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Monday, January 12, 2015

**SEPTEMBER 30TH M C



 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 30th, 1903:

GERAC'S GIN DOWN FOR REPAIRS.



COTTON ACCUMULATING. -  A reporter for The Advertiser had occasion to visit the Gerac gin Monday. They have a well equipped plant, provided with the latest machinery, and are doing a fine business. Since the gin started three weeks ago, the plant has been pushed to its utmost capacity. An accident to the machinery, which caused the stoppage of some of the gins, caused about 400 bales to accumulate, but the damage will soon be repaired and the work will then be rapidly caught up with. Gerac Bros. are using the round bale press, which make a convenient sized bale easy to handle, and weighing about 250 pounds. It is quite interesting to see how easily and quickly the cotton passes from the gin into the press and is turned out in a neat roll.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.




EFFECTIVE ADVERTISING
Of Louisiana and Texas Being Done by the Southern Pacific.

 The effective manner in which Texas and Louisiana are advertised all over the world by the Southern Pacific is every day borne out by new evidence, and a day or two ago letters came from across the Atlantic to General Passenger Agent, T. J. Anderson, both desiring information concerning the great Southwest. One of the letters was from an intended homeseeker, in Rosendaal, near Arnheim, The Netherlands, and the other from a man of means living at Bromberg, Germany, who wrote as follows:

      "Bromberg, Germany, August, 1903.
 "Dear Sir:
      "As I intend emigrating to the West of the South of the Union, I take the liberty to beg you to send me pamphlets, maps and through information about cheap farm lands in Louisiana, Texas and some other states and territories where there are still plenty of wild and uncultivated cheap lands or homestead lands, which may be had for farmers, ranchers and planters, about the climate, wages paid to farm laborers and cowboys. What is the average price of cheap wild lands (but fertile) per acre? Write me also prices of cattle, sheep, horses and mules. I would appreciate very much to be supplied with some agricultural magazines and newspapers.

 "Anticipating the pleasure of receiving your reply, I am,
                   Yours truly,
  
 It was only a few days ago that the Southern Pacific sent photographs of the East Texas tobacco fields and tobacco literature, on request, to Geo. M. Odlum, Special Agent of the Rhodesia Department of Agriculture at Salisbury, Rhodesia, South Africa.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.    





Moving in New Store. - Pellerin & DeClouet have been for the past week moving into their mammoth new store. The store as completed makes a handsome appearance. The two large show windows, which are of plate glass, are made like bed rooms, so that it is possible to display a bed room completely furnished. Laf. Advertiser 9/30/1903.


Should Be Named. - The official map of Lafayette shows that there are quite a number of unnamed streets in the Mills Addition. This should be remedied, and at the same time, we would suggest that the Council officially name Pierce and Jefferson streets Lincoln avenue, so as to do away with the absurdity of practically the same street having different names every time it makes a turn. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.


Was Not So Dry. - Would you think that it rained on twelve days in August? Well, it did; not much at a time, but it rained. The days were Aug. 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, 25, 26 and 31, and the total amount was 4.92 inches. Judging by the amount of dust we have had, August ought to have been a dry month, but it wasn't so dry after all, as the above shows quite plainly. And the temperature behaved rather nicely itself. The mean temperature behaved rather nicely itself. The mean temperature was 81 degrees, only 5 less than normal. The highest temperature happened on the 15th, when the thermometer registered 94, while the lowest occurred on the 31st, and was 67.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.



A Public Spirited Act. - A reporter for The Advertiser noticed in his rounds a few days ago that the street in front of H. Theall's livery stable on the court house square was particularly clean. Mr. Theall had at his own expense had the street cleaned, and had also thoroughly cleaned up his premises. This is a most commendable act, and deserves imitation by everybody. If each property owner would do same, we would have one of the cleanest towns in the state. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.


Donated by the Masons. - In an article in regard to the schools last week, we stated that the School Board had rented the first floor of the Masonic Hall. This was an error. The Masons, instead of renting the Board, have generously donated the use of the first floor free of charge. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.



A Colored School Building. - A beginning for a school building has been made by the colored people of the town. They have raised funds and built a one-room school house on their lot in Mills Addition, which is now occupied by one teacher. They will, as they secure funds, add to this building until it shall be large enough to meet all demands.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.                                                                






Court in Session.

 A criminal term of court opened Monday with Judge C. Debaillon presiding. The grand jury convened and began its investigation of infractions by law. They will probably conclude their labors to-day. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.



Wedding Bells.

 Monday afternoon at four o'clock Mr. M. Billeaud, a prominent merchant and planter of Broussardville, and Mrs. Antoine Guidry, of this place, were married at the residence of the bride, Rev. Father Crozier officiating. The wedding was a quiet affair, only relatives and a few very close friends being present. Mr. and Mrs. Billeaud left on the 5 p. m. train for San Antonio or a short wedding trip of ten or twelve days, when they will return and make Broussard their future residence. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.




 Won't Benefit the Community.

 We wonder if there is any man in Lafayette who has lived here for years made his money here, been sociably and humanely treated by his neighbors, and yet would refuse to aid with his voice add purse anything that is for the benefit of the community. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.

      












EUCHRE PARTY.
Given by Mouton-Gardner Camp U. D. C.

 The euchre given by the U. D. C. last Thursday evening in Pellerin & DeClouet's new store who generously donated the use of the first floor, was a success socially and financially. A most congenial crowd was present, which added much to the pleasure of the occasion. The Sontag Military Band kindly began the entertainment with several of their charming selections. During the evening a string band furnished music. The store was handsomely decorated with the natural colors and the tables were attractively set. The euchre game started at 8:30 with seventeen tables and was played through with great interest. The first prizes were won by Messrs. D. Schwartz and O. T. Ford, and Messrs. John Hahn and G. O. Harris. The consolation prizes were given to Mrs. B. N. Coronna, Miss Louise Doenges, and Messrs. E. T. McBride and A. L. Bourgeois. The prizes for lone hands went to J. A. Martin, Miss Irma Voorhies, Dr. J. A. Martin, and Mr. Rene Durand. The booby prizes fell to the lot of Misses Corinne Guidry, and Gertrude Coronna, and Messrs. Ben Schmulinski and Mike Crouchet. There was also a guest prize won by Miss Louise Doenges. The guests were: Misses Clara LeBlanc of Abbeville, Louise Doenges of St. Louis, Cessa Fuller of New Iberia, and Miss Silvernagle of New Orleans.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.





Birthday Party.

 Last Friday afternoon little Miss Dorothy Davis entertained her wee friends at a delightful little birthday party. Each of the invited guests received a dainty little invitation with the hostess' picture at the top, which read as follows"

 "My name is Dorothy David
     Just listen to what I say.
 I'se going to have a party
     On my very first birthday.

 I can scarcely write for thinking
     Of all the fun there'll be.
 Be sure you come and bring wif you
     Only a great big kiss for me."

 September 25. Four o'clock.
     Lafayette, La.

 At four o'clock seventeen of the little invited ones were present and ready for "all the fun" and, of course, there mammas were there, too. Mr. Carter was also there and he took a picture of all the little folks in a group, and each guest was given one of the groups as a souvenir of the occasion. Then delicious refreshments, just the kind to the suit the appetite of tiny folks, was served, and the mammas were not forgotten. The big "birthday" cake was then brought, and each little hand to cut and see what the luck would be. Master John Ramsey cut and got a lovely gold pin; Quentin Cunningham, a silver dime; Harold McMillan, a silver dime; George Bonnet, a gold pin; and as those little folks couldn't enjoy the fun unless Miss Dorothy shared it, she had to cut too, and she got the gold ring. Now there was a prize for the one who enjoyed the party the most. Every last little fellow enjoyed it just as much as could be; but Mrs. J. A. Martin, Mrs. Alex Mouton, and Miss Christian declared that little Miss Lucille Nickerson had had the most fun, so she was awarded a sweet little silver spoon.

 Those present were: Lucille Nickerson, Willie Serrett, Harold McMillan, Frank Melchert, Tradis Domengeaux, Paul DeClouet, George Bonnet, John Henry Carter, Lionel Mayer, Quentin Cunningham, Ben Gordon Hopkins, Mildred Hopkins, Roy Alleman, Tom Biossat Parkerson and John Ramsay.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.   




City Council.
Lafayette, La., Sept 8, 1903.

 

 A regular meeting of the City Council was this day held, Mayor C. D. Caffery, presiding. Members present: J. O. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, F. Demanade, H. L. Fontenot, M. Rosenfield, G. A. DeBlanc. Absent: D. V. Gardebled.
 The chairman of the Water and Light Committee reported progress in the matter of the new work at the plant, the reservoir being nearly completed, and also that of the pump. And everything in readiness for the pump which is due to arrive by September 15th, that the latest information from the builders of the pump is that same was completed and same was now in the test shop.

 The chairman of this committee also reported an accident to one of the dynamos, which had been sent to the Johnson's shop for repairs at a cost of $173.00, and the foundry promised to return same as soon as possible.

 Petition of Mr. L. Domingeaux by Mr. J. A. Van Dyke was refused.

 Dr. F. Mayer asked for an appropriation for the reception of the State Medical Association, during the month of May next. Action on the matter was deferred to next regular meeting.

 Bill of Dr. F. E. Girard for $46.00 for wire bought for street fair and turned over to town, was referred to Water and Light committee for adjustment.

 Communication of P. L. Breaux, principal of colored school, requesting an appropriation for erecting a public school in Mills addition was accepted. On motion of A. E. Mouton, seconded by M. Rosenfield and carried, the sum of $100.00 was appropriated for that purpose.

 It was moved by G. A. DeBlanc and duly seconded, and carried that the following ordinance be adopted:

 An Ordinance, providing for the construction  and paving of sidewalks along the streets of the town of Lafayette, La., and for keeping same in repair.

 Section 1 - Be it ordained that the City Council shall hereafter, whenever in its judgment the public interest requires it, build and construct along the streets of said town, side walks and curbing, concrete, brick or plank, as said Council may determine, and same shall be built according to plans and specifications be adopted by said Council.

 Section 2 - Be it further ordained, that said walks may be built under the direct supervision of the Council, or by contract, and in the event the same is to be built by contract, this said work shall be let to the lowest responsible bidder from whom there shall be exacted satisfactory security for the faithful execution of said contracts, the said work shall be given in an official journal of said town: provided in the event that no satisfactory bid is received, then that said Council shall have the right to reject any and all such bids, and thereupon to exercise its original rights to cause said work to be done under the supervision of the Street Committee of said town.

 Section 3 - Be it further ordained that the provisions of this ordinance shall also apply to all repairs to be hereafter made upon the side walks of said town.

 Be it further ordained that the cost of all work done under the provisions of this ordinance shall be borne as follows: two-thirds by the owners of the lot abutting the side-walk, curbing or portion thereof to be paved, improved or repaired, and one third by said town.

 Section 4 - Be it further ordained that whenever said Council shall determine to enter upon the construction of any work under this ordinance, the cost thereof shall be determined as soon as practicable, and thereupon said Council shall provide by ordinance for the assessment of all real estate abutting the side walk or curbing to be built or repaired to cover two of said cost; said assessment to be upon the basis of the respective frontage of said properties on said walk.

