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Tuesday, January 13, 2015

**DECEMBER 4TH. - M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of December 4th, 1908:


DEMONSTRATION FARM AT S. L. I.

This farm, located near the Industrial School, is under the supervision of the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, and is devoted to practical farm work as object lesson to the farmers of Southwest Louisiana. Next season three cuts along what is known as the government road, of one sere each, will be devoted to cotton, corn, oats and peas, so as to form a cut of two acres devoted to hay, that is pure Lespedezza or Japan clover.

 The fences have been all straightened so as to be all lateral, each cut being with square angles.

 The space devoted to the garden will be regulate so as to furnish the greatest variety from all of vegetables to the boarding scholars early and late.

 A cut will also be reserved to be cultivated by members of an agricultural club formed of the students and young men farmers in the neighborhood, and the club is in formation now.

 Truck farmers will also be benefitted by early visits in the spring, when demonstration in the use of hot beds for early plants will be made.

 Dates will be fixed during the season for meetings on the farm, notice being given in advance of the object of the demonstration as the season advances. At those meetings the U. S. agent supervising will always be present, to answer all questions referring to the ways and means used to obtain the results, and everything will be done in the most practical way, tab of work being kept to reference to time, cost, etc.

 It means simply farming in a business way, as all farmers ought to farm.
Lafayette Advertiser 12/4/1908.














 From the Lafayette Gazette of December 4th, 1897:


Railroads Reopening After a Depressing Period.

 Two months of quarantine, shutting out almost entirely the traffic over the Southern Pacific between New Orleans and points in Texas, has not in any way impaired the zeal of the line in opening the great highway for traffic.

 Commencing November 25, the various communities have raised their quarantine and immediately the double daily train service with buffet sleepers was put in operation, making connection at New Orleans with all lines east and north. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.

     






 Poetic Stillness in Parochial Politics?


 In accordance with the call issued by the Democratic Parish Executive Committee, a number of Democrats of the third ward met in the court-house Wednesday at 11 o'clock and selected 11 delegates to represent this ward in the parish convention which is to be held Saturday.

 Chairman Hahn, of the executive committee, presided over the meeting and Homer Mouton acted as secretery. Upon motion the following delegates were elected: I. A. Broussard, G. Voorhies, Julian Mouton, A. J. Moss, Joseph Ducote, Paul L. DeClouet, Theolin Dupuis, Edmond Mouton and John Hahn. It was agreed that the delegates present will cast the vote of the ward.

 The parish convention which is called to meet to-day will select delegates to the State convention to be held at Baton Touge on Dec. 9, when thirty-six delegates at large will be nominated. It will also choose a candidate for delegate from this parish.

 The Gazette knows of no candidate in this parish. There seems to be no aspirants for constitutional honors. Whether this poetic stillness in our parochial politics is due to the innate modesty of the local statesmen or not, we are not in a position to say, but the fact confronts us that although we are on the eve of election no one has offered his services to the people in the present emergency. May be this will be one those rare instances where this office will seek the man. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.




Christmas Excursions.

 Excursion tickets from all points in Texas to points in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia will be sold via Southern Pacific December 21 and 22, 1897, good for return within 30 days from date of sale, at rate of one fare for the round trip.

 Local tickets from and to any point on the line will be sold December 23, 24, 25, 30, 31, 1897, and January 1, 1898, good to return up to January 3, 1898, at rate of one and third fare. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.





Business Improving. - B. F. Anderson, the well-known carpenter, has contracted with Mr. Hebert Billeaud and will build a large dwelling house for that gentleman at Broussard. Mr. Anderson informs us that business in his line is beginning to show signs of improvement.
Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.





Ike Reported Well Again. - The friends of Ike Broussard were glad to see him well enough to go about, completely recovered from his late severe illness. 
 Laf. Gazette 12/4/1897.




Woodmen of the World.

 Professor Ives has succeeded in organizing a Camp of the Woodmen of the World in Lafayette. If the condition of the weather permits, the initial organization will take place this evening at the K. of P. Hall. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.

  
L. S. U.

 The Louisiana State University opened its doors on December 1, with an attendance of one hundred and fifty students the first day. Considering the disorganization of business caused by the recent epidemic, this is a very good showing. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.


Sullivan's "Lost Chord."

