post-mortem examination revealed the atrocious fact that she had been poisoned.

 As soon as the facts were known young Henry and his chum Debarge were arrested and lodged in jail; Henry being charged with the poisoning and Debarge as accessory, this being the findings of the coroner's jury.

 In learning of the action committed by his son, his father, Hon. S. P. Henry refused to interfere in any way with the findings of the coroner's jury.

 It leaked out at the inquest that Debarge in counseling Henry to poison Miss Chadwell had cynically remarked that the act would create fuss for a few days, but that everything would be all right in a very short time.

 How the poison was obtained has not been learned as yet? In fact of the prominent position of the father of the poisoner the above facts were not made public.

 The Advertiser gleaned the above facts from a well known official of this parish. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1899.






Circus Avoids Lafayette?
 Sells Bros., one of the largest traveling circuses in the United States will not come to Lafayette this year, but will exhibit at Opelousas. We have heard that the reason of Lafayette being left out was that our municipal authorities required too high a license.

 There are certainly reasons for and against such license. Some pretend that the coming of a circus in the village, carries away much money ; others hold that the license ought to be reduced so as to allow the circus to exhibit. The Advertiser is in favor of the last proposition.

The circus, and especially one of importance tends to do away with the lonesomeness of the locality, children are jubilant and impatiently waiting the arrival of the circus. There are given exhibitions seldom and young and old alike do not refrain attending and enjoy a good time.

As to the carrying away of much money, we think this is an error, as a great number of people are coming into town to see the circus will at the same time do their trading, which otherwise would not have been done in the village but at other places and the gain of one to our local merchants would in our mind compensate for the other.

We doubt very much that the majority of our population are in favor of such high license, we think that on the other hand they are willing to disburse a small outlay so as to enjoy things than in any large city can be seen, and we are of the opinion that in exacting such high license, our municipal authorities are acting against the will of the people.

Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1899. 




Letter to the editor: 
Mr. Editor.- Does it strike you that - your worthy contemporary - the Editor of the Lafayette Gazette sacrifices too much space in his valuable paper in speaking of the Pilette's meeting. Such a little affair has been granted too much attention by the men of such lofty genius as Mr. Mouton and the party he supports. Saith not the worthy paper that one hundred and fifty or two hundred men met at Pilette to form a ticket without a party, without a platform? Truly it is undignified to notice so insignificant a meeting and we are surprised at Mr. Mouton "The Antis-." (American Anti-Imperialist League?)Mr. Editor, made no promises to every voting Tom, Dick and Harry, but openly and frankly chose their ticket and the nominees in like manner openly announced their choice of valuable deputies, and this surprises Mr. Gazette - More, there is no ring in the Antis-ticket, no bossism, the candidates, even the Gazette admits, are good men, chosen from the different wards of the parish. Has not this move been long desired? Has not Lafayette Parish been long enough governed by the corporation ring. Have not our worthy planters sighed and moaned, have they not repeatedly received promises but after each election have not the town people secured the offices? A single glance at the ticket formed a Pilette will reveal that the candidates are from the best families in our parish, that they bear the cleanest records, that each and every one is eminently fitted to serve the people in the capacity for which they have been - The Antis-, Mr. Editor, held there initial meeting at Pilette, they addressed themselves to the men who constitute the bone and sinew of our population, our planters, they will hold their meetings in different points of our parish, they will address the same class of individuals, but never will they accept a vote from unlawfully registered Syrians or Dagoes.

These, Mr. Editor are my few remarks. I freely confess I admire Mr. Mouton in supporting his party, but give unto Ceaser what is Ceaser's, and in conclusion will say the Gazette's reporter wore magnifying glasses when he saw the one hundred and fifty or two hundred men at Pilette.
Very truly, ON-LOOKER.

Laf. Adv. 11/4/1899.



Executive Committee Meeting.

 The Parish Executive Committee met last Thursday morning at 10 o'clock a. m., at the Court House and decided in favor of democratic primaries. The committee ordered primaries to be held on December the 9th. Both wings of the party have decided to take part in said primaries and the campaign has begun with the usual vigor. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1899.


All Saints Day. - All Saints day was fittingly celebrated with the usual pomp and splendor at St. John's Catholic Church. The day after being set apart in honoring the dead, numerous floral offerings were deposited upon the tombs of the dear departed ones.
 Laf. Advertiser 11/4/1899.



Should Have Stayed at His Old Job.