 Section 5 - Be it further ordained that the sum assessed against the lot or real estate abutting shall be due and collectable within ten days after the completion of the work and its acceptance by the Council, and if not paid within that time, the City Council shall have the power to proceed by suit against the said owners and said real estate to collect the delinquent assessment, and the municipality shall have a special privilege on said property or prosperities to secure the sum assessed against it, with six per cent per annum interest thereon from the expiration of the said ten days until paid, which lien shall be the first privilege over all other claims except taxes; said privilege shall effect third persons from the date of the registry of the assessment in the mortgage book of the parish in which said real estate is situated, provided that the town Council, instead of enforcing the said assessment as above fixed, upon the payment in cash by the property owner of twenty five per cent of the amount due by the said property owner, may in their discretion, authorize the mayor to to approve notes or certificates signed by said owner, showing the amount respectively due by the persons and properties on said side walks or curbing so paved or improved, which shall be payable in one, two and three years, or sooner at the option of the property owner, with six per cent interest per annum, interest payable annually, which said notes or certificates (when a copy of the same is recorded with the assessment aforesaid) duly paragraphed as being recorded by the recorder of mortgages shall be secured by privileges, on the property, prior to all other charges, except taxes, and may be transferred carrying the lien, and privilege herein above provided for, to any contractor or other person provided that the town Council, instead of enforcing the said assessment as above fixed, upon the payment in cash by the property owner of twenty-five per cent of the amount due by the said property owner, may in their discretion, authorize the mayor to approve notes or certificates signed by said owner, showing the amount respectfully due by the persons and properties on said side walks or curbing so paved or improved, which shall be payable in one, two and three years, or sooner at the option of the property owner, with six percent interest per annum, interest payable annually, which said notes or certificates (when a copy of the same is recorded with the assessment aforesaid) duly paragraphed as being recorded by the recorder of mortgages, shall be secured by privilege, on the property, prior to all other charges, except taxes, and may be transferred, carrying the lien, and privilege herein above provided for, to any contractor or other person provided that when the work is done by the town, said certificates may be made to bearer or any person who may desire the same, and they shall enjoy the lien and privilege aforesaid.

 Section 6 - Be it further ordained that this ordinance shall take effect forthwith.

 Be it further ordained that in accordance with the provisions of the ordinance this day adopted relative to side walks, that Shillinger pavement 6 feet wide including the curbing be built, starting on Grant avenue at the center line of Crescent News Hotel, running to the corner of Lincoln Avenue to Pierce street, thence along the south east side of Pierce street to Vermilion street to Lafayette street, thence along the east side of Lafayette street to north Main st.

 Be it further ordained that the street committee be and is hereby instructed and empowered to have specifications prepared for said walk, and thereon to call for bids for said work to be submitted within 15 days notice, contractor to furnish bond in the sum to be hereafter determined, for the faithful compliance of his contract unanimously.

 Moved and duly seconded that the City Council meetings be held hereafter on first Monday of each month at 7:30 p. m. Carried.

 There being no further business, Council adjourned.
       

LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary,
           CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.






 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/30/1903.

 Monday afternoon at four o'clock Mr. M. Billeaud, a prominent merchant and planter of Broussardville, and Mrs. Antoine Guidry, of this place were married at the residence of the bride, Rev. Father Crozier officiating.

 J. C. Broussard does all kinds of cabinet work. Furniture repaired and upholstered and made as good as new.

 Walter Torian, after an extended tour of several months in Mexico returned home last Friday.

 Mr. and Mrs. David Mouton will move into their new home near Dr. Guidry's this week.

 J. P. Nolan, division master mechanic of the Southern Pacific, spent part of yesterday in Lafayette.



 Felix Gerac is expected home to-day, after an absence of five months traveling over various parts of Europe.

 Prof. Alcibiades Broussard, who is in charge of the Pilette school, is actively working to secure a larger and better school house. The building in use now is inadequate, and Prof. Broussard is trying to arrange for a two-story building, which is needed. 

 Mrs. W. V. Nicholson returned Sunday from San Angelo, Texas, where she has been for several months for her health. Her many friends will be glad to know that her health is much improved.

 Mr. VonEye, the affable agent at the S. P. Depot, in Carencro, informs us that the busy season is on, and that there are more goods being brought in than ever before at this season of the year.  Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.








 From the Lafayette Gazette of September 30th, 1899.


MRS. F. H. JAMES.

 A Former Resident of Lafayette, Gets in Serious Trouble by Killing an Actor in Chattanooga.

 Mrs. F. H. James, whose maiden name was Julia Morrison, and who, with her husband lived in Lafayette over a year, is now a prisoner in a Chattanooga jail, charged with the killing of Frank Leiden, an actor. The shooting occurred in the rear of the stage of an opera-house in that city. She fired three shots at Leiden, the bullets taking effect in the neck and head of the man. The third shot was fired while Leiden lay bleeding and dying.

 Mrs. James was immediately arrested and charged with murder and her husband was charged with being an accessory to the crime. The accusation against James was subsequently dismissed, but Mrs. James is in jail awaiting the action of the court. From all accounts she will be given a speedy trial and in a few days her fate will have been decided. Press dispatches from Chattanooga show that many of the prominent people of the city are sympathizing with Mrs. James. Since her incarceration she has been presented with an avalanche of flowers, fruits and other nice things and we are told that she is as well treated as if she were at a first class hotel. Whether these spontaneous expressions of sympathy are born of a conviction of her innocence or are merely an exhibition of the sentimental gush for which the American people are noted the correspondents do not say and will probably never be known. It is a fact in this country that a man or woman who commits a crime under sensational circumstances is often made a martyr of by a class of people who are bubbling over with a false sympathy. In this case The Gazette hopes that the sympathy is deserved and that Mrs. James will be able to prove to the jury that she was justified in killing Leiden.

 Mrs. James, or Miss Julia Morrison as she is called by the papers, came to Lafayette about a year ago and was joined by James to whom she was married by the Rev. I. T. Reams. The couple lived here up to a few months ago. While here they gave evidences of a great fondness of the stage and claimed to have written a number of plays. Mrs. James at one time tried to organize a local theatrical company in Lafayette, but met with little encouragement at the hands of our people. She wrote and published an alleged novel which appeared in a local paper. In that production she did not display the literary talent with which she is credited by a New Orleans paper. The people of Lafayette will remember Mrs. James as a woman of striking personality, of a tall and handsome build, intelligent face, remarkably blonde hair, rather graceful and always stylishly dressed and presenting a decidedly theatrical appearance. Little is known here of her antecedents.

 It is claimed by Mrs. James that she was persecuted and repeatedly insulted by the man she killed. If that is proven she may be acquitted, but should she fail to establish the truth of these allegations it is not unlikely that she will found guilty of murder.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.





Shooting of Mr. Guilbeau.

 News reached here Thursday that a serious quarrel took place on the streets of St. Martinville resulting in the shooting of Mr. Preston Guilbeau by a young man named Cap Broussard, son of the Mr. Gaston Broussard. We have failed to ascertain the cause of the trouble and the details of the shooting, but are informed that there was only one shot fired, the ball inflicting a very dangerous wound upon Mr. Guilbeau.

 The following special from St. Martinville gives an account of the shooting:

 "... St. Martinville, Sept. 28. - Preston Guilbeau, manager of the St. Martinville Oil Works, was shot last night by Adolph Broussard, a discharged employee of the Oil works. Guilbeau was going up the street in his buggy. When he passed J. B. Ferran's grocery store Broussard signaled him to stop, whereupon, according to Guilbeau's statement, Broussard apprehended the buggy, placed his foot on the step and cursed him. Guilbeau slapped him in the face. Broussard stepped back, pulled his revolver (a 38 caliber) and shot him. The ball entered the armpit and is supposed to have penetrated the lungs. Guilbeau's condition is very serious. Broussard was immediately placed in jail. ..."
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.

   



DEATH OF MRS. R. J. FRANCEZ.

 Saturday morning, at 8:15, Athenaise Bernard, widow of the late Doctor R. J. Francez, passed into everlasting life.

Her death was a sudden one, coming upon her as she was seated upon her gallery talking cheerfully with two of her little grand children; and, being so unlooked for, was a terrible shock to her children who were not with her to take to take the last sad farewell to a devoted and loving mother. Her last moments, however, were not bereft of comfort, for she died in the arms of one who had ever been to her beloved daughter - the wife of her son, Ernest.

 Mrs. Francez was born in this parish, Oct. 10, 1832, the eldest daughter of the late Gerasin Bernard and of his wife, Eugenie Mouton, who is still living at at advanced age.

 She was married in July, 1855 to Dr. R. J. Francez, a native of France, a gentleman widely known and esteemed throughout this section of the country. Her surviving children are Romain, Maurice, Ernest, Gaston and Aristide and a daughter, Cecile, wife of Mr. Galbert Guilbeau, all residents of Carencro; while Henri, Jules, Celine, Agnes and Clara died before their mother.

 The subject of this sketch was identified with Lafayette parish, having a large family connection and enjoying the affection of a large circle of friends, who share with here dear ones the grief occasioned by her sudden death.

 Mrs. Francez was of a singularly calm and peaceful nature; she had experienced in her long career many sorrows; but the storms of life had passed over her head, leaving few marks of their severity for she bore all trials with Christian fortitude and resignation. She was a firm and ardent Catholic and died with prayer upon her lips, secure in the promises of the faith in which she was born and in which she so consistently lived. She was kind and charitable and guileless in her character and had been much loved as girl, as woman and as the widow of "the old doctor" whose memory is still revered and beloved although he has passed many years ago into eternal rest.

 The funeral took place after the high mass at St. Peter's church, Sunday morning, Rev. Joseph Grimaud officiating, and was very largely attended by people from all parts of Lafayette parish.
                                    L. R. D.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.





THE ELECTION. - The election to levy a special tax of two mills for ten years was held last Tuesday. The result was most satisfactory to the advocates of the tax. The large majority of votes polled for the tax shows that our people mean to get the Industrial School. The following are the official returns:


 --------------------p. 1------------------

 In proportion to population the seventh and eighth wards have given the largest votes for the tax. The citizens of those wards are to be congratulated. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899. 






A SPLENDID RECORD.

 Owing to the change made by the last constitutional convention the parishes of Lafayette and Vermilion will not, after the election next April, be in the same judicial district.

 Lafayette has been joined to Acadia, and Vermilion will be in itself one district. For that reason our present district attorney, the Hon. Minos T. Guidry, will not appear before the people of Lafayette parish as a candidate for the office which he has so ably filled during the last ten years. In his retirement from the office of district attorney of this parish, The Gazette believes that Lafayette will be deprived of the services of one of the most successful and fearless prosecutors in the State. Mr. Gordy was appointed by the gallant Nicholls about ten years ago. When he first made his appearance in this parish as the State's attorney he was quite young and had been engaged in the practice of law only a short time, but he soon won the confidence of the people, the respect of the bar, and established for himself the reputation of a fearless and able district attorney. Always fair to the accused, he has never used the power of his office as an engine of persecution, and has never employed the tactics of the pettifogger to punish anyone he believed innocent. When, in his opinion, the State failed to make out its case he said so, but when convinced of the prisoner's guilt he prosecuted him with the force and eloquence born of an honest conviction. The Gazette does not wish to indulge in the fulsome praise of any public official, but it believes it is but fair to give credit to whom it is due, and in throwing this little bouquet at a man who has done his duty well, it is exercising one of the pleasant privileges of a journal - that of recognizing merit in a public official. During the ten years of his incumbency the office of district attorney - one of the most, if not the most, important department in the administration of justice - has been conducted with conspicuous ability. It has been free from even a suspicion of scandal, a fact which certainly speaks well for Mr. Gordy.