 The first correct copy of Sir Arthur Sullivan's great song, "The Lost Chord," ever printed in America, direct from the composer's own hand, will appear in the Christmas number of The Ladies' Home Journal. Over his signature Sir Arthur Sullivan states that of the millions of copies of "The Lost Chord" sold in America, all are incorrect, and that this is the first accurate copy of the song ever prepared by him, or for which he ever received a penny of payment. The complete music and words of Sir Arthur's copy of the song, expressly prepared for The Ladies' Home Journal, will be given. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.


Fatal Accident.

 Mr. Rupiter, who was injured in a break-down Saturday, died on his way to New Orleans, to which place he was going to receive medical attention at the Charity Hospital. Mrs. Rupiter also received injuries but they proved slight.


 The unfortunate occurrence was caused by the breaking of the carriage in which Mr. Rupiter and his wife were riding. They were both thrown violently to the ground, and the unfortunate man received wounds about the head, from which he subsequently died. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.

 H. M. Mayo Promoted.

 The Gazette is pleased to note that H. M. Mayo, the estimable young newspaper man who has been connected with the Times-Democrat, has received the appointment of advertising agent for the Atlantic Division of the Southern Pacific Company. Mr. Mayo's many friends will be glad to learn of his promotion. In his selection the Southern Pacific Company has recognized ability and rewarded sobriety and honesty. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.

    

WARD MEETING.

 In accordance with the call issued by the Democratic Parish Executive Committee, a number of the Democrats of the third ward met in the court-house Wednesday at 11 o'clock and selected 11 delegates to represent this ward in the parish convention which is to be held Saturday. Chairman Hahn, of the executive committee, presided over the meeting acted as secretary. Upon motion the following delegates were elected: I. A. Broussard, Leopold Hirsch, A. M. Martin, E. G. Voorhies, Julian Mouton, A. J. Moss, Joseph Ducote, Paul L. DeClouet, Theolin Dupuis, Edmond Mouton and John Hahn. It was agreed that the delegates present will cast the vote of the ward.

 The parish convention which is called to meet to-day will select delegates to the State convention to be at Baton Rouge on Dec. 9, when thirty-six delegates at large will be nominated. It will also choose a candidate for delegate from this parish.

 The Gazette knows of no candidate in this parish. There seems to be no aspirants for constitutional honors. Whether this poetic stillness in our parochial politics is due to the innate modesty of the local statesman or not, we are not in a position to say, but the fact confronts us that although we are on the eve of the election no one has offered his services to the people in the present emergency.  May be this will be one of those rare instances where the office will seek the man. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.



SPECIAL MEETING.

          Lafayette, La., Nov. 26, 1897.
   The City Council met this day with the following members present: Mayor Caffery, Councilmen Hahn, Hopkins, Martin and Davidson.

 Upon motion Dr. Martin, the secretary being absent, acted as secretary.

 Dr. Martin, as a member of the Board of Health, reported that the board had adopted the following resolution:

 Be it resolved, that we recommend to the City Council the adoption of the resolution adopted at the health conference held here on the 17th inst., relative to second hand goods from places where yellow fever prevailed lately, and furthermore that passengers will be admitted hereafter without any certificates.

 Thereupon the following was adopted: Be it enacted, by the City Council that the above and foregoing resolution of the Board of Health be and are hereby adopted, and that the same be enforced under the penalty of a fine not more than $100, in default of payment of fine imprisonment not exceeding thirty days.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
G. A. MARTIN, Secretary, pro tem.
Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.




 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 12/4/1897.

 Omer Patureau, proprietor of the Railroad Shaving Parlor, has received six fine blue-steel razors and a good supply of barber's material, which goes to show that he is doing a splendid business.

 Miss Dulice G. Veazey, of New Iberia, is spending two weeks with her little niece, Teal Veazey. They are having a merry time.

 The drummers have taken possession of the town. Scores of the genial "Knights of the grip" visit Lafayette every week.

 Mrs. H. A. Eastin, Mrs. Numa Judice and Miss Lucie Judice left Thursday for St. Martinville.

 Judge Allen, of Little Rock, who will be remembered as the counsel for Albert Brown in the ice factory arson case, was in town this week. Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.


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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of December 4th, 1897:





Selected News Notes.

 The heavy rainfall during the past week served to emphasize the necessity of giving immediate attention to some of the streets of the town along which were laid pipes for the water works. The time was never more opportune to profit by the old adage "a stitch in time saves nine".
  