Mr. Lee Walker, who at one time kept a lunch stand and restaurant in Lafayette and who secured a few months ago a position as brakeman on the run from Houston to Glayden, Texas, was reported last Tuesday afternoon as being killed having fallen between the cars. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1899.






A Successful Boy Farmer.

 There is a young farmer living in the eighth ward of this parish who has made a record during the current year of which any boy may well be proud. His name is Adlard Babin, his age only 14 years, and he is the son of a widow, Mme. Adonis Babin. By his own labor, supplemented by hired help for only two days, he has made 250 barrels of corn, an abundance of potatoes for the use of the family, has gathered six bales of cotton averaging 550 pounds per bale, and will get two more. Any parish or section populate with such boys as that could not help prospering, and the youth of Ascension will honor themselves, their parents and their country by emulating the example of intelligent energy and industry set by Master Adlard Babin. From the Donaldsonville Chief and in the Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1899.



 Smoker.

 The Century Club will give a smoker on Tuesday night, Nov. 7, 1899 at which the returns of the New Orleans election will be announced as soon as received. The public in general are invited. For the use of the rooms and all extra conveniences aside of the election returns a small admission fee of 50 cents will be charged. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1899.



 Roads Need Work.

 The Advertiser would like very much for the street committee to now and then upon the work done on our streets. There are some streets where one feels that he is stopping in the furrows of a plowed field rather than in a street. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1899.


Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 11/4/1899.


A cold wave struck Lafayette last Thursday. The first big frost of the season came in on time yesterday morning.

 Be sure to be at Falk's Opera House to-morrow Sunday night to witness the performance of the Melroy Chandler Real Negro Minstrels.

 The last day of this month will be Thanksgiving Day. The first big frost of the season came in on time yesterday morning.

Mrs. F. R. Tolson and two of her daughters made a trip to Cade during the week.

Rev. Father Forge will celebrate the Holy Mass to-morrow Sunday, Nov. 5th, at 9 o'clock a. m. at Scott.


 Go and enjoy yourselves with the Real Negro Minstrels to-morrow, Nov. 5th., at Falk's Opera House.

 The Carencro Sugar Manufacturing Co., was sold last Saturday to S. Gumbel & Co., of New Orleans, for the sum of $21,000.

 The Southern Pacific will grand reduced rates to Opelousas on Nov. 17 for Sells Brothers circus of 1 and 113 fare. The ticket will cost 90 cents per round trip.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1899.







From the Lafayette Gazette of November 4th, 1893:

Laf. Mob Threatens to Burn Rail Car.

 The following special dispatch from this town was printed in the Times-Democrat some days since. It might be termed the text to the succeeding article :

 In view of the fact that Sam T. Jack's Belle Creole Company is advertised to play here to-morrow night ;  be it
   
 Resolved, That we regard the negro females composing said company and parading themselves as creole beauties, to be an infamous slur on the fair name of the people of Louisiana, and firmly protest against the wanton and insulting exhibitions of that company. (Signed) Wm. Campbell, Julian Mouton, C. Debaillon, F. R. Tolson, N. P. Moss, Crow Girard, C. A. Thomas, Alfred Hebert.

 The subjoined is a part of an editorial taken from the New York Sun of the 25th instant, and for want of a more appropriate term we shall call it the context, and inaccuracies therein pass by for the time being, inasmuch as all the facts are known here:

 The controversy over the origin, derivation and significance of the word creole began years ago, and has been in progress ever since. Until Friday last, however, the adjustment of the question was in the hands of the disputing philogers. On that day it passed summarily, and, we hope, finally, into the hands of a Louisiana mob.

 A creole is, properly speaking, an American born of French or Spanish parents resident in the semi-tropical portions of the continent, adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico. The climatic conditions prevailing in those regions differ materially from those existing in France and Spain; and creoles, most numerous in Louisiana and Florida, do not enjoy the robust vigor which marks the larger number of Frenchmen and Spaniards. But they, especially the creole women, have a marked characteristic of beauty and supple grace ;  deep black eyes, soft, smooth, delicate complexions, gentle voices, and symmetry of figure, without obesity. Creoles are full blooded white persons without any admixture whatever of negro or Indian ancestry, and they pride themselves particularly upon this fact, which is an exception to the general rule in most Spanish-American or West Indian Rule countries.

