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Tuesday, January 13, 2015

**DECEMBER 22ND M C


From the Lafayette Gazette of December 22nd, 1900:



THE SALOON QUESTION.








The Police Jury Decides to Prohibit the Opening of Saloons Within Half a Mile of Town.


 It will be remembered that at its regular monthly meeting held on the 6th of this month, the Police Jury fixed the liquor license at $200. Subsequently the Town Council of Lafayette met and raised the liquor license to $1,000. There was reason to feat that low license in the parish and high license in the town would cause saloons to be opened just beyond the limits of the corporation. It was reported that a liquor dealer had already made arrangements to open a saloon in the neighborhood of the Industrial Institute. For obvious reasons this could not be permitted.


 Persons favoring a high license in the parish petitioned the Police Jury to hold a special session to reconsider the license question. Pursuant to a call issued by President Billeaud the Jury met Thursday morning. From what could be learned the members of the Jury who had voted to fix the parish license at $200 were not willing to accede to the petition of the high license advocates, but they were inclined to make any concession which they considered reasonable and which they considered reasonable and consistent with their former action. Capt. Buchanan offered a resolution which was adopted without a dissenting vote and which will make it impossible for any one to open a saloon within a half mile of the corporation of Lafayette. This resolution is intended to reach those who may have the intention of moving just outside the corporate limits of the town to avoid the payment of the $1,000 license. Had this resolution not been adopted the town would, in all probability have been annoyed by small whiskey shops situated where the police can not interfere to maintain order.
Other good feature's of Capt. Buchanan's resolution are that no one will be permitted to open a saloon without first securing a license and that no half-year license will be issued.
The following members were present at the meeting: Mr. Billeaud, Jr., president; Alonzo Lacey, Alex Broussard, J. C. Buchanan, F. G. Mouton, Odillon Blanchet, Saul Broussard, Aymar Labbe, Jno. Whittington. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900. 




Dance on New Year's Eve. - A number of the young men of Lafayette are making necessary arrangements for a dance on New Year's eve. The following committees are printed on the invitations which have just been issued:
Arrangement - Edwin Mouton, chairman; Louis Lacoste, Nicholas Hebert, Clifton Guidry,

George Pefferkorn. Invitation Committee - H. Plonsky, chairman; Joseph Lacoste, T. J. Guilbeau, E. T. McBride, Fred Courtney. Floor Managers - J. R. Domengeaux, chairman; Amick Courtney, Willie Levy, Rousseau Dugas. Reception - Louis Cyr, chairman; J. Z. Domengeaux, Edwin Chargoism Leonard Landry, Harry Lessley.
Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.





A MERRY CHRISTMAS. 

 Before the next weekly visit of The Gazette the anniversary if the birth-day of Christ will have been celebrated for the nineteen hundredth time by the Christian people throughout the world. As usual at this time of the year it is the pleasant duty of the journalist - the obscure scribbler of the country press not expected - to wish one and all a merry Christmas.
The Gazette believes that this community has reason to be merry. On every hand there are signs of prosperity and contentment. The people of the town and parish are, as a whole, prosperous, and, barring those stricken by visitations of death and disease, the year which is about to close had dealt kindly with all.
The Gazette hopes that its readers will spend the day in a fitting manner - that they will not only be happy themselves, but that they will contribute to the happiness of others.
Be merry all, be merry all,
With holly dress the festive hall,
Prepare the song, the feast, the ball,
To welcome Merry Christmas.
       Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900. 



LAFAYETTE AMATEURS
Scored a Decided Hit Last Wednesday Night at Falk's Opera-house.

 That Lafayette can boast of amateur actors who would do credit to the professional stage was evident at Falk's opera-house last Wednesday night. "College Chums," a most interesting comedy, was played in a manner which reflected much credit upon the players. Dr. Girard deserves praise for the good judgment exercised in selecting this bright comedy and the ability he displayed in directing the rehearsals. Mrs. H. McBride contributed largely to the success of the entertainment with suitable selections of music skillfully rendered on the piano.

 Dr. Girard, in the most difficult role, did splendidly and was very ably supported by F. V. Mouton and Don Caffery, the other "college chums." Felix E. and Ned Voorhies, as superannuated lovers, did their part so well that they were perfect counterparts of the proverbially foolish "old man in love." Willie Adams, acquitted himself very creditably; his unaffected ease and perennial smile made the "college scout" a decidedly is needless to say that Mrs. F. E. Davis, as the (unreadable word) Brazilian widow, elicited the most favorable criticism. Miss (unreadable name), Miss Lizzie Mudd and Miss Ula Coronna filled their roles with marked ability.

 The Gazette compliments the local amateurs upon their success. They contributed to a good cause and afforded the audiences a most pleasurable evening. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.




Fifteen Years in the Penetentiary.

 John Lamb, a negro sent to the penitentiary from this parish in 1985 for murder, has been given his freedom and has returned to this town. Lamb was sentenced for life but on account of good behavior while in prison his term of imprisonment was shortened to fifteen years. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.





Attempted to Save Lafayette.

 Lafayette was visited this week by four men and a young girl, who called themselves Disciples of Christ. They did not want to be taken for Salvation Army soldiers nor for followers of Brigham Young. They held a few impromptu meetings in the streets and sang hymns and implored their hearers to quit their sinful ways, but no repentent sinner appeared. From all accounts the "Disciples" left the town in the same state of wickedness in which they found it. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.




Christmas Tree.

 On Monday night, the 24th, there will be a Christmas tree at the Methodist church for the Sunday School class, but the public generally are invited to attend and take part in it. Should you desire you may send any present to the church before 4 o'clock in the afternoon. Write the name of the person for whom it is intended and it will be placed on the tree accordingly.
Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.


The Ladies' Club.

 The Ladies' Club held a most enjoyable meeting last Tuesday at the home of Dr. Hopkins. After the business session a lesson in English history was taken up and was followed by an interesting discussion led by Mrs. R. B. Raney. An able paper on the "Crusaders" was read by Miss McLaurin. The ladies then repaired to the dining room where a splendid lunch was spread. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.


A MERRY CHRISTMAS.

 Before the next weekly visit of The Gazette the anniversary of the birth-day of Christ will have been celebrated for the nineteen hundredth time by the Christian people throughout the world. As usual at this time of the year it is the pleasant duty of the journalist - the obscure scribbler of the country press not excepted - to wish one and all a merry Christmas.

 The Gazette believes that this community has reason to be merry. On every hand there are signs of prosperity and contentment. The people of the town and parish are, as a whole, prosperous, and, barring those stricken by visitations of death and disease, the year which is about to close has dealt kindly with all.

 The Gazette hopes that its readers will spend the day in a fitting manner - that they will not only be happy themselves, but that they will contribute to the happiness of others.

     Be merry all, be merry all,
     With holly dress the festive hall,
     Prepare the song, feast, the ball,
             To welcome Merry Christmas.
Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.





 Dance on New Year's Eve.

 A number of the young men of Lafayette are making necessary arrangements for a dance on New Year's eve. The following committees are printed on the invitations which have just been issued:

 Arrangement - Edwin Mouton, chairman; Louis Lacoste, Nicholas Hebert, Clifton Guidry, George Pefferkorn.