 The Gazette does not know if Mr. Gordy will retire from public life at the expiration of his term, but should he decide not to do so, his record as district attorney can safely be taken as a guarantee that in whatever position he may be placed the people will have no cause to regret that they have trusted him with their affairs.   Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.








Democratic Executive Committee.

        Lafayette, La., Sept. 25, 1899.
 Pursuant to call the Democratic Parish Executive Committee met this day with the following members present and represented by proxies: Chairman John Hahn, P. L. DeClouet, J. Aymar Labbe, P. A. Delhomme, Homer Durio, Aurelien Olivier, A. C. Guilbeau, Dr. M. L. Lyons by proxy, and Harrison Theall by proxy.

 Mr. P. L. DeClouet was appointed secretary by the chairman.

 On motion of P. L. DeClouet the following resolution was adopted:

 Resolved, That this committee reserves the right to admit or reject proxies to Democrats who are not members of this committee, provided that in case of admission said proxies be given to a Democrat of the same ward as the member giving the proxy.

 After the adoption of foregoing resolution, Mr. O. Cade was admitted as the proxy of H. Theall, member of the committee from the fourth ward.

 The chairman here stated that the committee was assembled to appoint a judicial committee to meet a similar one from Acadia parish.

 Thereupon the following persons were voted for and elected members of said judicial committee: Octave P. Guilbeau, E. G. Voorhies, I. A. Broussard, Julian Mouton, John Whittington, A. M. Martin.

 A committee from a mass meeting presented himself and submitted the following petition:

 To the Honorables John Hahn and D. A. Cochrane, Chairmen, and members of your Democratic Executive Committees of the parish of Lafayette: Gentlemen - We, the undersigned citizens and qualified voters of the parish, in view of the discord in our party and desiring harmony in our midst, respectfully petition your honorable bodies to unite and lend your best efforts to bring about this result which will insure security to our party and restore good fellowship and harmony among the white voters of our parish.

 By the pacific influence of our congressman, Hon. R. F. Broussard, during the last congressional convention, both factions were equally recognized and pledged to united action to restore harmony in the party. And we, your petitioners, believing that the best way to accomplish this end is to secure to the people a fair and honest registration, election and count. We earnestly urge and request that you call for white primaries for the selection of all candidates for district and local offices, and that the qualification for voting at said primaries shall be a pledge to vote for the candidates so chosen. Hoping for favorable consideration from your honorable bodies, we are, respectfully.

 On motion of the Hon. O. Cade, the foregoing petition was amended by erasing the name of D. A. Cochrane as one of the chairmen, and on motion of Mr. Guilbeau, it was further amended by inserting the word "Democratic" between the words "white" and "primaries," and as amended the petition was received to be considered when the committee meets to order primaries.

 There being no further business the Committee adjourned.
P. L. DECLOUET, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.
     






Nolle Pros Entered. - District Attorney Gordy entered a nolle pros in Jno. E. Primeaux's case last Thursday. Mr. Primeaux was charge with embezzling public funds. Before dismissing the case Mr. Gordy stated that he was satisfied that Mr. Primeaux was not guilty of the crime charged against him, and his indictment was the result of the mistaken identity of some persons connected with the matter.  Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.



THE COMMITTEES ACTION.

 At the meeting of the Democratic Executive Committee of this parish held at the court-house last Monday a committee composed of Messrs. Albert Guidry, W. B. Torian, Louis. G. Stelly and R. W. Elliott, called upon that body and presented a petition signed by a number of voters of this parish. The petition was addressed to John Hahn and D. A. Cochrane, presidents of the "respective Democratic Executive Committees." In it was embodied a request that "white primaries" be called to nominate parish and district officers. Messrs. Crow Girard, W. B. Torian and R. W. Elliott spoke in the advocacy of the propositions contained in the petition.

 Hon. Overton Cade proposed that the name of Mr. Cochrane be erased and that the petition be addressed to the only genuine committee of which Mr. Hahn is chairman, and Mr. A. C. Guilbeau moved that the word "Democratic" be inserted between the words "white" and "primaries" and that the petition be made to read "white Democratic primaries." The gentlemen presenting the petition readily consented to the amendments proposed by Messr. Cade and (unreadable words).

 Then, upon the motion of Mr. Cade the committee decided to "receive the petition to be considered when the committee will meet to order primaries."

 The Gazette is pleased to note these proceedings. They do not in the least add to the genuine character of the Hahn committee. That question has long ago been settled beyond doubt, but the action of the gentlemen who presented the petition may well be taken as the last incident in the existence of the committee presided over by Mr. Cochrane.

 Unfortunately some misguided Democrats have been deluded into the belief that the Cochrane committee had some claims to regularity, when in fact and in truth it had none. In the future it is not probable that any one will look to it for Democratic authority.

 The motions of Messrs. Cade and Guilbeau were eminently proper. As a body, representing the Democratic party in the parish, the committee could not with any propriety consider the petition so long as it was addressed to Mr. Cochrane's committee and it could not entertain any proposition for a primary not distinctly and absolutely Democratic in character. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.





MR. GIRARD'S EXPLANATION.

 To the Editor of The Lafayette Gazette:

 I regret the prominence you have given my remarks. I intended in a simple, straight forward talk to outline some of the reforms most needed.

 On the threshold I apologize for using the name of McEnery; but I explained that I made use of that name to indicate the period of time to which I desired to direct attention. I apologize for using the name, although it seems that the present administration are proud to do him honor, and when he rescued them from defeat at the hands of the Mr. Denegre and the Citizens' League, many of them seemed ready to fall down and worship him.

 Mr. Editor, I readily accept your kind and liberal offer that the discussion be free and open and unfair to none. With reference to the material improvement constructed during the eight years mentioned, I said the jail, clerk's office and Pin Hook bridge cost the parish between $20,000 to $25,000, I spoke from memory: - the official figures give it as $21,200. I am satisfied to let that stand. The debts left by that Police Jury were probably against the revenues of that year, which were no doubt ample to cover them. I remarked further in this connection that the last report of the Grand Jury contained the statement that the treasurer's report furnished them as their organization, showed cash on hand, $1.48. Since that time within my knowledge, debts have been incurred against the parish for several hundred dollars. I doubt now that any of the parish official's salaries for the quarter ending September 1, have been paid - I know that some have not been paid. I imagine that if the present incumbents should leave their offices at this time their successors would find a very respectable debt. Notwithstanding that the present revenues of the parish amount to not less than $25,000, exclusive of the road and poll taxes, by some error, or however it may be, they may have been unable to turn over to the school officials the thousand dollars promised.

 On the question of public education, I must say that your reporter has done me an injustice, unintentionally I hope; he admitted to me that he had lost a considerable portion of what I said.   What I did say and know to be true was in substance that "there has been marked improvement in the facilities for public education, but if there has not been more, was because in my opinion so much of the parish revenue was absorbed in the sheriff's office and jail." There has been of late years a decided awakening of the people to the necessities of education.

 Far from me to detract from the credit due the gentlemen who have faithfully devoted themselves to the development of the public school system. No branch of the government deserves more careful attention and more liberal support; the fact remains however that some of the teachers have not been paid since April last, and though the schools are now open, the teachers look for little or no pay until December or January next. I will not undertake to discuss where the fault lies.

 Certainly the responsibility for this condition must rest on some one. I grant freely "there are some very creditable schools," and they are accomplishing much material good. Is that cause that we should blind ourselves to the condition of some, possibly many of the others? Have all the schools in the parish the required number of attendants? Are all the teachers properly qualified and worthy to be entrusted with the care and instruction of young children?

 These are questions of vital importance to the people, and are matters about which they have every right to fullest information. In criticizing the financial policy of the Police Jury, I exercised a right of citizenship to discuss our public affairs, fairly and honestly, which I believe I have done. I shall not undertake to accuse anyone farther than errors of judgment and mismanagement.

 As to the two indictments, I have good reason for believing that they are more nearly political persecutions than legal prosecutions.

 If I have become engaged in the campaign, it is because of my belief in the Democratic rule of rotation in office.

 I shall lend myself by all honorable means to secure the free and fair expression of popular will, and when that is secured the purpose of this campaign shall have been accomplished,
               Respectfully,
                     CROW GIRARD. ..."

 With Mr. Girard's apology for having used the name of Gov. McEnery we have nothing to do. That illustrious gentleman is not on trial just now and we have no desire to find fault with his administration at this late day. We are willing to forgive him for his past errors if he has committed any. He has done valiant service to the Democracy of this State and as he is presently engaged in administering a deserved castigation to the Jacksonians we are pleased to doff our cap to the old man and to bid him godspeed in the good work.

 Our friend very adroity evades the issues raised in his speech at Falk's hall. Being a lawyer he knows he has a weak case and proceeds to beat around the bush, with the characteristic ingenuity of the legal mind. He no doubt feels that he had been unreasonable in his charges and he tries to let himself down easy by modifying his language. In his speech he confesses his inability to "trace out all the meanderings of the parish money as it goes out of the treasurer's hands," and speaks of a balance "that is still veiled in mystery," magnanimously conceding, however, that there are "good men among them," but he exclaims; "they stand in a hopeless minority!" Now he writes of "errors of judgment and mismanagement." In his speech he tell us that the "schools are little better, very little better." Now he writes of "marked improvement in the facilities for public education" and tells us of his disinclination to "detract from the credit due the gentlemen who have faithfully devoted themselves to the development of the public school system."

 Mr. Girard explains his unfair criticism of the school authorities by saving that he did not say what he is reported to have said. The stenographer who took down his speech is generally very accurate in his work and we do not think it possible that he could so completely have failed to report what Mr. Girard claims to have said in regard to the school. Without wishing to reflect upon the sincerity or credibility of anyone we are confident that Mr. Girard did say what he is reported to have said in our last issue. We are firmly convinced that he is altogether mistaken in this matter.

 We submit that Mr. Girard's explanation does not explain. In the foregoing article he dwells upon matters which have nothing to do with the remarks made in his speech. It is evident that appreciating the hopelessness of his case, he has made out the best argument that he could make under the circumstances. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.


      

  

    

  




   

  

Court Items.

 The following business was done by the district court this week:

 --------------------p. 1----------------

 Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.




  



        











INSURANCE TARIFF FOR LAFAYETTE.

 The matter of the proposed readjustment of the insurance tariff for this town has been decided adversely to the interests of the people of this community. The petition which was signed by the policy-holders of Lafayette and referred to the Southeastern Tariff Association for consideration has met the fate which a document of that kind always meets at the hands of a trust. The association referred the matter to Mr. W. F. Dunbar, stamping clerk at New Iberia, whose decree on questions of insurance rates for this section seems to be irrevocable as the ruling of Tom Reed in a Republican Congress.