 The general belief of many uninformed persons is that creole and octoroon are synonymous terms. This erroneous view, tenaciously adhered to during many years was shared by a theatrical manager who has been touring the United States with a number of octoroons, mulattoes, and negroes of both sexes in a company called "La Bell Creole Minstrels." When the company, on its travels, reached southern Louisiana, the home of genuine creoles, trouble began. At Lake Charles great indignation was shown, but no violence, and the theater was empty. At Lafayette, they found that a meeting had been held to denounce "their attempt to besmirch the fair name of Louisiana" by parading a crowd of quadroon women as creoles ;  and a committee headed by the Mayor informed them that they could not play there, but had better leave at once. The mob collected around the car in which the alleged creoles, and there were threats to burn it if they did not leave. When the car reached New Iberia the situation was so threatening that there was no performance. The manager decided it was best to quit the creole country, and, under this promise, the mob desisted from interference, and the pretended creoles departed North on a fast express. They will never go to Louisiana any more.  Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.


THE ADVANCE GUARD.


 Twenty-five men arrived in Lafayette on Sunday evening's freight train, being a contingent of the California workingmen now on their way to points in this and adjoining States in search of employment.  

 The party were begrimed with dust, worn out and nearly furnished, having had nothing to eat since leaving Houston. Most of the party possessed cards in various labor unions and some of them showing that they were far above the average "bum" tramp, in short, it could readily be seen that they were tramps from necessity and not from choice. Sheriff Broussard and Marshal Vigneaux, assisted by charitably inclined citizens, provided food for these wayfarers, who, after satisfying their hunger, departed apparently grateful for the kindness and help extended to them. Many, no doubt, will find work on the sugar plantations below.

 This contingent are of the number who were arrested in San Antonio and detained by the city authorities as common tramps, but shortly afterwards released by request of Gov. Hogg, who expressed the determination if it was not done to grant immediate relief, and stated that no American citizen should be arrested and treated as a common make factor on Texas soil, for simply asking for an opportunity to earn the means necessary to a livelihood. Gov. Hogg, doubtless recalled the time that he landed in Tyler with fifteen cents in his pocket, and only wanted a chance to work, is now applying to them the same rule that he should have wanted applied in his case. And in assuming correct, and in consequence of which, none of the party were molested in Texas, and none will be so long as they commit no infraction of the law.
 This detachment is the forerunner of the large army that it is feared will come pouring down on this section if the silver mines are forced to close by adverse legislation. It is claimed that mining is the only means available whereby thousands of people are enabled to earn a living, and should the demand for silver cease, these people must seek elsewhere the substance to keep body and soul together, hence their probable visitation of this section.

 Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.

Telephone Service From Lafayette to Rayne and Crowley.

There is a movement on foot to connect the two towns of Rayne and Crowley with Lafayette by telephone. This means a connection with almost every town adjacent to Lafayette, and ultimately a connection with New Orleans and other important places. A committee has been appointed from our town and they have had a meeting with a like committee from Crowley, and the prospects for an early completion of this progressive move is very promising. It is the duty of our business men to assist in this enterprise, as it will be a valuable boom to our town. The telegraphic service is far from being satisfactory, and once we get telephonic connection, the telegraph will be done away with altogether. By all means give us the telephone. Signed, Rayne Ranger.

The Advertiser is glad to be able to say to the good people of Rayne and Crowley that their desire for telephonic communication with Lafayette and other points will assuredly be gratified during this month.
Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.




Train Accident.

 The local freight train that left here Thursday for Beaumont ran into the rear end of a through freight at Terry station at 1:35 Friday morning. We have not heard if any damage was done, or if any one was injured. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.




Much Freight Traffic.

 Never before was the freight traffic so great as to present on the Southern Pacific railroad. The yard at this place has been blocked for some time, until an additional switch engine was put in service in day time and yet the two engines keep moving from 6 a. m. to 6 p. m. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.



"Upholsterer of the Wayside Ditches."

 An "upholsterer of the wayside ditches" (the name given to tramps in Germany) claiming to be a hostler by trade, in search of employment, was given a job at Mr. Vigneaux's stable, at a salary of $15 a month and board. Before starting to work he was given a square meal, and after satiating his hunger the ungrateful wretch sneaked away, and has not been heard of since.

 The Gazette's remarks on the tramp question has met with general approval, if we are to judge by the many expressions made to us. Even those who differed from us did so, so far as we can learn, not from a sentimental point of view, but purely on grounds of public necessity. The great big heart of the people of this town is all right. Lafayette Gazette 11/3/1893.


 Moving to the City.

