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Sunday, January 11, 2015

JANUARY 20TH M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 20th, 1904.


 To Be Added to the Institute Course, Beginning Jan. 25.

 It has been announced that a Department of Telegraphy will be added to the courses of study at the Southwestern Industrial Institute, beginning at the opening of the second term of the present session, Monday, Jan 25, inst. The establishment of this department arises as a result of the opinion expressed by General Manager Thornwell Fay, of the Southern Pacific road, that such a department was needed here and would be a valuable source of trained and efficient telegraph operators for this and connecting lines. Arrangements are being made whereby one of the Chief Train Dispatchers of the Southern Pacific line at this point may take charge of the new department, without letting it take away any of his regular duty hours in the Dispatcher's office. This arrangement is possible by reason of the fact that President Stephens, of the Industrial Institute, is himself an experienced railroad telegrapher having devoted a number of years to that work in responsible positions on the Texas and Pacific, Iowa Central, and Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroads. He will be able therefore to supplement the work of the Chief of the Telegraph department, and relieve him when necessary. This organization of the department will be an assurance will be an assurance to all railroad companies of the thoroughness of the training received and the full practical preparation to take a position immediately upon finishing the course at the Institute. The course as planned will require two years of study and practice, and will include English, Mathematics, Railroad bookkeeping and Telegraphic practice. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.  





Course in Telegraphy Receives Commendation of Railroad Officials.

 It is gratifying to learn of the favor with which the proposed Telegraphy Course at the Industrial Institute is being received in official railroad circles, as evidenced by the following letters: Morgan's La. & Texas Railroad and Steamship Co., Louisiana Western Railroad Company. Office of General Superintnedent.
New Orleans, La., Jan. 15, 1904.
Mr. E. L. Stephens, President,
Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute.
Lafayette, La.
Dear Sir:
Your letter of January 8, applying for permission of our Train Dispatcher, Mr. J. I. Hulse, to teach telegraphy in your institution, has been received. I had already received Mr. Hulse's application upon the same matter, and had passed favorably upon it.
I am very glad indeed to know that the State of Louisiana has added this department to the Southwestern Industrial Institute, and I hope that the results will meet with your fondest expectations. There is a steady demand for competent, reliable, and sober telegraph operators.
Yours truly,
T. Fay,
General Superintendent.
East Louisiana Railroad Company Office of Vice President and General Manager.
Covington, La., Jan. 15, 1904.
E. L. Stephens, Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute,
Lafayette, La.,

Dear Sir:
I note with great pleasure that you have established a Department of Telegraphy at the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute. In my opinion such work could be in charge of no better man than yourself, as I know from the work you have done as a practical telegraph operator in my service. From the standpoint of a railroad official, I wish to say that I believe that you are thus conferring a benefit upon the children of the State by helping them to learn a business that will be a help to any young man or woman, and also upon the railroads by giving them better employees. Wishing you every success in this undertaking, I remain,
Yours truly,
N. G. Pearsall.
Vice President and General Manager.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904. 



Faust's Minstrels. - Ted. F. Faust's Minstrels will appear at Falk's Opera House Jan. 28. This is said to be a high class company and those who are fond of a good minstrel show have a big treat in store. 
Laf. Advertiser 1/20/1904.
 


New Directory. - The Cumberland Telephone Company has issued a new directory correct to Jan. 1, which is being supplied to subscribers.
Laf. Advertiser 1/20/1904.



City Council Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., Jan. 4, 1904.

A regular meeting of the City Council was held this day, with Mayor C. D. Caffery presiding.
Members present: F. Demanade, A. E. Mouton, J. O. Mouton, H. L. Fontenot, M. Rosefield, G. A. Deblanc. Absent: D. V. Gardebled.
The minutes of the regular and special meetings were adopted as read. Petition from property owners on Main street between Lafayette and St. John streets praying for a cement walk between the points named and signed by Mrs. B. Falk, I. Bendel, S. Begnaud, Alida Primeaux, L. F. Guerre and Homer Bailey was presented to the Council.
Petition was accepted. Width of walk to be 6 feet and according to specifications furnished by street committee. Other petition from property of owners praying for a cement walk on Lafayette street between Vermilion and Main streets, west side, was presented to the Council and same was accepted unanimously.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.





Ten Nights in a Bar Room.

Although this play has been before the public for so many years, still there are a few plays that possess the drawing powers of this piece to-day.

The secret of its success is that the story is a popular one, and the incidents of the play are familiar to every man, woman and child in the country.

Geyer & Griswold have selected their large company with the greatest of care, employing only first class talent. Band concert at 7 o'clock nightly.

Everybody in the country can afford to see Ten Nights in a Bar Room played under a large water proof tent at the price of admission which is only 25 cents for adults, children 15 cents, children under six years free. So come and bring your whole family. Remember the date. Lafayette, Friday, Jan. 22.
 

Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.





Wedding Bells.

The society event of the week was the marriage of Mr. Fernand Mouton, a successful insurance agent, and Miss Sadie Mouton, the charming daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Mouton.


 The wedding took place on Thursday afternoon at 5 o'clock at St. John's Catholic church, Father Crozier officiating, in the presence of a large number of friends and relatives. After the ceremony a reception was held at the home of the bride. Mr. and Mrs. Mouton received many handsome presents. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.







ELECTION RETURNS.

LACOSTE, SHERIFF; 

VOORHIES, CLERK.


Such is the Verdict of Tuesday's Election.
Returns Given by Wards Showing the Vote for Each Candidate.


 The election Tuesday passed off quietly and orderly. Intense interest was shown in this election, and brought out a large vote. The results of the election follows:

FOR SHERIFF.
Ward 1. Lacoste 137, Broussard 54.
Ward 2. Lacoste, 161, Broussard 152.
Ward 3. Court House Lacoste 225, Broussard 180.
Ward 3. Mouton Switch Lacoste 52, Broussard 20.
Ward 4. Lacoste 138, Broussard 85.
Ward 5. Lacoste 78, Broussard 61.
Ward 6. Carencro Lacoste 142 (majority.)
Ward 6. Limoneaux's Lacoste 101, Broussard 31.
Ward 7. Lacoste, 62, Broussard 30
Ward 8. Lacoste 114, Broussard 33.

Lacoste's majority 584.


FOR CLERK OF COURT.

Ward 1. Voorhies 172, Scranton 389
Ward 2. Voorhies 183, Scranton 133.
Ward 3. Court House Voorhies 268, Scranton 136
Ward 3. Mouton Switch Voorhies 61, Scranton 9
Ward 4. Voorhies 117, Cranton 95.
Ward 5. Voorhies 83, Cranton
Ward 6. Carencro Voorhies 142 (majority)
Ward 6. Simoneaux's Voorhies 100, Cranton 33.
Ward 7. Voorhies 64, Scranton 28.
Ward 8. Voorhies 129, Scranton 17.

Voorhies majority, 773.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.





Mardi Gras. February 18-24. - Low round trip rates via Mobile and Ohio Railroad to New Orleans and Mobile. For all particulars apply to your home or write Jno. M. Beall, M. & O. R. R., St. Louis. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.




Arm Crushed. - E. A. Landry, a brakeman on the Morgan Railroad had his arm crushed Saturday at Franklin by being caught between two cars. H e was taken to New Orleans for treatment. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.





City Council Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., Jan. 4, 1904.

A regular meeting of the City Council was held this day, with Mayor C. D. Caffery presiding.
Members present: F. Demanade, A. E. Mouton, J. O. Mouton, H. L. Fontenot, M. Rosefield, G. A. Deblanc. Absent: D. V. Gardebled.
The minutes of the regular and special meetings were adopted as read. Petition from property owners on Main street between Lafayette and St. John streets praying for a cement walk between the points named and signed by Mrs. B. Falk, I. Bendel, S. Begnaud, Alida Primeaux, L. F. Guerre and Homer Bailey was presented to the Council.
Petition was accepted. Width of walk to be 6 feet and according to specifications furnished by street committee. Other petition from property of owners praying for a cement walk on Lafayette street between Vermilion and Main streets, west side, was presented to the Council and same was accepted unanimously.  
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.






 
 From the Lafayette Gazette of January 20th, 1900:


ABOUT LAFAYETTE.

"That Plucky Little City."


From the Baton Rouge Advocate.

