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Monday, January 12, 2015

**OCTOBER 21ST - M C


 From the Lafayette Advertiser of October 21st, 1903:

 NOTHING DEFINITE AT ANSE LA BUTTE,

 But Indications are Promising. - Gen. Miles, Gov. Hogg and Party Have Left, But Took Options on Several Large Tracts.

 Gen. Nelson A. Miles, Gov. Hogg, J. W. Swayne, and J. N. Bruck, who spent a week here investigating the oil fields at Anse la Butte and near territory left the latter part of last week. Their investigations have convinced them that the Anse la Butte field possesses great possibilities, while Mr. Bruck, and oil expert from Boston pronounces the Anse la Butte oil of a very superior lubricant. Mr. J. C. Nickerson, our wide-awake real estate agent, accompanied the party in their drives over the oil territory, and besides showing them many courtesies, was of much assistance to them in their investigations.

 Only one purchase outright was made and that by Mr. Bruck of 100 arpents near Anse la Butte. The others of the party have taken an option on some large tracts, which if purchased will run up into thousands of dollars.

 The advent of these gentlemen into the local field, should they close their options, will be of vast importance, and the possibility of their so doing, is more than a probability. They have taken steps toward the formation of a large company to control and develop their holdings in the Crowley, Jennings, Beaumont and Sour Lake fields, and expect to include Anse la Butte.

 No further action will likely be taken by the party just at present. The expenditure of such a large sum as is contemplated here, requires careful attention and haste is hardly to be expected. Gen. Miles will return some time in January, when the deal may be expected to be closed or some definite decision reached. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.

     

The Broussard-Scranton Mass Meeting.

 A large and representative audience was present at the political meeting held last Sunday in the interest of the Broussard-Scranton faction.


The capacity of the court house was taxed to its utmost was taxed to its utmost to accommodate the throng of people hailing from every section of the parish, and the presence of many ladies added grace to the occasion.

 Eloquent and spirited addresses were delivered by Judge Debaillon, Judge Julian Mouton, Hon. Wm. Campbell, Sheriff Broussard and Dr. G. A. Martin, candidate for coroner, whose happy-go-lucky style of discussing politics completely captivated his hearers. The remarks of the various speakers often times aroused the enthusiasm of the audience to the highest pitch, and every reference made to education and public schools was warmly applauded.

 The manly candor of Mr. Campbell in publishing the fact that he approved the poll-tax qualification for suffrage and had voted against its repeal, because the money raised by this means went to the support of the public schools, elicited tremendous applause, and the audience likewise manifested genuine approbation of the statement made by Sheriff Broussard that he had given practical proof of his earnest interest in the education of the children of his native parish by always subscribing liberally of his hard earned money toward the building of the school houses and for the advancement of education.

 The excellent music rendered by the Sontag Military Band and the brass band of Abbeville came in for a full share of appreciation, the voluntary and gratuitous services of the visiting band being a graceful compliment to Sheriff Broussard.

 The veteran Adrien Labbe was selected chairman of the meeting and the following gentlemen acted as vice-presidents: Jean Begnaud, Lewis Whittington, Charles Harrington, Harrison Theal, B. P. Landry, Darmas Landry, M. Billeaud, Sr., Hebrard Girouard, Antheal Bernard, H. Simoneaux, V. Kilchrist, E. Trahan, A. D. Verret, S. J. Montgomery, John Whittington, B. J. Pellerin and R. C. Landry. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.


 State Central Committee.

 Messrs. Crow Girard and J. J. Mouton attended the meeting of the State Central Committee in New Orleans on the 15th in regard to a rehearsing of the Lafayette case, but Mr. Girard decided to withdraw the request, and so the case was not brought before the committee. While there Mr. Girard was engaged to represent the Rees-Broussard faction of St. Martin parish, who made charges of the wholesale frauds in the primary election lately held in the that parish. The St. Martin case was referred to the executive committee with plenary powers to act.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.


A Republican Ticket.

 Mr. J. R. Domengeaux, secretary of the Republican parish committee stated to an Advertiser reporter that there is a strong possibility that the Republicans will put out a full parish ticket shortly after the meeting of the Republican State Committee. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.


SEEMINGLY SATISFACTORY.

 Elsewhere in this paper are published the rule adopted by the state primary by the state central committee. As will be noticed the date has been changed to Jan. 19, which is satisfactory in every way. The rules as adopted seem fair and have received the approval of the different candidates. There is, however, one serious objection, and that is the retention of the appointment of fifteen members at large. There is absolutely no necessity for this, and it is a source of danger. One committeman from each parish and one from each ward of New Orleans would constitute a sufficiently bulky committee without the addition of any members at large. However, since the committee has done its work satisfactory in other respects, there is no great need of too much complaint.
Lafayette 10/21/1903.

    

Wedding Bells.
FERREN - REVILLON.
 On Wednesday, Oct. 14, Mr. A. E. Ferren and Miss Louise Revillon were married at St. John's Catholic church, Rev. Father Crozier officiating in the presence of a large number of friends. Mr. Geo. Casanova, of New Orleans, was best man, and Miss Lizzie Ferren, sister of the groom, was the bridesmaid. After the ceremony a wedding breakfast was served to the newly wedded pair and a number of friends at the home of the bride's mother. Mr. and Mrs. Ferren left on the 1:00 p. m. train for Lake Charles, which will be their future home. The Advertiser joins with a large circle of friends in wishing them many years of happiness.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903. 




A Big Circus Coming.
The Great Sells & Downs shows have completed all arrangements to exhibit in Lafayette, Nov. 4, 1903.


The Sells & Downs has advanced rapidly during recent years until it has reached the front rank of tented enterprises, and is one of the biggest on the road. It advertises a greater number of features than any other show, and judging from the comments of the press, the commercial traveler and others who have seen it, the Sells & Downs Show produces all it advertises. With the Sells & Downs Show  from six to eight acts are to be seen at one time, in the three rings, hippodrome track, on the stage and in the mid air. The management of a show the size of Sells & Downs does not expect the people to be able to watch all of the many features, but they arrange to have several acts of various kinds at the same time, so that the spectator may take his choice and enjoy those that he admires most. Since people's differ, it is necessary for a circus the size of Sells & Downs to be cosmopolitan in character in order that all may be pleased, and those who have seen it know that it pleases and satisfies the most critical.

 The Great Sells & Downs Shows will positively appear in Lafayette for one day only, giving two performances on Nov. 4, 1903.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.

     

Death Defying Acts of Daring Diavolo.

 This year one of the great star features of the Adam Forepaugh and Sells Brothers Shows is the awe-inspiring and hair-raising act of the world-famous Diavolo, who accomplishes successfully at each performance the really wonderful feat of looping the loop on a bicycle. No more danger-deriding or death-defying deed could be devised. It simply beggars description. Starting from a point in the extreme height of the canvas dome the daring rider dashes down an incline plane over 100 feet and then with a terrific momentum thus attained, wheel and rider turn a complete somersault in mid-air. It is difficult to conceive how a man with sound mind can be tempted by money so ardently flirt with death.

    Diavolo and a myriad of other new and novel attractions will be seen here in vast and prodigious programme, when the great shows exhibit at Crowley on Monday, Oct. 26 and at New Iberia on Tuesday, Oct. 27.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.



At the Carencro Railroad Depot.

 The locality of the depot presents a stirring and business-like panorama at present, enlivening us to see. The traffic promoted by the Teche railroad, the two gins, the Ferris sugar company, which has a fine new platform for its use, joined by the greatly increased business of the Southern Pacific railroad, makes Carencro boom up more and more every day as a business centre. Nothing sleepy about us at this time of the year, although the flies do sometimes crawl over us in summer. Speaking of business and thinking of the hard-worked business-man reminds us that our Railroad agent these days looks as if he thinks the railroad man's life is not a happy lot. We hope that he will weather the storm and have strength enough left to discus the needs of the Corporation etc. by the time that "gentle sprig" returns to cheer us. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.  


Fair at Carencro.
There will be a fair at Carencro Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 7 and 8, for the benefit of the new Catholic church. Amusements of various kinds will be provided, also refreshments. In the evening there will be balloons and fireworks. This will be a notable occasion and you can't afford to miss it.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903. 



Killing at Carencro.

 Friday night J. B. Duplessin was shot and killed in Blot and Francez's saloon in Carencro by Angelle Roger. The two men became involved in a personal encounter, and Duplessin, who was a larger man, was worsting Roger. The latter shot while lying on the floor, being beaten by Duplessin. The coroner's jury exonerated Roger, but District Attorney Campbell made an affidavit charging him with manslaughter. He was released on a bond of $1,000. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.


Base Ball.

 The base ball game that was advertised to take place at Broussardville last Sunday, four of Pilette's best players against - nine from Broussardville, was played, and was very interesting until the fifth inning, when the Pilette boys took the lead. When they took the lead, the Broussardville boys refused to play any more, saying that the umpire had not given them justice. They had their own umpire. The following were the players from Pilette: F. C. Broussard, O. F. Comeaux, J. R. Langlinais. The score stood at the end of the seventh inning 14 to 6 in favor of Pilette. The crowd was as large as every before seen on a diamond here.
From the Pilette Correspondent,
PALMETTO.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.  

  



NEEDS SERIOUS ATTENTION. 

 There are two matters which need serious attention of our city council, one is the tramp nuisance and the other is the idle negro problem. 

The first, which at all times has been both a trouble and annoyance, threatens to become doubly so, since the authorities throughout Texas, are acting in concert to shut tramps and vagrants of all kinds out of the State, and the result will be an overflow into Louisiana, with a full complement for Lafayette. The share we have already had has been a most unwelcome one, and an increase in the number will be viewed with great alarm by many people, especially the ladies, some of whom are now afraid to stay home alone because of the fear of tramps. And in some cases their fears are well founded, for a good many tramps finding a woman at home by herself, will take advantage of her lone condition to be threatening and impudent. And they do not confine their visits to day time, but are bold enough to enter a yard as late as ten o'clock at night, ostensibly begging. Things of that kind are are not a reassuring nature to a woman whose husband is detained from home at night.

 There are sufficiently severe vagrant laws to cover the case and if properly enforced, certainly the tramp nuisance can be abated.

 We believe that our City council is composed of men who are willing and anxious to do whatever will conduce  to the welfare and happiness of the people of Lafayette, and that the only reason why a determined effort to rid the town tramps has not been made, is because pressure on business has caused them to overlook the matter. Now in view of the action in Texas authorities, it becomes urgently necessary that the Council move in the matter vigorously. And when they take up the subject, it will be a proper time to consider the idlers about town, both white and black. These people do not work, which is intolerable. If they don't work, they should either be made to work of leave. There may be some difficulty in reaching all the idlers, but a way should be devised by the Council, and, we feel confident, can be, if they will seriously consider the matter.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.


Sound and Timely Advice.
 To the Advertiser:

 All friends of education will undoubtedly take the hint contained in the timely comments of The Advertiser upon the unfriendly action of the member of the Police Jury from the 3rd ward in advocating a reduction in the parish rate of taxation, on the ground that the current expenses of the parish should be curtailed BY CUTTING DOWN THE YEARLY APPROPRIATION FOR SCHOOLS.

 This extraordinary proposition to reduce the appropriations for schools in the face of the knowledge that more school funds are needed now than every before, is without justification in reason, and unquestionably shows the danger to the public welfare that it involved in elevating to positions of power, individuals who habitually use the influence of their official position to obstruct public progress by antagonizing all measures reasonably calculated to be of general benefit to the community.

 Persons who favor decreasing the efficiency of our public school system are clearly out of join with the times, and we may rest assured that the higher interests of mankind will be advanced with great certainty by placing in control of government, men known to be in harmony with the progress and spirit of the age.

 The Advertiser is advising the people wisely in insisting that "more vigilance and discrimination in the selection of men for public office" should be exercised, and there are healthy indications that the advice will not go unheeded in the approaching election, by many who are now doing some hard thinking on this subject.
       (Signed)   VOTER.
 Lafayette, La., Oct. 17, 1903.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.




Century Club Elects Officers.

 At a regular meeting of the Century Club held on October 13 the following officers and committees were elected:

 C. D. Caffery, president; Dr. F. E. Girard, vice-president; Felix H. Mouton, secretary; F. V. Mouton, treasurer.

 Finance committee:  S. R. Parkerson, J. Edward Martin, Jerome Mouton.

 Membership committee:  Wm. Campbell, A. B. Denbo, Chas. Debaillon.

 Building committee:  S. R. Parkerson, Chas. Debaillon, Felix H. Mouton. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.





 WEDDING BELLS.
 Ferron-Revillon.

 On Wednesday, Oct. 14, Mr. A. E. Ferren and Miss Louise Revillon were married at St. John's Catholic church. Rev. Father Crozier officiating in the presence of a large number of friends, Mr. Geo. Casanova, of New Orleans, was best man, and Miss Lizzie Ferren, sister of the groom, was the bridesmaid. After the ceremony a wedding breakfast was served to the newly wedded pair and a number of friends and relatives at the home of the bride's mother. Mr. and Mrs. Ferren left on the 1:00 p. m. train for Lake Charles which will be their future home. The Advertiser joins with a large circle of friends in wishing them many years of happiness. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.


Fine Apples.

 Mr. G. M. Snodgrass brought to The Advertiser office yesterday a plum branch badly scarred by hail in Iowa the latter part of July; also two fine apples, one a very large and luscious one, raised in Arkansas, which was taken from an exhibit at the Arkansas State Fair by Mr. Snodgrass, which took a premium. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.


 The Euchre Friday Night.

 The euchre given by the ladies of the Jewish Aid Society at Falk's Hall last Friday night was a fine success socially and financially. A very large crowd was in attendance and everybody had a good time. The following are the lucky winners in the euchre: Mrs. A. J. LeBlanc and Miss Rosalie Coronna, first prizes for ladies; Mrs. D. Schwartz and Miss Ula Coronna, second prizes; Mrs. J. A. Martin and Miss Louise Fuselier, third prizes; Mrs. B. N. Coronna and Miss Doenges, fourth prizes; Mrs. A. J. LeBlanc and Miss Viola Young, lone hands; Mrs. Callen and Miss Irma Voorhies, booby prizes. The first gentleman's prizes were captured by Messrs. Marshall and G. Harris; the second by Messrs. A. C. Clark and Felix Mouton; the third, by Messrs. D. Schwartz and Pink Torian; the fourth prizes, by Lucious Prudhomme and Baxter Clegg; the lone hands, by Dr. F. E. Girard and Mr. A. C. Clark; and the booby prizes, by Messrs. C. D. Caffery and Ben Schmalinski. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.


Work on Breaux Bridge Road.

 We have been informed that to-day a large force of men would contribute twelve hours work on the road leading from Breaux Bridge to this town, and we sincerely hope that the work they will accomplish may be of a practical and substantial character. It will be remembered that The Advertiser has been strongly and incessantly advocating the construction and maintenance of a good dirt road between Lafayette and Breaux Bridge, and, in testimony of our earnestness regarding the matter, we submitted not long since, a plan that we believed would accomplish the end desired. From the fact that the citizens of Breaux Bridge did not act on the suggestion then presented for their consideration, and the further fact that in the present instance of working their end of the road after the manner described above, one day's gratuitous labor from all willing persons - without soliciting aid from Lafayette, we conclude that they feel capable of coping with as much of the route as is contained in St. Martin parish, independent of outside assistance. Be that as it may, Lafayette has shown all disposition to do her full part in the premises, and will continue to hold itself in readiness to render what assistance it can in the matter, if the occasion should arise. Let the two towns that are to be equally benefited by this relationship vie with each other for an early accomplishment of the end in view. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.      



Tried to Shoot His Wife.