 It is bootless to dwell upon the injustice inflicted on this community by the insurance people and to try to persuade them they are wrong. We must bow to the inevitable and meekly submit to their autocratic decision. Under the existing laws we are a the mercy of the insurance trust. No matter how arbitrary its ruling we are its legitimate prey. There seems to be no way out of it for the time being. But in the meantime we can indulge in the fond hope that there will be a day of reckoning. The Gazette would advise the people of this town to petition the next Legislature for remedial legislation. Arkansas, Texas and other States have sought relief in legislative enactments and why not Louisiana?   Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.





A CARD.
September 28, 1899.

 We were induced to sign a certain petition which was circulated by the political faction of which Messrs. Girard, Cochrane and Torian are leaders. That petition was signed by us, believing that it was to be used in good faith and just as written. But, without consulting the signers these gentlemen saw fit to make certain changes taking upon themselves the right of changing the petition after it had been signed by us. We do not think that such a high handed action will receive the approval of the honest voters of this parish. Jerome Guidry, Martial Hebert, Desprane Prejean, Louis Omer Dugas, Julien Comeaux, Remond Hebert, Joseph Prejean, Paul Comeaux, Atonos Comeaux, Lessin Credeur, Marius Roger, John Roger. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.


 A Nice Party.

 In response to unique invitations a large number of friends gathered at the country home of Mr. Cleobule Doucet last Sunday night. Both the house and the yard were given over to the merry-makers, the latter being supplied with comfortable seats and beautifully illuminated with torch lights and Chinese-lanterns. Music was furnished by the local string-band and those who wished to dance occupied the house while those who preferred the more quiet enjoyment of strolling through the grounds retired to the yard. Delicious refreshments were served which elicited many words of appreciation from the guests for the fair hostess. In the midst of merriment and pleasure time flew by unnoticed and the crowd reluctantly dispersed only when the late hour reminded them them that there is an end to all (rest of last sentence unreadable).
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.


Yellow Fever.

 Remarkable as it may seem, the people of New Orleans worry far less about the so-called fever than do their friends in more favored climes. The streets have their same air of business, and business is being done too. Philip Werlein, Limited, the Veteran Piano House, has found no falling off in demand for the sale of pianos. Adverse conditions can never stop the steady onward march of this great house.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.


MR. JUDICE'S OFFER.

 To the Citizens of the Parish of Lafayette. - You are cordially invited and earnestly requested to attend a meeting at Scott, Sunday, Oct. 1, 1899, at 3 p. m., called for the purpose of insuring the establishment of the Industrial school in this parish.

 The law reads that a certain number of acres of land as well as a certain sum of money be offered as a bonus.

 From all indications the parish of Lafayette will have a strong opponent in the the town of Iberia, therefore every cent this parish can raise in cash is necessary to offer as a cash bonus. With this fact in view and desiring to secure the establishment of the Southwest Louisiana Industrial Institute at Scott, I offer one hundred arpents of land with a natural oak grove, situated at ten acres from the station, or in lieu thereof, five thousand dollars ($5,000.) in cash for the situation of the Industrial School within one mile of Scott.

 In making this offer I desire to point out the many advantages this location offers for the establishment of the school and the greater benefit to follow to the greater number of our citizens in the event of its selection.

 The land is high, well drained and as fertile as any in the State. The locality is one of the healthiest in the country. The services of the Southern Pacific trains make it as easy a point of access as any in Southwest Louisiana.

 To use the words of Col. Prescott of the Ruston Industrial School "this school is for the benefit of the masses." It is a body in itself, not depending upon any local center; its isolation from the depressing influences of town life is in its favor and is to be desired and when the location of the school is in a place as small as Scott, with the same healthy, moral influence of a farming community surrounding it, the success of its students is more marked.

 I think the site would be acceptable and would be looked upon favorably by the State for the reason of its closeness to the rice parishes, where a wonderful development has been made within the past few years. Lands that were selling one dollar an acre now bringing $40 and $50 and made to pay big taxes to the State by an immigration for whom the State has not as yet done anything except this offer of sustaining an Industrial School in Southwest Louisiana.

 Speaking for our parish, I claim the establishment of the school at Scott will bring about a quicker and a greater development of its resources than at any point and that without interfering with anyone's measures of success on existing lines.

 The western part of the parish can take immigration and this infusion is necessary to bring about developments. Cosmopolitan exists here! The population in the western part of the parish is better prepared to adapt itself to new ideas or change or customs, than that in the older settled parts of the parish.

 Scott is also nearer the center of the parish than any other point on the railroad. There are nearer Scott than to Lafayette for instance, 483 children in the 1st ward; 593 in the second; say 350 in the eighth; and perhaps 100 in the third ward. A total of 1,526 white children between 6 and 18 years of age. See statistics of parish. Quite enough to support a school.

 The Carencro section is in as close proximity and the half of Cote Gelee is as nearby way of Darmas Broussard and proposed bridge at Whittington's.

 Hence the situation at Scott is central. It offers accessibility to perhaps a greater number of parish children than any other point. It is a superior location for students from a distance on account of the nearness to the railroad station of the site offered.

 Col. G. A. Breaux, Mayor Campbell, Crow Girard, Judge O. C. Mouton, Hon. M. T. Gordy, Dr. F. J. Mayer and John Lewis of Opelousas will address the meeting.

 Dr. Lyons will preside.

 I earnestly beg all citizens to lend their aid and support. Assuring them of mine and that of the people of Scott in the event that any other point can do better than Scott.
           Respectfully,
                     ALCIDE JUDICE.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899. 

   


 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 9/30/1899.

 The Cumberland Telephone Company has completed its line to Carencro and now anyone can transact it by the telephone.

 Mrs. C. Jeanmard has secured the services of a skillful dressmaker who arrived this week from St. Louis. The ladies of Lafayette should bear this in mind when making their fall purchases in millinery.

 Mr. E. J. Trahan has returned from Fort Davis, Texas, where he had gone for the benefit of his health.

 Miss Bertha Jenkins returned last Saturday from a three weeks' visit in Jennings during which time she attended the Christian Endeavor Convention at Lake Arthur.

 Dr. Beeler went to Crowley this week. The doctor was called there to do some dental work. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.



  

  

     






   





  
 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 30th, 1899:


A SAD TRAGEDY.

 Sometime last May, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. James left Lafayette where they had resided several months and went up North.

 It will be remembered that Mr. James was the druggist at the Moss Pharmacy where his genial smile always bade you welcome.

 Mr. and Mrs. James were married in Lafayette, by Rev. I. T. Reams of the Methodist church.

 It was known that she inclined towards the stage and during her stay here had tried to organize a theatrical company but failed.

 On last Friday night, September 22nd, while at Chattanooga, Tenn., filling the lead role in a farce comedy she came to grief.

 While a large and fashionable audience had gathered in the Chattanooga's Opera House, and the orchestra had just concluded the opening overture, three shots rang out. Two came together, then a pause, and then the third. The audience, thinking that it was the prelude of the farce comedy stood quiet and no one stirred until the stage manager came before the curtain and announced that an accident had occurred to the leading man, and quietly dismissed the audience.

 The shots had been fired from a revolver in the hands of Mrs. Morrison-James, killing instantly the leading man Frank Leidenheimer.

 Physicians and officers were summoned and a scene of terrible confusion was presented. The woman and her husband Mr. James were immediately arrested and taken to the city jail where each one was put in a cell. The victim lived only five minutes, and never uttered a word after the first shot.

 The tragedy grew out of a succession of bitter quarrels, the last of which took place at the afternoon rehearsal at which Mrs. Morrison-James slapped Leidenheimer's face. He made a motion to retaliate, but was hurried away by one of the stage hands. At night when the call for the first act came, Mrs. Morrison-James was nowhere to be found. Leidenheimer sent the stage manager to her room but she refused to appear. Then her maid called to her and she came out of her dressing room with the revolver in her hand walking deliberately up to Leidenheimer who was standing and fired twice. The first shot took effect in the neck. At the second he fell, and then as he lay bleeding and dying she fired the third shot, which struck him just below the third eye.

 She surrendered quietly to the officers. She made a statement to the officers, in which she claimed to have been insulted and misrepresented by Leidenheimer. She alleges that he began to persecute her and to insult her when the company started out, and when he found that her husband, who had no part in the cast, was to travel with her, he tried to have her deposed. She told a consistent straight story, every word of which was corroborated by her husband.

 She wept bitterly but refused to testify at the coroner's inquest who charged her with the killing of Leidenheimer in the following words :  "That Leidenheimer came to his death by gunshots wounds in the hands of Mrs. Morrison-James, that the crime was premeditated and wholly unjustified and that her husband, F. James, was an accessory to the crime.

 The victim was very popular and the company's sympathies were for him. He hailed from New Orleans where he had a certain number of relative.

 His body was forwarded there for burial.

 Mr. and Mrs. James appeared before the recorder on last Saturday morning, but on motion of the State Attorney, the examination was postponed to last Tuesday, the whole company giving bonds to appear at that time to testify against the woman.

 But on last Tuesday morning the whole company headed by its manager skipped off from the town on their way to New York rather than to testify against Mrs. James.

 Before his departure, the manager, Mr. Harris visited Mrs. James at the City jail and the scene between them was touching and affecting. Both of them wept and after thirty minutes of conversation Mr. Harris came out fully convinced that Mrs. James was justifiable in the terrible act she had committed.

 He made it publicly known that instead of prosecuting the woman he would do everything he could in her favor.

 During last Sunday, Mrs. James was visited in her cell at the jail by many influential ladies of Chattanooga who brought her baskets of flowers and fruits to cheer her up, and every day since, she has been the recipient of many attentions from the Chattanoogans. On last Monday, the mayor of Chattanooga and his wife, Dr. Monk and his wife, and Rev. Father Tobin, a catholic priest, visited her at the jail.

 On last Tuesday, the case came before the City Recorder, and on motion of the State, James was dismissed and his wife turned over to the Grand Jury who called in special session by the Circuit Judge.

 Immediately after the hearing, Mrs. James was removed from the City Jail to the County Jail where better accommodations were given her, and the last report conveys the information that her cell was fitted  up elegantly by the kind people of Chattanooga.

 So many versions of this sad affair, and so many  things have been printed that it is hard to find the motive that prompted Mrs. James to take the life of Leidenheimer.

 "I had to do it," "You have forced me to do it," and improper proposals to her by him were the reasons given by Mrs. James on the spot.

 It is now said that she has not the least remembrance of her act.
Lafayette Advertiser  9/30/1899.





Burglaries Solved.

Some time last week a young negro named Louis Dazin, alias Indian Bend,
desiring to indulge in a horse-back ride to Franklin and having no stock of his own, paid a visit to Mr. J. C. Nickerson's stable and secured a trotter for his trip. 

 Riding leisurely toward Franklin, his imaginative mind being in motion, "Indian Bend" thought it would be a good trick to sell the horse and soon after arriving at Franklin, he offered the horse for sale at such low price that the wide-awake officers of our sister town begin to think there was something wrong and learning that the rider came from Lafayette they sent a telegraphic message to our sheriff about the rider and his horse.

Sheriff Broussard being acquainted with the robbery of the horse answered to keep the negro until he could reach Franklin.

"Indian Bend" and the sheriff came back the same night and during the return trip "Indian Bend" negro like, narrated in a boasting way to the sheriff various nightly feats that he in company with a white young man named Hamie Hawkins and a negro named Jim Bailey performed in Lafayette.