Hon. W. W. Heard returned Saturday from his visit to Lafayette and New Iberia whither he had gone at the invitation of the Democrats of that section of the State. Mr. Heard was greatly pleased with his visit and was especially gratified with the warmth of the welcome which was extended to him as the nominee of the party for the Governorship, as well as with the evidences of substantial progress which he witnessed on every hand in this section. He was profoundly impressed by the zeal and public spirit manifested by the citizens of both Lafayette and Iberia in their friendly rivalry for the location of the new Industrial Institute, and he believes that this interest shown in the matter is the best possible guarantee of the success of the school after it shall have been established. From other sources the Advocate hears that the distinguished head of the Democratic ticket met with a very flattering reception at the hands of the citizens of both these enterprising cities, and that the impression he produced upon them greatly strengthened the ticket throughout that section of the State. The selection by the Board of Lafayette as the seat of the Industrial School, Mr. Heard observed, was in no sense due to favoritism or any bias on the part of the board, but it was adjudicated in strict accordance with the terms of the law which required that the school be located at that point offering the most favorable inducements. Lafayette offered a bonus which, it is said, will aggregate a sum somewhere in the neighborhood of $90,000, and this being the largest sum offered the prize was awarded to that plucky little city. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900. 






LAFAYETTE MOVING ONWARD.

The Lafayette papers are jubilant over the success of Lafayette in securing the location of the State Industrial School for Southwest Louisiana. For a great many years back it has been customary in many sections of the State to look upon Lafayette as an old-fashioned non-progressive community which was a hundred years behind the times. The unparalleled pluck which she displayed in giving a $90,000 bonus to secure the location of an educational institution will utterly dispel all such notions and will certainly put to shame many much larger towns which have heretofore affected to look down upon what they were pleased to style her primitive ways. We know of no such progressive spirit displayed by any other town in the South of twice the size of Lafayette, and we are quite sure that the money spent in securing this enterprise will be found to be the most profitable investment Lafayette has ever made. Her public spirit in this matter reflects credit not only upon the progressive population of Lafayette but upon the State as well, inasmuch as it shows the interest which the people in the entire State feel in the cause of progressive education. By reason of her location, the magnificent country by which she is surrounded and the facilities which she possesses for transportation, Lafayette is destined in the near future to take her place in the front rank of progressive Southern towns, and this generous act of hers will go a long ways towards facilitating the eyes of the country upon her. It is by long odds the handsomest and best paying advertisement which any town in Louisiana has ever invested in, and the good people of that fine old town are to be congratulated upon the splendid object lesson they have given to other more pretentious towns in this and other States.

The foregoing article is from the pen of our friend, Mr. Will Chevis, the able editor of the Baton Rouge Advocate. The neat and, we believe well deserved compliment paid our town, is very much appreciated.

As our contemporary truthfully remarks, years ago Lafayette was an old-fashioned town where the mossback pursued the even tenor of his way, unhindered by the elements of progress. Moss grew luxuriantly on the corner-post, the bobolink nursed its young in the gardens, the cheerful notes of the festive lark rang out melodiously in the ambient air and softened by the harsh tones of the batriachian band playing its twilight serenade down in the time-honored village pond. Then the mossback reveled in rustic simplicity, monarch of all he surveyed; happy within himself and at peace with his narrow world, his mind was restful and his heart was overjoyed.

But the locomotive came along. That great pioneer of progress made its influence felt. The town doffed the hoary garments of inactivity and lethargy and lost no time in donning the more attractive habiliments of progress. Mossbackism lingered a while, then silently withdrew from the strife for more congenial environments and men with public spirit and modern ideas came to the front. The town moved on at good and steady gait, kept up in the race with surprising speed and soon outstripped its more pretentious neighbors.


Lafayette's prosperity has not been of an ephemeral character. Its growth has been substantial and its steady advancement has been based upon solid foundations. There has been no inflated boom, but the town has grown because of its splendid location and superior advantages, and it is not to be wondered at that when the citizens abandoned a policy of inaction and employed more intelligent methods the town took its place among the progressive communities of the State.

The town appreciates the fact that it has prospered during the last six years as it never did before. It points with pardonable pride to a number of achievements of the past few years and feels that it has not been a laggard in the race of life. In the establishment of the Southwest Louisiana Industrial College the people of the town see ample cause for gratification. An institution of this kind, so auspiciously begun, can not fail to do a great deal of good. Its benefits are not to be measured by dollars and cents. Its salutary influence will permeate every artery of the social, moral and commercial life of the community. It will be like the dawn of a new era, the rising of another sun whose beneficent rays will fill all, young and old, with hope and ambition.

Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900.




MR. DEB'S LECTURE.


On Friday, Jan. 26, at Falk's hall, Eugene V. Debs, the most popular leader of the working classes in the United States, will deliver his famous lecture "Labor and Liberty." Wherever Mr. Debs has spoken he has created a very favorable impression of his ability to instruct and entertain his audience. He is a master of the English language and his strongest characteristic is his fearlessness. Even those who detest his doctrines concede that he is an honest and brainy man. It is to be hoped that the audience that will greet him at Falk's hall next Friday will be large and of a representative character. No admission will be charged, but we understand that those who have subscribed will be provided with reserved seats.
A committee, composed of the following gentlemen, has been appointed to receive Mr. Debs: Hon. Wm. Campbell, H. Church, Judge C. Debaillon, Jno. F. Bowen, B. J. Pellerin, Rev. C. C. Wier, F. H. Landry, Homer Mouton, Dr. F. R. Tolson, I. A. Broussard, H. L. Fontenot, Chas. D. Caffery, F. C. Triay, Crow Girard, Paul Demanade, A. M. Martin, H. Jagou, J. B. Coffey, Dr. N. P. Moss, J. B. Coumes, E. G. Voothies, E. W. Chase.
Mr. Debs will arrive on the afternoon train from the East. He will be the guest of the Crescent Hotel.

Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900.




WHY IS IT SO?
To the Editor/Laf. Gazette:

I have been reliably informed that the town has long since obtained final judgement in the suit against the Consolidated Engineering Company and that the only thing now to be done to satisfy the judgment is the execution of a writ directed to the proper officers. As some time has elapsed since final adjudication of the case, and as there appears no good reason for delay in this important matter would you kindly inform the public what prevents the execution of the judgement. Delays are dangerous it is said and I believe especially so in litigation, besides the town certainly needs all the money available. Would it not be a good idea to use the sum realized in the extension of water and light facilities.
CITIZEN.


... the Gazette's Reply ...

Owing to the fact that no property is known to be possessed by the Consolidated Engineering Company the town would, in order to recover the damages granted, have to sue on the bond. This would necessitate another lawsuit which would have to be instituted in the courts of New Orleans, at the domicile of the Surety Company, entailing the expenditure of so much money that the "game would not be worth the candle." Were the town to proceed against the sureties case would have to be tried on its merits, as the judgement against the Consolidated Company does not carry with it a judgement against the Surety Company. The question of whether or not the contractors did their work according to stipulations would have to be tried anew. The decision of the court against the Consolidated Company has secured the town in the possession of the amount of $1,000 which had been retained. It seems to be the intention of the municipal authorities not to proceed any further in the matter. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900. 




Infanticide. - Last Wednesday Capt. Ed Lenormand, of the government boat now dredging Vermilion river, found floating near the craft the body of a newly born white child of the feminine sex. The body was buried on the bank of the stream and the authorities were informed of the facts. Yesterday morning acting Coroner Gladu exhumed the body and held an inquest but nothing was brought out to dispel the veil of mystery which seems to cover this crime. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900. 


Escaped Convict Captured. - Dave Harmon, an escaped convict wanted in Acadia for horsestealing was captured by Sheriff Broussard a few days ago. Harmon is said to be a very smooth negro, but he displayed poor judgement in coming to this parish. He was taken to Crowley by Sheriff Lyons. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900.

Hog Thieves Caught. - Bill Dean and Jack Bellony, who relieved Ex-District Attorney Chargois of two fat hogs, were run down by Sheriff Broussard and are now in jail. The sheriff did some clever work in the case. With what appeared an insignificant clue he traced the meat to a cabin in Freetown and fastened the guilt upon the two negroes, one of whom confessed. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900. 


At the Opera House. - Next Thursday, Jan. 25, "Faust" will be presented at Falk's Opera-house. The favorite Southern actor, Mr. Chas. C. Tolson, will play the role of "Faust." Miss Madeline Price will appear as Dame Martha and Miss Lorena Graves as Marguerite. The company carries its own sceneries and electrical effects.
Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900.


Sad News for Dr. Gladu. - Last Thursday Dr. A. Gladu received the sad news of the serious illness of his son, Dr. Gaston Gladu, at Box, Oklahoma. Young Gladu was born and raised in this town where he has many friends and relatives who fervently pray that he will recover. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900. 