 Last Saturday morning a considerable local sensation was created by the attempt of William D. Huff, a well known resident here, to do bodily injury to members of his family. The circumstances as we learn them are that Huff tried to shoot his wife, and his sister who was present came to her rescue, and threw her arms around him, she being behind him. Huff then turned his gun, which was an ordinary shot gun of which the barrel had been sawed about half-off, and endeavored to shoot the latter. He succeeded in firing the gun but came nearer killing himself than any one else at the crown of his hat was pretty badly damaged. The cause of the trouble is said to be domestic unhappiness. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.    





 Elect Officers.

 The ladies of the Episcopal Guild met at the home of Mrs. Wm. Clegg Oct. 5, and elected the following officers for the ensuing year:  Mrs. F. E. Davis, president; Mrs. Wm. Clegg, vice-president; Miss Edna Close, secretary; Mrs. J. G. Parkerson, Jr., treasurer. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903. 




Lafayette City Council.  
Lafayette, La., Sept. 12, 1903.
 Hon. C. D. Caffery, Mayor of Lafayette, Lafayette, La. -
      
 Dear Sir: This is to advise yourself and the City Council of Lafayette that the recent ordinance lately adopted by that body ordering an assessment of only two thirds of the actual costs of paving certain side walks of the town against the property owners abutting on the side walk, instead of assessing the whole costs of said side walks, as fixed by the Legislature in whom this power is exclusively vested, is considered illegal in so far as it attempts to charge the property benefited with only two thirds of the benefit received, and to charge the other third to other property owners, who under the law, as above stated, in the contemplation of the Legislature, receive no benefit; and unless the ordinance is amended so as to conform to the law by charging the abutting owners all the costs, judicial proceedings will be instituted to prevent the consummation of any contract to carry it out. Desiring, however, to avoid unnecessary litigation be avoided, if my views are concurred in.
             Yours Respectfully,
                ORTHER C. MOUTON.
  Whereupon the City Council having considered above notice and finding that they are without authority in law to pay any portion of said walks, adopted the following ordinance:

AN ORDINANCE RELATIVE TO THE SIDE WALKS IN THE TOWN OF LAFAYETTE, LA.

 Section I - Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, la., that in the exercise of the powers conferred upon it by Act No. 147 of the acts of the Legislature of this state, of the year 1902, this Council shall hereafter whenever the public interest requires it, pave, plank, gravel, mechanize of otherwise improve the sidewalks, curbing, or any part thereof, within the corporation limits of said town, and shall levy and collect special taxes or local assessment on real estate abutting thge sidewalk of curbing to be improved, for the defraying cost thereof.

 Section II - Be it ordained that whenever the City Council shall decide to pave or improve any side walks or curbing in said town, it shall pass an ordinance calling for bids for the work, of which ten days notice shall be given in the newspapers published in this town, and shall let the contract to the lowest responsible bidder who can give satisfactory security; and after the contract has been awarded, the Council shall provide by ordinance, for an assessment of all real estate abutting the sidewalk, curbing or portion thereof to be paved or improved; provided that in case no satisfactory bid is received, then, and in that event, the said City Council shall proceed to the such work under the direction and supervision of the street committee of said City Council, and the cost thereof shall be assessed against the property abutting said sidewalks or portion thereof.

 Section III - Be it further ordained that as provided by said act of the Legislature, the owners of real estate abutting said sidewalk or curbing, shall pay the entire cost of said work, or the basis of the respective frontage of said property abutting the same.

 Section IV - Be it further ordained that the sum assessed against the real estate shall be due and collectable within ten days after the completion of the work and its acceptance by the City Council, and if not paid within ten days the City Council shall have the power to proceed by suit against the said real estate to collect the delinquent assessment; and the said municipality shall have a special privilege on said property or properties to secure the payment of the same assessed against it, with six per cent per annum interest thereon from the expiration of said ten days until paid, when lien shall be the first privilege over all other claims except taxes, said privilege shall effect third persons from the date of the registry of the assessment in the Mortgage Book of the parish of Lafayette, provided that the City Council instead of enforcing the said assessment as above fixed, upon the payment in cash by the property owners of twenty per cent of the amount due by said property owner, may in their discretion authorize the Mayor to sign and issue certificates showing the amounts receptively due by persons and properties on said sidewalks or curbing so paved or improved, which shall be payable in one, two, three, four and five years, or sooner, at the option of the owner of the property, with six per cent annum, interest payable annually; which said certificates (with a copy if same recorded with the assessment as aforesaid) duly paragraphed as being duly recorded by the Recorder of Mortgages, shall be secured by the first privilege on the property prior to all other charges except taxes, and may be transferred carrying the lien and privilege of the transferor at their face value to the contractor in payment of the work and paving done on said sidewalks or curbing or portion thereof; provided that the work is done by the City Council the said certificates may be transferred to other persons and shall enjoy the lien and privilege aforesaid.

 Section V. - Be it further ordained that this ordinance shall take effect at once.

 Now, where will these cemented sidewalks be placed? The following ordinance was also unanimously adopted:
 Section I - Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette La., that under and by virtue of an ordinance this day adopted, entitled "An ordinance relative to sidewalks in the town of Lafayette, La.," and in accordance with the provisions of Act No. 147 of the acts of the Legislature of this state of the year 1902, and considering that the public interest requires it, that a cement walk, six feet in width, and the necessary curbing thereto, and otherwise according to specifications in possession of the street committee of this Council, be built between the two following points and along the route, to wit:

 Starting on Grant Avenue at the centre line of the Crescent News Hotel, thence along the West side of said Grant Avenue to Lincoln Avenue (now Jefferson)  thence along the South side of Lincoln Avenue to Pierce street, thence along Southeastern side of Pierce street to Jefferson street to Vermilion street, thence along the South side of Vermilion street to Lafayette street to North Main street.

 Starting again at the corner of Lee Avenue and Vermilion street on the North side of Vermilion street and running thence to St. John street to Main street.

 Section II - Be it further ordained that a plank walk of six feet in width, wherever possible, and of such lesser width as as may be necessary to conform to the width of the sidewalk, and otherwise according to specifications in possession of the street committee, be built between the following points to wit:

  1. From corner of Vermilion street and Lee Avenue on East side of Lee Avenue, then on East side of Lee Avenue, then East side Oak street and West side Grant Avenue to Crescent News Hotel.

  2. From Vermilion street to Main, on West side Johnston street.

  3. From Lafayette street, (near Convent) going on North side of Convent street to St. John street, and thence on West of St. John street to Catholic church square.

  4. From corner of Grant Avenue and Lincoln Avenue, on East of Railroad, running on North of Lincoln Avenue to Chestnut street:

 Section III - Be it further ordained that public notice be given for ten days of this ordinance, moreover, calling for bids to do said work shall be let to the lowest bidder who shall give satisfactory security to the street committee in a sum in a sum to be determined by them for the faithful compliance of the contract and the completion of said work.

 Section IV - Be it further ordained that the entire cost of said walks shall be paid by the owners of the real estate abutting the same on the faces of the respective frontage of the property on said sidewalk, which amounts shall be due and collectable within ten days after the completion of the work and its acceptance by the City Council of this town, and if not paid within ten days, the Council shall proceed by suit against the said owners and said real estate, to collect said delinquent assessment, and for the payment of said sum so assessed, this Council shall have a special privilege over all other claims except taxes, and shall effect third persons, from the date of registry of the assessment in the Mortgage Book of the parish of Lafayette.

 Section V - Be it further ordained that the street committee of this Council may, and they are hereby authorized, in their discretion, to accept said work or any art thereof, by sections of one or more blocks.

 Section VI - Be it further ordained that in case no satisfactory bid is received for the construction of said cement walks or said plank walks; then, that said street committee is hereby authorized and empowered to proceed without delay to construct the same, or cause the same to be constructed, as provided by said act No. 147 of 1902. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.



City Council Proceedings.

         Lafayette, La., Oct. 5, 1903.
  Regular meeting of the City Council was held this day, Mayor Chas. D. Caffery presiding.

 Members present: J. O. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, H. L. Fontenot, M. Rosenfield, F. Demanade, G. A. DeBlanc, D. V. Gardebled.

 Minutes of previous meeting approved as read.

 Chairman of W. & L. commission reported having received invoice for pumps and everything was in readiness for same on its arrival.

 The treasurer's and Mayor's report was accepted as follows:

 -------------------p. 4-------------

 Mr. A. J. LeBlanc representing the fire department asked that free lights and license be furnished the department for the purpose of a street fair to be held in December for the benefit of the department.

 Moved and duly seconded that a committee of three be appointed to contract for street fair to be composed of the Mayor and two others, who are authorized to contract and execute with a representative of the U. S. Carnival Co., also the manner in which said Carnival shall be conducted, it being understood that said exhibition is to be given for the benefit of the fire department of this town and that the share of the department in the proceeds shall be not less than 25 per cent of all receipts and that said committee is also authorized to appoint a committee of six, two from each Company who shall have full charge of all matters relative to said show, so far as the department is concerned. Motion carried.

 Committee appointed by Mayor, Dr. F. E. Girard, F. V. Mouton.

 The following communication was received and ordered spread on minutes.
         Lafayette, La., Sept. 12, 1903.
  Hon. C. D. Caffery Mayor of Lafayette, Lafayette, La. - Dear Sir:  This is to advise yourself and the City Council of Lafayette that the recent ordinance lately adopted by that body ordering an assessment of only two thirds of the actual costs of paving certain side walks of the town against the property owners abutting on the side walk, instead of assessing the whole costs of said side walks, as fixed by the Legislature in whom this power is exclusively vested, is considered illegal in so far as it attempts to charge the property benefited with only two-thirds of the benefit received, and to charge the other third to other property owners, who under the law, as above stated, in the contemplation of the Legislature, receive no benefit;  and unless the ordinance is amended so as to conform to the law by charging the abutting owners all the costs, judicial proceedings will be instituted to prevent the consummation of any contract to carry it out. Desiring, however, to avoid unnecessary litigation, suggest that this question be examined by yourself and the council, to the end that litigation be avoided, if my view are concurred in.
     Yours Respectfully,
               ORTHER C. MOUTON.
  Whereupon the City Council having considered above notice and finding that they are without authority in law to pay any portion of said walks, adopted the following ordinance:

 AN ORDINANCE RELATIVE TO SIDEWALKS IN THE TOWN OF LAFAYETTE, LA.

 Section I.  Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, La., that in the exercise of the powers conferred upon it by Act No. 147 of the acts of the Legislature of this state, of the year 1902, this Council shall hereafter whenever the public interest requires it, pave, plank, gravel, mechanize or otherwise improve the the sidewalks, curbing, or any part thereof, within the corporation limits of said town, and shall levy and collect special taxes or local assessment on real estate abutting the sidewalk or curbing to be improved, for the defraying the thereof.

 Section II.  Be it ordained that whenever the City Council shall decide to pave or improve any side walks or curbing in said town, it shall pass an ordinance calling for bids for the work, of which ten days notice shall be given in the newspapers published in this town, and shall let the contract to the lowest responsible bidder who can give satisfactory security; and after the contract had been awarded, the Council shall provide by ordinance, for an assessment of all real estate abutting the sidewalk, curbing or portion thereof to be paved or improved; provided that in case no satisfactory bid is received, then, and in that event, the said City Council, and the cost thereof shall be assessed against the property abutting said sidewalks or portion thereof.

 Section III.  Be it further ordained that as provided by said act of the Legislature, the owners of real estate abutting said sidewalk or curbing, shall pay the entire cost of said work, or the basis of the respective frontage of said property abutting the same.

 Section IV.  Be it further ordained that the sum assessed against the real estate shall be due and collectible within ten days after the completion of the work and its acceptance by the City Council, and if not paid within ten days the City Council shall have the power to proceed by suit against the said owners and against the said real estate to collect the delinquent assessment; and the said municipality shall have a special privilege on said property or properties to secure the payment of the same assessed against it, with six per cent per annum interest thereon from the expiration of said ten days until paid, when lien shall be the first privilege over all other claims except taxes, said privilege shall effect third persons from the date of the registry of the assessment in the Mortgage Book of the parish of Lafayette, provided that the City Council instead of enforcing the said assessment as above fixed, upon the payment in cash by the property owner of twenty per cent of the amount due by said property owner, may in their discretion authorize the Mayor to sign and issue certificates showing the amounts respectively due by persons and properties on said sidewalks or curbing so paved or improved, which shall be payable in one, two, three, four and five years, or sooner, at the option of the owner of the property, with six per cent per annum, interest payable annually; which said certificates (with a copy of same recorded with the assessment as aforesaid) duly paragraphed as being duly recorded by the Recorder of Mortgages, shall be secured by the first privilege on the property prior to all other charges except taxes, and may be transferred carrying the lien and privilege of the transferred at their face value to the contractor in payment of the work and paving done on said sidewalks or curbing or portion thereof; provided that where the work is done by the City Council the said certificates may be transferred to other persons and shall enjoy the lien and privilege aforesaid.

 Section V.  Be it further ordained that this ordinance shall take effect at once.
Yeas: J. O. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, D. V. Gardebled, H. L. Fontenot, G. A. DeBlanc, F. Demanade.

 Moved by D. V. Gardebled, seconded H. L. Fontenot, that cement pavement walks be made on both sides of the street along the route outlined in the ordinance.
  Yeas: H. L. Fontenot, D. V. Gardebled.  Nays:  J. O. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, M. Rosenfield, G. A. DeBlanc, F. Demanade.  Motion lost.

 The following ordinance was also unanimously adopted:

 Section 1.  Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, La., that under and by the virtue of an ordinance this day adopted, entitled "An ordinance relative sidewalks in the town of Lafayette, La.," and in accordance with the provisions of Act No. 147 of the acts of the Legislature of this state of the year 1902, and considering that the public interest requires it, that a cement walk, six feet in width, and the necessary curbing thereto, and otherwise according to specifications in possession of the street committee of this Council, be built the following points and along the route, to-wit:

 Starting on Grant Avenue at the centre line of the Crescent News Hotel, thence along the West side of said Grant Avenue to Lincoln Avenue thence along the South side of Lincoln Avenue to Pierce street, thence along the Southeastern side of Pierce street to Jefferson street, thence along the East side of Jefferson street to Vermilion street, thence along the South side of Vermilion street to Lafayette street, thence along the East side of Lafayette street to North Main street.

 Starting again at the corner of Lee Avenue and Vermilion street on the North side of Vermilion street and running thence to St. John street, thence along the East side of St. John street to Main street.

 Section II.  Be it further ordained that a plank walk of six feet in width, wherever possible, and of such lessor width as may be necessary to conform to the width of the sidewalk, and otherwise according to specifications in possession of the street committee, be built between the following points to wit:

 1. From the corner of Vermilion street and Lee Avenue on East side of Lee Avenue, then East side Oak street and West side Grant Avenue to Crescent News Hotel.

 2.  From Vermilion street to Main, on West side Johnston street:

 3.  From Lafayette street, (near Convent) going on North side of Convent street to St. John street, and thence on West of St. John to Catholic church square.

 4.  From corner of Grand Avenue and Lincoln Avenue, on East of Railroad, running on North of Lincoln Avenue to Chestnut street:

 Section III.  Be it further ordained that public notice be given for ten days of this ordinance, moreover, calling for bids to do said work, which bids may include both the said cement and plank walks, or for either, and that the contract for said work shall be let go to the lowest responsible bidder who shall give satisfactory security to the street committee in a sum to be determined by them for the faithful compliance of the contract and the completion of said work.

 Section IV.  Be it further ordained that the entire cost of said walks shall be paid by the owners of the real estate abutting the same on the faces of the respective frontage of the property on said side walk, which amounts shall be due and collectible within ten days after the completion of the work and its acceptance by the City Council of this town, and if not paid within ten days, the Council shall proceed by suit against the said owners and said real estate, to collect said delinquent assessment, and or the payment of said sum so assessed, this Council shall have a special privilege on said properties, with six per cent annum interest thereon, from the expiration of said ten days until paid, which lien shall be the first privilege over all the other claims except taxes, and shall effect third persons, from the date of the registry of the assessment in the Mortgage Book of the parish of Lafayette.