 Invitation Committee - H. Plonsky, chairman; Joseph Lacoste, T. J. Guilbeau, E. T. McBride, Fred Courtney.

 Floor Managers - J. R. Domengeaux, chairman; Amick Courtney, Willie Levy, U. Fontenot, Rousseau Dugas.

 Reception - Louis Cyr, chairman; J. Z. Domengeaux, Edwin Chargois, Leonard Landry, Harry Lessley.
Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.





Little Boys, Beware!

 The town authorities request The Gazette to state that the ordinance prohibiting the shooting of firecrackers, etc., will be enforced and that violators of this law will be punished. The attention of parents is called to this ordinance. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.



Married.

 Mr. Albert Clark, of Beaumont, Texas, and Miss Henriette Doucet, of Lafayette, were married at the Catholic church last Wednesday by Rev. Father Bolard. The bride is a most estimable young lady and the groom is a successful young photographer doing business at Beaumont. After the marriage ceremony was concluded at the church the newly wedded couple were driven to the Southern Pacific station where they boarded a train for Beaumont, their future home. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.



Thanks to Fire. Co. No. 1.

 George Scherer requests The Gazette to thank Lafayette Fire Company No. 1 for valuable assistance extended to him during his illness. Mr. Scherer is sincerely grateful to the Company for its generous help. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.

Called to New Iberia.
 Mr. Ed G. Voorhies was called to New Iberia this week on account of the serious illness of his mother, Mrs. Felix Voorhies. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.


Catholic Knights.

 The local branch 792 of the Catholic Knights of America held a meeting this week and elected the following officers:  Rev. E. Forge, spiritual director; J. Alf. Mouton, president; F. E. Moss, vice-president; A. V. Labbe, financial secretary; R. H. Broussard, secretary and treasury; J. D. Mouton, trustee for three years; Albert A. Meaux, trustee for two years; F. E. Moss, trustee for one year; R. H. Broussard delegate to the next State Council which meets in New Orleans Feb. 14, 1901:  J. Alf. Mouton, alternate; L. E. Lacour, sergeant-at-arms; Ulysse Poimboeuf, sentinel. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.



CITY COUNCIL
Proceedings - Ordinances of Licenses for 1901.

             Lafayette, La., Dec. 11, 1900.
  A regular meeting of the City Council was held this day. Mayor Chas. D. Caffery presiding.  Members present:  F. Demanade, J. O. Mouton, F. E. Girard, G. A. DeBlanc, H. Hohorst, C. O. Mouton.  Absent: J. E. Martin.

 Minutes of the previous meetings were adopted as read.

 Dr. F. E. Girard reported having collected $15 for rent of pest-house property in the capacity of health-officer, for which amount he turned over his personal check.

 Moved by Geo. A. DeBlanc, seconded by H. Hohorst, that 300 feet of 350 pound pressure, D. J. Hose, three years guarantee, to purchased at once. Adopted.

 The W. W. and E. L. committee reported on hydrant to be place at on near power house, but was re-committed with instructions to ascertain if reported cost could not be reduced.

 The mayor submitted a report of an examination of the water and light plant made by Frank Printz, consulting engineer, on Nov. 30, and Dec. 1, and showing the result of the tests applied to the electrical engines - and changes made by said engineer, and said examination and report appearing satisfactory.

 On motion, duly made and seconded, the action of the mayor in obtaining said report was approved and the cost of same, $16, was ordered paid and warrant issued.

 The following bills were approved:

 ------------------p. 2----------------

 Moved and duly seconded that lumber account of J. C. Nickerson be rejected. Motion carried.

 Moved by F. E. Girard, seconded by G. A. DeBlanc, that the street committee be instructed to have the second street at the point where it crosses railroad fixed in such condition that the traveling public may use street from one side to the other across said railroad. Adopted.

 Moved by G. A. DeBlanc, seconded by C. O. Mouton, that the W. W. & E. L. committee ascertain the probable cost of two public water drinking fountains in the town and consider best location for same. Adopted.

 Moved by F. E. Girard, seconded by G. A. DeBlanc, that license of 1899 relative to liquor dealers be amended and graded as follows:


----------------p. 2---------------------

 The 1900 licenses law was then adopted with the above changes for the current year 1901, as follows:

AN ORDINANCE to levy, collect and enforce the payment of an annual license of persons or business firms and corporations pursuing any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, except those expressly excepted from such license tax by Article 229 of the constitution, and prescribing the mode and method in which certain persons, subject to license, shall make report of their business.

 Section I.  Be it enacted, etc., that on the second day of January, A. D. 1901, and each subsequent year the tax-collector shall begin to collect and shall collect as fast as possible from each of the persons or business firm, associations of persons, and corporations pursuing within this town any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, a license tax hereinafter graduated. All licenses shall be due and collectable during the first two (2) months of each year and all unpaid licenses shall become delinquent on the first day of March of each year and all firms that commence business after that date shall become delinquent unless the license is paid within ten (10) days.

 Section II.  Be it further enacted, etc., that the annual license for all kinds of business hereinafter named except as afterward provided, shall be graduated in classes.

MANUFACTURE.

 That for carrying on each business of manufacturing subject to license under article 229 of the constitution, the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of said business, as follows:

 Class 1. When the said receipts are $25,000 or more and less than $30,000 the license shall be $19.50.

 Class 2. When the said receipts are less than $25,000 the license shall be $15.

 BANKING.

 That for each business of carrying on bank, banking company, association, corporation or agency they shall be based on the declared or nominal capital and surplus, as follows:

 Class 1. When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $100,000 or more and less than $200,000 the license shall be $150.

 Class 2. When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $50,000 or more and less than $100,000 the license shall be $75.

 Class 3. When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $50,000 or less, the license shall be $50.

 The declared or nominal capital or surplus, as provided in this section, shall be ascertained and based upon the annual statement made in pursuance of existing laws.


MERCANTILE BUSINESS.

 Section 3.  Be it further ordained, that for every wholesale mercantile business, whether as principal, agent or commission, by auction, representing foreign merchants or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross annual amounts of sale as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross sales are $250,000 and not more than $500,000 the license shall be $100.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are $250,000 or less, the license shall be $50.

 Provided that no person or persons shall be deemed wholesale dealers unless he or they sell by the original or unbroken packages or barrels only; and provided further, that no person or persons shall be deemed wholesale dealers unless he or they sell to dealers for resale. If they sell in less quantities than original and unbroken packages, or barrels, they shall be considered retail dealers, and pay license as such. That for every business or selling at retail whether as principal, agent or commission, or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross annual amount of sales, as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross sales are $40,000 or more and under $50,000, the license shall be $40.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are $30,000 or more and less than $40,000, the license shall be $30.

 Class 3. When the gross sales are $25,000 or more and less than $30,000, the license shall be $25.

 Class 4. When the gross sales are $20,000 or more and less than $25,000 the license shall be $20.

 Class 5. When the gross sales are $15,000 or more and less than $20,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 6. When the gross sales are less than $20,000 the license shall be $10.

 Class 7. When the gross sales are $5,000 or less, the license shall be $5.