 Mr. John Comeau, for the past seven years occupying a position of trust in the millinery store of Mr. Jno. O. Mouton, departed Wednesday for New Orleans, where he will reside, having secured employment in the large dry goods House of Schwartz. John is a young gentleman of fine conduct, industrious, and The Gazette's best wishes for his success will ever follow him. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.


 Wagon Accident.

 Last Thursday morning a very serious accident befell Mr. Anatole Montet while driving a wagon team at the depot in Broussardville. The team took fright throwing Mr. Montet violently to the ground and inflicting very serious wounds about his head and body. Mr. Montet's injuries while serious and painful are not considered fatal, and doubtless he will be fully recovered from his unfortunate experience. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.

 Hit with Rock.

 Last Sunday, at 6:30 p. m., as the Alexandria passenger train was passing Knowles switch, a rock was thrown at the train and the missile striking Conductor Lusted on the cheek, inflicting a painful but not serious wound. Efforts should be made to discover the unknown miscreant, and when apprehended given the full extent of the law. After a heroic dose in administered to one it will deter others from indulging their mean inclinations. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.


 Cotton Burned.

 Tuesday fire was discovered in a lot of fifty bales of cotton on a flat car which had arrived from the west. The car was pushed up to the hydrant and a stream was played upon the burning mass. The fire was finally extinguished, but not before the whole lot was damaged, and some of the bales entirely consumed. The fire was caused by sparks from the switching locomotive. This cotton, we understand, was billed through or Liverpool, England. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.


 Cotton Burned in Carencro.

 The yard engine and crew were dispatched to Carencro Tuesday night to pull apart some 50 cars of merchandise and cars from a burning car of cotton, wedged in between the others. The loss would have been heavy but for the prompt assistance of the citizens of the town who, on discovery of the fire, pushed the adjoining cars away from the burning one, and kept a lookout to prevent further damage, until the switch engine should arrive. The relief train arrived in due time and soon separated the cars, but not before the fire had caused the destruction of 21 bales of cotton. The same day 2 cars of cotton caught fire at New Iberia, and with one car at Lafayette and one at Sunset, makes a total of accidents occurring on the line, which, within the same period, has no parallel in the history of the company. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.


 All Saints Day.

 "All Saints" and "All Souls" days are among the most impressive feasts of the Catholic church. The first is celebrated with all the brilliancy possible, for the church rejoices in the glory of its saints ;  on the second it assumes the deepest mourning, in remembrance of the departed, and many are the prayers offered up for them, while loving hands strew their graves with flowers. These days are always well kept in Lafayette, and this year the ceremonies were unusually grand and impressive.

 On Wednesday at 9:30 a. m., a solemn High Mass was sung, Rev. Butler, S. J., of Grand Coteau, being the celebrant, with Fathers Forge and Healy, as deacons. The choir, under the able direction of Miss E. Mouton, which us unusually fine on such occasions, surpassed itself. The solists were:  Misses Martha Mouton, Alix Judice, Alice Mouton, Nellie Bailey and Mrs. Sydney Mouton, Mr. Van der Cruyssen and Dr. F. J. Mouton. In the afternoon at 4:30 o'clock the "Vespers for the Dead" were sung, followed by an eloquent sermon by Rev. Butler. On Thursday morning the "Mass for the Dead" was largely attended. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.

   

  Selected News Notes (Gazette) 11/4/1893.

 Let's all go to the Fair in Carencro to-day and to-morrow.

 Cards are out announcing the approaching nuptials of Miss Rose Bendel to Mr. S. B. Kahn, which will take place on the 12th instant at the Synagogue in this town.

 Raoul Pellerin is replacing Onezime Mouton at Mr. J. O. Mouton's store near the depot. Onezime is now clerking for Mrs. J. O. Mouton.

 Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Debaillon with Messrs. H. J. Mouton, went over to St. Martinsville, by land, last Tuesday.

 Mr. Alfred Hebert having torn down the old athletic prize ring and will erect a fine dwelling house on the site, which will be occupied by his family as soon as completed. Lafayette Gazette 11/4/1893.



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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of November 4th, 1893:

 LIQUIDATION OF LAF. BUILDING ASSN.

 The Local Corporation Absorbed by the New-South B. & L. Ass'n, of New Orleans and a Branch of the Latter Established in Lafayette.