The young white man's family dwells in New Iberia and himself has been in Lafayette three years.

About a year ago and at various intervals since, Lafayette has been the scene of many night robberies. At one time extra watchmen were put on duty at night patrolling the streets but with no results. The guilty party could not be caught. Some two or three were arrested but after boarding a few days in the Parish Hotel, were released for lack of proofs.

And still the robberies were going on and the robbers made good hauls especially when they visited Mr. A. B. Denbo's residence where they secured besides fifty dollars in cash, a gold watch and several pieces of jewelry; they did not even respect parish officials as Assessor Martin's residence was relieved of ten dollars in cash and a valuable gold watch. Thinking that one day they might find themselves in the hands of the law they made a friendly call on the Hon. Judge Debaillon and secured there one watch. The residences of Messrs. T. M. Biossat, Leo Doucet and a good many others were visited by the night marauders.

From the particulars given by the two negroes it seems that Hamie Hanks was the head of the gang and that while the two were at work ransacking the house, Hankins covered the inmates with a revolver.

They revealed the fact that Hankins disguised himself at night and that he wore a pair of sleeper shoes (which were found in his trunk) so as to make the least noise possible in his nightly peregrinations.

Hankins was arrested at his boarding by Marshal Peck and the sheriff and put in jail. He denies everything.

He is twenty-five years old and just now he is in a sickly condition.
Until now, not one of the many articles have been found but it is strongly surmised that the tale of the two negroes is correct. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.


Town Full of Loafers. - All towns are more or less accursed with young men and boys who are classified as habitual loafers. In this respect Lafayette can claim her share, and at all hours of the day these white loafers parade the streets or take advantage of the free steps of corner stones. It is useless for this class of undesirable citizens to pretend that work cannot be had, as work is found for all who are anxious to labor for an honest living. Let our police officers keep a keen eye on these people and Lafayette will be better off.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.



New Wells Needed. - The committee of the City Council, composed of Messrs. C. O. Mouton, John O. Mouton and Geo. DeBlanc, has contracted with the Andrew Artesian Well Co., of New Orleans, to bore a well some 200 feet deep inasmuch as the two wells now in use at the water-works and electric light plant have dried up.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.



Mahara Minstrel Carnival. - This big minstrel organization comprised of 50 artists will be the opening attraction at the Opera House this season coming Sunday October 22nd. When you hear the blast of music and the bum-bum of the big Bass Drum on the streets Sunday, you may know that one of the biggest and best minstrel companies traveling is out on dress parade. As an extra feature this season and one that will please ladies and children, Mahara Bros. carry a complete Troupe of Shetland Ponies and wonderful performing Dogs. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.


OUR PUBLIC STREETS.
TO OUR CITY FATHERS 

:--- Gentlemen,

The people of Lafayette have chosen you as their faithful and trusty agents to look after the public affairs and interests of the city and also that of its citizens.
It is understood through the local press that you have contracted with a man called Victor Breaux at a cost of between $1,500 and $1,800 to grade up our streets and put them in thorough repair. I say publicly and boldly that this man does not understand his business, for a great deal of the work that he is doing is worse than throwing our public money away, for he is putting many of our back streets and cross streets in such a shape that it will be almost impossible to travel them with a load or without. He takes a pair of mules and ploughs two or three furrows down in the ditch that has been dug, up hill and down without any regard to drainage on either end. He puts on a gang of negroes and throws the dirt out of the ditch into the middle of the street in heaps, piles and clods whichever is the most leaving the middle of the street from six to eight inches lower than either side, so it will be impossible for the water to run off the street into the ditches, consequently the middle of the street will become the ditch that will have to carry the water.

I admit that this man is doing some very good work on our main streets, but his work on some of our back and cross streets is a nuisance and a disgrace to the town. If any of the street committee appointed by the council have any doubts about the above statement, let them get into a buggy and start from the W. W. and E. L.'s plant and drive straight up till they strike Lincoln Avenue. (Jefferson St.) near Cochrane's race track and examine the cross streets as they go along; they will find that they will have to drive with one wheel down in the ditch and the other wheel running from 6 to 12 inches higher over clods to the displeasure of everybody who attempts to drive the streets.
-J. Nickerson.              
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.






Races at Oak Avenue Park.

 Interesting races will be held to-morrow Sunday at Oak Avenue Park. In a quarter of a mile race; a purse of $200 will be contested by MAY, belonging to Armand Broussard of Breaux Bridge; and BABY, belonging to H. E. Parker, of Abbeville. Half a mile race, between LILLY and entered Eugene Ducharme; and BLUE entered by Joe William. A free for all race, 5 arpents; $50.00 to start, winner gets all. Entries closed today. A bicycle race between P. Krauss, L. McBride, and Alley Sprole, for a price of $75 will be run. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.

  








Industrial School Election.

 We give here below the result of the election last Tuesday for the proposed tax in favor the Industrial School.
 The vote polled was small.

----------------------------------

 This it is settled that the majority of the people in the parish are in favor of the tax which will bring the school within the bounds of the parish. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1899.





DISTRICT COURT.

 The following cases have been tried during the week.

  Jules George, carrying concealed weapon, guilty.
  Tommie Galofee, stabbing with dangerous weapon with intent to kill, guilty.
  Andre Louis, assault with a dangerous weapon with intent to murder, guilty.
  Joseph Sythe, larceny, not guilty.
  Villier Simon, burglary, guilty.
  William Green Jr., larceny, guilty.
  William Baby, violating labor contract, guilty.
  Millien Landry and Antoine Washington, violating fish law, guilty.
  Edw. Jasmin, larceny, guilty.
  Tom Chesly, larceny, not guilty.
  Adam Padillo, disturbing a peaceable assembly, guilty.
  Arista Broussard, murder, not guilty.
  John E. Primeaux, obtaining money under false pretenses, nolle pros. by the District Attorney explaining error of witnesses called before the Grand Jury.
  Paul Williams, stabbing with intent to kill, guilty. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.



Democratic Parish Exec. Committee Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., Sept. 25, 1899.

 Pursuant to a call the Democratic Parish Executive Committee met this day with the following members present: Chairman John Hahn, P. L. DeClouet, J. Aymar Labbe, P. A. Delhomme, Homer Durio, Aurelien Olivier, A. C. Guilbeau, Dr. M. L. Lyons, by proxy and Harrison Theall, by proxy.

 Mr. P. L. DeClouet was appointed secretary by the Chairman. On motion of Mr. DeClouet the following resolution was adopted:

 Resolved that this committee reserves the right to admit or reject proxies to Democrats who are not members of this committee, provided that in case of admission said proxies be given to a Democrat of the same ward as a member giving the proxy.

 After the adoption of the foregoing resolution, Mr. O. Cade was admitted as the proxy of H. Theall, member of the committee for the fourth ward.

 The Chairman here stated that the committee had assembled to appoint a judicial committee to meet a similar one from Acadia.

 A committee from a mass meeting presented itself and submitted the following petition:

 TO THE HONOROBLE JOHN HAHN AND D. A. CHOCHRANE CHAIRMEN AND MEMBERS OF YOUR RESPECTIVE DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES FOR THE PARISH OF LAFAYETTE:
     GENTLEMEN, -

    We the undersigned citizens and qualified voters of the Parish in view of the discord in our party and desiring harmony in our midst, Respectfully petition your Honorable Bodies to unite and lend your best efforts to bring about this result which insure security to our party and restore good fellowship and harmony among the white voters of our Parish.

 By the pacific influence of our Congressman, Hon. Robert F. Broussard, during the last congressional convention, both factions were equally recognized and pledged to united action to restore harmony in the party. And we your petitioners believing that the best way to accomplish this end is to secure to the people a fair and honest registration, election and count. We earnestly urge and request that your call for white primaries for the selection of all candidates for district and local officers, and that the qualification for voting at said primaries shall be a pledge to vote for the candidates so chosen. Hoping for favorable consideration by your Honorable Bodies, we are Respectfully,

 On motion of Hon. O. Cade the foregoing petition was amended by erasing the name of D. A. Cochrane as one of the Chairmen, and on motion of Mr. A. C. Guilbeau, it was further amended by inserting the word "Democratic" between the words "white" and "primaries," and as amended the petition was received to be considered when the committee meets in order primaries.

 There being no further business the committee adjourned.
                 P. L. DECLOUET,
              Secretary pro tem.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.


            
   






Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/30/1899.

 The Cumberland Phone Co., has completed its line to Carencro.

 Hon. O. Cade and Dr. N. D. Young, of Royville, attended to business in Lafayette last Wednesday.


 High Mass will be conducted to-morrow Sunday at Scott, at 8:30 o'clock a. m., by Rev. Father Forge, of Lafayette.

 Dr. Francez, Messrs. Albert Guidry and Ernest Bernard, of Carencro, were in our midst last Monday.

 Quite a number of our sports "took in" the Opelousas races last Sunday. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1899.



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 From the Lafayette Gazette of September 30th, 1893.




Call for Convention. - Sheriff Isaac Broussard of this parish, and Sheriff C. T. Cade of Iberia parish, have jointly issued a call for a convention of all the sheriffs of this State to convene in this town, for the purpose of effecting an organization of sheriffs similar to the one now in successful operation in Texas. The principal object is mutual assistance, which may be rendered in the detection of criminals, as well as a bureau of general information. The meeting will be held on the 14th of October.  Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.



Going Too Far.

 Some days since a gentleman, whose business takes him over a part of the parish nearly every day, told The Gazette that the negroes, now that they have a little ready cash earned by picking cotton, congregate every Saturday night, and under the pretense of enjoying a dance, embraced the opportunity to raise pandemonium, indulging in fights, and using the vilest language, which is getting to be a disagreeable nuisance.

 Last Saturday some three or four negroes were badly hurt in affrays in different neighborhoods, and in Carencro one was killed, the one committing the deed being now in jail. The underlying cause being whiskey, it is asserted.

 The continuation of these midnight orgies can but be fruitful of trouble, and something should be done to restrict them to within decent bounds. No one wishes to deprive the colored people of all proper amusement, but unless they show a disposition to conduct their entertainments in a becoming manner, they will invite measures for their suppression. It would, perhaps be best, for the their own good that no intoxicating liquors be dispensed at these gatherings.   Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.



An Eventful Trip.

 Dr. G. A. Martin returned from a visit to the World's Fair last Saturday, and reports having had a grand time in Chicago, and adds that no man who can possibly to do so should fail to see this wonderful fair. Among the many souvenirs brought back were some type, which the Doctor saw cast before his eyes, and gave The Gazette a few samples.

 The Doctor was on the Illinois Central that was held up in Illinois last week. The train was stopped at midnight, and the railroad employees rushed into the cars and told the passengers to hid their wealth, and asked those who were armed to go forward. Of course great consternation followed among the passengers. The Doctor hid his money in his bootleg, jumped up and asked for a pistol. A little lady from Cairo, Illinois, handed him a revolver, and he started forward, but when he reached the platform some hunters aboard had wounded and routed the robbers. The Doctor stated his profession and was called upon to examine the wounded people.