 Provided, that if any distilled vinous, malt or any other kind of mixed liquors be sold in connection with the business of retail merchant, grocer, oyster house, confectionery, or in less quantities than five gallons, the license for such additional business shall be as hereinafter provided for, provided further, that no license shall issue to sell liquors in less quantities than five gallons, for less than $1,000.

 Provided, that retail drugstores, owned or controlled and managed by a regularly licensed graduate of pharmacy, and selling vinous, spirituous or alcoholic liquors in less quantities than one quart, as drug or medicine only, shall pay the license mentioned in this section and shall not be required to procure the license required for saloons, etc., under this act, as retail liquor dealers.

 Provided further, that if drugstores, soda fountains, or other aerated water dealers offer for sale in connection, with such waters any vinous, spirituous or alcoholic liquors, such drug store, soda-fountains or dealers, shall be required to take out license as retail liquor dealers, as saloons, barrooms, etc., as provided in Section 9 of this act.

 Provided further, that farmers or planters having stores situated on their farms or plantations, and selling or advancing supplies to their employes exclusively, shall not be classed as merchants, nor shall they be required to take out a license under this act.

 Section 5. Be it further enacted, that for carrying on each business of gas light, electric light, water works, shoot-the-chutes, miniature railroad, saw mills employing ten or more hands, telephoning (including local and district telegraph) express company, cotton compress or ginnery, cotton pickery, slaughter house, distillery and rectifying alcoholic, or malt liquors, brewing ale, beer, porter or other malt liquor, manufacturing tobacco, cigar or cigarettes, refining sugar or molasses or either or both, manufacturing cotton seed oil, oil cake or cotton seed meal, that license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of each person, association or persons, business firm or corporation engaged in said business, as follows:

 Provided that this section shall not apply to planters and farmers grinding and refining their own sugar or molasses or ginning their own cotton or that of their tenants or manufacturing their own cotton seed into meat, cake or oil, or work by machinery for plantation or farm purposes, provided that no license shall be imposed or collected on cotton gins ginning for lint, not over four hundred bales of cotton per annum and provided further that this act shall not apply to those planters who granulate syrup for other planters during the rolling season.

 Provided that any agency for any or other establishment, selling by wholesale, ale, beer or other alcoholic or malt liquors in unbroken packages as usually contained in kegs, barrels, etc., shall pay a license based as follows:

 When said gross sales are $5,000 or more the license shall be $500. When the said gross annual receipts are less than $5,000 the license shall be $300.

 Class 1. When the gross annual receipts are $200,000 or more and less than $150,000 the license shall be $500.

 Class 2. When the said gross annual receipts are $200,000 or more and less than $150,000 the license shall be $500.

 Class 2. When the said gross receipts are $150,000 or more and less than $200,000 the license shall be $375.

 Class 3. When the said gross receipts are $100,000 or more and less than $150.000 the license shall be $250.

 Class 4. When the said gross receipts are $75,000 or more and less than $100,000 the license shall be $187.50.

 Class 5. When the said gross receipts are $50,000 or more and less than $75,000 the license shall be $125.

 Class 6. When the said gross receipts are $37,500 or more and less than $50,000 the license shall be $93.75.

 Class 7. When the gross annual receipts are $25,000 or more and less than $39,500, the license shall be $62.50.

 Class 8. When the said gross receipts are over $20,000 and not less than $15,000 the license shall be $50.

 Class 9. When the said gross receipts are over $15,000 and less than $20,000 the license shall be $37.50.

 Class 10. When the said gross receipts are less than $15,000 the license shall be $20.

AMUSEMENTS.

 Section 5.  Be it enacted, etc., that for every business or keeping a theatre, opera-house, ampitheatre, - academy of music, museum, managerie, circus or other traveling show, the license shall be based upon the number of the attaches, whether proprietors, performers, or other employes, as follows:

 Class 1.  When the number of said persons is one hundred or more the license shall be $500.

 Class 2.  When the number of said persons is seventy-five or more and less than one hundred the license shall be $400.

 Class 3.  When the number of said persons is fifty or more and less than seventy-five the license shall be $300.

 Class 4.  When the number of said persons is thirty or more and less than fifty the license shall be $250.

 Class 5.  When the number of said persons is twenty or more and less than thirty the license shall be $200.

 Class 6.  When the number of said persons is ten or more and less than twenty the license shall be $150.

 Class 7. When the number of said persons is five or more and less than ten, the license shall be $100.

 Class 8.  When the number of said persons is four the license shall be $75.

 Class 9. When the number of said persons is three the license shall be $50.

 Class 10. When the number of said persons is two the license shall be $40.

 Class 11. When the number of said persons is one the license shall be $30.

 Provided that the license for every hall or place where public entertainments are given not provided for in the section shall be based upon the seating capacity as follows:

 When the number of seats or spaces number 500 or more the licenses shall be $25.

 When the number of seats or spaces number less than 500 the license shall be license shall be $20.

 Provided further that no license shall be required for balls given by private persons or for charitable purposes.

 RAILROAD AGENTS, ETC.

 Section 6. Be it further enacted that each person carrying on the business or calling, of selling or dealing in railroad or steamship tickets whether said tickets are sold on the streets, in the office of the company he represents, or that of any other company, shall pay an annual license graded upon the number of companies he represents to-wit: One company, $25; two companies, $40; three companies, $50.

PEDDLERS AND HAWKERS.

 Section 7. Be it further enacted, etc., that each and every peddler or hawker shall pay an annual license grades as follows:

 When traveling on foot, $5; when traveling on horseback, $10; when traveling in one-horse vehicle, $20; when traveling in two-horse vehicle, $37.50; when traveling on any kind of a water craft, $100.

 Provided that, no person shall be allowed to sell goods as clerk or clerks, of any peddler or hawker, but that he or they must pay a license, in his or their own name, but that this (unreadable word) shall not apply to watercraft.

 It is further provided that all parochial (unreadable word) officers are hereby empowered and authorized, to cause all peddlers or hawkers, to (unreadable word) their parish license, and that the said peddlers or hawkers, failing to produce or exhibit the same, the said officers are directed and empowered by this act to seize said stock of merchandise and turn the same over to any court of competent jurisdiction with due information as to the violation of this act. Provided further that the said executive officers shall be entitled to receive as fees, the sum of $5 in each and every case from any peddler or hawker, clerk or clerks employed by said peddler or hawker, when paddling without a license in violation of this act. The said amount of $5 to be recovered before any court of competent jurisdiction out of the goods so seized.

 Provided further that no license shall be issued to any peddler or hawker for less than full rate for the current year.

 MOTELS, ETC.

 Section 8. Be it further enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping a hotel where lodging and eating are combined the license shall be based upon the number of furnished lodging rooms for guests, as follows:

 Class 1. When the said rooms are forty-five or more and less than seventy-five the license shall be $200.

 Class 2. When the said rooms are thirty or more and less than forty-five the license shall be $150.

 Class 3. When the said rooms are fifteen or more and less than thirty the license shall be $100.

 Class 4. When the number of said rooms is twelve or more and less than fifteen the license shall be $75.

 Class 5. When the number of said rooms is nine or more and less than twelve the license shall be $50.

 Class 6. When the number of said rooms is six or more and less than nine, the license shall be $40.