Lizzie Bailey Appointed to Asst. Census-Supervisor.
Mr. Clegg, census supervisor of this district, has begun the work preparatory to the census-taking which will commence next June. Being allowed the assistance of a clerk, Mr. Clegg has appointed Miss Lizzie Bailey to that position. He has already appointed some enumerators in the district. The others will be appointed in time to familiarize themselves with their duties. This being a very populous district the work of taking the census will be of considerable magnitude. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900. 



Notice. - Persons cutting ditches across the sidewalk to drain their yards are compelled by an ordinance to bridge of box the same.
The attention of the public is also directed to the ordinance against the placing of all kinds of trash in the streets. These ordinances will be strictly enforced.
ALPHONSE PECK, MARSHAL.
Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900.






Police Jury.
Lafayette, La., Jan. 2, 1900.

 The following ordinance was adopted levying a special license and road tax for the year 1900, under provisions of Article 291 of the State constitution:

 Be it ordained that there is hereby levied in and for the parish of Lafayette a special license and road tax for the the year 1900, under provisions Article 291 of the State constitution, to-wit:

 Each male citizen between the ages of 18 and 55, $1; each sulky, 25c; each single buggy, 35c; each double barouche, 50c; each wagon, 75c; each cane cart, 75c; each bicycle, 50c.

 Be it further ordained, that the special licenses and poll tax herein levied shall be due and collectible during the month of January, 1900, and shall become delinquent on and after the first day of February, 1900.

 Be it further ordained, that the tax-collector shall after the first day of February prox proceed to advertise all delinquents for thirty days and after the expiration of said advertisement, he shall proceed to enforce the collection of said license and poll tax by seizing and selling at public auction any property in possession of said delinquents. Interest shall be computed at the rate of two per cent per month with all costs incurred in the enforcement of said license and poll tax.

 Be it ordained that a fine of $25, or in default thereof imprisonment in the parish jail for thirty days, be and is hereby fixed as a penalty for the non-payment of the poll tax herein levied and any person so failing to make such payment within the time specified shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

 The tax collector is authorized to place on a supplemental list all names of persons not appearing on the regular rolls, and shall assess said persons in accordance with the rates herein above fixed.

 Moved and duly seconded that the license laws of 1900 be the same as those of 1899, as follows:

AN ORDINANCE to levy, collect and enforce the payment of an annual license tax upon all persons, associations of persons or business firms, profession, vocation, calling or business, except those expressly excepted from such license tax by Article 229 of the constitution, and prescribing the mode and method in which certain persons, subject to license. shall make report of their business.

 Section 1. Be it enacted by the Police Jury of the parish of Lafayette, State of Louisiana, that there is hereby levied an annual license tax for the year A. D., 1900 and for each subsequent year, upon each person, association of persons, or business firms and corporation, pursuing any trade, profession, vocations of calling or business, subject to licenses under article 229 of the constitution.

 Section 2. Be it enacted, etc., that on the second day of Jan., A. D. 1900 and each subsequent year, the sheriff and tax collector shall begin to collect as fast as possible from each of the persons or business firm, associations of persons, and corporations, pursuing within this parish any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, a license tax hereinafter graduated. All licenses shall be due and collectable during the first month of each year and all unpaid licenses shall become delinquent on the first day of Feb. of each year and all firms that commence business after that date shall become delinquent unless the license is paid within ten (10) days.

 Section 3. Be it further enacted, etc., that the annual license for all kinds of business hereinafter named except as afterward provided, shall be graduated in classes.

  
MANUFACTURE.

 That for carrying on each business of manufacturing subject to license under article 229 of the constitution, the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of said business, as follows:

Class 1. When the said receipts are $25,000 or more and less than 30,000 the license shall be $19.50.

Class 2. When the said receipts are less than $25,000 the license shall be $15.


BANKING.

 That for each business of carrying on bank, banking company, association, corporation or agency they shall be based on the declared or nominal capital and surplus, as follows:

Class 1. When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $100,000 or more and less than $200,00 the license shall be $150.

Class 2. When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $50,000 or more and under $100,000 the license shall be $75.

 Class 3. When the said declared or nominal capital or surplus is $50,000 or less, the license shall be $50.

 The declared or nominal capital and surplus, as provided in this section, shall be ascertained and based upon the annual statement made in pursuance of existing laws.


MERCANTILE BUSINESS.

 Section 4. Be it further ordained, that for every wholesale mercantile business, whether as principal, agent or commission, by auction, representing foreign merchants by auction, representing foreign merchants or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross annual amounts of sale as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross sales are $250,00 and not more than $500,000, the license shall be $100.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are $250,000 or less, the license shall be $50.

 Provided, that no person or persons shall be deemed wholesale dealers unless he or they sell by the original or unbroken packages or barrel only; and provided further, that no person or persons shall be deemed wholesale dealers unless he or they sell to dealers for resale. If they sell in less quantities than original and unbroken packages, or barrels, they shall be considered retail dealers, and pay license as such. That for every business of selling at retail whether as principal, agent or commission, or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross annual amount of sales, as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross sales are $40,000 or more and under $50,000, the license shall be $40.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are $30,000 or more and less than $40,000, the license shall be $30.

 Class 3. When the gross sales are $20,000 or more and less than $30,000, the license shall be $25.

 Class 4. When the gross sales are $20,000 or more and less than $25,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 5. When the gross sales are $15,000 or more and less than $20,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 6. When the gross sales are less than $15,000, and more than $50,000, the license shall be $10.

 Class 7. When the gross sales are $5,000 or less, the license shall be $5.

 Provided, that if any distilled vinous, malt or other kind of mixed liquors are sold in connection with the business of retail merchant, grocer, oyster house, confectionary, or in less quantities than five gallons, the license for such additional business shall be as hereinafter provided for, provided further, that no license shall issue to sell liquors in less quantities than five gallons, for less than $200.

 Provided, that retail drugstores, owned or controlled and managed by a regularly licensed graduate of pharmacy, and selling vinous, spirituous or alcoholic liquors in less quantities than one quart, as drug or medicine only, shall pay the license mentioned in this section and shall not be required to procure the license required for saloons, etc., under this act
as retail dealers.

 Provided further that if drugstores, soda fountains, or other aeriated water dealers offer for sale in connection, with such waters as vinous spirituous or alcohol liquors, such drugstores, soda fountains, or dealers shall be required to take out license as retail liquors as saloons, barrooms, etc., as provided in section 10 of this act.

 Provided further, that farmers or planters having stores situated on their farms or plantations, and selling or advancing supplies, to their employees exclusively shall not be classed as merchants, nor shall they be required to take out a license under this act.

 Section 5. Be it further enacted, that for carrying on each business of gas light, electric light, waterworks, shoot-the-chutes, miniature railroad, saw-mills employing ten or more hands, telephoning express company, cotton compress or ginnery, cotton pickery, slaughter house, distillery and rectifying alcoholic, or malt liquors, brewing ale beer, porter of other malt liquor, manufacturing tobacco, cigars, cigarettes, refinery sugar or molasses or either of them, manufacturing cotton seed oil, oil cake or cotton seed meal, that license shall be based on the gross annual receipts, of each person association of persons, business firm or corporation engaged in said business, as follows:

 Provided that this section shall not apply to planters and farmers grinding their own sugar or molasses or ginning their own cotton or that of their tenants or manufacturing their own cotton seed into meal, cake or oil, or work by machinery for plantation or farm purposes, provided that no license shall should be imposed or collected on cotton gins ginning for lint, not over four hundred bales of cotton per annum and provided further that this act shall not apply to those planters who gradulate syrup for other planters during the rolling season.

 Provided that any agency for any other establishment, selling by wholesale, ale, beer or other alcoholic or malt liquors in unbroken packages as usually contained in kegs, barrels, etc., shall pay a license based as follows:

 When said gross sales are $5,000 or more the license shall be $500. When the said gross annual receipts are less than $5,000 the license shall be $300.

 Class 1. When the said gross annual receipts are $200,ooo or more and less than $150,000 the license shall be $500.

 Class 2. When the said gross receipts are $150,000 or more and less than $200,000 the license shall be $375.

 Class 3. When the said gross receipts are $100,000 or more and less than $150,000 the license shall be $250.

 Class 4. When the said gross receipts are $100,000 or more and less than $100,000 the license shall be $187.50.

 Class 5. When the said gross receipts are $50,000 or more and less than $75,000 the license shall be $125.

 Class 6. When the said gross receipts are $37,500 or more and less than $50,000 the license shall be $93.75.

 Class 7. When the gross annual receipts are $25,000 and less than $39,500 the license shall be $62.50.

 Class 8. When the said gross receipts over $20,000 and not less than $15,000 license shall be $62.50.