 The robber was securely tied and the train proceeded to the next town, reaching there about two hours after the train had been held up. When the train came to a halt, the fire alarm bells of the town were set ringing, and soon the entire population was out. Cries of lynching rent the air, the rope was produced, and the crowd was about to mete out swift justice to the prisoner. Dr. Martin jumped up and harangued the crowd telling them that it would be cowardly to hand the man - that as he has now in the hands of the law, it was their duty as good law-abiding citizens to let the law take its course. His counsel prevailed.

 The Doctor tells The Gazette that the Fair is a grand educational institution, and the trip is worth years of study.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.



An Important Capture.

 It looks like Sheriff Broussard has effected an important capture in the person of the negro giving the name of Geo. D. Morton, but believed to be Jeff Gibbs. If he is the right man, he was a member of the notorious gang of Copiah (Miss.) robbers, and is the only one at liberty of the gang that operated in the vicinity except one. Three or four of them have been legally hanged and several sent to the penitentiary. The description sent by Sheriff Broussard was deemed sufficiently clear to warrant Sheriff Matheny of Copiah, in applying for registration papers which Sheriff Broussard received Thursday. In the same letter the information was conveyed that C. J. Allen will be here to-day or to-morrow to take the prisoner to Mississippi. There is a standing reward of $833 for the capture of Jeff Gibbs, and indications are that Sheriff Broussard will receive it.   Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.

     


To Stand Trial.

 There are sixteen negro men, two colored women, and two white men in jail awaiting trial before the criminal district court which convenes next Monday.

 Following is the date of incarceration, the names of the prisoners, and the offenses charged :

 April 18 - Chas. Sanders, highway robbery
 May 8 - F. Bache, (white), attempt to commit rape
 June 10 - Dr. F. C. Clark, (white), burglary
 June 30 - Gustine C_________, larceny
 August 1 - Alcee Conqueim, shooting at with intent to kill
 August 12 - Gyan William, larceny
 August 12 - Colin Dyer, larceny
 August 24 - John Brown, assault and battery
 September 10 - Alcee Thomas, breach of contract
 September 11, Jean Baptiste, breach of contract
 September 19 - Geo. D. Martin, alias Jeff Gibbs, fugitive from justice
 September 24 - Albert Chargois, shooting with intent to kill
 September 27 - Eugenie White, breach of contract
 September 27 - Joseph Golien, disturbance in public road
 September 27 - Sam Dugas, larceny
 September 28 - Sosthene Bell, larceny
 September 28 - Bibi Savoie, shooting with intent to murder
 September 28 - Austin, shooting at with intent to murder.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.





Wild Fracas.

 Bibi Savoy and Joseph Austin, were jailed Thursday charged with assault and battery on the person of Adam Scott, after having been badly shot by Albert Chargois. The fracas happened in the neighborhood of Carencro last Saturday, and all the parties are negroes. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.







To the Gazette:

 Our little town is coming to the front. The railroad company has made quite an improvement around the depot. And some of our neighbors have just unloaded lumber necessary to erect several new dwellings. This don't look like there were any hard times hereabouts.

 The public school has been opened one week and has an average attendance of eighteen. We think it will increase this week. The school is conducted by Prof. Toler, and the belief is general that we have the right man in the right place.

 The Sunday school is progressing nicely, with an attendance of 40. We are sorry to add that Lester Huffpauir is going to leave us, and we feat that we cannot find another one so faithful to the cause.

 We hear it rumored that we are to have a rice mill started here soon. If so, it will be a great thing, for it is badly needed. We are in the heart of the rice country, therefore it must prove a paying investment.
                      BELMONT.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.



Neat New Sign. - Mr. H. A. Eastin has painted a very neat sign for The Gazette. Mr. Eastin's taste with the brush is well known here, and we know that when we know that when we gave him the order we would not be disappointed with the result, and we are not. To those who may need any kind of painting we cheerfully recommend this gentleman as one that will give satisfaction. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.



New Oyster Saloon.

 Robert Bailey will open an oyster saloon to-day in the room adjoining A. M. Martin's saloon, opposite the court-house where he will always keep fresh oysters which will be served either raw or cooked. Robert has perfected arrangements which he is enabled to furnish fresh fish to the people of Lafayette every Friday. Those who desire to buy fish please give him the order during the week. Robert is a deserving young gentleman and it is sincerely hoped that he will receive his share of public patronage. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893. 


 Railroad Notes.

 The switch engine while attaching a caboose to a freight train, a few days since, ran off completely. All hands jumped off, and no one was hurt. The boys say Jake easily takes the cake as a jumper.

 Superintendent Owen was in Lafayette Thursday, and gave out the information that he would soon put in service two sugar cane trains between this point and Morgan City.

 The pay car has failed as yet to materialize, and that happy smile that usually comes over the faces of the railroad boys about the 20th of each month has, likewise failed to materialize.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.



 Not a Member of Trainmen. - The Gazette said last issue that the negro fugitive, George Morton, arrested and jailed last week, claimed to be a member of the Order of Railway Trainmen. As the inference may deduced by the uninitiated that colored men are eligible to membership we have been requested to publish the fact that the laws of the order forbids the admission of colored men. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.


Plead Guilty. - Gaston Labbe and John Taylor, two young men from Broussard, appeared before the Mayor, last Tuesday, to answer to the charge of "disturbing the peace and careless driving," plead guilty and were fined $8.50 each. The Gazette had heard different versions of the affair, some stating that the young men were not as culpable as many would infer, but as they voluntarily admitted the charge, nothing more can be said.
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.


Big Canes.  - Two industrious Italians, Antonio Tomazi, and Antonio Grossi, sent The Gazette two magnificent sugar canes, grown by them on Mr. Z. Doucet's place. The one from Tomazi weigh 5 3/4 pounds and measured, 8 feet; the one from Grossi weighed 7 pounds and measured 8 feet. With such splendid results who can doubt for a moment that our lands are splendidly adapted to the cultivation of the sugar cane. And it is such evidence as this placed before our eyes every day, that shows us the great need of a central refinery.  Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.






Chatauquan Circle.

 The organization of a Chataquan circle in town, besides the means of instruction it would afford, would bring the young people together and the sociability thus created could but be a source of much pleasure. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.






NECROLOGY.

 Died, in St. Martinsville, Wednesday morning, the 27th instant, at 4:15, Mrs. Mary Mathilde Mouton, wife of Mr. Fred Mouton.

 When the sorrowful tidings of the death of Mrs. Mouton reached Lafayette, it cast a gloom of painful surprise and sadness over the entire community. The news was so unexpected, that it was hard to realize that this estimable lady rendered here spirit to her maker. The writer was in St. Martinville last week, and Wednesday saw Mr. and Mrs. Mouton and children taking a walk along  the banks along the bayou, and little did he think that the angel of death was hovering over the happy family, and that soon the well-beloved wife and mother would go to her eternal rest.

 Born in November, 1869, she was just entering upon the threshold of life, surrounded by a devoted husband and four children, (the eldest seven years old) she could but feel that life was about to unfold its brightest pages, and a happy and contended future would be hers.

 Mrs. Mouton was an amiable and highly esteemed lady, who numbered a wide circle of friends and relations. Her loss is deeply lamented by all who were familiar with her kindness of heart and gentleness of character.

 Words, we know, are inadequate to assuage the feelings of those so terribly bereaved. The fountains of deep sorrow and regret requires time to spend their painful force, and The Gazette can but extend its sincere sympathy to the afflicted, and fervently hope that the Great Dispenser will give those so sorely tried, fortitude to bear the heavy cross that he has placed upon them. Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.





Base Ball.
A game of base ball was played on the grounds here last Saturday between the Stonewall, of Ile Pilette, and Favorites, of this town, which resulted in a victory for the latter club. Some very fair playing was developed during the game, and Jim Marsh easily carried off the honors. Appended is the score:


-----------------------------

 Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.



Selected News Notes (Gazette) 9/30/1893.

 The Police Jury meets next Monday.

 Court-house keeper Hirsch has given the court-house and yards a thorough cleaning preparatory to the meeting of court next Monday.

 Judge Debaillon's new law office is a beauty, of which the judge may justly feel proud, and furnishes additional evidence of the taste and skill of the contractor, Mr. Fred Mouton.

 To show the fertility of the soil in this town, it is only necessary to mention the fact that a man this week, with a sickle had cut from a ditch on Lincoln avenue, quite a lot of grass that will make fine hay.

 Mr. Felix Salles leaves to-morrow for New Orleans on a purchasing tour. It is his intention to buy a large amount of assorted goods, including a varied assortment of ladies dress goods.   Rev. Father Langlois, of St. Martinville, visited Father Forge and Healey this week.

 Miss Nita Scranton, of Youngsville, is spending some days in town with her friend Miss Lea Gladu.


 The friends of Mr. W. S. Torian will be pleased to learn that he has fully recovered from a spell of sickness that had kept him confined to his room for several days.

 Mr. Chas. J. Irvin, employed as clerk in Mr. P. J. McGuire's office in Algiers, wa here during the week, taking inventory of all material on hand.

 Mrs. L. E. Salles, of New Orleans, who is presently sojourning in Lafayette the guest of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Bailey, made a visit to Broussard the early part of the week, returning Wednesday.

 This is an age of "get there" and the town that sleeps will not be in it. - Lake Charles American. -- Eminently correct, and just what The Gazette has been telling the people of Lafayette.

 Spend your money at home. Buy from your home merchants, they will treat you right, and the money this expended, like bread cast upon the water will return to you again.

 The gentleman who stated that he though every person ought to take the trouble to give the editor all the news items from the country possible, made a very sensible remark.

 Mr. John Vigneaux has been having some alterations and repairs to his livery stable building. As now enlarged the building, we think, shows to much better advantage.

 A dance will take place in the High School building tonight, and whatever profit may be realized will be turned over to the school fund. We are, also, informed that the Alexandria string band will furnish the music.

 Half of the hard labor, without any of the privations, which would bring indifferent success in the Cherokee strip, would bring him not only comfort but riches in Lafayette parish.

 Because a man who is about to be arrested for a breach makes a break for liberty gives a policeman no legal right to shoot him.

 Some two weeks since were informed that it was proposed to put a play into active rehearsal, with a view of presenting it to the public at a later day, the money realized to go towards a fund for the high school. We trust the matter will not be allowed to languish.

 The bakers of this city are indulging in a cut rate war, and, in consequence, bread is selling for time being at 60 ounces for ten cents. One of the bakers told The Gazette that there was a largely increasing demand for bread, judging by the number of loaves he bakes. At the rate bread is selling few families care to go to the trouble of cooking rice, potatoes or grits.

 The Business Men's Association have been taking quite a long nap. Is it not about time for them to wake up, get together and discuss the best means to have a central refinery erected in this vicinity?
Lafayette Gazette 9/30/1893.









From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 30th, 1893:


 Troubles for Robbers.