 Provided that no license shall be required when the number of said rooms is less than six and that for every business or lodging alone the license shall be estimated on the same basis, as for hotels but graduated at one-half rates; provided that boarding houses shall pay sixty per cent of the rates of hotels.

 BARROOMS, ETC.

 Section 10. Be it enacted, that for every business of barroom, cabaret, coffee-house, saloon, grogshop, beer house, beer garden or other place, where anything to be drunk or eaten, on the premises is sold directly or indirectly the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of said business as follows:

 Class 1. When the said gross annual receipts are $10,000 or more and less than $15,000, the license shall be $3,000.

 Class 2. When the said gross receipt are $7,500 or more and less than $10,000, the license shall be $2,000.

 Class 3. When the said gross receipts are $5,000 or less, the license shall be $1,000.

 Provided, that no license shall be charged for selling refreshments for charitable or religious purposes, and provided further that no establishment, selling or giving away or otherwise disposing or any spirits, wines, alcoholic or malt liquors in less quantities than one pint, shall pay less than $200. Be it further ordained that no one shall be allowed to engage in the retail liquor business as provided by this ordinance, without first procuring a license and any one violating this section shall be liable to a fine of $100 and in default of payment 30 days imprisonment or each at the discretion of the mayor.

 Be it further enacted that any person beginning business shall for the first year pay the lowest amount provided by this ordinance. Provided further that when any kind of business provided for in this section, shall be combined with any other business provided for Section 8 the same classification shall be made as provided in this section, but the price for the licenses shall be equal to the price of the license required for each business separately.

 Section 10. Be it enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping billiard tables, pigeon hole, Jenny Lind, pool or bagatelle tables, and ten pin alleys, from which revenue is derived a license of $10 for each such table or alley shall be required and paid in addition to any other license due by the establishment, in which said tables or alleys may be situated. Provided that all persons, association of persons or business firms, and corporations engaged in the sale of soda water, meads, confection, cakes, etc., exclusively, shall be rated as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross annual sales are three thousand dollars and more than $2,000, the license shall be $10.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are less than $2,000, the license shall be $5.

 Provided, that this provision shall not apply to places where alcoholic, vinous or malt liquors are sold, and provided that, druggists selling soda-water, mead, etc., shall be required to take out a license under this act.

 Section 2. Be it enacted, etc., that for every individual or company carrying on the profession or business agency for steamboat, draying, trucking, keeping cabs, carriages, hacks or horses for hire, undertakers, owners or lessees, of toll bridges and ferries, master builders, stevedores, bill posting or tacking, contractors and mechanics who employ assistance, the license shall be graded as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross annual receipts are $1,000, or more the license shall be $20.

 Class 2. When the gross receipts are $750, or more and less than $1,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 3. When the gross annual receipts are less than $750, the license shall be $5.

 PROFESSIONAL.

 Section 12. Be it enacted, that every individual or individuals carrying on the business or profession of physician attorney-at-law, editor, dentist, oculist, photographer, jeweler and all other business not herein provided for shall be graded the same as set forth in the section 11 of this act, but graded at one half rates, and provided that no license shall bi issued hereunder for less than $5.

 Section 13. Be it further enacted, that all traveling vendors of stoves, lightning rods, and clocks, shall pay a license annually as peddlers or not. For everything trading stamp company issuing stamps to merchants, and all other dealers of every kind whatsoever, where the gross annual receipts are less than $5,000 the license shall be $125 and when the gross receipts are above $5,000 the license shall be $250.

 Section 14. Be it further enacted that on the 1st day of February of each year the tax collector, or ex-officio tax-collector shall deliver to the attorney appointed by the Council, for the purpose a complete list of all delinquent license-payers together with their location and kind of business, and the attorney shall immediately proceed to collect the same in accordance with this act, and if not collected within thirty days from the date of delivery of the lists of the collector of taxes, or of ex-officio tax-collector of taxes it shall be the duty of said attorney to render a written report giving the reasons for non-collection to the collector whose duty it shall be to report same to the Council.

 Section 27. Be it enacted, that in addition to the penalties provided in this ordinance, all unpaid license bear interest at the rate of two per cent per month from the first day of February and the payment thereon shall be secured by first mortgage in favor of the corporation on the property, movable or immovable, of the delinquent owing the license and the tax-collector shall collect said interest as provided by existing law and provisions of this ordinance.

 Be it enacted that a person, firm or company, having more than one place of business shall pay a separate license for each place of business.

 Section 29. Be it enacted that all laws or parts of laws in conflict with this act are hereby repealed.

 Section 30. Be it enacted that, the licenses issued in pursuance of this ordinance, shall be for the calendar year beginning Jan. 1, 1901 and ending Dec. 31, 1901.

 Section 31. Be it enacted that, this ordinance take effect from and after its adoption by the Council.

 Resolved that the Council does consider it to the interest of this town to accept the proposition of Messrs. Coleman & Malochee at the present time. Adopted.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1900.











 From the Lafayette Advertiser of December 22nd, 1894:
 

SPEND YOUR MONEY WHERE YOU MAKE IT.
 Pt. 2
 (Continued from last week.)
 

 In our last issue, under the above caption, we pointed out in a way to be easily understood, the harmful effects to the community that resulted from residents of one place sending off to other localities for such commodities as were readily obtainable at home. We showed that the direct consequence of the practice of patronizing distant markets was to withdraw money from local circulation and necessarily, from the support of the residents composing a community. As whatever operates against the interests of one member of a community, likewise militates against the welfare of is neighbor, on account of a mutuality of interests determined by an immutable law, it must follow that just in proportion as the home merchant suffers loss of profit on purchases that could be made of him, but that is paid to a merchant of another locality instead, to an analogous extent is the interest of the person making such purchases, undermined. This effect may be scarcely perceptible when restricted to an individual case, but is is surely and powerfully felt in the aggregate, the community suffering in general, as a consequence. If the lawyer and physician of Lafayette, representing one class of its citizens, do not patronize the merchant, baker and other tradesmen of his town, representing another class of its citizens, and the latter engaged the services of lawyers and physicians residing in far removed localities in preference to the men of profession belonging to Lafayette, neither class would have the means of earning a livelihood and both classes would be equally affected. Deprived of a means of substance at home the individual members of the community would be forced to seek new fields of employment and the town would go into bankruptcy.

 The foregoing illustration has been employed to demonstrate the great detriment capable of being accomplished by the pursuit of such a course, especially if carried to an extreme, and our more thoughtful people should give to this subject the serious consideration that is warranted by its importance, for an underlying principle of grave magnitude is here involved.

 It would be well for each one to take a selfish view of this question and patronize the local merchant not so much to help the latter as to build up one's own material interests, for by contributing to the welfare of the home tradesman you are inevitably adding to your own prosperity. The two things cannot be separated. Expenditure of money for our daily living is a necessity, but it is not possible to spend money that we have never earned or do not possess. The less money we send away from home the more money there will be in local circulation, and the more money there is in local circulation the prosperous will be every individual coming within the reach of its influence.

 We trust that our effort to arouse that worthy class of persons for whom our remarks find most direct application, to a realization of the far reaching and baneful effects of the practice we have condemned, will be fruitful of some good. We recognize the personal right of every citizen to exercise his high privilege accorded all free (unreadable word) to do just as he or she pleases, and do not intend that our expression shall be accepted in other that (unreadable words) spirit.