 Section V.  Be it further ordained that the street committee of this Council may, and they are hereby authorized, in their discretion, to accept said work or any part thereof, by sections of one or more blocks.

 VI.  Be it further ordained that in case no satisfactory bid is received for the construction of said cement walks or of said plank walks, then, that said street committee is hereby authorized and empowered to proceed without delay to construct the same, or cause the same to be constructed, as provided by said Act No. 147 of 1902.

 Moved by A. E. Mouton, duly seconded, that the sum of thirty dollars be paid Mrs. Huff for fraction of a piece of ground lying outside of her fence at southwest corner thereof. Motion carried.

 Be it ordained that the regular tax to meet the current expenses for the year 1903, be levied and fixed at 7 1/2 mills on the dollar on the assessed valuation of property in this town, as shown by the assessment roll for the year 1903. Adopted.
CHAD. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.




 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 10/21/1903.

 Jerome Mouton returned from New Orleans Saturday, having spent a couple of days there. 

 School Children to Take Part. - At the big educational rally to be held at the court house next Saturday, choruses of children from the High School and Primary school will sing.

 Ping Pong, the best game out, sets $1.00 to $4.50 at Lafayette Drug Store.

 Mrs. Crow Girard returned home Saturday from New Orleans, where she has been spending some time with her mother.

 W. S. Torian made a business trip to Abbeville.

 Richard Alexander, who has been engaged in merchandising here for nearly a year, has closed out his business, and accepted a splendid offer in Patterson. We regret to lose Mr. Alexander, and wish him success in his new home.

 W. C. McClellan, organizer for the Benovolent Knights of America of the Supreme Lodge of Meridian, Miss., is in the city with the purpose of organizing a lodge here.

 Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Snodgrass and little daughter, who have been spending two months most pleasantly visiting relatives and friends in Arkansas and Iowa returned Sunday.

 Mrs. J. J. Davidson went to New Orleans Thursday to spend a few days with her mother, Mrs. E. R. Kennedy.

 Mrs. Tom Torian and children and Miss Daisy Louvre, after spending ten days with Mr. Wm. Torian's family, returned home Saturday.

 A nice fish for Friday or some good oysters. Ring John Bunt up and he will supply you.

 W. S. Torian made a business trip during the week to Abbeville.

 Mrs. J. G. Parkerson sustained quite a bad fall Monday evening, causing a painful, though fortunately not serious injuries. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903.













  
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 From the Lafayette Gazette of October 21st, 1899:

IMPORTANT ARRESTS.
Hammy Hankins, a Young White Man, and Three Negroes Arrested on Charges of Burglary.

 Through the well-directed efforts of Sheriff Ike Broussard and Marshal Peck, four men, one a young white man, and the other negroes, have been put behind the bars on charges of burglary. The people of Lafayette will remember the burglaries that have been committed in this town during the past year, and it was with a feeling of relief that they heard of the arrest of the suspected persons. For a long time it seemed that officers of the law and citizens were successfully defied by the criminals.

 The persons incarcerated are Hammy Hankins, white, Louis Daizan, alias Indian Ben. Jim Bailey, and Albert Raymond, negroes.

 Daizan was arrested by Sheriff Broussard on a charge of horse stealing, and being a bad character, was closely questioned by that officer. He confessed to have been implicated in some petty thefts and finally admitted that he had helped to burglarize the homes of several of our citizens. He said Jim Bailey was in the gang of robbers and also implicated Hammy Hankins, who, according to the confessions of this negro and Jim, appears to have been the leader.

 Jim made a confession corroborating in all particulars that of Daizan. Neither knew of the arrest of the other at the time of his arrest, and both implicated Hankins.

 Raymond was arrested somewhat later, and will not talk.

 Hankins protests his innocence and says he does not know any of the negroes. Hankins is originally from New Iberia, but has been living here for about two years. His family resides in that town and have taken measures to give him legal counsel.

 Among other places, Jim and Dauzin confess to have entered the homes of Judge Debaillon, Assessor Martin, Dr. F. E. Girard, Messrs. A. B. Denbo, C. D. Caffery and T. M. Biossat.

 Jim and Daizan say that at Mr. Denbo's residence Hankins stood near the window outside, pistol in hand, ready to use it case of necessity. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.


New Artesian Well.

 The City Council committee composed of Messrs. Geo. DeBlanc, J. O. Mouton and C. O. Mouton, has contracted with the Andrews Artesian Well Co., of New Orleans, for sinking a new well for the electric light and waterworks plant. This was necessitated by the condition of the two wells now in use. The new well will be 200 feet deep.
Lafayette Gazette 8/21/1899. 


 ANOTHER LETTER FROM MR. GIRARD.

 To the Editor of The Lafayette Gazette.

 Dear Sir - I beg the privilege of a few lines to tell you of the political sin with which we charge you. We charge you with supporting the ring and combine against the people, of lending the powerful influence of the press to an effort to stifle the voice of the people, and being wholly undemocratic in advocating the return of an officer for the fourth consecutive term of office. And believing this we thought that you ought not to participate in our private counsels or caucuses.

 We should have been glad to have the N. O. Times-Democrat reporter, but thought we had to draw the line on the editor of The Gazette.

 I am reported as having said "that the committee has no right to place any restriction or qualification upon voters." That is only partially correct, and conveys a very different meaning from what I said. I said that the committee had no right to place such restriction and qualifications upon voters as would disfranchise white voters and tax-payers of the parish. That all white men who demanded admission to the Democratic party and pledged themselves to support the nominees have the right to participate in the primary election.

 There is no law providing elections for the selection of candidates and the attempt of the powers that be to shelter themselves behind a ridiculous and senseless article of the constitution is perfectly plain.

 I believe Mr. Editor for once you are wrong. I believe that rotation in office is good Democratic doctrine. I believe in the government of the people, for the people, by the people and will oppose the government of the people, for the ring, by the boss.

 By the way, Mr. Editor, may I ask under what law or by what authority the registration office has been opened?

 Thanking you for the use of your valuable space, I beg to remain
         Very respectfully,
               CROW GIRARD.

 Gazette replies....

 We think it comes with bad grace of Mr. Girard to charge us with being a ringster. Was he not himself allied to the old bull ring and did he not stick to it to the last? In a speech the other day he sang the virtues of that ring showing by his words, that though dead for years, his sympathies are still with it. At this very time he is moving heaven and earth to organize a ring of his own, and we submit that he is not the proper person to denounce rings. If he is a candidate for district attorney, as he is said to be, it is hardly probable that he will run by himself. He will make combines just like other people who are in politics. We don't think it is a great crime, but he should not find so reprehensible in others what he himself his guilty of.

 Mr. Girard says one of the reasons why a representative of this paper was denied admission into what he calls a "private caucus" is that we are supporting a parish officer for a fourth term. The meeting of which he speaks was not a "private caucus." A number of persons notoriously antagonistic to the the movement were there and there was present the representative of a newspaper which is not in sympathy with the purpose of the meeting. There was nothing private about it. There was no desire on our part to "participate" in anything. We wanted to be there as a reporter and did not think that there would be any objection on the part of men who proclaim such profound faith in the people and pretend to detest bossism.

 It strike us that if Mr. Girard wanted to exclude everybody who was not in favor of rotation in office he should not have been there. Did he not support Gov. McEnery for a third term in 1888 and again in 1892? The office of governor wields great influence and by reason of its vast appointive power may control the destinies of s State, but if there is any danger to the liberties of the people in allowing a man to hold a parochial office three or four terms it must certainly require the vision of an extraordinary patriot to see it. Mr. Girard considers it an undemocratic and unpardonable sin for us to support a parish officer for a fourth term, but says nothing about his support of a municipal officer for nearly a quarter of a century. It is therefore clearly shown that our want of opposition to Mr. Girard's idea of rotation had nothing to do with it. It is plain to us that Mr. Girard wants rotation for his opponents only.

 Mr. Girard tells us that he did not say that the executive committee "has no right to place any restriction or qualification upon voters," that he did say "that the committee had no right to place such restriction or qualifications upon voters as would disfranchise white voters and tax-payers." We confess that we are no hair-splitter and care not to argue on the difference between tweedledee and tweedledum.

 Mr. Girard professes an abiding faith in the people. So do we and so does every other Democrat, but it is bootless for men to proclaim their faith in the people every time election time comes around. We need lose no sleep about the liberty and rights of the people. They are fully able to take care of themselves. Caucuses may be held, machines may be built, rings and combines may be formed, but without endorsement of the people they will be bursted into more pieces than was Montejo's fleet.

 Mr. Girard expresses confidence in the executive committee, but says that influences are at work to induce it into wrong. The Gazette reposes absolute trust in the integrity and intelligence of the members of that body, and unlike Mr. Girard, we do not think they are the kind of men to be misled. If Mr. Girard knows that strong efforts are being made to induce them into error, he should come out with the facts. He should not permit such things to take place without raising his voice against them and exposing those who are responsible for them. That, it seems to us, would be the proper course for him to follow.

 Mr. Girard desires us to tell him under the what law or what authority the registration office has been opened. We will refer the question back to him. He is a lawyer and it would be as grotesquely inappropriate for us to quote the law to him as it is for him to attempt to lecture us on principle of rotation in office.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.




ABOLISH IT.

 The Gazette believes that the present quarantine affords very little, if any, protection and causes a great deal of unnecessary annoyance to the people. It certainly does not keep anyone from coming to this place, as it is safe to sat that persons from New Orleans can be found on our streets almost every day of the week. Passengers from neighboring towns - Opelousas, Carencro, Rayne, Crowley, Broussard - cannot buy tickets to this place without presenting health certificates to the railroad agents, but anyone can buy a ticket at New Orleans to New Iberia and travel from the latter place to Lafayette by team. Or if he should prefer it, he can buy a ticket at New Orleans to Opelousas or Rayne and when the train reaches here there is nothing to prevent him from stopping and redeeming the unused part of the ticket.

 A citizen of Lafayette who was at New Iberia the other day could not buy a ticket to come home because he had no certificate, and had recourse to a drummer who bought the ticket for him. The drummer used his certificate. Three residents of New Orleans were called here on business a few days ago. They procured fare to Breaux Bridge and drove from there here. A lady and a gentleman who wanted to come home from Opelousas did not care to pay 50 cents each for certificates and secured fare to Duchamp, but stopped here and got their money back for the unused portions of their tickets. We could cite many more instances to show that the present quarantine does not protect, but is is a nuisance pure and simple.

 The Gazette is pleased to learn that the parish board has raised the quarantine. Let the town do likewise.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.



Board of Health.

         Lafayette, La., Oct. 18, 1899.
  The Parish Board of Health met this day in special session with the following members present:  Drs. Geo. DeLaureal, R. O. Young, H. D. Guidry, U. Prejean and Messrs. L. G. Breaux, J. O. Broussard and D. A. Cochrane. Absent: Jasper Spell.

 President DeLaureal stated he had called the Board in special session at the request of several members to consider the advisability of removing all quarantine restrictions against New Orleans. By virtue of the powers conferred by the Board and after informal discussion with several members the president had requested Superintendent Owens of the Southern Pacific not to sell tickets to any point in Lafayette parish unless the purchasers held proper health certificates. Guards had also been placed at Broussard and Scott but have since been removed.

 By motion of Dr. Young seconded by Mr. Broussard all quarantine restrictions were abolished and Lafayette parish declared open to the world. Ayes: Young, Broussard. Cochrane.  Nays: Guidry. Not voting: Breaux and Prejean.

 There being no further business the Board adjourned.
GEO. DeLAUREAL, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.


THAT "ONE MAN POWER."

 "All white men of the parish opposed to the present local administration are invited" to meet at Pilette to-day "and help to nominate a ticket that will forever destroy "ONE MAN" power in Lafayette parish."

 The foregoing words for a part of an ominously yellow dodger which was posted up in various places throughout the parish. We suppose it is the confession of faith of the reformation. It is to be the war cry of those who tell us that the "one man power" must be destroyed.  As the Gazette does not know of the existence of such an anomaly it fails to see what is doomed to destruction. If there ever was any "one man power" in this parish it has long ago ceased to exist. If it exists now, it exists only in the minds of men who are making war upon wind-mills. Serious folk will not likely engage in so Quixotic an undertaking. It may suit the purpose of ambitious men to use so trite an expression as "one man power," but what Judge Clegg aptly terms the "tyranny of phrase" has been thrown off by the reasoning mind. The gentlemen who are leading the movement will never bamboozle the people by such senseless twaddle, and the most verdant tyro in kindergarten politics knows better.

 But it matters not. "One man power" is the title of the song which will be sung at Pilette to-day. The spell-binders will tell about it. The mocking birds will warble it. The bull frogs will add to it their joyous refrain and the dulcet symphonies of the distant cow-bell, the bobolink and the lark will be blended with the expiring echoes resounding in one glorious acclaim over the green, undulating plains of Pilette which bid fair to remain forever the citadel of straight Democracy. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.


JUDGE DEBAILLON COMPLIMENTED.

 Before bringing its labors to a close the Grand Jury recently impaneled in Vermilion paid Judge Debaillon a very handsome compliment. No district judge in the State has had more business before his court and no one could have disposed of that business more speedily and correctly than has Judge Debaillon. As is well known the judge is thoroughly versed in criminal and civil law and being what may be termed a "hustler" he has succeeded in keeping the docket of his court free from any accumulation of business. The Gazette is pleased to note that the people of Vermilion have appreciated his efforts toward an efficient and wholesome administration of justice. The grand jury says at the conclusion of its report:

 "We have been greatly assisted in the performance of our labors by the able and instructive charge administered to us by your honor, and have attempted as far as lay in our power to comply with the same in both its spirit and letter. In view of the fact that your honor will not be among us as our presiding judge after the April election and in view of the fact that in all probability no other Grand Jury will form a part of the court before the change in our judicial district, we feel that we would be unmindful and ungrateful if we failed to commend your honor for your uniform fairness and justice with which your actions have been guided as the presiding judge of this court of the parish of Vermilion. We will lose an upright and impartial judge who has ever been mindful of the welfare of the people.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.



City Council Proceedings.

          Lafayette, La., Oct. 17, 1899.
  Pursuant to a call the City Council held a special meeting with the following members present:  Mayor Wm. Campbell, F. Demanade, J. O. Mouton, C. O. Mouton, F. E. Girard, Geo. DeBlanc. Absent: H. Hohorst, J. E. Martin.

 The object of this meeting was for the purpose of devising ways to furnish the E. L. and W. W. with water.

 Moved by Geo. DeBlanc, seconded by F. E. Girard, that a committee be appointed to confer with Mr. Ben Andrews Artesian Well Co., of New Orleans, La. Motion carried.

 The mayor appointed the W. W. and E. L. committee and gave them full power to act on the proposition of Mr. Andrews to have a well dug at plant.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
WM. CAMPBELL, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.

TAX ORDINANCE
To Acquire Industrial School.

 AN ORDINANCE to levy and collect a special tax of two mills on the dollar of the assessed value of property in the corporation limits of the town of Lafayette, La., annually for a period of ten years, beginning with the year 1900 and ending with the year 1909, to secure the location in the parish of Lafayette, La., of the State Industrial Institute provided for by Act No. 162 of the Acts of the Legislature of this State of the year 1898; the title of said Institute to be in the public and said special tax when collected, shall be used for the benefit of said Industrial Institute to be located in the parish of Lafayette, La. All in accordance with the petition of the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette, and the election thereon, under the provisions of Act. 232 of the constitution and Act No. 131 of the Acts of the Legislature of 1898. Whereas, upon a petition signed by more than one-third of the property tax-payers of the town of Lafayette, La., and therefore, presented to this body, an election was ordered to take the sense of the property tax-payers of said town on the proposition to assess, levy and collect a special tax of two mills on the dollar of the assessed value of property in said town of Lafayette, La., annually for a period of ten years, beginning with the year 1900 and ending with the year 1909, to secure the location in the parish of Lafayette, La., of the State Industrial Institute, provided for by Act 162 of the Acts of the Legislature of 1898, and whereas an ordinance was adopted ordering said election, in accordance with the terms of said petition and the same then published for thirty days, and said election duly held according to law, and a majority of the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette, La., entitled to vote under the general election laws of the State, in numbers and in value, having voted in favor of said tax of two mill for ten years. Therefore

  SECTION I. -   Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, La., that a special tax of two mills on the dollar of the assessed value of all property in the said town of Lafayette, La., annually for ten years, beginning with the year 1900 and ending with the year 1909, be and is hereby assessed, levied and shall be collected for the purpose of securing the location in the parish of Lafayette, La., of the Industrial Institute, provided by Act No. 162 of the Acts of the Legislature of the State for the year 1898.

