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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

**EARLY LAFAYETTE OPERA HOUSE/THEATRE

.""A Wise Woman

"The Wise Woman Company,"
which plays at Falk's Opera house
to-morrow night, recently
filled an engagement at Baton
Rouge, where it won the most
flattering encomiums of the
press. The Baton Rouge Truth,
edited by Capt. John McGrath,
is noted for its conservative criticism
of theatrical companies
and for this reason The Gazette
does not hesitate to reproduce
the following compliment it pays
"A Wise Woman Company:"


A FINE TROUPE.
"A Wise Woman," under the management of Mr. Leslie Davis,
was greeted both at matinee and
regular performance yesterday
by large audiences, notwithstanding
the patrons of Elks Theatre
had received several severe jars
during the first days of the week
by coming in contact with "rotten
shows," and were, in consequence,
considerably disgusted. When it became known, however, that Mr. Leslie Davis was manager of "A Wise Woman," people were convinced that his show
was a fine one and so it proved.


Of the many excellent troupes
brought here by Mr. Davis, this
one stands at the head of the
list. Among the actors and actresses
there is not a single one
but is perfect in the role in
which they appear. The parts
are lively, dialogues exceedingly
witty, music catchy and song
sweetly sung. The entire show
from start to finish is highly
amusing and of the most refined
character. There- is nothing
coarse or vulgar, as is too often
the case, in low comedy. Truth
seldom prints after notices of a show, either of approval or condemnation, but in the present instance, wishes to convey an idea of the excellence of presentation, in this city of "A Wise
Woman." It was a good show
and just what was expected under
the management of that pop--
ular gentleman, Mr. Leslie
Davis, whose motto is "the best or none."
Lafayette Gazette 1/3/1903.




Cold Night at Opera-house.

 The Glee, Mandolin and Guitar Clubs of the Louisiana State University gave a musical entertainment at Falk's hall Monday night. The attendance was as large as could be expected, owing to the poor light and exceedingly cold temperature in the hall during the performance. As long as the people are not furnished with better accommodation by the manager of the hall, no troupe can hope to do a good business in this town. However, considering the disadvantages under which the university boys they did very well. Their performance was a creditable one in every respect. Lafayette Gazette 1/4/1896.




T0-morrow night at Falk's Opera House, a Grand Concert by the famous Guatemalan Marimberos, or performers on the Marimba, the ancient musical instrument, used over a thousand years ago at the court of the Kings of Anahuac and Rulers of Quiche, Central America.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1895





From the Lafayette Gazette of January 5th, 1895.

Worst Show Ever.

 The Midway Plaisance troop filled an engagement here last Thursday. Their show was by far the poorest that has come to Lafayette this season. It required sublime nerve on the part of these people to show in a civilized community. The tableaux and mandolin player were the only redeeming features of the entertainment. In justice to Manager Falk, it is right to say that he was imposed upon as well as the public. Lafayette Gazette 1/5/1895.

Midway Man in Trouble.

 Louis Striffer, one of the managers of the Midway Plaisance Company, was arrested Friday morning by Sheriff Broussard, upon complaint of Harry St. George, a performer for the same company. St. George informed the officer that Striffer had a pistol concealed on his person. To the sheriff Striffer admitted the correctness of the charge and gave up his pistol. The proper affidavit was made he pleaded guilty before Justice McFadden who fixed his appearance bond at $100. The prisoner could not furnish the required bail and was committed to jail. St. George claimed that Striffer refused to pay him and the other performers and was about to take a train for New Orleans and to prevent him from leaving he had him arrested. Striffer denies this charge and says that he had only $7 in cash besides railroad fare to New Orleans for himself and a woman. Lafayette Gazette 1/5/1895.


Coming to Falk's.

 On next Sunday will be presented at Falk's Opera House, this city, a unique entertainment, and which will, no doubt, be worthy of a liberal patronage, in the form of a musicale by a company of South American Indians, highly educated in the art of music on their favorite instrument, the marimba. Space forbids further description of this company of their melodious instruments, which, it is said resembles in tone the zylophone, and to better understand and appreciate this company of natives, our people should procure tickets for next Sunday, January 6. Lafayette Gazette 1/5/1895.


Falk's Opera-house.

 The Field Minstrels play at Falk's Hall last Monday night. It is strictly a first-class company, and deserves the most generous support of the public.
 Lafayette Gazette 1/5/1901.


 A GOOD COMPANY - The Frederic Bryton Co., appeared at Falk's Opera House last Wednesday and Thursday nights and gave first class entertainments in every respect, and by special request repeated again an entertainment last night. - We wish to see more of the very same - sort.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/7/1899. 