(Rest is not clear enough to finish. Gist: Upbuilding of our community in which we live depends on our own.......our interest binds.....and we want to live in way that ....common welfare.Lafayette Advertiser 12/22/1894. 





Rail-Road Needed.

 Why this large section of fertile country has not prospered ?  We wonder not the cause. Why its population failed to reach the 10,000 mark ?  Is a question easily solved. Our people do not possess the moral courage and energy desired. For instance we take New Iberia, Crowley are, as proofs of our assertion, to show that it is entirely due to the strong spirit and great energy of its people. Chance has no more to do in the affairs of the world, as was in olden times, nearly everything was ascribed to chance, but now pluck has taken its place, and dormant energy is no stock to indulge in at present.

 For a number of years, our people is looking for railroad connection with the outer world. It is a rich and beautiful sugar cane country, susceptible of immense development, which requires but little inducement to interest the Southern Pacific railroad in building up a branch road.

 We need and want a railroad, and by all means, we will have it, and in accordance with business principles we think that a line built from here to Lafayette, which is a prominent railroad center, for going any way: West, East, or North, would be better for us. But should we not be successful in getting it there, we must look elsewhere. So we ask all those interested in this move to give us a pull. Says the Attakapas Vindicator, "Brains mixed with printer's ink make the most powerful compound known to the civilized world." So, let us all follow this and ask our Brothers to give us a help.

 Let us start the ball rolling and keep it rolling. Let us all pull together and the long needed railroad will come out sure. Let us not stop here. From the Breaux Bridge Valley of the Teche.

 The Advertiser voices the sentiment of the entire population of Lafayette in expressing the hope that our worthy and struggling little sister town of Breaux Bridge will realize at an early day its heart's greatest desire - railway communication with the world, via the town of Lafayette. An effort was made by citizens of the two towns, several months ago, to interest the Southern Pacific Company in the building of a branch road from Breaux Bridge to Lafayette, but the effort proved of no avail, the company assigning no special reason for declining all propositions submitted in aid of the enterprise.

 In view of the great mutual benefit that would result from connecting Breaux Bridge with Lafayette by rail it behooves property-holders of both of these towns to bend their combined energies toward welding so important a commercial link, at the earliest date possible, and to that end The Advertiser will contribute in every way within its province. Lafayette Advertiser 12/22/1894.


Brick Walk for School.

Having had occasion to visit that section of the town in which the public school house is located we thought to take advantage of the opportunity to inspect the brick walk donated by Mr. B. Falk to the public school, announcement of Mr. Falk's expressed intention of laying such a walk having been made through the columns of The Advertiser several months ago. Our presence on the ground made it quite apparent there was no brick wall visible in any direction within the range of the eyesight. We concluded  that Mr. Falk had been prevented from carrying out his promise until this time on account of other and more pressing matters demanding his attention, and have no doubt it is his purpose to lay the brick walk in the very near future, at least, before next vacation. Lafayette Advertiser 12/22/1894.


Received Calendar.


We have received from a friend the Almanac and Calendar of the Apostleship of Prayer for 1895. The beautiful cover design embodying the Apostleship coat of arms, and done in five different colors, is a triumph of artistic illumination. The handsome frontispiece of Our Lady of Lourdes, the many superb half tone engravings which embellish the pages, the varied and readable matter, the exquisite verses, and the mine of statistics relative to the work of the League make the Apostleship Almanac for 1895 a most fitting souvenir of the golden Jubilee year, indispensable to league directors, promoters and associates. It is issued from the new office of the Central Direction 27 and 29 West street, New York, and the price being only 10 cts., makes it a cheap almanac. Lafayette Advertiser 12/22/1894.
 


     
MARRIED.
 Ducote - Martin. - Mr. Joseph Ducote and Miss Caroline Martin were united in marriage on the 18th. instant, at St. John's church, in the presence of a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Mr. Robert Bailey and Miss Louise Revillon were in attendance as groomsman and bridesmaid. The contracting parties are highly connected in this community and many were the good wishes showered on them.

 From the church the bridal party repaired to the home prepared to receive the happy young couple, and toasted to the health and prosperity of the bride and groom.Lafayette Advertiser 12/22/1894.

 
 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 12/22/1894.
  
Mrs. Felix Voorhies of New Iberia visited relatives in town this week.

 Moss Bros. &Co. have had a lively trade of holiday goods, this week.

 Mr. J. Ruhl Mouton, son of Hon. Ambroise Mouton of Lake Arthur and Miss Hattie L. Graham of Lake Charles, were united in marriage on the 18th instant.

 Misses Edna and Lou Gardner of Grand Coteau attended the Ducote - Martin wedding and returned home Wednesday.

 The Orleans Hotel - First Class Rooms and Meals at all hours.

 On the 7th. inst. of this month a company capitalized at $250,000.00 was organized at Rayne, La., for the purpose of building a railroad from Church Point to Rayne. Dr. Arthur Guilbeau, of Breaux Bridge, and Dr. George Strummer, of Broussardville, were pleasant callers at our office, Thursday.

 Dr, J. H. Mumford, who has recently located at Indian Bayou from the northern part of the state, was in our town last Wednesday.

 A finished picture for only 5 cents. Were? Next to the post-office. It is done by dropping a nickel in the slot of an automatic machine. 

The town has been wearing a real lively air this week, a new impulse being given to business in consequence of the approaching holidays.

 Hogs For Sale

  At Alfred Hebert.

 Dr. Weir, son of T. D. Weir, who is located at Burke Station in the practice of medicine, paid the paternal home a visit this week.

 The Christmas exercises of Prof. Greig's school will be held in the school house and will begin at 2:30 p. m. sharp. Friends and patrons are invited to attend. 

 Fine candies and BonBons and a complete assortment of cakes and nuts at Moss Bros. & Co.

 T. M. Biossat, Mouton & Salles, Moss Bros & Co. and D. V. Gardebled are the business firms especially advertising seasonable holiday gods in this issue of The Advertiser, and all three of these firms are well prepared to supply your needs.

 The performance of the Otto H. Krause Stock Company at the opera house last Sunday night did not give the satisfaction anticipated.

 You can get suited in Christmas and New Year cards at Moss Bros. & Co. They are showing a most attractive line this season. 

 Mr. C. C. Brown, of Carencro, who has been seriously ill for several weeks past, is reported as being much improved. This is welcome news to Mr. Brown's numerous friends who had grown solicitous about his condition.

 Ask John O. Mouton about the Daily States cigar and he will tell you that customers are well pleased with them, and always inquire for them.

 We gratefully acknowledge several complimentary criticisms of our execution of the programs for the dancing soiree that will take place at Crescent Hotel Christmas eve. 

 From Wednesday morning to Thursday night of next week we will devote special time to the collection at our office, of amounts due us from subscribers and patrons who have found it inconvenient to pay up before that time. Our thanks are due to those who so promptly responded to our first request for a settlement.

 Toy books and story books for children, and nicely bound books by popular authors, in single volumes and sets, suitable for holiday gifts, abound in great variety at Moss Bros. & Co. 