 Class 9. When the said gross receipts are over $15,000 and less than $20,000 the license shall be $50.

 Class 10. When the said gross receipts are less than $15,000 the license shall be $20.

 AMUSEMENTS.

 Section 6. Be it enacted , etc., that for every business of keeping a theater, opera house, ampitheatre, academy of music, museum, menagerie, circus or other traveling show, the license shall be based upon the number of the attaches, whether proprietors, performers, or other employees, as follows:

 Class 1. When the number of said persons is one hundred or more the license shall be $500.

 Class 2. When the number of said persons is seventy-five or more and less than one hundred the license shall be $400.

 Class 3. When the number of said persons is fifty or more and less than seventy-five the license shall be $300.

 Class 4. When the number of said persons is thirty or more and less than fifty the license shall be shall be $50.

 Class 5. When the number of said persons is twenty or more and less than ten, the license shall be $150.

 Class 6. When the number of said persons is ten or more and less than twenty the license shall be $150.

 Class 7. When the number of said persons is five or more and less than ten, the license shall be $100.

 Class 8. When the number of said persons is four the license shall be $75.

 Class 9. When the number of said persons is three the license shall be $50.

 Class 10. When the number of said persons is two the license shall be $40.

 Class 11. When the number of said persons is one the license shall be $30.

 Provided that the license for every hall or place where public entertainments are given not provided in this section shall be based upon the seating capacity as follows:

 When the number of seats or spaces number less than 500 the license shall be $20.

 Provided further that no license shall be required for balls given by private persons or for charitable purposes.



RAILROAD AGENTS, ETC.

 Section 7. Be it further enacted that each person carrying on the business or calling, of selling or dealing in, railroad or steamship tickets whether said tickets are sold on the streets, in the office of the company he represents, or that of any other company, shall pay an annual license graded upon the number of companies he represents to-wit: One company, $25; two companies, $40; three companies, $50.


PEDDLERS AND HAWKERS.

 Section 8. Be it further enacted, etc., that each and every peddler or hawker shall pay an annual license graded as follows:

 When traveling on foot, $5; when traveling in one-horse vehicle, $20; when traveling in two-horse vehicle, $37.50; when traveling on any kind of a water craft, $100.

 Provided that, no person shall be allowed to sell goods as clerk or clerks, of any peddler or hawker, but that he or they must pay a license, in his or her name, but that this proviso shall not apply to watercraft.

 It is further provided that all parochial executive officers are hereby empowered and directed, to cause all peddlers or hawkers, failing to produce or exhibit the same, the said officers are directed and empowered by this act to seize said stock or mechandise and turn the same over to any court of competent jurisdiction with due information as to the violation of this act. Provided further that the said exexcutive officers shall be entitled to receive as fees, the sum of $5 in each and every case from any peddler or hawker clerk or clerks employed by said peddler or hawker when peddling without a license in vioation of this act. The said amount of $5 to be recovered before any court of competent jurisdiction out of the goods seized.

 Provided further that no license shall be issued to any peddler or hawker for less than the full rate for the coming year.

 HOTELS, ETC.

 Section 9. Be it further enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping a hotel where lodging and eating are combined the license shall be based upon the number of guests, as follows:

 Class. 1. When the said rooms are forty-five or more and less than seventy-five or more and less than seventy-five the license shall be $200.

 Class 2. When the said rooms are thirty or more and less than forty-five the license shall be $150.

 Class 3. When the said rooms are fifteen or more and less than thirty the license shall be $100.

 Class 4. When the number of said rooms is twelve or more or less than fifteen the license shall be $75.

 Class 5. When the number of said rooms is nine or more and less than twelve the license shall be $50.

 Class 6. When the number of said rooms is six or more and less than nine, the license shall be $40.

 Provided that no license shall be required when the number of said rooms is less than six and that for every business or lodging alone the license shall be estimated on the same basis, as for hotels but graduated at one-half rates; provided that boarding houses shall pay sixty per-cent of the rates of hotels.

 BARROOMS, ETC.

 Section 10. Be it enacted that for every business or barroom, cabaret, coffee-house cafe, beer saloon, liquor exchange, drinking saloon, grogshop, beer house, beer garden or other place, where anything to be drunk or eaten on the premises is sold directly or indirectly the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of said business as follows:

 Class 1. When the said gross annual receipts are $10,000 or more and less than $15,000, the license shall be $400.

 Class 2. When the said gross receipts are $7,500 or more and less than $10,000, the license shall be $300.

 Class 3. When the said gross receipts are $5,000 or less the license shall be $200.

 Provided, that no license shall be charged for selling refreshments for charitable or religious purposes, and provided further that no establishment, selling or giving away or otherwise disposing of any spirits, wines, alcoholic or malt liquors in less quantities than one pint, shall pay less than $200. Provided further that when any kind of business provided for in this section, shall be combined with any other business provided for in section 8 the same classification shall be made as provided in this section, but the price for the licenses shall be equal to the price of the license required for each business seperately.

 Section 11. Be it enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping billiard tables, pigeon hole, Jenny Lind, pool or bbagatelle tables, and ten pin alleys, from which revenue is derived a license due by the establishment, in which said tables or alleys may be situated. Provided that all persons, association of persons or business firms, and corporations engaged in the sale of soda water, meads, confection cakes, etc., exclusively, shall be rated as follows:

Ctable Class 1. When the gross annual sales are three thousand dollars and more than $2,000, the license shall be $10.

 Class 2. When the gross sales are less than $2,000, the license shall be $5.

 Provided, that this provision shall not apply to places where alcoholic, vinous or malt liquors are sold, and provided that, druggists selling soda-water, mead, etc., shall be required to take out a license under this act.

 Section 12. Be it enacted etc., that for every individual or company carrying on the profession or business agency for steamboats, draying, trucking, keeping cabs, carriages, hacks or horses for hire, undertakers, owners of lessees of toll bridges, ferries, master builders, stevedores, bill posting or tacking contractors and mechanics who employ assistance, the license shall be graded as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross annual receipts are $1,000, or more the license shall be $20.

 Class 2. When the gross receipts are $750, or more and less than $1,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 3. When the gross annual receipts are less than $750, the license shall be $5.


 PROFESSIONAL.


Section 13. Be it enacted, that every individual or individuals carrying on the business or profession of physician attorney-at-law, editor, dentist, occultist, photographer, jeweler and all other business not herein provided for shall be graded the same as set forth in the section 11 of this act, but graded at one half rates, and provided that no license shall be issued hereunder for less than $5.

 Section 14. Be it further enacted, that all traveling vendors of stoves lightning rods, and clocks, shall pay a license annually, of $100 whether traveling as peddlers or not. For every trading stamp company issuing stamps to merchants, and all other dealers of every kind whatsoever, where the gross receipts are above $5,000 the license shall be $250.

 Section 15. Be it further, enacted that for carrying on the business pursuits known as cotton factorage, grain and produce commission houses, or any other factorage or commission business brokerage in stocks, bonds, real estate produce, surgar, cotton, or other brokerage business whether buying or selling for actual, spot or future delivery where the intention of the parties is to make an honest, bonafide delivery, the license shall be based, on the gross annual commissions and brokerage on sales and purchases as follows:

 Class 1. When, the annual gross commissions exceed $5,000 and are no more than $10,000 the license shall be $50.

 Class 2. When the annual gross commissions are $5,000 or les the license shall be $25.

 Section 16. Be it enacted that for every lumber yard, whose gross sales are $2,000 or less the license shall be $20.


 Section 17. Be it enacted that for every sewing machine agent or agency, fruit stand, soda stand, horse and mule trader, cigar and tobacco stand, the license shall be $5.


 Section 18. Be it enacted that when any two are more kinds of business, are combined except as herein expressly provided for there shall be a seperate license required for each kind of business. Where any company or association shall lease, operate, manage or control, the business franchise, property of other corporations, associations or firms, that shall pay a seperate license for each business.

 Section 19. Be it enacted, etc., that annual receipts, capital sales, and premium in this act, referred to as basis of license are those for the year for which the license is granted; the standard for their estimation shall be prima facie of the preceeding year, of the business has been conducted, previously by the same party or parties to whom they claim to be successors. If the firm or company be new, gross sales for the first two months shall be considered as the basis, and six times that amount shall estimated as the annual receipts of such business. Provided that any person, commencing business after the first of July, shall pay one half of the above rates.