The Frederick Bryton Company.

 One of the best theatrical troups that have visited Lafayette in many years, performed at Falk's Opera-house this week. It was billed for one night, but Mr. Falk prevailed upon Mr. Bryton to give three performances, all of which were well attended and greatly enjoyed. The next attraction will be the Schubert Symphony Club which appears on the 20th. Lafayette Gazette 1/7/1899.







Faust's Minstrels. - Ted F. Faust's Minstrels will appear at Falk's Opera House Jan. 28. This is said to be a high class company and those who are fond of a good minstrel show have a big treat in store. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/9/1904.





From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 10th, 1903:

A New Opera House.


Lafayette is to have a new opera house. It is a sure thing this time. Mr. Felix Salles, one of our enterprising merchants will erect a two story opera house in the near future on the lot adjoining the Mouton and Salles building. It will be 50 by 96 feet with iron front and will be furnished with opera chairs. It will have a seating capacity of 450 on the main floor, and 250 in the gallery. The opera house is to be first class and will be an ornament to the town.  

Lafayette Advertiser 1/10/1903.


Hebert's Hall.

The inauguration ball given on Thursday evening by Mr. T. Hebert, Jr., at his new splendid Hall has proved a success in every sense of the word. Everything went off charmingly -- every thing was fair and sweet and beautiful -- the hall, the music, the refreshments, and last but not least, the young ladies and the old ones too. Mr. Hebert is decidedly the man for our town ; and this his laudable and beneficial undertakings be crowned with success and be rewarded with a rich and golden harvest, is the wish which comes up from the core of our editorial heart.

To the young Hyperions, we present the compliments of the young ladies and gentlemen and of the community at large, for the able and efficient manner in which they have discharged their part of the task. Lafayette Advertiser 1/10/1874.




New Opera House.

Mr. L. F. Salles informs us that he will put up a two-story, 50x96 galvanized iron building on the lot adjoining Mouton & Salles' store. The lower floor will be used for store rooms and the upper story will consist of a well-equipped opera-house. Mr. Salles is having a plan made and will build as soon as practicable. It is his intention to build something really neat and at the same time large enough for the town.
Lafayette Gazette 1/10/1903










From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 11th, 1905:

JEFFERSON THEATRE.


Opens Sunday Night Jan. 15, with "Hoity-Toity." Weber and Fields' Great New York Success.


"Hoity-Toity," one of Weber and Fields' most wonderful creations, which begins an engagement at the Jefferson Theatre Sunday, Jan. 15, has been aptly termed "The Mighty Monarch of Merry Musical Plays." This is not surprising when one considers Weber and Fields' manner of doing things. They never do things in a half way manner, they are after results, and lovers of musical comedy and bright burlesque, will admit when they see "Hoity-Toity" that these men who stand alone in their class, achieved remarkable results with this, the most successful, of all their many costly and beautiful productions. The book is by Edgar Smith; the music by John Stromberg, and as all the distinctly original and unique stage business taught by Julian Mitchell, has been retained, it is hardly necessary to say that those who revel in this class of amusement, have in store the treat of the season.

Convulsion one takes place at Yale University, where all the characters meet and a boat crew appears to take Lady Grafter on a trial spin. The scene changes to a river view, where a shell is seen with the rowers and Lady Grafter as the coxswain; stereopticon slides depicting perfectly moonlit waters and the panorama of the river bank beyond. A beautiful boating song is sung, and the effect is said to be one of the prettiest imaginable.

Convulsion two takes place at Monte Carlo, where arrives Philip Sauerbraten who has waxed wealthy in the delicatessen business and Herman Kaffekaken and Frederick Schnitzel, who are anxious to separate Philip from his money, and in this they would be successful were it not for Lady Grafter, a beautiful gambler, who elects to take it all herself - a feat accomplished by the aid of her trailer Reuben Hunter, who has a side show of his own in the form of an Irish Cannibal King, Kazoo, whom he exhibits in a cage at so much per visit. There also appears General Steele, an American billionaire, and his six radiantly beautiful daughters, and Harvard Yale who is touring the country with a college minstrel company. The original Weber and Fields' production will be seen here. 

 Lafayette Advertiser 1/11/1905. 




 ...PARTIAL BITS OF STORY AVAILABLE....
THIS PLAYED PRESUMABLY AT FALK'S OPERA HOUSE....
W. B. PATTON IN THE "MINISTER'S SON."


There is something about Mr. Patton's personality that asserts itself in every play that he is put in. Somehow, he seems to carry an atmosphere around with him that freshens and sweetens the theatre and the audience like a draft of pure air from hills where daisies blow.  And the part of "Simon-Ray" so quaint, so picturesque, affords the brilliant young actor unlimited opportunities....blah blah blah... 