 Several months ago the Board of Directors of the Lafayette B. and L. Ass'n, finding that the interests of the association were suffering for the reason that the issuance of new stock to non-borrowers was not rapid enough to supply the demand for loans from the great proportion of would-be borrowers amongst the shareholders, and foreseeing to what an extent an insufficiency of money to lend would obstruct the progress and prosperity of the association, it was decided, after mature consideration of the directors, to recommend to the stock holders a liquidation of the affairs of the local association. At a general meeting of the members called for that purpose, the views of the board were ratified, and the directors were authorized to open negotiations with one or more responsible national associations with a view of transferring the assets of the local for ready cash and thereby greatly facilitate the act of liquidation. After several weeks of correspondence and investigation by the directors, the New South of New Orleans, was selected as the most desirable national association with which to entrust the interests of the local organization. As soon as this conclusion was reached the necessary measures for effecting the transfer were put in operation until final completion of the deal last Saturday.

 The New South Building and Loan Association of New Orleans, is strictly a Southern institution in origin and instinct, and the substantial character of its principal stockholders, seconded by a Board of Directors of high integrity whose members are recognized as being business men of the most conservative kind, is a full guarantee of the worth and responsibility of that association.

 As soon as the deal between the two associations was finally consummated on a basis of entirely satisfactory to all parties concerned, the New South proceeded to establish a "local branch" in our midst, and pursuant to the call of the General  Agent, Mr. H. J. Evans, published in the last issue of The Advertiser meeting of the Lafayette shareholders of the association was held in the Bank building for an election of directors and officers, last Monday night. Mr. Evans showed that 237 shares of stock had been subscribed for by the following citizens of Lafayette:


--------------p. 4------------------

 After a few explanatory remarks by the Mr. Evans, bearing on the general scope and usefulness of an institution such as the New South, the shareholders present formed themselves into a temporary organization and unanimously elected the following named persons to constitute the first board of directors for the branch:

-------------------p. 4------------

 The directors soon after being elected chose the following officers, in compliance with charter provisions:

 -------------------p. 4----------------

 The local branch of the New-South being fully organized, is ready to act on any business coming before its directors in relation to the objects and purposes of the association.

 All inquiries should be addressed to the secretary, Mr. S. R. Parkerson, Assistant Cashier of the People's State Bank, of Lafayette. Prompt attention will be given to all matters of interest to local branch, by its directors and officers.

 We will add that it is a rule of the New-South to make all loans as soon as papers can be completed, and that the association's affairs being operated largely on banking principles, it always has ample funds to make all loans applied for by its members.

 For the information of the public append the names of the directors and officers of the New-South B. & L. Association, proper:


 ----------------p. 4----------------

 In conclusion we wish to add that it is the general opinion of our business men that the absorption of the local association and the consequent establishment of a branch of a strong and responsible national in Lafayette, is a decided gain for our people, for the capability of the latter to furnish money to borrowers, is unlimited as compared to the very circumscribed means of the local, under existing circumstances.

 Success to the New-South and its Lafayette "branch". Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1893.



A Telephone.

 There is a movement on foot to connect the two towns of Rayne and Crowley with Lafayette by telephone. This means a connection with almost every town adjacent to Lafayette, and ultimately a connection with New Orleans and other important places. A committee has been appointed from our town and they have had a meeting with a like  committee from Crowley, and the prospects for an early completion of this promising. It is the duty of our business men to assist in this enterprise, as it will be a valuable boom to our town. The telegraphic service is far from being satisfactory, and once we get telephone connection, the telegraph will be done away with altogether.

 By all means give us the telephone.
        (Signed)   RAYNE RANGER.

 The Advertiser is glad to be able to say to the good people of Rayne and Crowley that their desire for telephonic communication with Lafayette and other points that their desire for telephone communication with Lafayette and other points will assuredly be gratified during this month. Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1893.


PARALLEL STATEMENTS.

 Of Even Date, That Speak for Themselves.

 THE FALSE.

 An editorial in the San Antonio (Texas) Daily Express of Oct. 6th, 1893:

 ACCURSED OF HEAVEN.