 SECTION II. - Be it further ordained, etc., That said special tax of two mills shall be extended annually for the period hereinabove provided, on the assessment roll of said town at the same time that the general tax is extended and shall be collected within the same time and in the same manner as the general tax is or may be collected.

 SECTION III. - Be it further ordained, etc., That in the event said State Industrial Institute, provided for by Act No. 162 of the Legislature of 1898, be located in the parish of Lafayette, La., the said special tax of two mills shall be duly collected and shall be subject to the order of, and paid to, the proper authorities of the State of Louisiana as may be provided by law, and shall be used for the benefit of said Industrial Institute, so located in the parish of Lafayette, La., to be known as the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute.

 SECTION IV. - Be it further ordained, That in the event said Industrial Institute is not located in the parish of Lafayette, La., then this ordinance shall be without effect.

 SECTION V. - Be it further ordained, That this ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage.
WM. CAMPBELL, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.




  

  
   


 

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of October 21st, 1893:


THE SHERIFFS IN SESSION.

 Twenty Sheriffs Present In Person and by Proxy.

 At four o'clock on Saturday evening at the Court House in this town, the Meeting of Sheriffs of the State, was called to order by Sheriff Broussard of this parish. As is well known the meeting was held under the recent call published over the signatures of Sheriffs Broussard and Cade suggesting a permanent organization of Sheriffs for mutual assistance in the performance of their duties especially in the administration of the criminal laws.

 Sheriff Broussard opened the meeting by calling Sheriff Cade to the chair. Sheriff Mauberret of New Orleans was then elected secretary and a call of the roll showed the following Sheriffs present in person: L. H. Huson, De Soto; D. T. Stafford, Rapides; J. W. Connolly; Sabine; J. T. McClellan, Madison; I. A. Broussard, Lafayette; C. T. Cade, Iberia; E. L. Daniels, Union; Remy Klock, Orleans; E. W. Lyons, Acadia; A. W. Connelly, Terrebone; Victor Mauberret, Orleans; A. L. LeBlanc, Vermilion; J. G. Harper, Cameron; David Rees, St. Martin; A. G. Frere, St. Mary.

 The following were represented by proxy:  D. J. Reid, Calcasieu; J. W. Dunn, _____; E. C. Nunez, St. Bernard; C. D. Kemp, Grant; Isaac Garrett, Quanchita; John Weber, St. John; T. S. Fontenot, St. Landry; Lee Me Alvin, Vernon; and others.

 Mr. Julian Mouton of the local bar here addressed the meeting, tendering the Sheriffs a cordial welcome and commending the purpose of their meeting, which they request, he explained at some length.

 On motion of Sheriff McClellan, a committee on constitution and by laws was appointed as follows:  McClellan, Frere, J. W. and A. W. Connelly, Stafford, Huson, Rees, Klock and Mauberrett.

 A recess was then taken in order to allow the committee time to do its work, and at 8:30 o'clock when the meeting was again called to order they submitted for consideration the constitution and by-laws of the Texas Sheriffs which with immaterial amendments were adopted. The following are some of the principal provisions. An initiation fee of five dollars and annual dues of ten dollars are provided. Each member is to contribute five dollars to say one who may kill or wound a member while is the discharge of duty, etc. etc.

 The constitution has been published at length in the Times-Democrat.

 Messrs. Cade and Mauberrett were then elected permanent President and Secretary respectively and the other officers were then chosen as follows:
I. A. BROUSSARD, Treasurer.
A. W. CONNELLY, Sergeant at Arms.

 The Treasurer is required to furnish a bond of $250 to insure the faithful performance of his duties.

 The next meeting of the association will be held in New Orleans on January 15th, next, - at which time no doubt every parish in the State will be represented.

 After finishing up their work the Sheriffs repaired to the Rigues Hotel and sat down to a supper which has been well prepared, and was elegantly served. This little refreshment of the inner man was we understand a compliment tendered the Sheriffs by a number of citizens, the management of which was left to Sheriff Broussard, to the complete success of which we desire to testify in person.

 Among others who sat down with visitors was our worthy District Judge A. C. Allen, who responding to a call from the Sheriff, spoke in very appropriate and eloquent terms on the part the sheriff plays in our political economy. The supper seemed to be enjoyed by every one.

 On Sunday morning just before the peep 'o day, the sheriffs and a few friends besides, "one of whom we were which", availing themselves of the kindness and liberality of the Southern Pacific officials boarded the train, bound for the Salt mine, and at New Iberia were met by Gen. F. F. Myles, well known here, of Myles & Co. of New Orleans, lessees of the mines.

 Gen. Myles took the party in charge and with them boarded a train on the Salt Mine Branch and soon they were speeding to "Avery Island", one of the most attractive and picturesque bits of earth to be found on this Western Hemisphere. It has been often described by graceful writers and in no sense have they ever overdrawn the unique character of its beauty and originality. It really resembles a beautiful and stately mountain.

 Arriving on the Island we were shortly brought to the shaft, or more correctly speaking, one of the shafts, and lowered some 160 feet into the earth and there saw that most wonderful deposit of salt which has puzzled so many geologists and scientific men. Colored lights were turned on to the rock-like-salt, down in the mine, with weird, but pleasing effect. A trip to the island and down into the mine is certainly an event not to be missed by any one who has the opportunity of going there. Individually, we consider it a trip well worth taking. After viewing the mine pretty thoroughly the party returned to New Iberia and at ten o'clock set down to a fine breakfast at the Alma House. And from there they dispersed.

 Going back to our starting point, we desire to say we hope this will not be the last meeting of the Sheriffs at Lafayette. We are glad they came, and hope they will come again. The people of this town are ever ready to extend cordial and fitting welcome to visitors and we trust the sheriff's have gone back home in such condition of mind that they will not gainsay this remark.

 The sheriffs requested us to tender their thanks to the officials of the Southern Pacific Company for their distinguished courtesy and kindness in affording them the opportunity to visit the salt mine, as they did.

 The Advertiser desires to extend its acknowledgments to Sheriff Broussard for courtesies shown in connection with the recent meeting of Sheriffs and their trip to New Iberia, and to express the hope that the movement so well started by himself and Sheriff Cade will result in a permanent and useful organization of all the Sheriffs of the State. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.



Police Report.
Month of Sept. 1893.

Sept. 1st  James Broks: drunk, disturbing the peace and suspicious character,  5 days jail; Jos. Black and Chas. Milligan, vagrant and suspicious character, 5 days jail.

 Sept. 9 Liza and Mary Victor, nuisance and disturbing the peace, 5 days or $10; Joe Alparado, fighting and disturbing the peace, $2.50 or 5 days.

 Sept. 12. Harry Burels, Eugene Jurner and Thos. Bathurs, vagrants, ordered out of town.

 Sept. 15 Chas. Walthous and Sam Fills, suspicious character, ordered out of town; Chas. Hill, vagrant, ordered out of town; John Starvey, vagrant, ordered out of town; Victor Sarott, nuisance, ordered out of town.

 Sept. 26. Albert Belanni, disturbing the peace $2.00 or 5 days; Loumas Jones, disturbing the peace, $2.00 or 5 days jail; Gaston Labbe and John Taylor, racing on the street, each $5.00.

 Sept. 28 S. T. Walker, T. Jamison and Martin Wartominic, suspicious character, 10 days; Rufus Parks, suspicious character 10 days.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.



Jail Labor.

 The jail labor of the corporation has been doing most excellent work on the streets under the direction of town Marshall Vigneaux and his deputies. This is a splendid method of turning to good account, the cost of boarding and lodging tramps, vagrants and other violators of the law. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.



Attempted to Harm His Family.

 Last Saturday morning considerable of a local sensation was created by the attempt of William D. Huff, a well known resident here, to do bodily injury to members of his family. The circumstances as we learn them are that Huff tried to shoot his wife, and his sister who was present came to her rescue, and threw her arms around him, she being behind him. Huff then turned his gun, which was an ordinary shot gun of which the barrel had been sawed about half off, and endeavored to shoot the latter. He succeeded in firing the gun but came nearer killing himself than any one else on the crown of his hat and was pretty badly damaged. The cause of the trouble is said to be domestic unhappiness.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.

    


Burglaries in Broussardville.

 Our sister town Broussardville was the scene of several burglaries last Saturday night. The home of Dr. F. C. Latiolais was entered and the doctor relieved of a gold watch. Also, $25.00 in cash was stolen from a Mr. Collins. Unsuccessful attempts were likewise made to burglarize the homes of Messrs. M. Billeaud and Aled. Billeaud. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


Chief Attraction.

 W. H. Harris Nickel-Plate Show formed the chief attraction of the town on the 18th instant. Both, the day and night performances were witnessed by fairly large audiences. The exhibitions were good and were well worth the price of admission, fifty cents. Through the good offices of Rev. J. P. Healy the pupils of Mt. Carmel Convent and other schools of the town were admitted to the show under a half rate. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


Grand Bazaar at Breaux Bridge.

 Residents of Lafayette who would like to enjoy a day out could not do better than to attend the grand bazaar at Breaux Bridge, to-morrow. Many attractions will be presented to cause time to pass away pleasantly and the entertainment is given for a good object, the public school Breaux Bridge, which is under the management of the good sisters of the order of Perpetual Adoration. A most cordial welcome awaits all who may attend. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


To Work the Roads.

 We have been informed that to-day a large force of men would contribute twelve hours work on the road leading from Breaux Bridge to this town, and we sincerely hope that the work they will accomplish may be of a practical and substantial character. It will be remembered that The Advertiser has been strongly and incessantly advocating the construction and maintenance of a good dirt road between Lafayette and Breaux Bridge, and, in testimony of our earnestness regarding the matter, we submitted not long since, a plan that we believed would accomplish the end desired. From the fact that the citizens of Breaux Bridge did not act on the suggestion then presented for their consideration, and the further fact that in the present instance of working their end of the road after the manner described above, one day's gratuitous labor from all willing persons - without soliciting aid from Lafayette, we conclude that they feel capable of coping with as much of this route as is contained in St. Martin parish, independent of outside assistance. Be that as it may, Lafayette has shown a disposition to do her full part in the premises, and will continue to hold itself in readiness to render what assistance it can in the matter, if the occasion should arise. Let the two towns that are to be equally benefited by this relationship vie with each other for an early accomplishment of the end in view. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.

Jail Labor Utilized.

 The jail labor of the corporation has been doing most excellent work on the streets under the direction of town Marshall Vigneaux and his deputies. This is a splendid method of turning to good account, the cost of boarding and lodging tramps, vagrants and other violators of the law. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.

       

Advertiser's French Department.

 That the addition of a french department to The Advertiser has been appreciated by those for whom this feature was intended, is fully attested by the large enrollment of their names on the subscription list of the paper. We specially call the attention of advertisers to the fact that they may utilize with much profit to themselves, the french columns of The Advertiser. Our charges for space will not be in excess of the value of the services rendered. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.





Pay Car Rolls In.

 The Southern Pacific pay-car was a most welcome visitor on the 18th instant. Although over two months' wages were due the employees, the Company paid but one. The men appear to be satisfied, however, on the principle that "half a loaf is better than no bread." Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


 Free Sugar Cane at Fair. 

 One day last week a whole carload of sugar cane was dumped in Louisiana state building at the Fair, for gratuitous distribution and proved a highly enjoyable treat to several thousand people who became the recipients of it, a majority of whom saw and tasted sugar cane for the first time in their lives. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


Burglaries at Broussardville.

 Our sister town Broussardville was the scene of several burglaries last Saturday night. The home of Dr. F. C. Latiolais was entered and the doctor relieved of a gold watch. Also $25.00 in cash was stolen from a Mr. Collins. Unsuccessful attempts were likewise made to burglarize the homes of Messrs. M. Billeaud and Alex Billeaud.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.  



GIRARD - SINGLETON.

 The marriage of Miss Leila Singleton to Dr. P. M. Girard was solemnized last Tuesday at the M. E. Church of this place, by Rev. John A. Miller. The wedding hour was 12 o'clock p. m., and long before that time their many friends has assembled to witness the ceremony. The interior of the church was tastefully decorated with moss, evergreens and natural flowers that added charm to the impressiveness and solemnity of the occasion. The design was a large horse shoe neatly executed in evergreens and natural roses, and encircling the initials G-S of the contracting parties, the de-shoe being gracefully suspended to streamers of evergreens. To the sweet strains of the wedding march rendered by Miss Alix Judice, the bridal party approached the altar and took a position directly underneath the horse-shoe that was the omen of "good luck" intended to follow every footstep of the happy couple throughout their wedded life, and the picture here presented was most lovely and impressive. After the ceremony the groom and bride received the warm congratulations of relatives and personal friends who were present, and them proceeded to the home of Mrs. P. D. Beraud, Dr. Girard's sister. A bridal tour having the World's Fair for an objective point, had to be abandoned at the last moment, to the great disappointment of all concerned, on account of the serious ill health of the groom. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


CREOLE
Correctly Defined.
A Lafayette Episode.

 The theater goers of Lafayette has been prepared for an evening of much enjoyment, by the declaration made in the columns of The Gazette that "Manager Falk has made a ten-strike in securing for the opening of the season Sam T. Jack's famous Creole Burlesque Company, the only one of its kind in existence, and which will appear on the 19th, etc. This announcement coupled to another statement made by our local contemporary that "Sam T. Jack's 50 Creole Beauties will give one of their fine entertainments at Falk's Opera House next Thursday. This company don't play small towns, and the only reason that the stop over in Lafayette is to fill up a week made in making the circuit" was calculated to give the Creole beauties flattering introduction to our people. The two statements quoted being made under a misapprehension of facts, be it understood.

 The bright anticipations of the promised surprise might have been realize but for the fact that developed 36 hours before the appointed time, that the Sam T. Jack Company was composed mostly of negro females. This discovery soon assumed a serious aspect, and in about sixty minutes presented a most formidable obstacle to the presentation of the pseudo-Creole beauties to the residents of this community, as appears from the following preamble and resolution adopted by our citizens:

 In view of the fact that Sam T. Jack's Belle Creole Company is advertised to play here to-morrow night (19th); be it Resolved, That we regard the negro females composing said company and parading themselves as Creole beauties to be as infamous slur on the fair name of the people of the State of Louisiana, and firmly protest against the wanton and insulting exhibitions of that company.
(Signed) Wm. Campbell, Julian Mouton, C. Debaillon, F. R. Tolson, N. P. Moss, Crow Girard, C. A. Thomas, Alfred Hebert.

 Mr. B. Falk, in deference to the sentiment of the people, promptly wired the Sam T. Jack Co. at Opelousas, that he would not permit them to use his opera house, and that the citizens objected to the company playing in Lafayette at all. This information did not deter the troops from coming to town and proceeding as far as the opera house with the avowed intention of compelling Manager Falk to allow them the use of his stage in conformity with their contract, or subject him to damages. Mr. Falk was firm in his determination, however, and notified them definitely they could not occupy his premises, and announced himself prepared to meet any demand made on him as to the company's legal rights in the case.

 Well, Sam T. Jack's 50 Creole Beauties did not fill their engagement in Lafayette, and left the town a wiser, if (unreadable words) crowd.