 Section 20. Be it enacted, etc., that the business of the previous year, as also the actual condition and results of the business of the current for the new firms, associations or corporations for the purposes of calculating licenses shall be ascertained by the tax collector in the sworn statement of the person, or persons in interest, his or their duly authorized agent, or officer made before the tax collector or his deputy; provided that if the tax collector be not satisfied with the said sworn statement he shall traverse the same by a rule, taken in proper court. On trial of said rule the books and written entries, and memoranda of said person or persons, firms, companies, corporations of parties, shall be brought into court, and subjected to the inspection and examination of the court, the officer who took the rule, and such experts as he may employ or the court may appoint, provided that this inspection shall not be construed as entitling the defendant to introduce in evidence said books and documents any more than he would have been without such inspection; provided also that the license shall issue in accordance with said sworn statement, notwithstanding the prospect or pendency of the rule, and the final ratification shall be made as ordered by the court.

 Section 21. Be it further enacted, that if, any business shall be conducted, without a license in case herein provided, the tax collector shall through the attorney appointed by the State for such purpose, on motion in the proper courts as provided in the Constitution and which shall be without deposit or advance costs, take a rule on the party or parties, doing such business to show the cause on the fifth day, exclusive of holidays, after the service thereof, why said party or parties should not pay the amount of license claimed and penalties or be ordered to cease from further pursuit of said business, until after having obtained a license; and in case, said rule is made obsolute the order therein shall be considered a judgement in favor of the parish for the amount decreed to be due, by defendant for license, and penalty and costs, heretofore and hereinafter provided for, and shall be executed in the same manner as other judgements. Provided in addition to the commission allowed the attorney, a penalty of 25 per cent on the amount sued on, is hereby fixed and provided, which penalty shall be turned into the general fund of the parish.

 It is hereby expressly provided that each person, association of persons, business firms or corporations required to take out a license under this ordinance shall be required to take out a license under this ordinance shall be required to post the same in a conspicuous place in his or their place of business under a penalty of not less than $10 no more than $100 recoverable by the collector before any court of competent jurisdiction and it shall be duty of the tax collector, to visit in person or by deputies the several places of business herein mentioned and ascertain that the provisions of this section are strictly carried out.

 Section 21. Be it further enacted that the only legal evidence that a license has been paid shall be the appropriate form of license adopted by the Jury and no receipts issued by the tax-collector in place of the license itself shall be valid and this clause shall be construed to prevent the tax collector from issuing a receipts in lieu of the appropriate form to any person, association of persons or business corporation; provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed as to exclude oral evidence of lost or destroyed licenses.

 Section 22. Be it further enacted that, the tax-collector shall prepare and keep a book in which he shall record or file, the statements made under oath of all persons, associations of persons, business firms or corporations, who may apply for license to pursue any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business under this act.

 Section 23. Be it further enacted that thje tax-collector, is hereby empowered and required to adminster oath to any person, president or proper officer, business firms or corporations applying for license under this act, and any tax-collector or ex-officio tax-collector who shall sign any jurat or certify to the correctness of any oath without adminstering the oath in person to the applicant shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction be dealt with in accordance with existing laws, relative to dismissal from office of such officer or officers, and in addition to which they shall be subject to a fine of not less than $100 or more than $1,000. That when the oath is taken before the collector no charge shall be made for the same. Any false swearing as to the gross receipts of any person or persons or corporations through their president or proper officer or agent applying for license shall constitute the crime of perjury to be punished as directed by existing criminal laws of the State.

 Section 24. Be it enacted that the tax-collector is hereby required to keep a license register in which he shall enter the names of every person, association of persons, business firms or corporations with the trade, profession, vocation, calling or business pursued, the class and graduation of the same the amount of the license thereon, and the date of the collection or payment thereof. The collector shall before the end of calendar year submit to the jury a full and complete, transcript of said register.

 Section 25. Be it enacted, that the tax-collector or ex-officio tax-collector violating any of provisions of this act or who shall willfully rate any persons association of persons, association of persons, business firms or corporation a license for a less sum than the corresponding to their graduation shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor in office, and shall on conviction, before a competent authority be summarily dismissed therefrom.

 Section 26. Be it enacted that on the 1st day of February of each year the tax-collector, or ex-officio tax-collector shall deliver to the attorney appointed by the State, for the purpose of a complete list of all delinquent license-payers together with their location and kind of business, and the attorney shall immediately proceed to collect in accordance with this act, and if not collected within thirty days from the date of delivery of the lists of the collector of taxes or ex-officio collector of taxes, it shall be the duty of said attorney to render a written report giving the reasons for non-collection to the collector whose duty it shall be to report same to the Council.

 Section 27. Be it enacted, that in addition to the penalties provided in this ordinance, all unpaid license shall bear interest at the rate of two per cent per month from the first day of February and the payment thereon shall be secured by first mortgage in favor or the corporation on the property, movable or immovable, of the delinquent owing the license and the tax-collector shall collect said interest as provided by existing law and provisions of this ordinance.

 Section 28. Be it enacted that a person, firm or company, having more than one place of business shall pay a seperate license for each place of business.

 Section 29. Be it enacted that all laws on parts of laws in conflict with this act are hereby repealed.

 Section 30. Be it enacted that, the licenses issued in pursuance of this ordinance take effect from and after its adoption by the Jury.

 Section 31. Be it enacted that this ordinance take effect from and after its adoption by the Jury. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900.











 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 20th, 1900:


Small Pox.

It has been reported to us that an idea prevails in the parish to the effect that Lafayette is in the midst of a small pox epidemic and that people are dying by the dozen. We wish to inform the people that such are not the facts. We had a few cases of small pox none of which to our knowledge resulted fatally. But to magnifying the disease to stretching proportions this is to buncombe and the work of a few who live to hear themselves talk.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.




Eugene V. Debs.

The brilliant orator and fearless leader will lecture at Falk's Opera House Friday January 26th, 1900 at 8 p. m., subject Labor and Liberty. Expenses will be paid by a subscription and all who have so cheerfully subscribed and will be provided with tickets which entitles them to reserve seats. There will be no admission fee and a cordial invitation is extended to all.

COM. ARRANGEMENTS.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.





First National Bank. - The Board of Directors of the First National Bank of Lafayette met on the 16th., and elected the following officers to serve during the present year. N. P. Moss, president; J. G. Parkerson, vibe-president; S. R. Parkerson, Cashier; F. V. Mouton, asst-cashier; C. D. Caffery, attorney; O. C. Mouton, notary.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.




Like Uncle Sam. - Mr. S. Kahn the popular clothing is like Uncle Sam. He fully believes in expansion therefore he is making room for more goods and at the same time he is making a big reduction in prices. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.





Partial Recovery. - Mr. A. E. Mouton recovered a part of his valuable papers which were stolen from his office. They were found on the trucks of a freight car in the railroad yards at Lake Charles by a night watchman. The car was set into the yard from Texas. Thus while the officers were going East, the culprits traveled west.   Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.





FAUST AT THE OPERA HOUSE.

 The favorite Southers Tolson Co. will present the powerful Romantic Drama Faust at the Opera House next Thursday night Jan. 25 with Edwin Southers in his great masterpiece of Mephisto (The Devil,) supported by the clever southern actor. Mr. Chas. C. Tolson as Faust, Miss Madeline Price   as the Dame Martha  character and Miss Lorena Graves as the local Marguerite. Special scenery and electrical effects are carried by this company and a satisfaction performance is guaranteed. The Catholic Mass and Gloria in Vatria as sung by the Southers Quintette is a feature of the performance. Admission 25, 50, and 75 cents. Reserved seats at Falk's. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.    





Held Over.

 So pleased was the audience with the performance of the A. M. Hill Comedy Company at Falk's Opera House last night, that the management was prevailed to stay over and give another performance in Lafayette to-night. The entertainment is somewhat different from the line of theatrical companies that visit Lafayette and the departure from beaten path is a most happy one. It consists in three delightful little one act plays told in a refined and remarkably intelligent manner by some of the most famous authors of modern comedy. The A. M. Hill Comedy Company is one of artistic people and its interpretation of the stories is delightfully refreshing.

The first play is a sweet little piece entitled "Love's Victory." It is written by Minnie Maddern Fisk and was never before produced in the South.

The other two plays are of the richest farcical comedy order. The second one, "The Golden Goose" was written by Sutherland Edwards and gives the excellent company every chance to display its arts. The final play is entitled "Brazen Born." It is one by Sydney Rosenfeld the author who wrote most of Roland Reed's plays that have made him famous the world over.
The entertainment is like a touch of Rosina Vokes or Felix Morris and is one that interests and amuses from the first curtain to the last.


There is little doubt that for to-night's performance the capacity of Falk's Opera House will be tested. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894. 