 Mr. Clay, a prosperous merchant of Arnaudville, was in Lafayette Monday and gave us a pleasant call. Mr. Rogers is postmaster of Arnaudville since 24 years, notwithstanding the various administrations during that long period. He must possess a cinch on that place.

 Messrs. G. O. Couvillon and H. H. Couvillon of Avoyelles Parish were visiting Mr. J. C. Couvillon, their brother, last Thursday.

 It is a twelve pound boy at L. E. Lacour's.

The theatrical at season at Falk's Opera House will open Tuesday 7th. and Wednesday 8th. of December with the play "The Fortunes of a Waif," a 4 act melodrama and rendered by the Metropolitan Comedy Co. Reserved seats on sale at B. Falk's store.

 A grand bazaar will take place at Mauriceville December 18th, and 19th, 1897 for the benefit of the Catholic Church. A select programme will be given during those two days and a gay time is expected. Don't fail to attend.

 Mr. Alex Mouton of New Orleans spent a few days in Lafayette during this week. Mr. Mouton will in the future reside in Breaux Bridge and attend to the business of the R. Martin Sugar Co. of which he is one of the interested parties.

 Toys: Dolls, carriages, trunks, Piano's at Schmulen's Racket Store.
 The Office of Santa Clause is at the Racket Store. Office hours from 12 a. m. to 12 p. m. and from 12 p. m. to 12 a. m. Mr. William Pellerin representing F. Gumbel & Co. cotton brokers of New Orleans was in Lafayette Thursday. F. Gumbel & Co. are one of the largest firms of the city.

 
Go to R. R. Exchange Shaving Parlor for a shave and try a blue steel razor, it will cost you only 15cts.  That popular young artist Omer Patureau, of the R. R. Exchange Saving Parlor, received a half dozen fine blue steel razors and a large assortment of barber's supplies, and is now prepared to do first class work, in the art of Hair Cutting, shaving, shampooing, singing, etc.


 Mr. Sidney Bouchard, formerly assistant agent of the S. P. at Lafayette is appointed agent at Mermentau and took charge of his new employ on Dec. 1st.

 
A large assortment of toys for Christmas arrived at Schmulen's Racket store. Miss Leila DeBlanc made a short stay at the home of her brother, Mr. Geo. A. DeBlanc, last week, enroute from the city of Mexico to New Orleans.

 Remember friends of sheriff I. A. Broussard were much pleased to see him well enough to be walking the streets again, this week.

 A painful accident happened last Sunday in which Wm. Rupeter, a dairy man, lost his life. Mr. Rupeter was returning home in his carriage in company with his wife and when reaching Osma Boudreaux plantation in turning too fast the carriage turned over and both Rupeter and his wife were violently thrown to the ground. Rupeter was rendered unconscious and never recovered, his wife sustained only a few scratches. Mr. Rupter was sent to the New Orleans Hospital but he died before reaching the City. He was buried the next day in the Protestant cemetery at Lafayette. Deceased was originally from Germany.

 Shoo Fly Rockers, boys velocipedes, at Schmulen's Racket store.

 Cards are out announcing the marriage of Miss Marie Archinand, of New Orleans, to Mr. John M. Jorda. The nuptial ceremony will take place Dec. 14th at St. Louis Cathedral, New Orleans.
 Fine bonbons and chocolates at Moss Bros. & Co's.
 What is new in hats? A visit to Moss Bros. & Co's. millinery department will answer that question to the entire satisfaction of any lady.

 We expect every subscriber to come during next week to settle his subscription of 1897. We will be at our office every day of the week, and if necessary we will remain at night.


 What about a Mardi Gras parade in Lafayette for next year?

 Races will be run at Surrey Park, at Lafayette, Sunday, Dec. 12th, between Barlow, belonging to Don Louis Herpin and Fi D. the Cochrane filly. Distance: 7 arpents and purse of $200.00. Other races will take place during the day. Refreshments will be sold at low prices. Admission: 25 cts.

 
Who is to blame for the delay in bringing the mail to the post office in the morning? A little more expeditiveness in this matter will satisfy many citizens. Mr. Sidney Bouchard, formerly assistant agent of the S. P. at Lafayette is appointed agent at Mermenteau and took charge of new employ on December 1st.