 It is just such affairs  and deceptions that give (unreadable words) and grossly (unreadable words) among the masses of the South, that a "creole" is a white (unreadable word) tainted with negro blood, and to silently permit such insolent exhibitions as are made by a company of negro females and persons of mixed blood typifying "Creole" beauty, would be a quasi admission on our part, of the truthfulness of their representation, to a public who should be, but is not better informed.

 The correct meaning of the word creole is defined by Webster in this language :

 1.  One born in America, or the West Indies, of European ancestors.

 2.  One born within or near the tropics, of any color.

 Note :  The term creole negro is employed in the English West Indies to distinguish the negroes born there from the Africans imported during the time of the slave trade. The application of this term to the colored people has led to an idea common in some part of the United States, though wholly unfounded, that it implies an admixture greater of less of American blood".
R. HILDETH.

 It is in this last sense that persons who are not better informed regard, what it will suit our present purpose to denominate a native of Louisiana, or creole, as being one of mixed blood - a white person tainted with negro blood, instead of what he is well known to be at home, in Louisiana, the embodiment of all the higher traits of mind and heart in man - the WHITE man ;  and the people of Lafayette and other place in the state, deserve and will receive the plaudits of the world for repudiating, as they did, all reflections to the contrary, cast by Sam T. Jack's troupe of cross breeds and their associates, on a titillation proudly borne by the best families of Louisiana, that must, and will ever be resolutely defended against slanderous attacks or inferences, from whatsoever source. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.    

             

 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 10/21/1893.

 Mr. W. B. Lindsay returned home this week, after a prolonged absence.

 Mr. Baxter Clegg arrived home on the 19th inst, from Houston, Texas.

 Mr. J. Vigneaux has been making improvements to his stable near the depot.

 Dr. A. R. Trahan, and sisters, Misses Stella and (unreadable), returned from the Fair last Tuesday.

 The gravel train which was running between Lafayette and Iowa Junction has been discontinued. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.



 From the Lafayette Gazette of October 21st, 1893:

AN INFAMOUS FAKE.

 The Sam T. Jack's "Belle Creole Company" at present traveling over the State giving performances, billed and paraded as "creole beauties" is in reality composed of mulatto women an negroes. As advertised, as well as in fact, this conglomeration of dusky "half breeds" is a vile slur on the native white people of the State. The slanderous imputation sought to be conveyed in their advertisements that the creoles are such as is represented by this troupe is a monstrous falsehood and a wanton insult to the people, and is being properly resented.

 The people of Lafayette as soon as apprised of the true status of this crowd, at once took decisive steps to express their outraged feelings, as the subjoined indicates :

At a mass meeting (held Wednesday last) of the citizens of this town the following preamble and resolution was unanimously adopted :

 "In view of the fact that Sam T. Jack's 'Belle Creole Company' is advertised to play here to-morrow night ;  be it
  "Resolved, That we regard the negro females composing said company and parading themselves as creole beauties, to be an infamous slur on the fair name of the people of the State of Louisiana, and firmly protest against the wanton and insulting exhibitions of that company".

 Mr. B. Falk, owner of the Opera house, did not lose any time in promptly cancelling the engagement at his house.

 The Gazette justly feels indignant and humiliated that its columns were used to the extent of advertising the mongrel crew. The Gazette and Mr. Falk were imposed upon as to the nature of the troupe. A tout bon eutendeur, salut.

 Such disreputable concerns can depend upon it that the people of Lafayette will not tolerate their kind, and it is best that they pass on without stopping. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


Troupe Does Not Perform.

 When given to plainly understand that no show would be allowed here, the Sam Jack dusky troupe wisely concluded that "discretion was the better part of valor" and did not perform. Their car arrived Thursday morning and was still on the track Friday when this paper was put to press. We heard that the manager had wired to the proprietor of the troupe in Chicago advising that all appointments made in the State be cancelled. This, for them, is the best and safest course to pursue. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


Give Editor Benefit of Doubt.

 A newspaper editor is not infallible. Frequently he may print matter that might turn out incorrect. He may be misinformed, imposed upon or purposely deceived, but the general public holds him accountable for every item published. He has to face the music, no matter how disagreeable, although conscious of his entire innocence of willful wrong doing. There are those who delight to misconstrue his motives for two principal reasons. First, their personal dislike of the editor; second to make a political point. To reach the last they are prepared to go to low depths, indeed. Such a thing as giving him the benefit of the doubt never enters their mind. But the editor loses no sleep. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.  




THE SHERIFFS.

 As per announcement the first Sheriff's convention of Louisiana was organized last Saturday, at the court house in this town, with fifteen sheriffs present and with the proxies held, making a total of twenty-nine members in the association.

 Those present were:  L. H. Huson, DeSoto; D. T. Stafford, Rapides; J. W. Connolly, Sabine; J. T. McClelland, Madison; Isaac A. Broussard, Lafayette; C. T. Cade, Iberia; E. L. Daniels, Union; Remy Klock, Orleans; E. W. Lyons, Acadia; A. W. Connelly, Terrebonne; Vic Mauberret, Orleans; A. L. LeBlanc, Vermilion; J. G. Harper, Cameron; D. Rees, St. Martin; A. G. Frere, St. Mary. Proxies were held from: D. J. Reid, Calcasieu; E. C. Nunez, St. Bernard; C. D. Kemp, Grant; Isaac Garrett, Ouachita; T. S. Fontenot, St. Landry; Lee McAlvin, Vernon, and six others, who proxies were duly presented.

 Julian Mouton, Esq., by request, explained the scope and purposes of the association, and his further remarks were timely and to the point.

 A permanent organization was effected by the election of the following officers:  C. T. Cade, Iberia, president; T. D. Stafford, Rapides, vice-president; Vic Mauberret, Orleans, secretary; I. A. Broussard, Lafayette, treasurer; J. W. Connelly, sergeant-at-arms.

 The constitution and by-laws of the Texas Association slightly altered to meet the requirements of this association were adopted. The membership fee is placed at $10 and the same amount is to be annually paid for dues. Each member is to contribute $5 to prosecute any one who may kill or wound a member in the discharge of his duty. The family of any member who dies in office will receive $5 from each member.

 Those present paid their membership fee, and the treasury of the association was placed on a firm basis to start with. The next meeting will be held in New Orleans on January 25, 1894. Before adjournment a vote of thanks was tendered Mr. Hirsch for the manner in which the court room was placed for the reception of the sheriffs.

 After the meeting of the sheriffs and invited guests repaired to the Rigues hotel, where a most sumptuous banquet was partaken of and thoroughly enjoyed. It was quite a late hour when the party broke up, and they had but a short rest, for they left on a special train for the Salt Mines at 5:20 a. m.

 The reception accorded the party by the Salt Mines officials, and especially Mr. S. L. McColla, the affable general manager of the company, was most cordial, and the party were given the amplest facilities to view the mines. After some interesting hours spent in sightseeing the party departed for New Iberia, which point was reached at about 10 o'clock, and upon invitation of Mr. Cade, the party took breakfast at the Alma house. After breaking their fast the party strolled about town for some hours, before taking the trains for their respective homes

 The association is now a fixed fact, and it is but simple justice to Sheriff Ike Broussard to say that to him more than to any one else is the consummation of this organization due. Being an honorary member of the Texas association, he had a chance to view its workings, was impressed with the idea that a similar organization in this State would prove a help to the sheriffs in detecting crime and the arrest of the perpetrators. That the organization will flourish, and meet the full expectations of its promoters, is the general wish.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


The Gazette Meets Sheriff Klock.

 The Gazette was pleased to meet Mr. Remy Klock, the affable criminal sheriff of Orleans parish, at the sheriff's convention. Mr. Klock is a nice gentleman, full of fun, and made many friends during his visit here which is to be hoped will not be his last. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.




Mr. Mauberret's Views.

 A few days ago Mr. Victor Mauberret, civil sheriff for the parish of Orleans, returned to the city from the convention of sheriffs of the state, held at Lafayette. The session was held for the purpose of drawing up some plan by which the workings of the different sheriffs' offices in the state might be systematized and made known to the other sheriffs, and to remedy the rude manner of conducting business in some of the parishes. Mr. Mauberret was elected secretary of the convention, and brought back to the city the constitution and by-laws adopted at the meeting.

 The organization will be a permanent one and the one object will be able to make the working of the office as easy and as perfect as possible.

 The criminal sheriffs have decided to have published in the leading New Orleans dailies the criminal events of the parish, and full description of the criminal. In this manner not only do the sheriffs of the adjoining parishes become aware of the crime, whatever it might be, but every person in the parish will know of the deed the day after it has been committed. The object of the sheriffs is to have made known as soon as possible to their brother officers the existence of a crime, and they have taken the method described to accomplish their purpose.

 Mr.Mauberret says that the association of sheriffs is still so young that nothind definite has been done excepting the completion of the organization.
From the N. O. Picayune and in the Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


Burglaries at Broussardville.
 Saturday night some unknown thieves raided the residents of Broussardville, and stole a valuable gold watch from Dr. F. C. Latiolais and $25 in cash from Section Master Collen. The midnight marauders also attempted to break into the residences of M. Billaud, Jr., and Alex. Billaud, but were frustrated. It is supposed that tramps committed the thefts, but so far no clue has been found as to the guilty parties.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.



Sentences.

 Judge Allen passed the following sentences Saturday.

 Dr. C. F. Clark, larceny, 1 year in the State penetentiary.

 Grant Williams, horse-stealing, two years in the State penitentiary.

 Sosthene Bill, larceny, 4 months parish jail.

 Fannie Foote, larceny, 4 months parish jail.

 Leonard Latiolais, assault and beating, $25 and costs or 30 days in parish jail.

 Albert Clotio, horse-stealing, 15 months in State penitentiary.

 Alphonse Briscoe, using obscene language near private dwelling, $10 and costs or 30 days in parish jail.

 Ambroise Guidry, using obscene language near private dwelling, $10 and costs or 30 days in parish jail.

 Jean Baptiste, cutting with intent to kill, 1 year in the State penitentiary.

 Wm. Jenkins, discharging fire-arms on public highways, 30 days in parish jail.

 Frances Comeau, larceny, 5 months in the parish jail.

 A. Cormier, violation of labor contract, 2 weeks in parish jail.

 Jos. Choate, assault and beating, $25 and costs or 30 days in parish jail.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.





Ran From Work.
While the policeman was looking the other way, two young white men working the streets under the vagrant law, made a break for liberty. The policeman pursued, but the "boys" were too swift of foot, and the last seen of them they were putting into effect Horace Greeley's advice, and were "going west," at a lively rate.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.



Railroad Provides Financial Assistance.

 Mr. T. J. Allingham has shown us a list contributions made by him amounting to $84.45 in behalf of Mr. Wm. Holleman's son Frank, who, it may be remembered was so severely injured while trying to jump on a train. Mr. Allingham has turned over to Mr. Holleman $50 for which he holds that gentleman's receipt, and will remit the balance $34.45 this week, which he has on hand. Mr. Allingham has proven himself in this undertaking a true Christian for his zeal and effort in behalf of the unfortunate. The contributors are not forgotten, and come in for much praise for their well placed philanthropy. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


Water Sprinkler Problems.

 Some drawbacks have been experienced in getting sufficient water to work the street sprinkler, but this inconvenience Mr. Alfred Hebert proposes to overcome by having put up in the cannery building yard, a small steam engine that will pump up the water, so as to have a supply that can be easily reached by the sprinkling truck, thus affording facilities that will permit the sprinkling cart to do more and quicker work then heretofore. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


Hand Car Accident.

 Last Sunday while several carpenters were on a hand car going full speed on the Teche Railroad, they ran against a barb wire, which was stretched across the track, sometime during the night previous. One of the men, Mr. J. D. Wood, was quite seriously hurt, being thrown from the car and sustained several cuts about the head and body. He had a narrow escape from being killed. The miscreant or idiot who placed the wire across the track should be dealt with according to the law.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


An Omnibus?

 It is rumored that the Teche Railroad Company intend to run an omnibus between Carencro and Lafayette at night enabling passengers from Breaux Bridge, Arnaudville and Carencro to travel by the night trains leaving Lafayette. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


Received Certificate.

 Prof. L. Tapissier received a few days since his certificate as a member of the Louisiana Pharmaceutical Association, having passed the necessary examination before the State Board of Examiners, with a high percentage which should prove very conclusively his ability as a druggist. Dr. Tapissier entertained a number of his friends in a right royal manner a few evenings ago in honor of the event. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893. 






Married.

 Dr. P. M. Girard, of Scott, and Miss Leila Singleton, of this town, were united in the holy bonds of marriage; at the Methodist church on the 17th instant, the Rev. J. A. Miller officiating. This young couple start out on the voyage of life carrying with them the best wishes of a host of friends, for a long, prosperous and happy trip. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


 School Children Guests of Circus.

 The circus management kindly invited the convent school children and the pupils of Mrs. Bailey's school to attend the evening performance, which was accepted. The children were out in full force and thoroughly enjoyed the show.

 The performance given by the circus was quite largely attended. The show itself is fair, and worth the price of admission. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


From our Carencro Correspondent.
This time next month, or maybe sooner, the cry "all aboard for Breaux Bridge," will be heard at the Carencro depot, a fulfillment of another of your correspondent's predictions. Now our prophetic mind prompts the assertion that Carencro will have the first refinery in the parish. Watch and see.
(Signed) TOTIDEM VERBIS.

Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893. 






 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 10/21/1893.

 The stiff north winds of the last few days has compelled the overcoat to make its appearance. The first frost of the season was seen here last Monday.

 Judge Debaillon was in Broussard Monday, shaking hands with his many friends.

 Mr. P. B. Roy visited New Orleans this week to purchase the fall stock for of clothing for Messrs. Dupleix and Roy, proprietors of their large store near the Catholic church in Broussardville.


 The Southern Pacific pay car is overdue by many days. Its advent would cause smiles to many who yearn for its arrival.

 W. D. Huff, an engineer in this town, was arrested last Saturday and detained until an inquiry can be held into his mental condition. No report has yet been made.

 Judge Allen has refused to admit Martin Bagley to bail. Bagley, it will be remembered, killed a man by the name of Ford in Vermilion parish a few weeks ago.

 Mr. Romain Francez requests The Gazette to state that he has completed the surveying of the Teche Railroad, and will hereafter attend to his duties as parish surveyor. He is also ready to do surveying for those who may desire his services.

 Mr. C. J. Sanders has opened up a saddlery shop, and leather depot, opposite Mr. Revillon's store, where he will be at all times ready to serve any one who may wish anything in his line.

 Dr. G. W. Martin, of Arnaudville, was in Lafayette Tuesday en route to the World's Fair. The doctor will remain until the closing.

Sam Plonsky, assistant weigher in the United States Mint in New Orleans, came in Sunday night to spend a week in Lafayette with his relatives and friends Sam reports that he is very well pleased with his position.

 Bob Cunningham, of the Rayne Ranger, came to Lafayette Saturday to look on the sheriff's convention, and fell in the swim. He attended the banquet at the Rigues House, and, also, the excursion to the Salt Mines.

 Judge Debaillon went to Abbeville, this week.

 Mr. Ernest Constantin went to Grand Coteau this week on business, and left Mr. Oscar Couret in charge of the livery stable during his absence.

 The Ferris Sugar Company have completed their platforms, making one more improvement at Carencro, and affording ample facilities to planters for shipping cane to that company.

 In Carencro Mr. Romain Francez will lay off in town lots that portion of land adjoining the Teche Railroad depot, and proposes to sell them at a reasonable figure. It will be known as the Francez Addition.

 "Uncle" Joe Rageur, our veteran blacksmith in Broussardville,  was reported ill. We are glad to state that he is now up and attending to business.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.







 From the Lafayette Gazette of October 21st, 1899:



IMPORTANT ARRESTS.
Hammy Hankins, a Young White Man, and Three Negroes Arrested on Charges of Burglary.