SLI.  - Next week we will publish the list of subscription to the Industrial School and to the amount of expenses. Wonder if your name will be thereon?
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.



Buildings Mean Prosperity.  Quite a lot of buildings are going up in various parts of the town. When the saw and hammer are in motion there is prosperity about.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.




Cemetery Cleanup. - The cleaning up of Catholic cemetery has been in progress for a few days under the supervision of Rev. Father Forge and ere long this last earthly residence will be in.... (rest unreadable) 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.

  

Knights of Honor.

Lafayette Lodge, Knights of Honor, held a very interesting meeting at Falk's Opera House, their usual place of meeting, on Wednesday evening last. Ass announced, it was a special meeting held for the purpose of installing officers for the ensuing year, and so fixed that certain officers of the Grand Lodge who were to be at Opelousas on the 16th, might likewise visit the brethren here. The Lodge was called to order at eight o'clock by Dictator J. D. Trahan with a full attendance of Sir Knights and the following grand officers present:

 Eugene F. Dyer, Grand Dictator; D. T. Weil, Past Grand Dictator, Edward Demikamp, Grand Treasurer and D. J. Searcy, Grand Reporter. After some little preliminary work the doors were thrown open and a number of visitors in waiting, invited for the occasion, entered the lodge room and the installation ceremonies were proceeded with, Past Grand Dictator Weil and Grand Dictator Dyer, officiating. The officers elect, a list of whom we published not long since, were then duly installed. The installation ceremony is short but the same time quite impressive. At the conclusion of this part of the work Grand Dictator Dyer addressed the Lodge and guests on the merits of the order, and was listened to with marked attention. He made no claim to oratory and spoke without ostentation. His remarks were plain and sensible and we are quite sure produced a very favorable impression for the speaker individually as well as the cause he advocated. Past Dictator Weil also spoke with marked effect and Judge A. C. Allen also present made an appropriate and eloquent address, and was followed in turn by Judge Debaillon and Dr. Trahan. At the conclusion of the evenings work the members of the lodge and their guests descended to the room below and sat down to an excellent supper gotten up for the occasion, during which a number of toasts were drunk and all seemed to have a pleasant time. Altogether the meeting was a success and we have no doubt produced a very favorable impression for the benevolent order under whose auspices it was held. We understand that several applications for membership were signed on the spot. The Grand Officers left by the early morning train for New Orleans. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894.   
 

 


Move to Widen Lincoln Avenue.

 A movement to broaden to the same width as Lincoln Avenue, the narrow street now leading from this Avenue to the Bank would, no doubt, create a considerable commotion among the property holders along the line, yet such a thing would be in the nature a decided improvement to the town as it would, also, greatly enhance the value of lots lining the route, for business purposes. We realize it would require a vast amount of moral courage on the part of our alder men to propose and carry out such a radical improvement, and yet nothing especially unreasonable is embodied in the proposition. The law of expropriation properly exercised would protect all parties at interest against irreparable loss, and the good results of such a measure to the community in general should be quite obvious. It is only by movements of this kind that towns and cities secure improvements of great and lasting benefit. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894.




At the Convent. - In response to a courteous invitation from the Mother Superior of Mount Carmel Convent here, we had the pleasure of visiting that institution during the past week, and while there took advantage of the opportunity to look into the arrangement of the building. There can be no question but that most excellent judgement is shown in the arrangement and disposition of the study rooms as well as in all other departments. It has a corps of well equipped instructors who are thoroughly posted in all modern ideas and methods of teaching. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894. 



Hoodlums on the Train. - Last Wednesday afternoon, while returning from the Sheriff's meeting in New Orleans, sheriff Broussard was a passenger on the train and during the trip chanced to observe that three individuals, passengers on the train, would get off at stations and gather rocks and pieces of coal, and while the train was running on its way, they would throw at people along the track for amusement. So when the train crossed the line into this parish he paid close attention and saw the same three young hoodlums apparently trying to leave their mark in this part of the State. One little negro was sitting on a fence post, and one of the throwers sent a piece of coal after him which struck the post and scattered into the smallest pieces. On arrival of the train here the sheriff placed them under arrest without ceremony, and brought them before Judge Martin, where the proper charge was made against them and the case fixed for hearing at eleven o'clock Wednesday morning.
 

 The prisoners were all young men and gave their names as J. T. Martin, E. S. Summerford and F. M. Saurrels. Bond was fixed at twenty-five dollars for each accused, and we learned was procured by placing the sum of forty-seven dollars and two silver watches in the hands of a citizen who signed as security. On Wednesday morning however, the prisoners were conspicuously absent, but as they did not say "farewell" to any one so far as we know, we are unable to give their present address, and likely they will never be heard of again, especially throwing at people from a train. We desire to commend the course of sheriff Broussard in this matter. He did just what an officer should do under the circumstances. The result of the missiles thrown by these people might have been most serious; it is said that a missile thrown from a running train moves with a peculiar velocity. When rocks are thrown at trains much indignation is felt and justly so. The reason is the same when the conditions are reversed. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894. 


School Over-Crowding. - The Lafayette public school, Mr. Greig and Miss M. Jamieson teachers, has reached a total enrollment of 108 boys and girls and is so over-crowded that many pupils have been refused admittance on account of lack of accommodation. This school has furnished 13 pupils who passed successful examination for the High School, - seven in the fifth grade and six in the sixth grade. A few seats therefore will be vacant next Monday, and those desirous of being entered should make immediate application. It is to be hoped that the School Board, aided by the citizens, will soon provide ample accommodation to meet all the demands resulting from the impulse which has been given the cause of public education in the parish by the establishment of the High School.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894. 





To the Editor:
A Dilemma.

Mr. Editor: - During the past week a class in Grammar, had under consideration the agreement of pronouns with their antecedents, and the girls most emphatically dissented from the custom of employing the masculine gender in cases where the antecedent does not indicate the gender; for instance sentences of this kind: "Each pupil should study his lesson." "His" by custom is I suppose to indicate the superior importance (?) and majesty (?) of the masculine gender, but it is not fair or just Mr. Editor to ignore entirely the gender sex in such expressions and there are many? The girls shook their heads, and I say they are right. Those who have charge of the language factory should give immediate attention to this deficiency and supply a word "to fill the bill" as they say. My girls won't agree to the custom; will some of our gallant scholars give advice and help us out of the dilemma?
TEACHER.


Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894. 



 


The Lafayette Graded School.

 As has been previously announced in these columns, this school will be opened on Monday, the 22nd instant, under most propitious conditions. The number of pupils first enrolled, as appears from the list here published, kindly furnished us by the principal, Prof. LeRosen, is altogether creditable:

 FIFTH GRADE. - John Sonnier, Hector Prejean, Louis Prejean, Gilbert Bonin, Albert Meaux, Ovey Comeaux, Kossuth Olivier, Davis Church, Cyprien Trahan, Robert Broussard, Ephis Defez, Edwin Chargois, Richard Chargois, Ferdinand Mouton, Gilbert Singleton, Sosthene Martin, Dupre Bernard, Anna Hopkins, James Montgomery.

 SIXTH GRADE. - Mary Webb, Mary Sprole, Virgie Young, Virginia Marquis, Andrew McBride, James Alpham Allie Sprole, Philip Clegg, Archie Morgan.

 Other applicants for admission have been instructed to present themselves Monday morning for examination, so that the number given above will be further increased, it is fair to presume.

 At his writing there is every indication that this new public school will soon be well under progress, and in its sphere of great usefulness the ADVERTISER bespeaks for it the unstinted support of every true friend of education in Lafayette parish.

 To the directors of the Lafayette High School and those of our generous minded citizens through whose co-operation it has been possible to advance public educational interests in this community to its present broad plan, is justly due the thanks of the people. To Mr. Julian Mouton, president of the School Board, especially, should be accorded a large share of the credit in this matter, for he has undoubtedly been a zealous worker in the cause.

 The following are the Board of Directors of the High School: Chas, Olivier, Mouton, Thos. B. Hopkins, J. Hahn, B. Falk, Dr. G. W. Scranton, Antoine Guidry, Alex Delhomme, and Julian Mouton.

 The ADVERTISER hopes that the good work will ever go on, and that the span of time may soon be encompassed, when Lafayette parish will stand in the very foremost rank intellectually, as in every other way. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894.  

    



What a View. - E. F. Dezalba and Fred Garrison, view artists, have presented to Mayor Campbell, a beautifully bound album containing views of the Catholic church, Father Forge's flower garden, Beausejour springs and other places of interest in the town and vicinity. This work is a perfect specimen of the photographer's art and shows that these gentlemen understand their business thoroughly.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894.






Knights of Honor.