 Mouton & Hopkins desire to call the attention of all the ladies, to the fact that they have just received a very large stock of Henrietta's cashmere, Ladies Clothes seeking cloths, Serge's flannels etc. from St. Louis. They also have a nice assortment of ladies and men's gloves.  
 What about a Mardi Gras parade in Lafayette for next year?

Lafayette Advertiser 12/4/1897. 




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Lagniappe: 
A Life-sapping Vice.

 An ordinance imposing a license of $1,000 upon all persons dealing in cigarettes in the city of Denver, Col., and daily penalties for violations of the ordinance, went into effect November 10, 1897. This is Denver's protest against what is possibly the most pernicious vice of the age. The cigarette ought to be extirpated from the face of the earth.  Cunningly rolled and made up into dainty little packages to more readily tempt the unwary boy, or youth, it is the slow poison that insidiously undermines the brains of men, leading to certain destruction of mental firmness and stamina. There is little doubt that the cigarette vice is responsible for many infirmities of the mind and their evil consequences, and fosters suicide and insanity. And the extent of the harm can be fully appreciated when it is known that the sins (infirmities) of the parent is transmitted even unto the fourth generation.

 At the rate the American people are developing the cigarette habit the nation will soon develop into a race of degenerates - mental and physical dwarfs. If American character and statesmanship, (already admitted to have declined a great deal in comparison with the past), is to be preserved the invidious cigarette will have to be exterminated. It is a destroyer of nerve vitality, that seldom fails to leave its impress on the devotee. Cigarette manufacturers are gigantic poison stills gnawing away at the foundation of manhood, and should be suppressed as great public evils. Not satisfied with feeding the fire already burning in grown men, the cigarette manufacturer and vendor seeks to kindle the blaze in our innocent little children by offering prizes to decoy the half willing into purchasing the dainty scraps of rice paper surcharged with a poison so deftly manipulated as to sooth the mind that it may the more unsuspecting steal away the brain substance. The temptation is so artfully strewn about us by those who are growing rich from the profits from that source, that it nigh contaminates the milk of the nursing babe.

 The suppression of the cigarette vice is well worthy the attention of the national congress, if there is enough mental capacity left in that body that has escaped the baneful influence of the cigarette to recognize this threatening destroyer of American statesmanship, now stalking unhampered through the land. The poison of the cigarette if slow in its march of destruction it is no less sure,and we should undertake the reform, as a people, before the destroyer shall have progressed that far as to own us all slaves and its servants. The time to strike is now and, in our humble way, we commend to all thoughtful of openly and systematically combating a vice that is to be dreaded all the more because so insidious, a vice that is surely lowering the standard of manhood by making mental, physical weaklings of our cherished boys almost from the time they can lisp the word "mother
".  

Lafayette Advertiser 12/4/1897  



lagniappe #2.
The Elevation of the Negro.
[From the N. O. States.]


 Because the States has taken such radical and unequivocal ground in favor of disfranchisement of the negroes by the approaching Constitutional Convention, we learn that the negroes have come to regard us as their enemy and as desiring to deprive them of all their civil rights and subject them to a sort of peonage. On the contrary, The States is the best friend of the negro race has in this State. That the negro is unfit to rule is proved by the whole history of the his race for six thousand years. In all those centuries the negro in his native jungles and left himself has never evolved a single feature of civilization. The only progress he has made in the arts and methods and ideas of enlightenment he has made under the institution of slavery and the force of the discipline of the white man, and wherever he has been released from slavery and left to himself, as in St. Domingo for instance, all the accumulated works of civilization, all the progress, all arts and religion created by the whites have decayed and perished, and the negro has again degenerated into a savage and into cannibalism. If then such has been his fate, left to the forces of his own characteristics, is it surprising, is it incredible to say, that, thrown into the arms of unscrupulous carpet-baggers and scalawags, whose only interest in the negro was to use him as tool to plunder the civilization of the South and whose only teachings of him were in the corruption, the disreputable trickeries and the profligacy of politicians; it is strange that, predisposed by nature to savagery the negro, under such conditions, rapidly accepted these evil lessons and instead of rising from the level of the disciplined slave he sunk tot he very lowest social, moral, and political plane, and hence, it is incredible to declare that, after thirty years of freedom, he is less fit to exercise the franchise than he was when he first became an emancipated slave from the cotton and cane fields of the masters, whose example of discipline had developed him into something of an enlightened and Christian being?

 From the N. O. States and in the Lafayette Gazette 12/4/1897.    


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