Through the well-directed efforts of Sheriff Ike Broussard and Marshal Peck, four men, one a young white man, and the others negroes, have been put behind bars on charges of burglary. The people of Lafayette well remember the burglaries that have been committed in this town during the past year, and it was with a feeling of relief that they heard of the arrest of the suspected persons. For a long time it seemed that officers of the law and citizens were successfully defied by the criminals.


 The persons incarcerated are Hammy Hankins, white, Louis Daizan, alias Indian Ben, Jim Bailey, and Albert Raymond, negroes.
Daizin was arrested by Sheriff Broussard on a charge of horse stealing, and being a bad character, was closely questioned by that officer. He confessed to have been implicated in some petty thefts and finally admitted that he had helped to burglarize the homes of several of our citizens. He said Jim Bailey was in the gang of robbers and also implicated Hammy Hankins, who, according to the confessions of this negro and Jim, appears to have been the leader.

 Jim made a confession corroborating in all particulars that of Daizin. Neither knew of the arrest of the other at the time of his arrest, and both implicated Hankins.

 Raymond was arrested somewhat later, and will not talk.

 Hankins protests his innocence and says he does not know of any the negroes. Hankins is originally from New Iberia, but has been living here for about two years. His family reside in that town and have taken measures to give him legal counsel.

 Among other places, Jim and Daizin confess to have entered the homes of Judge Debaillon, Assessor Martin, Dr. F. E. Girard, Messrs. A. B. Denbo, C. D. Caffery and T. M. Biossat.

 Jim and Daizin say that at Mr. Denbo's residence Hankins stood near the window outside, pistol in hand, ready to use it in case of necessity.

 Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.
 



New Artesian Well.  - The City Council committee composed of Messrs. Geo. DeBlanc, J. O. Mouton and C. O. Mouton, has contracted with the Andrews Artesian Well Co., of New Orleans, for sinking a new well for the electric light and waterworks plant. This was necessitated by the condition of the two wells now in use. The new well will be 200 feet deep. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.
 



ANOTHER LETTER FROM MR. GIRARD.

To the Editor of The Lafayette Gazette:

 Dear Sir -- I beg the privilege of a few lines to tell you of the political sin with which we charge you. We charge you with supporting the ring and combine against the people, of lending the powerful influence of the press to stifle the voice of the people, and being wholly undemocratic in advocating the return of an officer for the fourth consecutive term of office. And believing this we thought that you ought not to participate in our private councils or caucuses.


 We should have been glad to have the Times-Democrat reporter, but thought we had to draw the line on the editor of The Gazette.


 I am reported as having said "that the committee has no right to place any restriction or qualification upon voters." That is only partially correct, and conveys a very different meaning from what I said. I said that the committee had no right to place such restriction and qualifications upon voters as would disfranchise white voters and taxpayers of the parish. That all white men who demanded admission to the Democratic party and pledged themselves to support the nominees have the rigtht to participate in the primary election.


 There is no law in Louisiana governing or providing for primary elections for the selection of candidates and the attempt of the powers that be to shelter themselves behind a ridiculous and senseless article of the constitution is perfectly plain.


 I believe Mr. Editor for once you are wrong. I believe that rotation in office is good Democratic doctrine. I believe in the government of the people, for the people, by the people and will oppose the government of the people, for the ring, by the boss.


 I feel perfectly confident of the good intention of the executive committee, but I know that strong efforts are being made to induce them into error.


 By the way, Mr. Editor, may I ask what law or by what authority the registration office has been opened ?
Thanking you for the use of your valuable space, I beg to remain,
Very respectfully,
CROW GIRARD.




...The Gazette Replies...
 

 We think it comes with bad grace of Mr. Girard to charge us with being a ringster. Was he not himself allied to the old bull ring and did he not stick to it to the last? In a speech the other day he sang the virtues of that ring showing by his words, that though dead for years, his sympathies are still with it. At this very time he is moving heaven and earth to organize a ring of his own, and we submit that he is not the proper person to denounce rings. If he is a candidate for district attorney, as he is said to be, it is hardly probable that he will run by himself. He will have to make combines just like other people who are in politics. We don't think this is a great crime, but he should not find so reprehensible in others what he himself is guilty of.


 Mr. Girard says one of the reasons why a representative of this paper was denied admission into what he calls his "private caucus" is that we are supporting a parish officers for a fourth term. The meeting of which he speaks was not a "private caucus." A number of persons notoriously antagonistic to the movement were there and there was present the representative of a newspaper which is not in sympathy with the purpose of the meeting. There was nothing private about it. There was no desire on our part to "participate" in anything. We wanted to be there as a reporter and did not think that there would be any objection on the part of the men who proclaim such profound faith in the people and pretend to detest bossism.


 It strikes us that if Mr. Girard wanted to exclude everybody who was not in favor of rotation in office he should not have been there. Did he not support Gov. McEnery for a third term in 1888 and again in 1892? The office of governor wields great influence and by reason of its vast appointive power may control the destinies of a State, but if there is any danger to the liberties of the people in allowing a man to hold a petty parochial office three or four terms it must certainly require the vision of an extraordinary patriot to see it. Mr. Girard considers it an undemocratic and unpardonable sin for us to support a parish officer for a fourth term, but says nothing about his support of a municipal officer for nearly a quarter of a century. It is therefore clearly shown that our want of opposition to Mr. Girard's idea of rotation had nothing to do with it. It is plain to us that Mr. Girard wants rotation for his opponents only.


 Mr. Girard tells us that he did not say that the executive committee "has not right to place any restriction or qualification upon voters," that he did say "that the committee had no right to place such restriction or qualification upon voters as would disfranchise white voters and tax-payers." We confess that we are no hair-splitter and care not to argue on the difference between tweedledee and tweedledum.


 Mr. Girard professes an abiding faith in the people. So do we and so does every other Democrat, but it is bootless for men to proclaim their faith in the people every time election time comes around. We need to lose no sleep about the liberty and rights of the people. They are fully able to take care of themselves. Caucuses may be held, machines may be built, rings and combines may be formed, but without the endorsement of the people they will be bursted into more pieces than was Montejo's fleet.


 Mr. Girard expresses confidence in the executive committee, but says that influences are at work to induce it into wrong. The Gazette reposes absolute trust in the integrity and intelligence of the members of that body, and unlike Mr. Girard, we do not think they are the kind of men to be misled. If Mr. Girard knows that strong efforts are being made to induce them into error, he should come out with the facts. He should not permit such things to take place without raising his voice against them and exposing those who are responsible for them. That, it seems to us, would be the proper course for him to follow.


 Mr. Girard desires us to tell him under what law or what authority the registration office has been opened. We will refer the question back to him. He is a lawyer and it would be as grotesquely inappropriate of us to quote the law to him as it is for him to attempt to lecture us on the principle of rotation in office.

 Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.






ABOLISH THE QUARANTINE!!!


 The Gazette believes that the present quarantine affords very little, if any, protection and causes a great deal of unnecessary anoyance to the people. 

 It certainly does not keep anyone from coming to this place, as it is safe to say that persons from New Orleans can be found on our streets almost any day of the week. Passengers from neighboring towns - Opelousas, Carencro, Rayne, Crowley, Broussard - cannot buy tickets to this place without presenting health certificates to the railroad agents, but anyone can buy a ticket at New Orleans to New Iberia and travel from the latter place to Lafayette by team. Or if he should prefer it, he can buy a ticket at New Orleans to Opelousas or Rayne and when the train reaches here there is nothing to prevent him from stopping and redeeming the unused part of his ticket.


 A citizen of Lafayette who was at New Iberia the other day could not buy a ticket to come home because he had no certificate, and had recourse to a drummer who bought the ticket for him. The drummer used his certificate. Three residents of New Orleans were called here on business a few days ago. They procured fare to Breaux Bridge and drove from there here. A lady and a gentleman who wanted to come here from Opelousas did not care to pay 50 cents each for certificates and secured fare to Duchamp, but stopped here and got their money back for the unused portions of their tickets. We could cite many more instances to show that the present quarantine does not protect, but is a nuisance pure and simple.
The Gazette is pleased to learn that the parish board has raised the quarantine. Let the town do likewise.

Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.







Board of Health.

 Lafayette, La., Oct. 18, 1899. - The Parish Board of Health met this day in special session with the following members present:  Drs. Geo. DeLaureal, R. O. Young, H. D. Guidry, U. Prejean and Messrs. L. G. Breaux, J. O. Broussard and D. A. Cochrane. Absent: Jasper Spell.

 President DeLaureal stated he had called the Board in special session at the request of several members to consider the advisability of removing all quarantine restrictions against New Orleans. By virtue of the powers conferred by the Board and after informal discussion with several members the president had requested Superintendent Owens of the Southern Pacific not to sell tickets to any point in Lafayette parish unless the purchasers held proper health certificates. Guards has also been placed at Broussard and Scott but have since been removed.

 By motion of Dr. Young seconded by Mr. Broussard all quarantine restrictions were abolished and Lafayette parish declared open to the world. Ayes: Young, Broussard, 'Cochrane.  Nays:  Guidry.  Not voting:  Breaux and Prejean.

 There being no further business the Board adjourned.
GEO. DELAUREAL, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.


 All Saints Day.

 All Saints Day will soon be here, so don't defer the tribute due those who have gone before. Take advantage of this nice weather to brighten up tombs, fences, etc. For this we have procured small cans of ready-mixed paint in white and black and other colors. Moss & Co. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.


THE   TWELFTH CENSUS.

The next census of the United States will, from all accounts, be the most complete and thorough ever taken in this country. With the view of making the census a lasting benefit to the whole country, the government is taking every means to insure accuracy and efficiency in the various departments. Supervisors have been appointed on account of their known ability and character and it is proposed to select enumerators for their qualifications, regardless of their political affiliations.

 In this section of the State the twelfth census will be of very great importance, as it will show the wonderful progress made in the last decade. It will show the increase in population and in the different industries, giving reliable information as to the development of the country, both in an educational and industrial way. Louisiana has no reason to be ashamed of its vast resources and advantages and it will have a splendid opportunity to make a showing worthy of itself. It is the intention of the supervisor of this district to solicit the good will of the people toward having a proper appreciation of the duties of the census-taker and census-giver and to obtain this end the valuable co-operation of the press is desired.

 In olden times the census man was looked upon by many misinformed persons as a wicked intruder who went around nosing into other people's business out of pure cussedness, but that impression does not prevail to any perceivable extent now. The census-taker has a plain duty to perform and the un-readiness of people to give the desired information, makes it annoying and disagreeable to all concerned. The census-taker or enumerator is paid for the amount of work that he does by acting sensibly people help him along and save themselves unnecessary trouble.

 At the request of Mr. Clegg, the supervisor for this district, The Gazette will, during the time inte rvening between now and next June, print a number of articles which may help the enumerators in their work. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.



THAT "ONE MAN POWER."

 "All white men of the parish opposed to the present local administration are invited" to meet at Pilette to-day "and to help to nominate a ticket that will forever destroy 'ONE MAN' power in Lafayette parish."

 The foregoing words form a part of an ominously yellow dodger which was posted up in various places throughout the parish. We suppose it is the confession of faith of the reformation. It is to be the war cry of those who tell us that the "one man power" must be destroyed.  As the Gazette does not know of the existence of such an anomaly, it fails to see what is doomed to destruction. If there ever was any "one man power" in this parish it has long ago ceased to exist. If it exists now, it exists only in the minds of men who are making war upon all wind-mills. Serious folk will not likely engage in so Quixotic an undertaking. It may suit the purpose of ambitious men to use so trite an expression as "one man power," but what Judge Clegg aptly terms the "tyranny of phrase" has been thrown off by the reasoning mind. The gentlemen who are leading this movement will never bamboozle the people by such senseless twaddle, and the most verdant tyro in kindergarten politics knows better.

 But it matters not. "One man power" is the title of a song which will be sun at Pilette to-day. The spell binders will tell about it. The mocking birds will warble it. The bull frogs will add to it their joyous refrain and the dulcet symphonies of the distant cow-bell, the bobolink and the lark will be blended with the expiring echoes, resounding in one glorious acclaim over the green, undulating plains of Pilette which bid fair to remain forever the citadel of straight Democracy. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.


 JUDGE DEBAILLON COMPLIMENTED.

 Before bringing its labors to a close the Grand Jury recently impaneled in Vermilion paid Judge Debaillon a very handsome compliment. No district judge in the State has had more business before his court and no one could have disposed of that business more speedily and correctly than has Judge Debaillon. As is well known the judge is thoroughly versed in criminal and civil law and being what may be termed a "hustler" he has succeeded in keeping the docket of his court free from any accumulation of business. The Gazette is pleased to note that the people of Vermilion have appreciated his efforts directed toward an efficient and wholesome administration of justice. The grand jury says at the conclusion of its report:

 "... We have been greatly assisted in the performance of our labors by the able and instructive charge administered to us by your honor, and have attempted as far as lay in our power to comply with the same in both its spirit and letter. In view of the fact that your honor will not be among us as our presiding judge after the April election and in view of the fact that in all probability no other Grand Jury will form a part of the court before the change in our judicial district, we feel that we would be unmindful and ungrateful if we failed to commend your honor for your uniform fairness and justice with which your actions have been guided as the presiding judge of this court of the parish of Vermilion. We will lose an upright and impartial judge who has ever been mindful of the welfare of the people. ..."
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.





 City Council Proceedings.

     Lafayette, La., Oct. 17, 1899.
 Pursuant to a call the City Council held a special meeting with the following members present: Mayor Wm. Campbell, F. Demanade, J. O. Mouton, C. O. Mouton, F. E. Girard, Geo. DeBlanc.  Absent: H. Hohorst, J. E. Martin.

 The object of this meeting was for the purpose of devising ways and means to furnish Electric Light and Water Works plant with water.

 Moved by Geo. DeBlanc, seconded by F. E. Girard, that a committee be appointed to confer with Mr. Ben Andrews of the Andrews Artesian Well Co., of New Orleans, La. Motion carried.

 The mayor appointed the W. W. and E. L. committee and gave them full power to act on the proposition of Mr. Andrews to have a well dug at plant.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
WM. CAMPBELL, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.


 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 10/21/1899.

 Sheriff Ike Broussard, accompanied by Hon. Wm. Campbell, left during the week for Baton Rouge in charge of eight prisoners bound for the penitentiary. He and Mr. Campbell will incidentally attend the meeting of the State Central Committee.

 The Democratic State Central Committee met at Baton Rouge last Thursday and by a vote of eighty to five decided to hold a nominating convention in Baton Rouge on Dec. 20. A proposition for a primary was presented, but received only five votes.

 Notice. - Mr. F. F. Carter will vacate the house near the post-office, now occupied by him, on Nov. 1, and a new tenant is desired. - Chas. D. Caffery.

 Leave your orders for fashionable dressmaking at Mrs. Bailey's. Mrs. Ramsey, who has charge of this department, is thoroughly competent. Prices moderate.

 In Broussard. - The most pleasant hay-ride of the season took place last Monday evening. All the young people who took part in the ride enjoyed themselves to their hearts' content.
Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.




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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of October 21st, 1893.



THE SHERIFF'S IN SESSION.

 Twenty Sheriffs Present In Person and by Proxy.

 A Successful Meeting.

 At four o'clock on Saturday evening at the Court House in this town, the Meeting of Sheriffs of the State, was called to order by Sheriff Broussard of this parish. As is well known the meeting was held under the recent call published over the signatures of Sheriffs Broussard and Cade suggesting a permanent organization of Sheriffs for mutual assistance in the performance of their duties especially in the administration of the criminal laws.

 Sheriff Broussard opened the meeting called by Sheriff Cade to the chair. Sheriff Mauberret of New Orleans was then elected secretary and a call of the roll showed the following Sheriffs present in person:

 L. H. Huson, DeSoto; D. T. Stafford, Rapides; J. W. Connolly, Sabine; J. T. Mc Clellan, Madison; I. A. Broussard, Lafayette; C. T. Cade, Iberia; E. L. Daniels, Union; Remy Klock, Orleans; E. W. Lyons, Acadia; A. W. Connelly, Terrebonne; Victor Mauberret, Orleans; A. L. Leblanc, Vermilion; J. G. Harper, Cameron; David Ress, St. Martin; A. G. Frere, St. Mary.