Lafayette Lodge, Knights of Honor, held a very interesting meeting at Falk's Opera House, their usual place of meeting, on Wednesday evening last. Ass announced, it was a special meeting held for the purpose of installing officers for the ensuing year, and so fixed that certain officers of the Grand Lodge who were to be at Opelousas on the 16th, might likewise visit the brethren here. The Lodge was called to order at eight o'clock by Dictator J. D. Trahan with a full attendance of Sir Knights and the following grand officers present:

 Eugene F. Dyer, Grand Dictator; D. T. Weil, Past Grand Dictator, Edward Demikamp, Grand Treasurer and D. J. Searcy, Grand Reporter. After some little preliminary work the doors were thrown open and a number of visitors in waiting, invited for the occasion, entered the lodge room and the installation ceremonies were proceeded with, Past Grand Dictator Weil and Grand Dictator Dyer, officiating. The officers elect, a list of whom we published not long since, were then duly installed. The installation ceremony is short but the same time quite impressive. At the conclusion of this part of the work Grand Dictator Dyer addressed the Lodge and guests on the merits of the order, and was listened to with marked attention. He made no claim to oratory and spoke without ostentation. His remarks were plain and sensible and we are quite sure produced a very favorable impression for the speaker individually as well as the cause he advocated. Past Dictator Weil also spoke with marked effect and Judge A. C. Allen also present made an appropriate and eloquent address, and was followed in turn by Judge Debaillon and Dr. Trahan. At the conclusion of the evenings work the members of the lodge and their guests descended to the room below and sat down to an excellent supper gotten up for the occasion, during which a number of toasts were drunk and all seemed to have a pleasant time. Altogether the meeting was a success and we have no doubt produced a very favorable impression for the benovolent order under whose auspices it was held. We understand that several applications for membership were signed on the spot. The Grand Officers left by the early morning train for New Orleans. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894.   
 

 

City Council Proceedings.

LAFAYETTE LA.,  Jan. 16th, 1894.

 At a special meeting held this day the following members were present:

 Wm. Campbell, Mayor; A. T. Caillouet, Felix Demenade, John O. Mouton, Andre Martin.

Absent: Albert F. Cayard, I. N. Satterfield and Alb. Delahoussaye.

 The minutes of the meeting and also the report of of the Finance Committee were read and approved.

 Resolved, that the following licences for the year 1894, be and the same is hereby adopted, as follows :


AN ORDINANCE.

 To levy and enforce payment of an annual license tax upon all persons, association of persons, or business firms or corporations pursuing any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, except those who are expressly excepted from such license tax by articles 296 and 207 of the Constitution.

 Section 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, La., That there is a tax for the year of 1894 and each subsequent year upon each person, association of persons, or business firms and corporations, pursuing any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business except those expressly exempt from such license tax by Articles 206 and 207 of the Constitution.

 Sec. 2. Be it further ordained, etc., That immediately after the promulgation of this Ordinance the tax collector shall collect as fast as possible, from each person or business firm, association of persons and corporation, pursuing within the limits of said town and trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, a license tax is hereinafter graduated. All licenses shall become delinguent on the first day of March of said year, and all persons who commence business after that date shall become delinquent unless the license is paid ten days from the date of opening; and after the 1st. of July half license shall be collected.

 Sec. 3. Be it further ordained, etc., That licenses shall be graded in three classes except as afterward provided.

 Sec. 4. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every mercantile business of selling at retail, whether as principal, agent or on commission, or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross amount of sales for the year 1892, as follows:

 First Class - When the gross sales are twenty thousand dollars, ; amd less than five thousand, the license shall be twenty dollars.

 Second Class - When the gross sales are fifteen thousand dollars, or more and less than twenty thousand, the license shall be fifteen dollars.

 Third Class - When the gross sales are fifteen thousand dollars, ; and less than five thousand, the license shall be ten dollars.

 Provided, that if any distilled, vinous, malt or other kind of mixed liquors, be sold in connection with the business of retail merchant, grocer, restaurant, oyster house, confectionary or druggist, in less quantities than five gallons, the license for such additional business shall be as hereinafter provided in Section 9 of this ordinance; provided further, that no license shall issue to sell liquors in less quantities than five gallons for less than one hundred dollars.

 Sec. 5. Be it further ordained, etc., That for carrying on each business of telegraphing or telephoning, the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts as follows :

 First Class - When gross annual receipts are over twenty thousand dollars, the license shall be thirty dollars.

 Second Class - When the gross annual receipts are less than twenty thousand dollars and more than fifteen thousand dollars, the license shall be twenty-five dollars.

 Third Class - When the gross annual receipts are fifteen thousand dollars or less the license shall be fifteen dollars.

 Section 6. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every business of keeping a theater, or hall where entertainments are given, the license shall be ten dollars for each one thousand inhabitants of the town, to be paid by the person owning or controlling for rent or hire the building or buildings in which said entertainments are given; provided that all travelling troups or show of any kind using said hall shall pay, in addition, a license. The provisions of this section applying to such halls only when used local clubs, societies, etc., and not to traveling troups or companies.

 Sec. 7. Be it further ordained, etc., That no museum, menagerie, circus or other traveling show, shall be permitted to make exhibition within the corporate limits unless they have first paid a license of one hundred dollars, said amount being imposed and to be paid before each and every performance; provided, that an additional license for each and every performance shall be issued and paid before exhibition of same is allowed, provided for each small show a license of $25.

 And provided further, that any performance or exhibition before sunset shall be considered a complete performance or exhibition subject to the license aforesaid and any exhibition or performance after sunset shall be liable to license as another and distinct performance.

 Sec 8. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every business of keeping a hotel where lodging and eating are combined the license shall be based on the number or rooms for guests as follows:

 First Class - When said rooms are twelve in number; or more, the license shall be twenty-five dollars.

 Second Class - When said rooms are nine in number, or more, and less than twelve, the license shall be $17.50.

 Third Class - When said rooms are six or more, and less than nine, the license shall be $12.50.

 Fourth Class - When said rooms are less than six, the license shall be $10.

 Provided, that for lodging alone the license shall be one half the above rates. Provided further that for boarding houses and lunch houses the license shall be ten dollars.

 Sec 9. Be it further ordained, etc., That every business or bar room cabaret, coffee house, beer saloon, liquor exchange, drinking saloon, grog shop, beer garden or other place where anything to be drunk or eaten on the premises is sold directly, the license shall be based on the gross receipts of said business as follows:

 First Class - When said gross receipts are seven thousand, five hundred dollars, or more, the license shall be three hundred dollars.

 Second Class - When said gross receipts are five thousand dollars, or more, and less than seven thousand, five hundred dollars, the license shall be two hundred dollars.

 Third Class - When said gross receipts are less than five hundred dollars, the license shall be one hundred dollars.

 Provided no license shall be charged for selling refreshments for charitable or religious purposes ;  and that when any business provided for in this section shall be combined with any business in section 4, the same classification shall be made as prescribed in this section ;  but, the price of the license shall be equal to the license required for each seperately.

 Sec 10. Be it further ordained, etc., That for every business of keeping a livery stable, or of persons keeping cabs, hacks, carriages and horses for hire shall be graded as follows:

 First Class - When gross annual receipts exceed two thousand dollars, the license shall be twenty-five dollars.

 Second Class - When gross annual receipts exceed one thousand dollars and are less than two thousand dollars, the license shall be twenty dollars.

 Third Class - When gross annual receipts are seven hundred and fifty dollars or more, and less than one thousand dollars, the license shall fifteen dollars.

 Fourth Class - When gross receipts are less than seven hundred and fifty dollars, the license shall be ten dollars.

 All persons using drays, wagons or carts for hiring or hauling are hereby required to obtain from the collector a tin plate with a number painted thereon, and have the same nailed on the vehicle in a conspicuous place, and pay four dollars per year license.

 Sec 11.  Be it further ordained, etc., That in addition to the graduated system as herein adopted there shall be a miscellaneous system so as to apply to traffics, trades and professions, vocations, callings or business of any kind, where the graduated system is not applied, and not being in conflict therewith, as follows, to wit :

 From each attorney-at-law, physician, dentist, editor, photographer and occultist, five dollars.

 Each fruit and ice cream dealer, five dollars.

 Each oyster stand, five dollars.

 Each billiard table, from which revenue is derived, five dollars.

 Each concert and theatrical performance, each day, five dollars ;  provided, that where such performance is given by charitable or benevolent associations for their own purposes, no license shall be charged.

 Every lumber yard, ten dollars.

 Each horse and mule trader, five dollars.

 Each gun and pistol establishment, five dollars.