 At the primary election held last Saturday to select a nominee for a police juror to succeed Mr. Ford Huffapuir in the secnd ward, Mr. Jos. W. Broussard, brother of Sheriff Broussard received a majority (78) votes.

Wedding Announcement. - Formal announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Julia Olivier to Mr. Frederick Hobein on the 27th inst., at St. John's catholic church in this town.

 Mr. Felix Villere, employed in the construction of the new catholic church at Carencro, was precipitated to the ground from the top of a ladder last Tuesday, but fortunately suffered no serious injury.

 The man who wears "THE BUCK SKIN BREECHES" has a happy wife. She never had to mend. Every pair warranted. 

 On account of its proximity to Christmas the visit of the Southern Pacific pay car yesterday was fraught with peculiar interest for our railroad boys. 

 The application of Mr. Martin Bagley for a change of venue from Vermilion to Lafayette parish, was granted by the court sitting at Abbeville, on the 14th instant. The case will come up for trial at the next term of the criminal court. Mr. Bagley being charged with murder committed in Vermilion parish.

 The caravan of Midway Plaisance savoring that took Lafayette by surprise last Tuesday, succeeded in squelching an admission fee from a goodly number of our young as well as more mature citizens. The show was a miserable disappointment to all those who either had to "attend a lodge meeting" or "set up with a sick friend." 

 Negotiations that had been in progress for several days and by which Mrs. Antoine Guidry was to assume control and management of the Rigues Hotel, came to an abrupt ending Thursday of last week, Mrs. Guidry relinquishing all further intention of securing possession of this most popular hostelry.

 The children's festival that was to have taken place at the Methodist Christmas eve will be postponed until the afternoon of the 27th so as to not conflict with the exercise of Prof. Greig's school Monday evening. The interesting programs of songs, recitations and games is being arranged for the children's festival, under the direction of Mrs. Randle, promises to be one of much enjoyment to the little folks. 

 At their stated communication on Saturday December, 15th inst., Hope Lodge No. 145 F. A. M.elected the following officers for the ensuing year: Chas. D. Caffery, W. M. ; Wm. Campbell, S. W.; D. A. Cochran, J. W.; F. S. Mudd, Treasurer; Crow Girard, Secretary.; John Vigneaux, S. D.;

 Mr. W. A. Bonnet, the well known photographer has decided to reopen a photograph gallery in Lafayette and will arrive here in the early part of January. He will occupy his former stand in the second story of Moss Bros. & Co.'s building. Mr. Bonnet is an artist of rare merit as the work he has done in this community during a former residency in Lafayette, abundantly testifies, and his return is a valuable acquisition to the town.

 On going of duty last Monday morning Mr. Auguste V. Labbe, an employee in the Waters-Pierce Company's local agency, discovered that the office had been burglarized sometime during Saturday or Sunday night. A small amount of money the agent is accustomed to carrying over night for change, was found missing from the drawer of the desk in which it was kept locked up. There is no clue to the theft.

 A sad accident occurred at Broussardville last Wednesday. A young man by the name of Alphonse Woutreaux while jumping from one car to another fell between them and was killed.
 Engineers, Conductors and brakemen smoke the Daily States cigar. It is made of imported tobacco and is the best 5c. Cigar on the market today. FOR SALE by John O. Mouton.

 Copies of the last number of the North American Review can always be procured of Moss Bros. & Co. The December number is a specially strong one, containing very able contributions from Monsignor Satilli on "The Catholic School System in Rome"; "Brigandage On Our Railroads" by the Hon. Wade Hampton and "Our Experiments in Financial Legislation" by the Comptroller of the Currency. 

 Gen. F. F. Myles visited his fine farm and country residence near town, this week.

 We received a pleasant visit from postmaster J. R. Davis, of Duson, last Tuesday. 

 Go to Gardebled's pharmacy for fine candies and bonbons. A complete assortment at lowest prices. Mr. L. E. Lacour and brother made a flying business trip to New Iberia last Wednesday.

 Dr. Russel Caffery and bride arrived in our town yesterday and are the guests of their brother, Chas. D. Caffery, Esq. 

 "The Child Stealer," a great drama will be presented at Falk's Opera House by Emma Warren and her superb company.

 Remember the date, Sunday Dec. 23rd '94. 

 A fine assortment of fine candies and bonbons for the holidays at Gardebled's.

 Mr. Albert Arceneaux, who already owns several small houses in our town has lately begun to the erection of another building for the purpose of renting.

 The Emma Warren theatrical company, traveling with its own band and orchestra, will visit Lafayette the 23rd instant. Reserved seats now on sale at Falk's Opera House. 

 What might have resulted in a disastrous conflagration Thursday night, was promptly nipped in the bud by Prof. W. A. LeRosen's presence of mind, a ladder, and axe and a bucket of water. The flue in the professor's sleeping apartment at Mrs. A. C. Young's caught fire and the flames had begun to communicate to the contiguous woodwork, when they were effectively extinguished as just reported.

 Next week E. W. Phillips, contractor and builder of New Iberia, will begin the construction of two cottages on Mr. P. B. Roy's lot adjoining Moss Bros. & Co.'s store, mentioned in these columns. 

 Engineer Charley Devoe, who sustained such serious bodily injury while in the discharge of his duties, recently, is said to be improving very fast under treatment at the Charity Hospital at New Orleans.

 We return thanks to Dr. Arthur Guilbeau for a complimentary copy of his "Magnolia Blossoms" schottische. The doctor is possessed of musical talent of no mean order as his latest composition indicates.











 From the Lafayette Gazette of December 22nd, 1894:

A RAILROAD TO BREAUX BRIDGE.

 With characteristic vigor the Breaux Bridge Valley of the Teche gets after the people and makes a very earnest effort to infuse some life in our dormant bodies. Our good neighbor is perfectly right. The people of this section is unfortunately absent from ours. Our confrere is correct; Breaux Bridge needs a railroad and the only way she will get it is by having it built from Lafayette. Concert of action on the part of the people of both towns is all that is required to attain the desired end. The citizens of Rayne have organized a company and will build a road from their town to Church Point. If a small town like Rayne possesses the energy and wealth to push a project of this kind to a successful termination is it possible that a city like Lafayette with the assistance of Breaux Bridge cannot do as much? A road, as proposed by our confrere, would be of great benefit to both towns, and to the surrounding country, and we assure him that we shall do all in our power as a journal to induce the people to take over the proper interest in this movement. We publish below the Valley of the Teche's timely editorial and advise all to read it:

Why this large section of fertile country has not prospered ?  We wonder not the cause. Why its population failed to reach the 10,000 mark ?  Is a question easily solved. Our people do not possess the moral courage and energy desired. For instance we take New Iberia, Crowley are, as proofs of our assertion, to show that it is entirely due to the strong spirit and great energy of its people. Chance has no more to do in the affairs of the world, as was in olden times, nearly everything was ascribed to chance, but now pluck has taken its place, and dormant energy is no stock to indulge in at present.

 For a number of years, our people is looking for railroad connection with the outer world. It is a rich and beautiful sugar cane country, susceptible of immense development, which requires but little inducement to interest the Southern Pacific railroad in building up a branch road.