 The following were represented by proxy: D. J. Reid, Calcasieu; J. W. Dunn, East Carroll;  E. C. Nunez, St. Bernard; C. D. Kemp, Grant; Isaac Garrett, Quachita; John Weber, St. John; T. S. Fontenot, St. Landry; Lee Mc Alvin, Vernon; and others.

 Mr. Julian Mouton of the local bar here addressed the meeting, tendering the Sheriffs a cordial welcome and commending the purposes of their meeting, which by request, he explained at some length.

 Sheriff Remy Klock then submitted to the meeting a well written paper touching upon the scope and design of a permanent association of Sheriffs and expressed great pleasure at meeting his brother Sheriffs. The paper was diverted to be filed for use in the future.

 On motion of Sheriff Mc Clelland a committee on constitution and by-laws was appointed as follows: Mc Clelland, Frere, J. W. and A. W. Connelly, Stafford, Huson, Rees, Klock and Mauberrett.

 A recess was then taken in order to allow the committee time to do its work, and at 8:30 o'clock when the meeting was again called to order they submitted for consideration the constitution and by-laws of the Texas Sheriffs which with immaterial amendments were adopted. The following are some of the principal provisions. An institution fee of five dollars and annual dues of ten dollars are provided. Each member is to contribute five dollars to say one who may kill or wound a member while in the discharge of duty, etc, etc.

 The constitution has been published at length in the Times-Democrat.

 Messrs. Cade and Mauberrett were then elected permanent President and Secretary respectively and the other officers were then chosen as follows:

I. A. BROUSSARD, Treasurer.
A. W. CONNELLY, Sergeant at arms.

 The Treasurer is required to furnish a bond of $250 to insure the faithful performance of his duties.

 The next meeting of the association will be held in New Orleans on January 15th next, - at which time no doubt every parish in the State will be represented.

 After finishing up their work the Sheriffs repaired to the Rigues Hotel and sat down to a supper which had been well prepared, and was elegantly served. This little refreshment of the inner man, we understand a compliment tendered the Sheriffs by a number of citizens, the management of which was left to Sheriff Broussard, to be a complete success of which we desire to testify in person.

 Among others who sat down with visitors was our worthy District Judge, A. C. Allen, who responding to a call from the Sheriffs, spoke in very appropriate and eloquent terms on the part the sheriff plays in our political economy. The supper seemed to be enjoyed by every one.

 On Sunday morning just before the peep'o day, the sheriffs and a few friends besides, "one of whom we were which", availing themselves of the kindness and liberality of the Southern Pacific officials boarded the train, bound for the Salt mine, at New Iberia were met by Gen. F. F. Myles, well knows here, of Myles & Co. of New Orleans, lessees of the mines.

 Gen. Myles took the party in charge and with them boarded a train on the Salt Mine Branch and soon they were speeding to "Avery's Island", on of the most attractive and picturesque bits of earth to be found on this western Hemisphere. It has been often described by graceful writers and in no sense have they ever been overdrawn the unique character of its beauty and originality. It really resembles a beautiful and stately mountain.

 Arriving on the Island we were shortly brought to the shaft, or more correctly speaking, one of the shafts, and lowered some 160 feet into the earth and there saw that most wonderful deposit of salt which has puzzled so many geologists and scientific men. Colored lights were turned on to the rock-like salt, down in the mine, with weird, but pleasing effect. A trip to the island and down into the mine is certainly an event not to be missed by any one who has the opportunity of going there. Individually, we consider it a trip well worth taking. After viewing the mine pretty thoroughly the party returned to New Iberia and at ten o'clock sat down to a fine breakfast at the Alma House. And from there they dispersed.

 Going back to our starting point, we desire to say we hope this will not be the last meeting of the Sheriffs at Lafayette. We are glad they came, and hope they will come again. The people of this town are ever ready to extend cordial and fitting welcome to visitors and we trust the sheriffs have gone back home in such condition of mind that they will not gainsay this remark.

 The sheriffs requested us to tender their thanks to the officials of the Southern Pacific Company for their distinguished courtesy and kindness in affording them the opportunity to visit the salt mine, as they did.

 The Advertiser desires to extend its acknowledgements to Sheriff Broussard for courtesies shown in connection with the recent meeting of Sheriffs and their trip to New Iberia, and to express the hope that the movement so well started by himself and Sheriff Cade will result in a permanent and useful organization of all the sheriffs of the State. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.

  


"CREOLE."
CORRECTLY DEFINED.
A Lafayette Episode.


  The theatre goers of Lafayette had been prepared for an evening of much enjoyment, by the declaration made in the columns of the Gazette that "Manager Falk has made a ten-strike in securing for the opening of the season. Jack's famous Creole Burlesque Company, the only one of its kind in existence, and which will appear on the 19th etc." This announcement coupled with another statement by our local contemporary that "Sam T. Jack's 50 Creole Beauties will give one of their fine entertainment at Falk's Opera House next Thursday. This company doesn't play small towns, and the only reason that the stop-over in Lafayette is to fill up a week left open by reason of a mistake made in making up the circuit" was calculated to give the Creole beauties a flattering introduction to our people. The two statements quoted being made under a misapprehension of facts, be it understood.

 The bright anticipations of the promised surprise might have been realized but for the fact that that developed 36 hours before the appointed time, that the Sam T. Jack Company was composed mostly of negro females. This discovery soon assumed a serious aspect, and in about about sixty minutes presented a most formidable obstacle to the presentation of the pseudo-Creole beauties to the residents of this community, as appears from the following preamble and resolution adopted by our citizens:

 In view of the fact that Sam T. Jack's Velle Creole Company is advertised to play here to-morrow night (19th); be it

 Resolved, That we regard the negro females composing said company and parading themselves as Creole beauties, to be an infamous slur on the fair name of the people of the State of Louisiana, and firmly protest against the wanton and insulting exhibitions of that Company,

 Signed: Wm. Campbell, Julian Mouton, C. Debaillon, F. R. Tolson, N. P. Moss, Crow Girard, C. A. Thomas, Alfred Hebert.

 Mr. Falk, in deference to the sentiment of the people promptly wired the Sam T. Jack Co. at Opelousas, that he would not permit them to use his opera house, and that the citizens objected to the company playing in Lafayette, at all. This information did not deter the troupe from coming to town and proceeding as far as the Opera house with the avowed intention of compelling manager Falk to allow them the use of his stage in conformity with their contract, or subject him to damages. Mr. Falk was firm in his determination, however, and notified definitely that they could not occupy his premises, and announced himself prepared to meet any demand mad on him as the company's legal rights in the case.

 Well, "Sam T. Jack's 50 Creole Beauties" did not fill their engagement in Lafayette and left the town a wiser, if not a worried crowd.

 It is just such affairs and deceptions that give rise to the common and grossly (unreadable word) impression among the masses of the that a "creole" is a white negro (unreadable words) as are made by a company of negro females and persons of mixed blood typifying "Creole" beauty, would be a quasi admission on our part , of the truthfulness of their representation, to a public who should be, but is not better informed.

 The correct meaning of the word creole is defined by Webster in this language.

 1. One born in America, or the West Indies, of European ancestors.

 2. One born within or near the tropics of any color.

 Note: The term creole negro is employed in the English West Indies to distinguish the negroes born there from the Africans imported during the time of the slave trade. The application of this term to the colored people has led to an idea common in some parts of the United States though wholly unfounded that it implies an admixture greater or less of African blood."
                 R. HILDRETH.

 It is in this last sense that persons who are not better informed regard what it will suit our present purpose to denominate a native of Louisiana or creole as being one of mixed blood - a white person tainted with negro blood, instead of what he is well known to be at home, in Louisiana the embodiment of all the higher traits of mind and heart in man - the WHITE man, and the people of Lafayette and other places in the state deserve and will receive the applaudits of the world for repudiating, as they did all reflections to the contrary cast by Sam T. Jack's troupe of cross breeds borne by the best families of Louisiana, that must, and will ever be resolutely defended against slanderous attacks or inferences, from whatsoever source.

Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893. 
 



Jail Labor. -  The jail labor of the corporation has been doing most excellent work on the streets under the direction of town Marshall Vigneaux and his deputies. This is a splendid method of turning  to good account, the cost of boarding and lodging tramps, vagrants and other violators of the law. 
 Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.
 

Pay Car Finally Arrives. -  The Southern Pacific pay-car was a most welcome visitor on the 18th instant. Although over two months wages were due the employees the Company paid but one. The men appear to be satisfied, however, on the principle that "half a loaf is better than no bread." Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1903. 


Free Sugar Cane at World's Fair. -  One day last week a whole carload of sugar cane was dumped in Louisiana state building at the Fair, for gratuitous distribution and proved a highly enjoyable treat to several thousand people who became the recipients of it, a majority of whom saw and tasted sugar cane for the first time in their lives. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893. 


Advertiser in French. - That the addition of a french department to the ADVERTISER has been appreciated by those for whom this feature was intended, is fully attested by those for whom this feature was intended, is fully attested by the large enrollment of their names on the subscription list of the paper. We specially call attention to the fact that they may utilize with much profit to themselves, the French columns of the ADVERTISER. Our charges for space will not be in excess of the value of the service rendered. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


Domestic Unhappiness. -  Last Saturday morning considerable of a local sensation was created by the attempt of William D. Huff, a well known resident here, to do bodily injury to members of his family. The circumstances as we learn them and that Huff tried to shoot his wife, and his sister who was present and came to her rescue, and threw her arms around him, she being behind him. Huff then turned his gun, which was an ordinary shot gun of which the barrel had been sawed about half off, and endeavored to shoot the latter. He succeeded in firing the gun but came nearer killing himself than any one else as the crown of his hat was pretty badly damaged. The cause of the trouble is said to be domestic unhappiness. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.  






MARRIED. GIRARD-SINGLETON.
 

 The marriage of Miss Leila Singleton to Dr. P. M. Girard was solemnized last Tuesday at the M. E. Church of this place, by Rev. John A. Miller. The wedding hour was 12 o'clock p. m., and long before that time their many friends had assembled to witness the ceremony.


The interior of the church was tastefully decorated with moss, evergreens and natural flowers that added charm to the impressiveness and solemnity of the occasion. The design was a large horse shoe neatly executed in evergreens and natural roses, and encircling the initials G - S of the contracting parties, the deshoe being gracefully suspended to streamer of evergreens. To the sweet strains of the wedding march rendered by Miss Alix Judice, the bridal party approached the alter and took a position directly underneath the horseshoe, that was the omen of "good luck" intended to follow every footstep of the happy couple throughout their wedded life, and the picture here presented was most lovely and impressive. After the ceremony the groom and bride received the warm congratulations of relatives and personal friends who were present, and then proceeded to the home of Mrs. P. D. Beraud, Dr. Girard's sister. A bridal tour having the World's Fair for an objective point, had to be abandoned at the last moment, to the great disappointment of all concerned, on account of the serious ill health of the groom.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.



Working on Breaux Bridge Road.

 We have been informed that to-day a large force of men would contribute twelve hours work on the road leading from Breaux Bridge to this town, and we sincerely hope that the work they will accomplish may be of a practical and substantial character. It will be remembered that The Advertiser has been strongly and incessantly advocating the construction and maintenance of a good dirt road between Lafayette and Breaux Bridge, and in testimony of our earnestness regarding the matter, we submitted not long since, a plan that we believed would accomplish the end desired. From the fact that the citizens of Breaux Bridge did not act on the suggestion then presented for their consideration, and the further fact that in the present instance of working their end of the road after the manner described above, one day's gratuitous labor from all willing persons - without soliciting aid from Lafayette, we conclude that they fell capable of coping with as much of the route as is contained in St. Martin parish, independent of outside assistance. Be that as it may, Lafayette has shown a disposition to do her full part in the premises, and will continue to hold itself in readiness to render what assistance it can in the matter, if the occasion should arise. Let the two towns that are to be equally benefited by this relationship vie with each other for an early accomplishment of the end in view. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


Carencro Church.

 The congregation of St. Peter's church have commenced preparations for a grand Fair and Dramatic entertainment to be given as the initial fund for the proposed new Catholic church so much needed in Carencro.

 The entertainment will last three nights, commencing on Saturday November 4th, and ending on Monday the 6th, especial preparations being made for providing everything necessary for a fine dinner to be served reasonably cheap on the grounds, after Sunday's High Mass. Those having charge of affairs have determined to encourage by cheap prices for the articles sold, a liberal patronage from Carencro and the neighboring towns. They are equally determined to leave no stone unturned to make money for the new church and to that end will solicit contributions from liberally inclined persons. The people of the town and surrounding country have ever been generous and it is not likely that they will fail now when it is an object which interests each and every one of us. As is usually the case the chief burden of obtaining means for the purpose will devolve upon the ladies of the congregation; and the ladies of St. Ann, a society of one hundred and forty-eight members have pledged themselves to give their services in aid of this worthy cause. Let us then make up our minds that no one of us is too poor to help build a church of which our children after us, may be proud; let none refuse to give the small portion which counts in the valuable whole. There is a tradition that the magnificent church of St. Sophia in Rome, was ordered to be erected by one of the christian emperors who desired that his name should be emblazoned on the front, so that he might have the honor of having dedicated the beautiful building to the service of his God. But behold upon the day when the structure stood completed, the world read upon the marble front:  "This church was built by Euphrasia, widow."  When summoned before the emperor in fear and trembling she explained: "Lord, I only gave a handful of straw from my poor bed, to the beasts that pulled the stone." The ruler abashed no longer, claimed the church as his work, but proclaimed throughout the land that the poor widow's mite had been accepted by God, while the powerful monarch's offering was as nothing in His sight.

 May not our widows, wives, mothers and daughters give their mites with a good will, and thus share in the honor of erecting a temple in which the word of God may be taught to ourselves and to those who come after us.
       (Signed)  ON DIT.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.

  


Burglaries in Broussardville.

 Our sister town Broussardville was the scene of several burglaries last Saturday night. The home of Dr. F. C. Latiolais was entered and the doctor relieved of a gold watch. Also $25.00 in cash was stolen from a Mr. Collins. Unsuccessful attempts were likewise made to burglarize the homes of Messrs. M. Billeaud and Alex. Billeaud.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.






POLICE REPORT.
Month of Sept. 1893.

 Sept. 1st.  James Broks, drunk, disturbing peace and suspicious character, 5 days jail. Jos. Black and Chs. Milligan, vagrant and susp. character, 5 days jail.

 Sept. 9.  Liza and Mary Victor, nuisance and disturbing the peace, 5 days or $10. Joe Alparado, fighting and disturbing the peace, $2.50 or five days.

 Sept. 12.  Harry Burels, Eujene Jurner and Thos. Bathurs, vagrants, ordered out of town.

 Sept. 15.  Chas. Walthous and Sam Fills, suspicious character, ordered out of town. Chs. Hill, vagrant, ordered out of town. John Starvey, vagrant, ordered out of town. Victor Sarott, nuisance, ordered out of town.

 Sept. 26.  Albert Belanni, disturbing the peace, $2.00 or five days jail. Gaston Labbe and John Taylor, racing on the street, each $5.00.

 Sept. 28.  S. T. Walker, T. Jamison and Martin Wartominic, suspicious character, 10 days. Rufus Parks, suspicious character, 10 days.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.

RELIEF FOR THE SUFFERERS.

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 Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


Nickel-Plate Show.

 W. H. Harris Nickel-Plate Show formed the chief attraction of the town on the 18th instant. Both, the day and night performance were witnessed by fairly large audiences. The exhibitions were good and were well worth the price of admission, fifty cents. Through the good offices of Rev. J. P. Healy the pupils of Mt. Carmel Convent and other schools of the town were admitted to the show under a half rate. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.



   





 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 10/21/1893.

 Col. Gus. A. Breaux was in town during the week.