GOOGLE for write-ups on this...


Also FALK'S OPERA HOUSE..

Hal Reid's Greatest Melodrama, The Knobs of Tennessee...

Big Strong Cast - Tons of Scenery, Great Mechanical Effects.

 Tickets at Gardebled's....







THE KNOBS O' TENNESSEE.

 Saturday, Jan. 18th, Hal Reid's best efforts in Melodrama, The Knobs O' Tennesee, will be presented at our local play house by a fine company, with all the scenery and mechanical effects, that were used in the original productions.

 Hal Reid's plays,  lately,  have been enjoying great favor and attracting large audiences. At the Old Cross Roads, Human Hearts and Roanoke by Reid are all masterpieces but not to be compared in heart interest, mechanical and melodramatic construction with the best of all, The Knobs O' Tennessee. Seats are now ready. The management has given this play a remarkable cast. At Falk's Opera House to-night. Lafayette Advertiser 1/11/1902.






The "Storm Beaten" troupe gave two performances here during the week, and met with great favor. It is a deserving company, and we wish it success.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/11/1890.



Coming to Falk's Opera-house.

The Lone Star State has long proved a fertile theme for the pens of the author and playwright. Probably no country of any age can furnish more interesting or romantic stories, and its heroes are classed among the greatest in American history. It is a fitting tribute that the gifted son of a sister Southern State should be one of the greatest impersonators of the heroic deeds of Texas men, and Mr. Albert Taylor, a native of fair Alabama, has received the highest enconiums from both press and public for his splendid characterization of Jim Bowie, one of the brave defenders of his native country during the Mexican war of 1836. In addition to a thrilling and forceful story, replete with heart interest and startling situations, "Texas" contains a strong comedy element and is interspersed throughout with strong and original specialties. - San Antonio Express, December 16, 1894.

 "Texas" will be presented Sunday afternoon at 2:30 at Falk's Opera-house.
Lafayette Gazette 1/11/1896.

Indian Musicians at Falk's.
The troop of Indian musicians under the management of Courtney M. Young, played at Falk's Opera House last Saturday night and discoursed the sweetest music heard in this town for some time. The audience was small, but everybody in the house seemed to be delighted with the entertainment. The manager, Mr. Young, is a most affable gentleman and those who had the pleasure of acquaintance with him were impressed with the uniform courtesy with which he treats everyone. Lafayette Gazette 1/12/1895.


The Georgia Minstrels.

The engagement of the Georgia Minstrels at the Peavery Grand last evening proved a popular one in spite of the humidity of the atmosphere. The house was not uncomfortable and was filled with an unappreciative audience.

The Georgia Minstrels comprise of the oldest organizations of this character on the road. It is composed entirely of colored singers and comedians, many of them well known to the theater going public. The performance the company gives is a first class one. The singing was excellent, the choruses being particularly appreciated and calling forth encores. The songs were familiar ones, but were of the character the public seldom tires of. The performers responded t0 encores of songs and dances with evident reluctance, for on the stage, with the physical efforts of the comedians, it was hot -- extremely hot -- judging by the perspiring comedians. -- Sioux City Journal. This company will be at Falk's Opera House, Sunday, Jan 13.
Lafayette Gazette 1/12/1895.



 "Pawn Ticket 210." - This beautiful and thrilling play was rendered in a most pleasing and artistic way by the Sheldon Stock Company last night to a large and appreciative audience. We were present on this occasion and can speak knowingly of the performance and performers. We have not space our command to do full justice to either the play or players. The play is good and the players elegant. Everyone rendered his or her role in a most artistic and pleasing way. Miss Hazel Harrison, as Bessie Fairfax, a child of nature simply captured the house and held it from beginning to end. She is petite, cute,  vivacious and charming. Miss Monica Fahey, as Ethel Wayne, the pursued, filled the role to perfection and carried the audience with her. Harry Sheldon, as Jim Bixby, a man who had seen better days, displayed to the fullest extent the great histrionic ability wherewith he is gifted. He is an excellent actor and can do full justice to any role he assumes.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1900. 


    

"The Little Homestead."

The success of "The Little Homestead" comes to Falk's Opera House Wednesday Jan. 20, is due largely to the fact that no attempt is made to exaggerate on what might have been an actual life story. The characters are taken from life and the pretty tale is but the simple recital of chapters in a life's history. A play with the home as the central object is bound to touch the popular pulse and herein lies the charm of "The Little Homestead," which is from the pen of W. B. Patton, author of "The Minister's Son."
Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1904.