  A current of disaster seems to be running against train robbers, and one of the notable occasions on which they have been routed was at Centralia, Ill., on the night of September 20th, last, when three doughty knights of the road descended upon an Illinois Central passenger train. It was the train known as the "Chicago and New Orleans Limited," and carried a large list of passengers destined for New Orleans and other points in Louisiana. Having left Centralia on its southward journey, it stopped a little way out to take on coal, and it was then that the outlaws showed (unreadable words) and ordered the Engineer (unreadable words) with revolvers. (several sentences unreadable) outside and the officers on the inside until the robbers secured a sledge hammer and broke into the door of the business car. More shooting followed and then two hunters, passengers on the train, appeared on the scene, armed with shot guns and the robbers were routed in short order; one being severely wounded and all three caught and jailed. Among the passengers on this train was Dr. G. A. Martin of this place, who took quite a part in the affair. When the fight in the express car was going on a brakeman ran through the car calling such passengers as had arms to go to the assistance of the trainmen, and Dr. Martin, not armed himself, sought to obtain a weapon from his fellow passengers. A lady from Illinois tendered him a revolver and with it the Doctor went to the express car but the shooting was over when he got there. The prisoner who was severely wounded was caught on the spot and passengers were so wrought up they wanted to finish him at once. Dr. Martin assisted the Conductor and a Priest on board, in quieting them. The Doctor afterwards attended the wounded robber. In connection with incident, we make the following extract from the Cairo Daily Telegram :

 "There was renewed excitement in the express car when they brought the captured robber through from the rear door on his way to the baggage car. The sleeping car conductor held him by the back of the neck with a revolver at his head. As they passes through the train several men sprang from their seats with drawn revolvers and proposed to kill the captured scoundrel. Dr. G. A. Martin of Lafayette, La., jumped upon a seat and demanded that the prisoner be spared. He argued that it was cowardly to kill him there, while he was defenseless, and would also frighten the women on the train and do no good. His counsel prevailed. He then announced himself a physician and offered to examine the wounds of the man, from which the blood was flowing in streams. But the crowd shouted no, Doctor, let him die. But the Doctor gave him some relief anyway in spite of the threats thrown at him by over-heated heads."     Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.                 






 BREAUX BRIDGE MAIL SERVICE.

 The following article from the Valley of the Teche, reproduced in The Evangeline, of St. Martinville, we publish, together with the comments of the latter contemporary, for the benefit of the business men of Lafayette whose most direct interests should impel them to act promptly and firmly in meeting half-way the good people of our sister town of Breaux Bridge:

 "On Saturday 2nd inst., on Thurday 7th inst., on Saturday 9th inst. and on Monday 11th inst., our mail failed to reach us, because the train was behind time. Now on any day of the week, when the trains are not on time, it is only a delay of a few minutes in any other place than here; but at Breaux Bridge is one of fully 24 hours and on Saturdays of 48 hours; on Monday evening we then get three mails at a time. When we ask the mail-driver why he does not wait a few minutes for the arrival of the train, so that he may have the mail of the day, his answer is that the road from here to the depot is in such bad condition that it would not be prudent for him to be caught on that road during the night. The fact is that although, at the livery stables of Lafayette and Breaux Bridge, they will not undertake to bring a passenger through that road in the night. The writer himself was forced to start once during the night to take the 6 a. m. train at Lafayette, and although he had one of the best drivers in town, he lost his way, upset buggy, passenger and himself in a pond of water; part of the baggage was lost and he finally drove back to Breaux Bridge, as it was impossible to find his way to Lafayette, and the train was missed.

 And of this road which seven miles long, there is only one mile in such a shameful condition; and it is painful to state, that although during the greater part of the year it is the only outlet both for travelers and freight, in spite of all the complaints and remonstrances the people have never found it possible yet to obtain relief. And this in the face of the fact that we are paying a tax of ten mills and of the awful drawback that it brings on this community.

 Besides it is now the season of business; merchants and planters as well, are every evening longing after their mails, so as to ascertain the ruling price of our crops and find it hard to be so deprived of it, sometimes for three days.

 If our police jury will not or can not give due attention to such an important matter, it is in the interest of the planters and the merchants to take some other action for having this important work accomplished. In view of the great benefit to be derived from it, a subscription list might be made out and all parties interested will very likely do their duty. It is useless for us to invite immigration of any kind before a change has taken place, because any capitalist that will have to pass through that road, when it is in such condition, will be scared out, not only of this place, but very likely out of a country which has so many inducements hidden out of his view, and such a tale will do much to destroy any confidence in our assertions of the beauty of this section of the state.

 We have already said so much of that road, that we would not have said one word more about it, if we had not been specially requested to do so." - Valley of the Teche.

 "Now we will ask but one question to our esteemed Confrere; "Why is Breaux Bridge "freezing" so closely to Lafayette when it could so easily and naturally stand by St. Martinville, her sister town, belonging to the same parish. Why "hug" Lafayette? ? ?    We have the power to help Breaux Bridge, much more than Lafayette, (a town belonging by another parish,) Don't growl, neighbor! recite the "Mea Culpa", and all will be said! ! ! ! - The Evangeline.

 Business men of Lafayette, you will be recalcitrant to your duty as citizens, and blind to your own interests if you refuse to act decisively in this matter. St. Martinville, a town of much smaller pretentions that our own, is quick to recognize the benefits that would result of necessity, from a regular and intimate trade intercourse with Breaux Bridge and the rich country surrounding it. We need not expatiate on this point, however, as its logic is too plain to not be understood. The question that should engage our attention is how to bring about this intercourse that is so greatly desired by our neighbor, and that is burdened with so much of good for Lafayette? The most practical, as well as the most economical method by which the short road (only 7 miles in length) can be placed in a good and safe traveling condition from January of each year, is the one to be adopted.

 It appears that the police Jury of St. Martin has turned a deaf ear to the appeals of parishioners interested in the maintenance of the road now under consideration. The Evangeline explains the reason for the deafness - this road does not went its way to St. Martinville. Why the citizens of Breaux Bridge and surroundings should be "freezing so closely to Lafayette" does not admit of any argument. The wherefore is too obvious, and it behooves the people of Lafayette town and parish to heartily second those of Breaux Bridge and St. Martin parish in their eagerness to enjoy with us the many advantages we possess as a business and railroad center.

 The people of this parish have already spoken through the Police Jury. This body, always quick to recognize that the good of the county seat ostensibly involves the good of the parish, took the initiative step over two months ago to do its share toward fostering the intercourse between Breaux Bridge, thereby evidencing not only a willingness but a strong desire to see these towns linked together by a good "dirt road" at least, that could be travelled in less than an hour at an ordinary gait.

 The Lafayette end of the road being disposed of, then, it only remains for us to provide for that portion of the route contained in the parish of St. Martin. Its Police Jury refusing to lend the assistance necessary, it must be obtained from another source. The only plan is that offered by private subscriptions, as the Valley of the Teche proposes. Any why not utilize the idea? If regarded in the light of a business investment - and a number of our merchants with whom we have discussed the subject are of the opinion that a good dirt road would bring Lafayette within an hour of Breaux Bridge would be worth thousands of dollars in business to this town, each year - no person engaged in any trade, or avocation that would be profited by an increased circulation of money in this community could reasonably object to contribute a mite towards the accomplishment of such an immeasurably good object. Residents of Breaux Bridge, for correspondingly, valid reasons would no doubt willingly submit to the same plan of raising the necessary fund.

 What remains to be done, then, if we are all agreed on what has been said? We submit the appended suggestion to bring matters to a speedy close, and we hope the honesty and sincerity of our intentions will compensate for any weakness of execution or error of judgment that may be exhibited by our action in the premises. We suggest that a committee of three citizens of Breaux Bridge be selected by that municipality to ascertain immediately the definite cost of repairing and placing in first-class condition the public road, (by the short route) from the town of Breaux Bridge to the line of Lafayette parish. This information should be gotten from one, or more, responsible persons who would agree to carry out the contract at a stipulated price and under limitation of time. When it is done let this committee report to a committee of citizens of Lafayette to be composed of Mayor Wm. Campbell and Messrs. Felix Demanade, Chas. O. Mouton, N. P. Moss and T. M. Biossat and Alfred Hebert. The committees in a conference will decide on the best means to carry out the measure under advisement and unite in raising the fund required for its accomplishment. If this be thought not the simplest and best plan, the columns of The Advertiser are open for the suggestion of a better one.

 It is incumbent on us to explain that we have not consulted the pleasure of our fellow-townsmen whose names we have so unceremoniously proposed for the committee of citizens from Lafayette, but from our personal knowledge of them, we believe they would not refuse to act in such a capacity, under the circumstances, as they are of a number who have never failed to lend the their presence and their services whenever the demand has been made on them for a good cause of a public character. It should be superfluous to add, that if these gentlemen consent to serve the community in the manner indicated, and at a personal sacrifice, it must be admitted, no one else ought to feel authorized to raise any objection.

 Let our friends from Breaux Bridge "start the ball rolling."
 Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.



The Cost of Late Trains.

The following article from the Valley of the Teche, reproduced in The Evangeline, of St. Martinville, we publish, together with the comments of the latter contemporary, for the benefit of the businessmen of Lafayette whose most direct interests should impel them to act promptly and firmly in meeting half-way the good people or our sister town of Breaux Bridge: 

 "On Saturday 2d. inst., on Thursday 7th inst.,  and on Monday 11th inst. our mail failed to reach us, because the train was behind time. Now on any day of the week, when the trains are not on time, it is only a delay of a few minutes in any other place than here; but at Breaux Bridge it is one of fully 24 hours and on Saturdays of 48 hours; on Monday evening we then get three mails at a time. When we ask the mail driver why he does not wait a few minutes for the arrival of the train, so that he may have the mail of the day, his answer is that the road from here to the depot is in such bad condition that it would not be prudent for him to be caught on that road during the night. The fact is that although, at the livery stables of Lafayette and Breaux Bridge, they will not undertake to bring a passenger through that road in the night. The writer himself was forced to start once during the night to take the 6  hr. a. m. train at Lafayette, and although he had one of the best drivers in town, he lost his way, upset buggy, passenger and himself in a pond of water; part of the baggage was lost and he finally drove back to Breaux Bridge, as it was impossible to find his way to Lafayette, and the train was missed.

  And of this road which is seven miles long, there is only one mile in such a shameful condition; and it is painful to state, that although during the greater part of the year it is the only outlet both for travelers and freight, in spite of all complaints and remonstrance's the people have never found it possible yet to obtain relief. And this in the face of the fact that we are paying a tax of 10 mills and of the awful drawback that it brings on this community.

 Besides it is now the session of business; merchants and planters as well are every evening longing after their mails, so as to ascertain the ruling price of our crops and find it hard to be so deprived of it, sometimes for three days.

  If our police jury will not or cannot give due attention  to such an important matter, it is in the interest of the planters and the merchants to take some other action for having this important work accomplished. In view of the great benefit to be derived made out and all parties interested will very likely do their duty. It is useless for us to invite immigration of any kind before a change has taken place, because any capitalist that will have to pass through that road, when it is in such condition, will be scared out, not only of this place, but very likely out of a country which has so many inducements hidden out of his view, and such a tale will do much to destroy any confidence in our assertions of the beauty of this section of the state.

  We have already said so much of that road, that we would not have said one word more about it, if we had not been specially requested to so so.
-- Valley of the Teche.

 


Bread Wars. - A fierce and disastrous competition between the bakers of the town has been in progress for several days past, which has made bread "dirt cheap," as our devil expresses it, in our midst. Actually, many people are complaining that they get too much bread for five cents, and refuse to accept more than one of the two loaves sold for that price. If it were not that we believe this bakers' row is bound to come to an end very soon on account of the clear unreasonableness of the competition, the Advertiser would be tempted to convert the bread war into an immigration document for Lafayette, for it should prove a very strong one. We "kneed" to add that our remarks on this most "yeasty" do(ugh) not aim to intensify the already "fermented" state of affairs. We are firm believers in legitimate competition, but, like all other members of a well bre(a)d business community, deplore every form of rivalry in commerce that can result only in loss and disaster to all concerned, and if we mistake not the people themselves, the only beneficiaries in happenings of this kind, do not entirely approve of ruinous competition. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.  