 Each soda stand, five dollars.

 Each shooting gallery, five dollars.

 Each peddler or hawker of clothing, jewelry, notions, cutlery, pictures, wares, spectacles, etc., ten dollars.

 Each sewing machine agent or depot where sewing machines are sold, five dollars.

 Each Butcher shop, ten dollars.

 Each Vendor of Milk, five dollars.

 Each Fly horses, ten dollars.

 No license shall issue for less than five dollars, except when the business or object is so trifling the mayor may, if he thinks proper, authorize the collector to issue a smaller one on such business as may not come under any of the provision thereof.

 Nothing in this ordinance shall be construed as licensing or permitting any performance which is prohibited by other laws, ordinances or police regulationsns.

 Any transfer or acceptance or a transferable license without the consent of the mayor will be null and void.

 Sec. 12 Be it further ordained, etc., That the licenses issued in pursuance of this ordinance shall commence on the 1st day of January and ended the 31st of December, 1894, and from year to year thereafter, and said license shall be collected in the manner provided by the charter of the town, and according to sections, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, and Act No. 150 of the General Assembly of 1890.

 Sec. 13 Be it further ordained, etc., That a person, firm or company having more than one place of business shall pay a seperate license for each place of business.

 That the collector, before issuing a license, shall swearar t the party applying for said license as the amount of his gross sales for the preceding year, and shall keep said as on file ;  and he shall also keep a register of the names, dates and amounts paid by each and every person taking out license.

 Sec. 14 Be it further ordained, etc., That this ordinance shall take effect immediately after promulgation.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894.

 


 
 From the Lafayette Gazette of January 20th, 1894:


The Sheriffs' Convention. - The Louisiana Sheriff's Association of which Sheriff Broussard of this parish is the originator, met in New Orleans Monday, and from accounts published in the city papers it is a success, Governor Foster was present and delivered a brilliant and interesting address. Mayor Fitzpatrick also spoke. Most of the parishes in the state were represented, not excepting Lafayette. Or course, Ike was on hand and, as usual, took a prominent part in the proceedings. Tuesday;s Picayune contains his picture and has this to say about him: "The treasurer of the association is Mr. I. A. Broussard, of Lafayette. He is one of the most jovial of the members. He was born in Calcasieu parish in 1857, and before entering public office had been engaged in raising stock and trading cattle. He was elected sheriff in 1888. Yesterday, at the Crescent Club, Mr. Broussard took great pleasure in introducing his friend, Mr. Julian Mouton, of Lafayette, as a "sure winner" to become the successor of Mr. Overton Cade as representative from Lafayette in the legislature."  Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1894.




Paid High For Their Fun.
 Sheriff Broussard is always on the lookout for violators of the law. While on the train last Wednesday he noticed a party of young men amusing themselves by throwing chunks of coal and stone at people standing along the railroad. The sheriff did not interfere with their "sport" until the train reached Broussardville, in this parish, where they provided themselves with a fresh supply of pieces of coal and stone and when the train was passing the big pond near that place they threw several chunks at a party of women and children engaged in fishing. When the train stopped at this place Sheriff Broussard arrested three young men named J. T. Martin, E. S. Summerford and F. M. Sorels, and made affidavits against them in accordance with the facts. Judge Martin fixed their appearance bond at $25, which was signed by Henri Crouchet to whom the accused turned over $47 in cash, and two silver watches. Thursday at 11 0'clock the hour fixed for trial, the young men failed to show up. They had left during the night. The money goes to the public school fund.
Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1894. 



Bath Rooms for Ladies. - We understand that mayor Mouton is making arrangements to build another bath-house at the BeauSejour Springs. This house will be used exclusively by the ladies and will be completed for the opening of the season.
Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1894.



The Arlington Minstrels. - The famous Arlington Minstrels will appear at Falk's opera house, Thursday, January 25. The members of this company are all white and their delineations of negro character are smooth and refined, much better than a genuine negro minstrels. The company is a large one and comes highly recommended, are are sure of a full house as they will play at popular prices, 25, 35 and 50 cents. Seats now on sale at Falk's.

Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1894.



The A. M. Hill Comedy Company.

 The A. M. Hill Comedy Company gave a delightful performance at Falk's opera house last night. The performance consisted of three charming little one-act plays. The first one was called "Love's Victory." It is a remarkably sweet little piece told in the excellent language of Minnie Maddern Fisk. The story gave Miss Agnes Hill an excellent opportunity to display her talent, which is of the very highest order, while the other members of the company took excellent care of the characters assigned them. The second piece was the "Golden Goose," an uproariously funny piece written by Sutherland Edwards. The story and plot are most humorous and the audience was well nigh convulsed with laughter from the opening of the story to the fall of the curtain. The one that appeared to please most all, however, was "Brazen Born," the closing play. It lasted for about an hour and there was a laugh for almost every minute of the sixty. The situations are particularly ludicrous and errors occasioned by mistaken identity formed a wide field for the remarkably clever company to exhibit their art. So pleased was the audience with the performance that the management was prevailed upon to spend a second night in Lafayette. Accordingly this excellent company will be seen again to-night in Falk's opera house. 

Reserved seats for sale at Mr. Falk's store. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1894.




 


 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 20th, 1914:

EDISON TALKING PICTURES!
A Most Wonderful Invention.

 Last Wednesday night the Jefferson theatre was filled practically to capacity to witness Edison's latest and possibly most wonderful accomplishment, talking pictures. The performance was carried through without  flaw and was enjoyed and marveled at by everyone present.

 The performance opened with a lecture, the lecturer was a moving picture and as he moved and talked the Kinetiscope spoke in absolute time with the motion of his lips, producing such an illusion that the audience involuntarily applauded. The lecturer, picture man, then introduced other pictures, ladies singing, musicians playing, dogs barking and always the Kintetiscope accompanied with the sounds timed exactly making everything almost real and actual.

 After the lecture a splendid program of comedy, music and drama was given, not a flaw occurring to mar the reality of the pictures. The performance was not alone wonderful, but delightfully entertaining. Manager Parkerson of the Jefferson is due thanks for securing this great attraction, giving the people of this city the opportunity of seeing this astonishing invention. As a great many did not see the pictures he is making an effort to secure a return engagement and has strong hopes of succeeding. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1914.


TANGO CONDEMNED BY LOCAL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS.

 The following resolutions were adopted at a meeting of the local council Knights of Columbus:

 Whereas the prevailing dances consisting of the tango and other reprehensible forms that have been sweeping the country, are a cause of much concern and anxiety to all careful and clean-minded people;
   Whereas the conditions now existing are growing to an alarming extent, and present not only a grave educational, but a still graver moral issue;
   Therefore, Be it resolved, That the members of the council are individually opposed to these new and detestable forms of dancing.

 Be it resolved, That each and every member of this council take a stand against the introduction of these dances into our social circles, and hereby constitutes itself a medium whereby the attention of the fathers and mothers of Lafayette parish is called to the numerous danger signals which mark the path of the boys and girls who adopt these dances:

 Be it resolved, That the members of this council lend their best efforts to bring about a revival of such beautiful dances as the quadrille, the lancers and the varieties, and to restore the graceful waltz to its old place in the dancing card, and to that end they allow the free use of their Home to the young people of the city and parish;

 Be it further resolved, That these resolutions be spread on the minutes of this meeting and copies be mailed to the different councils of the State, and that our delegates to the State Council be instructed to present same for consideration and approval at the meeting of the State Council;

 Be it further resolved, That these resolutions be published in the local papers, in the Morning Star and the Coumbiad. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1914.   

     







  






LAGNIAPPE:
Rising From the Ranks.


The best engineman has been a fireman; the best conductors are made of brakemen; the best officials are promoted from the ranks. Mr. John M. Toucey, general manager of the New York Central, was once a trainman, President Newell, of the Lake Shore, used to carry chain in an engineering corps on the Illinois Central. President Clark, of the Mobile and Ohio, was a section man; afterwards a fireman. Another man who drove grade stakes is President Blockstand, of the Alton. Allen Manville, the late president of "the largest road on earth," was a store-house clerk. President Van Horn, of the Canadian Pacific, kept time on the Illinois Central. A man named Town, who used to twist brake-wheels on the Burlington, is now Vice President Town of the Southern Pacific, President Smith, of the Louisville & Nashville, was a telegraph messenger-boy. President Clark, of the Union Pacific, used to check freight and push a truck on the Omaha platform. The Illinois Central, I believe, has turned out more great men than any other road. President Jeffery, of the Denver Rio Grande, began in the Central shops at forty-five cents a day.

From McClure's Magazine and in the Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1894.

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