 Mr. Jack Nickerson left for Chicago and the Fair on Wednesday morning.

 Mr. W. B. Lindsay returned home this week after a long absence.

 Mr. Baxter Clegg arrived home on the 19th inst., coming from Houston, Tex.

 There will be preaching at the Methodist church next Sunday, 29th, instant.

 Mr. J. Vigneaux has been making improvements to his stable near the depot.

 The gravel train which was running between Lafayette and Iowa Junction has been discontinued. Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1893.


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 From the Lafayette Gazette of October 21st, 1893:

THE SHERIFFS.

 As per announcement the first Sheriffs' convention of Lousiana was organized last Saturday, at the court house in this town, with fifteen sheriff's present, and with the proxies held, making a total of twenty-nine members in the association.

 Those present were:  L. H. Huson, DeSoto; D. T. Stafford, Rapides; J. W. Connelly, Sabine; J. T. McClelland, Madison; Isaac A. Broussard, Lafayette; C. T. Cade, Iberia; E. L. Daniels, Union; Remy Klock, Orleans; E. E. Lyons, Acadia; A. W. Connelly, Terrebonne; Vic Mauberret, Orleans; A. L. LeBlanc, Vermilion; J. G. Harper, Cameron; D. Rees, St. Martin; A. G. Frere, St. Mary.  Proxies were held from: D. J. Reid, Calcasieu; E. C. Nunez, St. Bernard; C. D. Kemp, Grant; Isaac Garrett, Ouachita; T. S. Fontenot, St. Landry; Lee McAlvin, Vernon, and six others, whose proxies were duly represented.

 Julian Mouton, Esq., by request explained the scope and purposes of the association, and his further remarks were timely and to the point.

 A permanent organization was effected by the election of the following officers: C. T. Cade, Iberia, president; T. D. Stafford, Rapides, vice-president; Vic Mauberret, Orleans, secretary; I. A. Broussard, Lafayette, treasurer; J. W. Connelly, sergeant-at-arms.

 The constitutions and by-laws of the Texas Association slightly altered to meet the requirements of this association were adopted. The membership fee is placed at $10 and the same amount is to be annually paid for dues. Each member is to contribute $5 to prosecute any one who may kill or wound a member in the discharge of his duty. The family of any member who dies in office will receive $5 from each member.

 Those present paid their membership fee, and the treasury of the association was placed on a firm basis to start with. The next meeting will be held in New Orleans on January 25, 1894. Before adjournment a vote of thanks was tendered Mr. Hirsch for the manner in which the court room was placed for the reception of the sheriffs.

 After the meeting of the sheriffs and invited guests repaired to the Rigues hotel, where a most sumptuous banquet was partaken of and thoroughly enjoyed. It was quite a late hour when the party broke up, and they had but a short rest, for they left on a special train for the Salt Mines at 5:20 a. m.

 The reception accorded the party by the Salt Mines officials, and especially Mr. S. L. McColla, the affable general manager of the company, was most cordial, and the party were given the amplest facilities to view the mines. After some interesting hours spent in sightseeing the party departed for New Iberia, which point was reached at about 10 o'clock, and upon invitation of Mr. Cade, the party took breakfast at the Alma house. After breaking their fast the party strolled about town for some hours, before taking the trains for their respective homes.

 The association is now a fixed fact, and it is but simple justice to Sheriff Ike Broussard to say that to him more than to any one else is the consummation of this organization due. Being an honorary member of the Texas association, he had a chance to view its workings, was impressed with the idea that a similar organization in this State would prove a help to the sheriffs in detecting crime and the arrest of the perpetrators. That the organization will flourish, and meet the full expectations of its promoters, is the general wish. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.





AN INFAMOUS FAKE.


 The Sam T. Jack's "Belle Creole Company" at present traveling over the State giving performances, billed and paraded as "creole beauties" is in reality composed of mulatto women and negroes.


 As advertised, as well as in fact, the conglomeration of dusky "half breeds" is a vile slur on the native white people of the State. The slanderous imputation sought to be conveyed in their advertisements that the creoles are such as is represented by this troupe is a monstrous falsehood and a wanton insult to the people, and is being properly resented.

 The people of Lafayette as soon as apprised of the true status of this crowd, at once took decisive steps to express their outraged feelings, as the subjoined indicates :

 At a mass meeting (held Wednesday last) of the citizens of this town the following preamble and resolution was nunimously adopted.

 "In view of the fact that Sam T. Jack's "Belle Creole Company" is advertised to play here to-morrow night ; be it

 "Resolved, That we regard the negro females composing said company and parading themselves as creole beauties, to be an infamous slur on the fair name of the people of the State of Louisiana, and firmly protest against the wanton and insulting exhibitions of that company."

 Mr. B. Falk, owner of the Opera house, did not lose any time promptly cancelling the engagement at his house.

 The Gazette justly feels indignant and humiliated that its columns were used to the extent of advertising the mongrel crew. The Gazette and Mr. Falk were imposed upon as the nature of the troupe. A tout bon eutendeur, salut.Such disreputable concerns can depend upon it that the people of Lafayette will not tolerate their kind, and it is best that they pass on without stopping.

 Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.



 Saddlery Shop. - Mr. J. C. Sanders has opened up a saddlery shop, and leather depot, opposite Mr. Revillon's store, where he will be at all times ready to serve any one who may wish anything in his line. Laf. Gazette 10/21/1893.


 Surveying Completed. - Mr. Romain Francez requests The Gazette to state that he has completed the surveying of the Teche Railroad, and will hereafter attend to his duties as parish surveyor. He is also ready to do surveying for those who may desire his services. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


 Vagrants Run For It. While the policemen was looking the other way, two young white men working the streets under the vagrant law, through down their hoes and made a break for liberty. The policeman pursued, but the "boys" were too swift of foot, and the last seen of them they were putting into effect Horace Greeley's advice, and were "going west," at a lively rate.  Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893. 


 Water Woes. - Some drawbacks have been experienced in getting sufficient water to work the street sprinkler, but this inconvenience Mr. Alfred Hebert proposes to overcome by having put in the cannery building yard, a small steam engine that will pump up the water, so as to have a supply that can be easily reached by the sprinkling truck, thus affording facilities that will permit the sprinkling cart to do more and quicker work than heretofore. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.




Married.

 Dr. P. M. Girard, of Scott, and Miss Leila Singleton, of this town, were united in the holy bonds of marriage, at the Methodist church on the 17th instant, the Rev. J. A. Miller officiating. This young couple start out on a voyage of life carrying with them the best wishes of a host of friends, for a long, prosperous and happy trip. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.




 Attended Circus.

 The circus management kindly invited the convent school children and the pupils of Mrs. Bailey's school attend the evening performance, which was accepted. The children were out in full force and thoroughly enjoyed largely attended.

 The show itself is fair, and worth the price of admission. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.


Thefts in Broussardville.

 Saturday night some unknown thieves raided the residents of Broussardville, and stole a valuable gold watch from Dr. F. C. Latiolais and $25 in cash from Section Master Collen. The midnight marauders also attempted to break into the residences of M. Billeaud, Jr., and Alex. Billaud, but were frustrated. It is supposed that tramps committed the thefts, but so far no clue has been found as to the guilty parties. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893. 





A GROWING EVIL.

 From the report of our last grand jury in regard to the bills of indictment returned, as well as those thrown out, the conclusion is forced upon one that much of the criminal expenses are caused by some very trivial matters. In this respect the complaint is general throughout the State, and we know of no remedy that will work a radical cure quicker than the deductions embraced by the following article from the Baton Rouge Truth :

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 Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.




 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 10/21/1893.

 The pay car is overdue by many days. Its advent would caused smiles to many who yearn for its arrival.

 Mr. Bolden Huffpauir wants to sell or trade for town property a farm on Queue Tortue bayou.

 W. D. Huff, an engineer in this town, was arrested last Saturday and detained until an inquiry can be held into his mental condition. No report has yet been made.

 Judge Allen has refused to admit Martin Bagley to bail. Bagley, it will be remembered, killed a man by the name of Ford in Vermilion parish a few weeks ago. Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1893.



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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of October 21st, 1882:


Killing Near Arnaudville.

 One Marcelleus Guitrot was shot and killed near Arnaudville by a negro last Saturday night. It appears that the negro in some way had given offence to Guitrot and a number of his friends and to cancel this they proposed to make short work of him. With that object in view, it is said, they went to his house and were in the act of making a forcible entry when the negro, who expecting the visit, had governed himself accordingly, fired with the fatal effect above mentioned. Deponent saith that much indignation exists in the community directed against the negro, who it seems ought to have prepared a rope for this well meaning party. - Lafayette Advertiser, 30 Sept.

 The above extract from the Lafayette Advertiser pf Sept. 30 has been called to our attention, and it is a very erroneous statement of the circumstances connected with the unfortunate homicide of Marcellus Guitrot. The facts are as follows:

 On the 17th September Narcisse Semain, a colored man, living in St. Martin's parish about 8 miles below Arnaudville, was in the village of Arnaudville and grossly insulted Mr. A. Durio in his store because he refused to allow credit to another colored man. Semain left the store after daring Mr. Durio out to combat, threatening to return again and have the difficulty settled. On the 21st he returned to the s



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(Communication.)
PUBLIC ROADS.

 In the official proceedings of the Police Jury of September second, one reads :  "On motion, Resolved, that the petition from the citizens of Prairie Sorrel and vicinity asking for the opening of a public road, leading from the head of Lincoln Avenue to Prairie Sorrel, was after due reading and consideration laid on the table."

With due respect to the body to whom the petition was addressed, nothing of the kind, (from which it might be inferred that expense was to be entailed on the parish) was asked by the citizens of Prairie Sorrel. Asking the parish to open a road is one thing ;  asking it to declare a public road, one opened and tendered is quite another. What was asked, was that the road, as now opened, be declared a public road, for reasons to which allusions will presently be made. Not as much have need been asked, for only that portion of the road from Lincoln avenue, around the property lately purchased by Dr. Mudd, is not public road.

 Under Section 3385, Revised Statutes of 1870, all roads, which had been opened and in common use, twelve months prior to the passage of the act, were declared public roads ;  as a fact any inhabitant of the parish knows, that the road leading to Prairie Sorrel, except the portion named above, was "opened and in common use" many years prior to 1870 ;  and therefore was, and is a public road.

 Next to common schools, the great desideratum, in every community, is good roads, reaching out to every populous part of the parish ;  it is held nearly every where as an important indicia to the degree of civilization which the community enjoys, I say "nearly every where," because the wretched neglect of roads, would seem to indicate a different opinion in many of the authorities charged with their supervision.

 The Legislature, in its wisdom, has seen fit to permit levies of parochial taxes in aid of schools ;  and to care for the public roads, to impose compulsory labour on the citizens under the eye of the Police Jury, through its road overseers. Now, all that the citizens of Prairie Sorrel and its vicinity asked the Police Jury was, the privilege of putting under the road overseer, at least a portion of the labour required of them, on the road leading to their vicinage, so that they and their families could pass them in safety with some comfort ;  and that the many people who use it to haul timber and fire wood and who are by no means confined to the inhabitants of this particular vicinity, should have passable roads ;  nothing need be now said of public travel, which nevertheless enters for its share in the needs of the inhabitants of the neighborhood.

 We are not advised of the official consideration, which "laid on the table" this simple and evidently equitable petition ;  but we are told, passing strange, that with some of the Jury at least, the idea is that favoured localities should have all the work done on the roads ;  and that other localities less in favor, must contribute their labour to give the favorites good roads, then if they wish good roads for themselves, they must make them besides. Good Messieurs, Police Jurors, won't you please tell us the way to your favour, so that we may have the favoured public road ;  we promise to keep it a profound secret !

 If you say that you find great trouble in having such public roads as you now have, properly worked, the reply is that your unjust and inequitable system, is the cause. It necessarily makes unwilling hands. No man is such a dunce, as not to know that he should not be compelled to build a road for B, to the exclusion of one for himself. If he is made to help B build a road, in justice should not B help him?

 The true policy is to have a public road for every vicinage, then the authorities should have it kept up, as the law now gives them the means ;  thus educate people to the necessity of good roads, soon they will take pride in them, as people do in fine dwellings and good schools ;  then all trouble will vanish.

 We simply ask that we be permitted to put at least a portion of our own work on the road of our vicinage, as a public road ;  we say that it is just and right that we should be permitted to do so ;  that good administration requires that it should be done ;  that the legislature contemplated that all should be dealt with equal justice. The more good roads we have in our parish the better.

 The present law only give police jurors authority to pass all ordinances deemed necessary, relative to public roads. Whether that body may expose the parish to have to buy a road in the future, now tendered it by land owners, simply because its own officer may, in justice, put a portion of work upon it ;  whether, in other words, the police jury is not compelled, as a good administrative body, to accept for the public road tendered by proprietors, is a question to which, with your permission, I may recur hereafter.

 The importance of the subject to the whole community must be the apology, if any is needed, for the length of this communication.

 It we fail to have to have roads, at least, let us have light on the subject ;  hence these views are submitted to the public.
GUS A. BREAUX.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1882.


    


CITY COUNCIL OF VERMILIONVILLE.

 {Special Session, October 3rd, 1882.

 Present: M. P. Young, Mayor, and Councilmen Bailey Gerac, Falk, Lombard, Mouton, Pellerin and Revillon.

 The readings of the minutes was dispensed with.

 The claim of Chas. O. Olivier, Assessor Registrar, for registering voters at May election, 1882, amounting to $50.00 was presented, and on motion said claim was rejected.

 The account of Dr. F. S. Mudd for $10 for attending a sick colored woman, was laid on the table subject to call.

 Account of Smith, Alpha and L. Marchand, for services as jurors on Coroner's inquest were taken up and on motion, rejected.

 On motion it was ordered, that from and after the passage of this resolution, all owners of public places where liquors are sold, will be required to close their establishment every night at 12 o'clock; and it is further ordered that all persons violating this ordinance shall be fined in the sum of five dollars, or be imprisoned for five days, or both at the discretion of the Mayor.

 Resolved, That the Constable be and is hereby instructed to have all branches of trees, &c., obstructing sidewalks removed immediately.

 On motion, it was ordered, that a committee of two be appointed to confer with some surveyor, engineer, or competent person, to ascertain what would be the probable cost of making a survey and map of the town, including the Mills addition and the Gardner survey, and that said committee report at the next meeting.

 The Mayor appointed Messrs. Bailey and Pellerin on said committee.

 On motion the council adjourned.
M. P. YOUNG, Mayor.
H. M. BAILEY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 10/21/1882.


  















  








   


















 

































ABOLISH THE QUARANTINE!!!


 The Gazette believes that the present quarantine affords very little, if any, protection and causes a great deal of unnecessary anoyance to the people.

 It certainly does not keep anyone from coming to this place, as it is safe to say that persons from New Orleans can be found on our streets almost any day of the week. Passengers from neighboring towns - Opelousas, Carencro, Rayne, Crowley, Broussard - cannot buy tickets to this place without presenting health certificates to the railroad agents, but anyone can buy a ticket at New Orleans to New Iberia and travel from the latter place to Lafayette by team. Or if he should prefer it, he can buy a ticket at New Orleans to Opelousas or Rayne and when the train reaches here there is nothing to prevent him from stopping and redeeming the unused part of his ticket.


 A citizen of Lafayette who was at New Iberia the other day could not buy a ticket to come home because he had no certificate, and had recourse to a drummer who bought the ticket for him. The drummer used his certificate. Three residents of New Orleans were called here on business a few days ago. They procured fare to Breaux Bridge and drove from there here. A lady and a gentleman who wanted to come here from Opelousas did not care to pay 50 cents each for certificates and secured fare to Duchamp, but stopped here and got their money back for the unused portions of their tickets. We could cite many more instances to show that the present quarantine does not protect, but is a nuisance pure and simple.
The Gazette is pleased to learn that the parish board has raised the quarantine. Let the town do likewise.

Lafayette Gazette 10/21/1899.

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