Shooting at Negro Ball. - At a negro ball near Carencro on the night of the 23rd inst. one Scott Nevins was shot and it was thought fatally wounded by one Albert Chargers. The latter was arrested the day following and lodged in the parish prison. He claims to have acted in self defense. The latest news from Nevins is that he is still alive though seriously hurt. On Thursday Constable Breaux of the 6th ward apprehended two other negroes as being implicated in the shooting of Nevins. Their names are Bibi Savoie and Austen Joseph and they also are now behind the bars. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.




On the B. B. Diamond. - The "Favorites" of Lafayette, and "Stonewalls," of Anse Pilette, met on the diamond promptly Sunday evening, according to appointment, and the favorites won by a score of 22 to 13. The contest for championship was very eager and exciting, and was witnessed by a large number of interested amateurs of the bat and ball. Both teams put forth their best efforts and dis some very good, as well as quite bad, playing. During the course of the game the fact was plainly developed that bot the Favorites and Stonewalls possess a good proportion of excellent baseball material, which, with systematic training would easily rate with the "professional." Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.



 Town Bakers Battle. - A fierce and disastrous competition between the bakers of the town has been in progress for several days past, which has made bread "dirt cheap," as our devil expresses it, in our midst. Actually, many people are complaining that get too much bread for five cents, and refuse to accept more than one of the two loaves sold for that price. If it were not that we believe the bakers' row is bound to come to an end very soon on account of the clear unreasonableness of the competition, The Advertiser would be tempted to convert the bread war into an immigration document for Lafayette, for it should prove a very strong one. We "kneed" to add that our remarks on this most "yeasty" subject do(ugh) not aim to intensify the already "fermented" state of affairs. We are firm believers in legitimate competition, but, like all other members of a well bre(a)d business community, deplore every form in commerce that can result only in loss and disaster to all concerned, and if we mistake not the people themselves, the only beneficiaries in happenings of this kind, do not entirely approve of ruinous competition.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.



Broussard & Cade. - A current item of some importance is the recent call issued by Sheriff I. A. Broussard of this parish and C. T. Cade of Iberia, for a convention of all sheriffs of the State to be held in this town on October 14th next, with the view of organizing a permanent association of sheriffs such as is operated successfully in several States of the Union. We look upon this as a very important movement which ought to be fruitful of many good result, especially in the administration of the criminal laws throughout the State. A thorough understanding between sheriffs in regard to the apprehension of lawbreakers fleeing from one parish to another will do much to promote law and order throughout the State. It is easy to conceive also that every sheriff's office might be a bureau of information by means of which the arrest of fugitives could be made swift and sure in every parish in the State. In organizing and operating such a system no great amount of work need be entailed thereby while on the other hand much expense can be saved. The Advertiser congratulates Sheriff Broussard and Cade upon their foresight and trust that there will be a full attendance of sheriffs.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.

     
FLAT CULTIVATION FOR SUGAR CANE.
(Continued.)

 MR. EDITOR :- I do not want you to suppose that I think for a moment that I can change the opinion of the majority of the farmers of this country, who have followed their fathers' grandfathers' and great-grandfathers' system of farming for the last hundred years, or that it makes one hundredth part of a cent difference with me (personally), whether they do or not. It is well known by all practical men that the system of farming in this country, like many other things, is fifty years behind the times, and the majority of the people know it, but they are unable to cut loose from their old rules, for fear of failure, therefore, in order to keep pace with the times, it is the duty of everyone who can afford to do so.

 Being an old practical farmer of many years experience in different countries, I feel that if I can do anything to help my co-workers of the soil, that it is my duty to do so ;  I claim that by flat cultivation of cane, there can be a great deal of time and money saved, and much better results. In the first place, put on three horses and plow the ground 10 to 12 inches deep in order to break up the old crust, open the pores of the ground, so that it will absorb all the surplus water that falls, then put on the harrow and harrow the ground smooth, mark it out four inches deep, plant your cane, cover it with the plow four inches deep, in the spring bar it off, and hoe it, then take a two-horse cultivator and go through it twice in a row, every ten or twelve days, and hoe if  necessary to keep the weeds out of the cane. By this system, it will be much easier harvesting for men, and teams, than by the old ditch system. In order to protect the stubble through the winter, after the cane is harvested; take a plow and throw a light furrow from each side of the row over the stubble, which will prevent it from freezing, and make it much fresher and stronger in the spring ;  under the old system the stubble freezes, which causes the sap to sour, run down and destroy your crop.

 I claim that under the above system, there is a better drainage than under the old, for if the ground is plowed deep, and the pores kept open by thorough cultivation, it will absorb all the water that ever falls during the summer or cane growing season. As it will be distributed over the whole surface instead of being run into a narrow channel between the rows, there to stand in many cases until it evaporates, and scalds out all the cane roots that come in contact with it. Another important point under this system of cultivation is that the cane will receive the full benefit of every light shower that falls during the dry season, which it cannot under the old system.

 I claim that under the system of flat cultivation, there can be raised from two or three tons more per acres, than by the old ditch system. Cane that will produce 20 tons per acre, will average from 15 to 16 joints to the cane ;  that means on an average one and a quarter tons per acre for each joint. It is well known that two joints at the bottom are worth three or four at the top. I claim that under the above system there can be saved from two or three joints that are covered up with the plow by the old system, which will more than make the difference in weight per acre, that I claim, which will make a difference of eight or ten dollars per acre.

 As to cane blowing down, I am satisfied from personal observation and knowledge gained from some of our oldest planters and sugar refiners that it is a great benefit to the cane as it allow the warm sun to get in to the roots, after a cold heavy rain, producing a quick, strong, vigorous growth that will much more than pay for all the extra trouble in harvesting. Mr. Editor, as the above system of cultivation is to a certain extent experimental on my part, I should like to open correspondence in a friendly way, with some of our old experienced planters, believing a great deal of good might come out of it.

  Yours respectfully,
                   J. NICKERSON.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.






Southern Pacific Provides Aid.

 Mr. C. P. Huntington, President of the Southern Pacific Co. recently tendered to the Health officers of New York, the Morgan steamship, Algiers, to be used in transporting food, clothing, medicine, &c., from New York to the Yellow Fever sufferers at Brunswick, Georgia. The use of the steamship represents a considerable item of expense and Mr. Huntington's act is one of human sympathy and kindness. Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.











Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/30/1893.

 A feeble shower fell Monday evening last, but it was hardly heavy enough to do any apparent good.

   The cool weather of the last few days has acted with good effect in forcing the cotton bolls open, which advances the gathering of the staple to a remarkable extent. The season of cotton picking, during the last few weeks has been pressing.

Whopping cough continues to firmly hold the fort in Lafayette.

 The Board of School Directors will meet on next Saturday October 7th.

 The pay car hasn't shown up yet for this month nor has its rumble been heard.

 Messrs. W. F. Owen and J. P. Nolan of the Southern Pacific Railroad were in town Thursday.

 The Methodist Church has been much improved in appearance by a fresh coat of paint.

 We have had a good deal of job-work this week, which has made us scarce of reading matter.


 We have put in a mailing machine this week, and within the next we expect to galley our entire subscription list.

 District Attorney Gordy arrived here on the 26th inst., a few days in advance of the opening of court to "reconnoiter."

 Mr. R. J. Tanner of this place has been relieving for a few days Mr. T. Coleman, as Engineer on the Salt Mine Branch.

 Two sons of Dr. A. Gladu, Leonce and Gonzales will leave for Baton Rouge on the 2nd inst. to enter the Louisiana State University.

 There are not many eggs being shipped to market from here, despite the fact that figures are unusually encouraging.

 The Court House square has been nicely cleaned up, and the weeds cut down preparatory to holding a term of court, which opens Monday.

 Judge Debaillon's law office has about reached completion. The painter has finished his part, and the structure does credit to its builders.

 The competition in the bread market here must have reached to the "ginger-snap" by now. We are sure that Mr. Cracker has been drowned in the race.

 At Mrs. Webre's restaurant on Lincoln Avenue, meals are given at all hours. This establishment will be conducted in first-class style. A dining room is arranged apart for ladies.

 The telephone located in the Advertiser office, has been doing a splendid business this week, owing greatly to a busy harvesting season.

 Mr. C. J. Irwin spent a few days in town this week on business. Mr. Irwin was formerly a resident of this place but is at present holding a position as clerk in an office of the Southern Pacific at Algiers.

 Judge W. E. Bowen has been granted a forty days leave of absence, to attend the Railroad Trainmen's convention, which meets in Boston shortly. Mr. Bowen will possibly visit Chicago before his return.

 The sugar yield for next year has been set decidedly higher than any figure ever dreamed of. We hope that Lafayette parish will be in the list for a good sum. We need only the determination, as everything else is a natural gift.

 Mr. John O. Mouton returned home from his Northern trip last Tuesday. Mrs. Mouton, who accompanied him, stopped in New Orleans to make certain purchases for her store on the corner of Vermilion and Washington streets.

 Don't forget the entertainment at Scott, for the benefit of the Lafayette High School, on Saturday, Oct. 7. The production will be on display of home talent, and in aid of the very charitable and pressing cause of education. We urge upon our people the necessity of their co-operation in this endeavor, and feel assured that Lafayette's attendance on that occasion will be highly acceptable.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1893.






LAGNIAPPE:
THE SOUTHERN ACCENT.
 From the N. O. States.

 The Columbia, S. C., State expresses its regret over the gradual disappearance of the Southern accent and the old fashioned pronunciations that were peculiar to the South in its good old days.

 "Fifty years ago,: observes the State, "a gentleman of elegant culture, attired in an elegant blue dresscoat, with gilt buttons, buff vest, blue trousers drawn down tightly over pump-soled boots, with straps, would sing "Gyide me, O Thou Great Jeovah," or read his title clear to mansions in the 'skyie' without any apprehension that his nicety of speech would ever be stigmatized as provincial. He would speak with pride and affection of his brother, 'Jeems,' and, being slightly 'deef,' would be much 'obleeged' if his friend would be so 'kyind' as to elevate his voice somewhat."

 The Philadelphia Ledger remarks that the South maintains that its traditions are as good, if not a little better than, those of New England. "It was the arbiter of elegance in Colonial times, and may claim to have been far the more faithful to the polite usage of the best days of English writing and speech. It was elegant, then, to 'bile' the vegetables, and to make a 'ch'ice' 'jint,' and to 'larn a child to read. Edward Eggleston used to delight in pointing out that most of what we regarded as the illiterate mispronunciations, and verbal usages of the Hoosier dialect had the recommendation of Shakespear, and Miss Murfree has proved that a good many Tennessee mountain words and sayings are Elizabethian. The Southerner is not without justification for the fashions of speech current in his section, and it may well be questionable whether English would gain or lose by the abandonment of these in an effort to conform to a precise standard - which would have to be one arbitrarily established, since none has ever existed and none now exists.

Lafayette Advertiser 9/30/1903.    

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