 The terrific storm which recently caused such destruction of life and property in Louisiana serves to call attention to the fact that the Pelican state is subject to about every plague known to other lands, and to some peculiarly its own. The seven vials of St. John seem to have been poured out upon it, the curse of heaven to rest ever upon its people. It is the home of the flood and the storm, the abiding place of disease and death. Destructive overflows are as common in Louisiana as cyclones in Kansas and far more destructive. The coast country for a distance of from twenty to sixty miles inland is one vast unhealthy swamp, liable at any time to be swept by the waves of the ocean. The low flat surface of the state, its thousands of stagnant bayous, its intolerable heat and excessive rainfall - ranging from sixty inches in the south to fifty inches in the north - make Louisiana the natural home of malaria and mosquitoes, alligators and indolence. Yellow fever constantly lurks in the marshes, poisonous reptiles infest the semi-tropical forests and leprosy is as common as in Jerusalem or the Hawaiian islands. Naturally, in such a country the inhabitants become enervated, deficient in physical vigor, mental strength and moral stamina. They plant, not expecting to reap, and build, doubtful if they will enjoy. They mark time by the mighty floods or yellow fever outbreaks, and drift down stream of time like wreckage on the Father of Waters, growing more sallow and shiftless year by year, until carried off by one of the many curses of that unhappy clime. The fact is that Louisiana is an unfinished country, one of which the Lord has not yet fully prepared for human habitation. It has not yet passed the carboniferous ere. Some centuries hence, when the lakes have been transformed into coal beds and the sediment carried down the great river has built up the unhealthy lowlands - when the saurian has given place to higher types of animal life and the mosquito and malaria microbe have been reduced to the minimum, Louisiana may afford happy homes to a progressive and prosperous people. In the meantime it were the wisdom for those now there - who have moved in before the Lord threw the country open to settlement - to give o'er their losing battle with fate and come to Southwest Texas, a Paradise that should have been settled 500 years ago. - San Antonio Daily Express of Oct. 6th, 1893.


 Extracts from a letter published in the Kansas City Progress of Oct. 6th, 1893, written by the editor of that newspaper whilst traveling through Louisiana:

 "This portion of Louisiana (Southwestern La.) is one of the prettiest, most fertile and prosperous lands, it has ever been our pleasure to view.

 "It is the most wonderful and interesting spot of earth in our land.

 "We wonder, are constantly surprised and live in a transcendental strain of amazing delight continually. They rasie sugar cane, cotton, rice, corn, oats, wheat, grass and fruits in this country. The farmers are all doing well and if they farmed as systematically as the men of the west, they would soon get wealthy. We do not know of a place in the world where we would rather own a farm in this scope of country. The soil is rich, seasons and climate perfect, and the healthful, delightful salt gulf breeze keeps the atmosphere pure and invigorating. There are fewer doctors in this country than any place we have ever seen. All kinds of vegetables, small fruits, pears, japanese fruits and figs grow here to perfection. The possibilities in these lines are very great.

 "There are vast virgin forests of cypress, hickory, oak, walnut, magnolia and gum awaiting development by capital. These valuable timbers are so plentiful here that the people use them for wood.

 "To anyone looking for a place on which nature has lavishly bestowed here most artistic touches; one where the soul can drink in nature's most exquisite loveliness continually; where there is perfected harmony, purity and beauty in earth, air and sky; we know of no place more fully encompassing these requirements.

 "We have never met a more polite and hospitable people, most of whom are French and Creoles. A stranger is treated with such genuine marks of courtesy that he cannot help but be favorable impressed with the people. He meets with cordial and pleasant manners and speech everywhere.

 "The fact is, the more you know of the southern people the greater becomes your admiration for them. They are refined, liberal, broad and tolerant. We would be willing to spend the rest of our days on earth among such people as we found here, and eternity would not be clouded with unpleasant associations if it is inhabited by such noble, kind and considerate people.
Kansas City Progress.


 In commenting on the editorial of the San Antonio Express referred to the above, the N. O. Times - Democrat has appropriately replied:

 The press of the country has spoken in the most sympathetic tones, of the tornado disasters which recently befell the coast district of Florida, Georgia, and the two Carolinas on the Atlantic and Louisiana and Mississippi on the Gulf coast. Nothing in better spirit and more touching could be said than was said on this subject by the New York Press, one of the bitterest and most sectional of Republican papers, of the Carolina disaster, in appealing to the people of New York to send assistance to the sufferers.

 It is somewhat of a surprise, therefore, in the midst of the universal sympathy and these earnest tenders of assistance to find the last storm made the basis of an onslaught on Louisiana, by a Southern paper, so foul and venemous as to leave doubts of the sanity or sobriety of the writer, or to create the suspicion that there were personal incidents in his life connected with Louisiana which has made him bitter towards the State.

 The San Antonio Express, under the title "Accursed of Heaven," tells the readers that the late storm was a (unreadable word) from Providence in Louisiana as punishment for its sins; that (unreadable words) a matter of fact, cursed by (unreadable words) unfit for human habitation.