Coming to Falk's Opera House: 

 Manager Falk announces the coming of the Krauss stout Big Company at the Opera House for a special one night engagement Sunday, January 23rd in the great New-York sensational play "The Police Inspector".


  This is a big scenic production and will be presented with new and special scenery. This is a strictly first class company in every respect. Mr. Krauss has played engagements here and always has the best. And this season he had an exceptionally strong company. An extra feature of this sterling attraction is Marie Fellows, the phenomenal Contralto in Illustrated songs; carrying a $1,000.00 (one thousand dollars) stereopticon outfit for the proper presentation of the same. Nothing like it ever produced in our city.

 
Don't forget the date. One night only Sunday, January 23rd.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/15/1898.




NEGRO ACTORS.

The last issue of the Baton Rouge Advocate contains some very pertinent remarks anent to negro theatrical companies. The comments of our contemporary were elicited by a recent performance of Billy Kersands' aggregation before an audience of cultured Baton Rougeans. The Advocate is right. A decent regard for the proprieties should cause white people to keep away from the vulgar exhibitions of negroes who have absolutely no business to appear on the stage of a theater patronized by the Caucasian race. Only a few weeks ago Southern newspapers very properly censured the president of the United States because he dined with a negro of education and good manners. The criticisms could not have been to severe, but while we are throwing stones at the chief executive we should not engage in building a glass house for ourselves, as the missiles may come back to us. It is questionable if it is more reprehensible for a white man to eat at the same table with a negro of known culture than it is for a Southern gentleman to take his wife and daughter to listen to the very objectionable jokes of a coarse negro whose only attractions are an abnormal pair of jawbones and a large mouth. The unedifying spectacle of an illiterate darkey entertaining white people of refinement should not be tolerated in this country. The Advocate very forcefully says that "negro theaters are for negro actors and white theaters for white actors. The Advocate continues.
" If there is one question upon which the South stands absolutely solid and united, it is the negro question. Not only our great thinkers and writers, but our humblest citizens, have well-defined and wholesome views on this subject. Their views are not harmful, or injurious or unjust to the negro, but by reason of the peculiar and paramount ethical and sociological questions involved, we are forced to take strong and extreme positions and stand like bulwarks of stone against every shadow and suspicion of encroachment upon the line of demarcation between the races.

"Social and intellectual pleasures and all the pastimes we enjoy must be all the pastimes we enjoy must be absolutely and entirely separate and apart from joint participation of the races. Assuming that the entertainment offered was of the highest order, we hold that we are inconsistent and absolutely culpable in turning our play-house over the negroes and placing them as our entertainers and ourselves as guests.

"The stage and dressing rooms, the scenery, draperies and trappings that we use, the mimic drawing-rooms and landscapes that our ladies and children occupy are not fit and proper things for even the temporary use of a party of negro men. It is a desecration of such t things and a lowering of the standard of our ideals when we do such things.

“Think of the exaltation of our ideals and facial contortions and idiotic prattle of Billy Kersands !

“It seems a travesty upon decent propriety that the rusty and faded antics, the harsh and horrid nightmare of sounds and the repulsive countenance of such a creature could be set up as a program of entertainment for ladies and gentlemen.


“There is not one shadow of excuse about the whole. There was not one single ray of intellectual enjoyment. There was not a single note of melody from a single throat, and save and excepting the ventriloquism and the contortions of the boneless negro, there was nothing on the program worthy of a moment’s notice.

“But its worthiness or unworthiness from an artistic standpoint is not to be considered. The question is, Can we afford to give our play-house and its belongings over to a company of negroes and make them our entertainers and be their guests? We think not, if we expect to hold to the high ideals that separate us on all lines of social and personal association.”
From the Baton Rouge Advocate and in the Lafayette Gazette 1/18/1902.

 




NEGRO ACTORS.