 We need and want a railroad, and by all means, we will have it, and in accordance with business principles we think that a line built from here to Lafayette, which is a prominent railroad center, for going any way: West, East, or North, would be better for us. But should we not be successful in getting it there, we must look elsewhere. So we ask all those interested in this move to give us a pull. Says the Attakapas Vindicator, "Brains mixed with printer's ink make the most powerful compound known to the civilized world." So, let us all follow this and ask our Brothers to give us a help.

 Let us start the ball rolling and keep it rolling. Let us all pull together and the long needed railroad will come out sure. Let us not stop here. From the Breaux Bridge Valley of the Teche.

 The Advertiser voices the sentiment of the entire population of Lafayette in expressing the hope that our worthy and struggling little sister town of Breaux Bridge will realize at an early day its heart's greatest desire - railway communication with the world, via the town of Lafayette. An effort was made by citizens of the two towns, several months ago, to interest the Southern Pacific Company in the building of a branch road from Breaux Bridge to Lafayette, but the effort proved of no avail, the company assigning no special reason for declining all propositions submitted in aid of the enterprise.


 In view of the great mutual benefit that would result from connecting Breaux Bridge with Lafayette by rail it behooves property-holders of both of these towns to bend their combined energies toward welding so important a commercial link, at the earliest date possible, and to that end The Advertiser will contribute in every way within its province. From the Breaux Bridge 'Valley of the Teche,' and in the  Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.


That "Cow-Boy" Preacher.

 The "cow-boy" preacher, Mr. Montgomery, who, it will be remembered, preached in Lafayette some years since, was refused admission by the Methodist conference held in New Orleans a few days ago, on the ground that he is in the habit of making the most extravagant statements. A minster told the conference that Mr. Montgomery had once related the following incident from the pulpit: While tending cattle in the West on one occasion, a herd of 9,000 steers stamped and in trying to escape from their path he rode to the brink of a precipice forty feet high and leaped from its summit into the raging river below followed by the whole 9,000 steers, yet he escaped without being hurt. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.

   



Emmigration to La.

 Under caption "An Invitation to Northern and Western men" the Advocate of Baton Rouge has produced a journal attracting attention to the resources of Louisiana. It is edited by the Bureau of Immigration and indicates close research by the authors of the several articles contained therein, all expanding on the theory that our state presents unrivaled opportuties for the settler. Speaking of Lafayette parish the volume is very praising, referring particularly to the fertility of our soil and the growth of tropical fruits. It certainly is to be hoped the book will be successful in its purpose and obtain for the state a large influx of immigration. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.




Excellent Opportunity for Real Estate Man. - Some people from North Dakota came here a few weeks since intending to locate providing they obtained land, but finding available lands taken up they left this locality and went to Jefferson Island, Iberia parish. We suggested in our last issue that there was an elegant opportunity for a real estate man right here in Lafayette. There is a bonanza for some one who may grasp the opportunity. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.


 Just Passing Through. - John E. McDonald, the ever genial Mac, passed through Lafayette Sunday night, being on his way to Houston to do some work in connection with the "time-tables" which he is getting up for the Southern Pacific company.
Laf. Gazette 12/22/1894.


Adding On. - Our good friend, Bob Richard, is having a store room added to the Bagarry barber shop, and will start in business for himself on the 1st of January. He will keep a complete line of gent's furnishing goods, such as shirts, collars, handkerchiefs and all kinds of underwear. Bob is well and favorably known and will doubtless get his share of the public patronage. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.




A Horrible Death.

 A horrible death happened at Broussardville Wednesday night. Alphonse Boudreaux, aged about 18 years, was run over by a freight train and his body was terribly mangled. The unfortunate young man had gone to the depot to carry some lunch for his brother, a brakeman on the road, and while waiting about the railroad yards he jumped on a car to take a ride and fell between the wheels with the fatal result mentioned above. His head was mashed into a jelly and his body was literally cut in two. Coroner Gladu went to Broussardville and held an inquest and made a report in accordance with the facts. Young Boudreaux was an exemplary youth and his untimely and tragic death will be deeply regretted by a large circle of friends. He was an industrious lad and his sad demise will be an irreparable loss to a widowed mother. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.







School Closing.

 The Lafayette Public School, Prog. Greig principal, will close Monday evening Dec. 24, with appropriate Christmas exercises. A pleasant time in anticipated and all friends and patrons are invited to attend. The exercises will begin at 2:30 p. m. sharp. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.


Election to Replace Hoffpauir.

 A primary election was held in the second ward to select a member of the Police Jury to replace Mr. Ford Hoffpauir whose resignation from that body was necessitated by continued illness. The vote cast was as follows: Jos. W. Broussard 78, Ben Avant 62, and W. M. Harson 23. Mr. Broussard is a very worthy gentleman and will prove a useful member of the Police Jury. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.


Would Like to Give "Pointers."

 What a pity that Charles A. Dana of the Sun, Joseph Pulitzer of the World, or even Col. Baker of the Times-Democrat, don't come to Lafayette to get some pointers about running their newspapers. This, like all other towns, has within its limits a few "Knowalls" who could tell these distinguished editors more about the newspaper business in ten minutes than the late Horace Greeley could have told them in a month. And the wonder is: Why don't these intellectual giants go where they could display their peculiar abilities; but, "Full many a flower is born to blush unseen and waste its sweetness on the desert air." Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.

    

Opening on Jan. 1st.

 Our good friend, Bob Richard, is having a store room added to the Bagarry barber shop, and will start in business for himself on the 1st of January. He will keep a complete line of gent's furnishing goods, such as shirts, collars, handkerchiefs and all kinds of underwear. Bob is well and favorably known and will doubtless get his share of the public patronage. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.

  

Huge Orange.

 Mr. Charles Steiner, brought to our office Saturday an orange measuring sixteen inches in circumference, the skin of which was five-eights of an inch in thickness. It was of the sweet variety. Mr. Steiner says that from the tree bearing this fruit last year he obtained five hundred oranges, but this year the same plant only produced five. He attributes this defect to the early frost. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.


Elected Officers.

 Hope Lodge No. 145 F. & A. M. held a meeting on the 15th instant and elected officers to serve for the ensuing year: Chas. D. Caffery, W. M.; Wm. Campbell, S. W.; D. A. Cochrane, J. W.; S. Mudd, treasurer; Crow Girard, secretary; Albert Cayard, S. D.; Jno. Vigneaux, J. D.; Jean Brun, tyler.
Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.


The Cayrets Entertain.

 Mr. and Mrs. D. Cayret entertained a few friends at their residence Sunday evening in honor of Master L. Francez, of Carencro. The charming hostess spared no pains to make the time pass most pleasantly, and a more delightful evening was never spent by the guests, who were; Misses Eugenie Bernard, Nidia Campbell, Alida Campbell, Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Francez, Edmond Couret, Horace Mouton, Loulou Breaux, G. Francez, Rene Bonnet and Gaston Mouton. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.



Dr. Russell Caffery.