 It is not necessary to enter into any discussion of these absurd falsehoods, or to refute them - for they carry their own refutation with them. It is only to the ugly spirit of bitterness which the article contains that we wish to call attention. If the San Antonio Express proposes to invite immigration to Southwestern Texas by such methods, reviling and slandering its neighbors, it should be repudiated by the people of that section, who, we know, do not share its bitterness, hatred and un-charitableness.

 What should induce us to believe that there is something in the personal career of the writer of these falsehoods, which makes Louisiana a disagreeable remembrance to him is the fact that he has singled it out for his attack.

 Nearly all the other Southern States have been visited by the same or similar tornadoes in the last two months and damaged as much, or nearly as much, as Louisiana, South Carolina lost as many lives, but the Express cannot see any curse hanging over that State. Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama and North Carolina were all visited. And Texas itself has suffered from like storms in the past. We have not forgotten the Sabine Pass disaster of a few years ago; nor yet the destructive storm and loss of life in that very portion of Texas to which the Express invites Louisianians as a refuge. Was it a curse sent from heaven there?

 Still more monstrously false is its assertion about yellow fever, for Louisiana is one of the few Southern States which has altogether escaped that disease in the last few years, and it is due to its efforts that the fever has been prevented from crossing over into Texas. Georgia is now in the throes of an epidemic. Florida has had the fever this summer. Alabama and Mississippi have been afflicted for the last ten years, but Louisiana, "where the disease lurks all the time," as the Express declares, has been entirely free from it.

 Another objection of the Express to Louisiana is that the rainfall is heavy here. We confess to this. There is so much rain here that Louisiana never suffers from a drought, and it is never necessary to appeal to the charity of the world on that account, as the farmers of Western Texas, to which the Express invites us to immigrate, were compelled to do a few years ago because their crops were burned up by the drought. There are fewer crop failures in Louisiana than in any State in the Union because it has sufficient rain. In San Antonio the rainfall is only 31 inches per year, and in some of the surrounding country, to which it invites us, only 13 inches, not enough for crop safety, which perhaps may explain why it considers a sufficient rainfall "a curse from heaven." We would mention, merely as illustrative of its falsehoods, that instead of being hotter, the climate of Louisiana is milder and more equal than that of Southwest Texas;  and that the Gulf coast, which the late storm ravaged, enjoys such pleasant breezes and so agreeable a climate as to make it a favorite residence during the summer.

 We have perhaps given the Express article to much attention. It was not, however, because we wish to protest against the spirit of phariseeism it contains, and to repudiate its sectional bitterness as alien to the South. We would be sorry, indeed, to believe that anywhere in the Southern country such a spirit prevailed as that shown in the Express' article, or that such disrespectful methods and falsehoods were resorted to in order to attract immigration to any State or section; and we therefore prefer to think that the article was inspired by a personal motive, the result of some private prejudice of the writer toward Louisiana. No Southern paper, no true Southern man, has ever before indulged in such falsehoods and slanders. There is some private reason for this malicious attack on Louisiana.
From the New Orleans Times-Democrat and in the Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1893.            

   

       



     

    

       

  

            

  





          



   





POLICE JURY PROCEEDINGS.

     Lafayette, La., Oct. 20th, 1893.
  The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present. Ford Hoffpauir, R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry, A. A. Delhomme and H. M. Durke.  Absent:  J. G. St. Julien and C. C. Brown.

 Mr. Alfred Hebert here appeared before the Jury and presented his commission as Police Juror, of the 2nd ward, vice W. B. Torian resigned.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 The committee appointed to re-insure the court house reported that duty performed, and two policies each for $2,500 secured through Lewis and Lacombe, agents, in the Royal of Liverpool, and Hartford Connecticut. The rate being fixed at 6 1/2 per cent premium for three years no reduction could be obtained. The report of the committee was accepted and approved.

 Mr. E. G. Voorhies here appeared and presented his resignation as member of  the auditing committee, assigning that the duties incumbent upon the committee, since the system of contracts with the various officers had been adopted, were of so insignificant nature, as to render the services of that body practically useless. Mr. Voorhies urged the acceptance of his resignation as he did not consider himself justified in receiving as he did not consider himself justified in receiving remuneration for the slight services now imposed on the committee and further that the presence and advice of District Attorney M. T. Gordy would suffice in the disposal of all matters of doubtful legality. By motion the resignation of Mr. Voorhies was accepted.

 By motion duly made the auditing committee, was abolished.

 Hon. Julien Mouton appeared before the Jury and urged a liberal appropriation for the maintenance of the Public Schools of the Parish, and upon motion the following was adopted:  Resolved that the sum of $1,500 be and is hereby appropriated to the public schools of the parish in general and the same made payable to the order of Hon. Julien Mouton, president of the Parish School Board.

 The following account was laid over:

 A. Cheffer, Lumber ... $88.28

 The following accounts were approved:

 H. Billeaud, feeding prisoners ... $110.00

 Thompson Hoffpauir, Unloading lumber ... $2.00

 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1893. 





 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 11/4/1893.

 Dr. F. R. Tolson made a flying trip to San Antonio, Texas, this week.

 Mr. E. H. Vordenbaumen has returned home after a long absence during which be visited the World's Fair, and other points of interest in the North.

 On yesterday "Company C" our local veterans participate in a pic-nic at Bayou Tortue and we have no doubt it was an enjoyable occasion.

 Some unknown person threw a missile into the passenger coach on train No. 50 last Sunday between Haas and Eola and struck Conductor Lusted on the check bone.

 A local freight train crashed into the rear end of a through freight at Terry, a few miles East of Beaumont, about 1:30 a. m. yesterday. No destitute report as to extent of damage done, has been received.

 Mr. Alfred Hebert is building a fine residence on Lincoln Avenue on the site of the club house of the Lafayette Athletic Association, recently removed.

 A few days since Mr. H. L. Monnier received from Chief of Police Caster of New Orleans a picture of the individual arrested there recently for obtaining money under false pretenses; and he as no hesitation in saying he is the same man who defrauded Mrs. Monnier.

 Another visit of the S. P. paycar last Wednesday instead of Saturday was highly appreciated by the railroad employees in particular, and everybody in general. When the company pays off again about the 20th inst., as is expected, it will have fully cancelled all back dues to the men.

 The World's Fair closed on the 31st ultimo. The impression it has left upon its 22 millions in visitors will make itself felt for generations to come.

 Circuit Court will sit here on Tuesday 7th inst. We hear there will be one case to ponder. We also learn that Judge Perry of this Court, who for some time has been in bad health is now much improved. Lafayette advertiser 11/4/1893.



  

  

  



  






     

  

  


   

  

      

         

























 










Lagniappe:
HISTORIC COACHES.

 They Have Been Prominent Factors in Many Bloody Scenes.


 For many generations the coach has played an important part in the world's work and pleasures. What tales it could tell of court and field. History itself may be said to have run on wheels. In the tragedies of French history, especially, we find the lumbering four-wheeled conveyance playing a conspicuous though silent part. The gallant Henry of Navarre, man of his day though he was, had a conservative aversion to the novelty. He much preferred sturdy steed on which he was wont to trot along the streets of seventeenth-century Paris. But one day that crazy fanatic, Jen de I'Isle, set upon the king as he was ambling along and had nearly plunged his dagger in the royal breast. Henry deemed it unwise any longer to appear among his excitable lieges on horseback so reluctantly resorted to a coach as a means of conveyance. His coach was supplied, not with glass windows, but simply leather curtains lined with silk; and it was in this vehicle that he was riding when the assassin Ravaillae availed himself of the king's exposed position to plunge his knife in his heart.

 After that the state coaches were built in a manner to afford more security to their occupants, and were made with solid backs and sides. Even this was not found safe, and in some instances the coach panels were lined with select sheet iron. The coach of Louis XIV was attacked by the half-starved mob as it passed through the streets in his funeral procession -  a forewarning of the mighty convulsion which was to burst forth ninety years later. But the tragic history of royal coaches in France was by no means closed by this ebullition. As Louis' graceless successor, Louis XV of the name, was stepping into his coach he was stabbed by Damiens, and France had nearly lost the worthless and dissolute of all her rulers. The vivid picture of the sad and strange journey of the sixteenth Louis, with his stately queen, from Versailles to Paris, will not be readily forgotten by those who have been thrilled by Carlyle's description of it. When, in the end, Louis was condemned to death, he went to the scaffold in a filthy hackney carriage. His beautiful and haughty queen rode to her death in a yet meaner conveyance. She was doomed to go thither in a hideous tumbrel, like ordinary mortals, and she ascended it and took her place, standing bare-headed against the side with her hands tied beneath her, the savage mob yelled out: "Widow Capet, get into your pleasure!" 

 From Waverly Magazine and in the Lafayette Advertiser 11/4/1893.


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