 In Christ church last Wednesday evening Miss Edith Cushman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Cushman, was married to  Dr. Russel Caffery, Rev. H. D. Ayes, rector of the church officiating. The church was well filled with friends and relatives, the "Daughters of the Church," of which the bride was one, were well represented. To the familiar strains of Mendelson's wedding march the bridal party entered the front door and proceeded up the aisle to the chancel, as follows: The ushers, Messrs. Charles Barry, J. H. Daughtery, J. W. McCuthon and Charles Calhoun; best man Mr. Dan Caffery, brother of the bridegroom; maid of honor, Miss Janie Cushman, sister of the bride's mother, with the bridegroom and the bride with her father, Mr. Cushman. After the ceremony Dr. and Mrs. Caffery left for New Orleans, whence, after a short stay, they go to San Antonio, where they will be at home after January 1 at 118 Avenue D. The bride wore a traveling costume of tan colored silk, trimmed with brown velvet and white point lace, with hat and gloves to match, and Miss Cushman wore a street costume of gray novelty goods, trimmed with pale blue satin and white lace. The chancel was beautifully decorated with palms and Southern smilax forming pillars of green on each side the entrance. From the beak of the eagle on the reading desk a heart of pale pink roses was hung by a white satin ribbon. A long rope of evergreens was festooned from the arch above the entrance to the chancel and from its center hung a four-leaved shamrock. From the Houston Post. -

 Dr. Caffery is a native of this parish being the brother of our townsman Mr. C. D. Caffery. He is well known in Lafayette where he has many friends who wish him much happiness. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.




A Pretty Wedding.

 One of the prettiest weddings ever witnessed in Lafayette was the one last Tuesday which united Mr. Joseph Ducote and Miss Caroline Martin in the sacred bonds of marriage. Nuptial ceremonies always attract large crowds of people in Lafayette, and this occasion was no exception to the rule. Long before the appointed hour a large number of people assembled in front of the Catholic church and waited for the arrival of the bridal party, who came at the time and walked to the altar in the following order: Miss Louise Revillon, the bridesmaid, prettily attired in a beautiful costume of pink silk, and the groomsman, Mr. Robert A. Bailey; next came the bride, becomingly gowned in brocaded satin, leaning on the arm of her brother, Mr. J. E. Martin. She was the ideal bride in her elegant dress, which was a splendid specimen of the dressmaker's art. The followed the bridgegroom accompanied by his aunt, Mrs. Jules Revillon. The impressive ceremony of the church was performed by the Rev. Father Maltrait who made a brief sermon and spoke very feelingly. After the the reverend gentleman had concluded the ceremony and pronounced the happy couple husband and wife, a few friends and members of the two families repaired to the future home of Mr. and Mrs. Ducote and extended them their earnest congratulations and good wishes. Refreshments were served and toasts were proposed to the happiness of the newly made couple. Some very handsome and valuable presents attested the esteem of many well-wishers. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.


A Relic of Lafitte.

 Dr. H. E. Martin, of Acadia parish, came to Lafayette this week and brought with him a very curious old pistol, which, no doubt, was once the property of the famous pirate, Lafitte. It was found near Bayou Nepiquet by some people while searching for treasures supposed to have been buried by LaFitte. It is exactly fifteen inches in length with the cannon in a yellow metal resembling copper. What bears out our statement that it belonged to the great pirate is the name "LAFITTE" in capital letters engraved on the handle. While the letters are somewhat effaced, they are easily discernible with a glass, but with the naked eye it is impossible to see them. This odd relic is now in the possession of a gentleman in Lafayette where it will remain for some days after which, it is intended to forward it to the Louisiana Historical Society at New Orleans. Lafayette Gazette 12/22/1894.

  


 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 12/22/1894.

 The Gazette wishes a merry Christmas to all its readers.

 Mr. H. H. Hohorst went to New Orleans this week on some business.

 Exactly thirty-nine bachelors took in the show at Falk's Tuesday night.

 We acknowledge receipt of the 95 calendar of the Columbia Bicycle Company.

 A Boston man says our streets reminded him of home - they are so circuitous.

 A number of young ladies are making preparations to give a party at the Crescent Hotel on Christmas eve.

 Charles Debaillon from the Crescent city Thursday to spend the holidays with his parents.

 Don Greig, who is attending school at Port Gibson, Miss., came to spend the holidays with the family of his uncle, Dr. F. S. Mudd.

 The Otto H. Kraus theatrical company performed at Falk's Opera House Sunday night to a fair audience.

 At one time last Saturday there were seven hundred and fifty cars in the Southern Pacific yard, all loaded.

 The "Ranger" in charge of Paymaster Hanford doled out to the railroad men their pay Saturday. About $8,500 was disbursed.

 A car containing sixty bales of cotton caught fire from the sparks of a locomotive at Mouton Switch Thursday week and was totally destroyed.












GIRLS THAT DON'T MARRY.
Perhaps the Fault Lies Back of Them with Their Early Training.

 Why are there so many bachelors and old maids nowadays? Perhaps one reason lies in the education of our modern girls and the blame must rest with their mothers. Consider the life of a girl belonging to the upper middle-class from the age of eighteen to twenty eight; it is a careless, selfish, irresponsible epoch, in which the daughter studies her own convenience and pleasure solely, and the mother, by foolish indulgence, aids and abets her. Once a girl is free from the trammels of the school-room, and is fully fledged in society, nothing is denied her. She may be late in bed, or, perchance, take her breakfast there, the while she skims a novel belonging to the "new" order of fiction. Her day is compassed with no single duty save to look her best and enjoy life. There is time in such an existence for the ugly weeds of jealousy, thoughtless, unkind chatter, and even free behavior to take root and flourish. Then, perhaps, some young man of modest means comes along, and offers his heart and hand to the daughter. As a single girl she is free from all responsibility. She has not to consider ways and means, paterfamilias never refuses to make the dress check bigger if desired, and she has few wishes ungratified. If she marries, her suitor can only offer her a much smaller home than that to which she has been accustomed; a restricted income, probably; and the sweet yet solemn duties of wife, and later, oft-times, those of mother. The prospect does not appeal very keenly to the egotistical maiden, and as the life she is living only teaches her to love herself before any one else, the would-be lover receives his conge.

 Another class of girl, fed by the "new" play and the "new" novel, cannot make up her mind to wed, because of the grisly skeletons for which she has been tutored to seek in a man's past. We take it that the parents of a girl, whose position and experience give them a much better chance of judging, will certainly ascertain whether the man is a worthy suitor, and if they deem him so, surely it is unwise for a girl to pry into every past episode. But, with an imagination that has been unhealthily reared, that has been taught to look for evil where it may not be, the modern girl rushes in where angels fear to tread, and the pure, warm love which, coming from a fresh, innocent heart, is a safeguard to many a man is denied her lover. Unless the suitor comes up to the standard of virtue as shown in the hero of certain feminine and one-sided novels, she will have none of him. Thus it comes to pass that the fin-de-siecle wooers are faring very hardily.

 Meanwhile the happy years of early womanhood, when all the world is kind, roll by, and the Rubicon of thirty is crossed. Then it is that single girl awakes to the knowledge of what she has lost, or is losing - the pleasant duties of house mistress, with husband and children to consider, are denied her, and she sighs for the clinging touch of baby fingers and the mother-love in whose train follow so many noble qualities. If the daughter sees her mistake in time, and is able to rectify it, a happy and useful life may still await her. But what is needed to render girls desirable wives should be taught them from their earliest years.

 From the New York Advertiser and in the Lafayette Advertiser 12/22/1894.   


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