The last issue of the Baton Rouge Advocate contains some very pertinent remarks anent to negro theatrical companies. The comments of our contemporary were elicited by a recent performance of Billy Kersands' aggregation before an audience of cultured Baton Rougeans. The Advocate is right. A decent regard for the proprieties should cause white people to keep away from the vulgar exhibitions of negroes who have absolutely no business to appear on the stage of a theater patronized by the Caucasian race. Only a few weeks ago Southern newspapers very properly censured the president of the United States because he dined with a negro of education and good manners. The criticisms could not have been too severe, but while we are throwing stones at the chief executive we should not engage in building a glass house for ourselves, as the missiles may come back to us. It is questionable if it is more reprehensible for a white man to eat at the same table with a negro of known culture than it is for a Southern gentleman to take his wife and daughter to listen to the very objectionable jokes of a coarse negro whose only attractions are an abnormal pair of jawbones and a large mouth. The unedifying spectacle of an illiterate darkey entertaining white people of refinement should not be tolerated in this country. The Advocate very forcefully says that "negro theaters are for negro actors and white theaters for white actors. The Advocate continues. "If
there is one question upon which the South stands absolutely solid and united, it is the negro question. Not only our great thinkers and writers, but our humblest citizens, have well-defined and wholesome views on this subject. Their views are not harmful, or injurious or unjust to the negro, but by reason of the peculiar and paramount ethical and sociological questions involved, we are forced to take strong and extreme positions and stand like bulwarks of stone against every shadow and suspicion of encroachment upon the line of demarcation between the races.

 "Social and intellectual pleasures and all the pastimes we enjoy must be all the pastimes we enjoy must be absolutely and entirely separate and apart from joint participation of the races. Assuming that the entertainment offered was of the highest order, we hold that we are inconsistent and absolutely culpable in turning our play-house over the negroes and placing them as our entertainers and ourselves as guests.

"The stage and dressing rooms, the scenery, draperies and trappings that we use, the mimic drawing-rooms and landscapes that our ladies and children occupy are not fit and proper things for even the temporary use of a party of negro men. It is a desecration of such t things and a lowering of the standard of our ideals when we do such things.

“Think of the exaltation of our ideals and facial contortions and idiotic prattle of Billy Kersands !

“It seems a travesty upon decent propriety that the rusty and faded antics, the harsh and horrid nightmare of sounds and the repulsive countenance of such a creature could be set up as a program of entertainment for ladies and gentlemen.


“There is not one shadow of excuse about the whole. There was not one single ray of intellectual enjoyment. There was not a single note of melody from a single throat, and save and excepting the ventriloquism and the contortions of the boneless negro, there was nothing on the program worthy of a moment’s notice.

“But its worthiness or unworthiness from an artistic standpoint is not to be considered. The question is, Can we afford to give our play-house and its belongings over to a company of negroes and make them our entertainers and be their guests? We think not, if we expect to hold to the high ideals that separate us on all lines of social and personal association.”
From the Baton Rouge Advocate and in the Lafayette Gazette 1/18/1902.








“The Knobs o’ Tennessee.”


Saturday, Jan. 18, Hal Reid’s best effort in melodrama, “The Knobs o’ Tennessee,” will be presented at our local play-house by a fine company, with all the scenery and mechanical effects that were used in the original production. Lafayette Gazette 1/18/1902.








At the Opera House. - Laughter holding both its sides, as old John Milton put it, pervades "Jane" which has been given first place as one of the funniest of the funny comedies of the day. Wherever acted it literally packed the theater in every city where it was produced. "Jane" chases dull care away without an effort. Fretting people laugh at it in spite of themselves, and leave the theater after the final curtain much the better for an evening of unalloyed fun. Unusually strong is the present cast. At the Lafayette Opera House Sunday.
Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.

 

JANE.

The result of deception is no better illustrated than in the greatest of all comedies "Jane" which comes to the Lafayette Opera House next Sunday night, January 20. To know that the prodigal protégé misrepresents to his guardian that he is married, and that his wife's extravagance causes him to draw heavily on his fortune, while in reality he does it to pay his gambling debts, and the untimely arrival of the guardian, who comes to see the wife, place the young spendthrift in a position that can hardly be acceptable, especially as he desires that the guardian must not know that he has been deceiving him, and to carry out his deception it will be necessary to present his wife and offspring to the guardian. The predicament of the young man can be imagined. But at the last moment, Jane, his pretty housemaid, comes to his assistance and arranges matters so that she will act the part of a wife to him during the stay of the guardian. Jane however is secretly married to her master's valet, who is jealous and irritable that during the visit of the guardian he gives the secret away. Lafayette Gazette 1/19/1895.


JANE. (1)

Frohman's brilliant comedy success, "Jane" will occupy the boards at the Opera House for an engagement of one night next Sunday next. The company presenting "Jane" is one of great merit, as the name of Frohman would suggest. Mr. Frohman has an enviable reputation for handling only the most legitimate attractions and "Jane" is no exception to the rule. Adapted from the French, "Jane" possesses all the elements of bright sparkling wit and refined humor, always found in the gay capital of the sister Republic, and "Jane" has the advantage over them all that there is no risqué situation and nothing in the line of double entendres. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1895.

JANE (2)

Frohman's great company appears at the Opera House next Sunday evening Jan. 20 for one night only, presenting the farcical success "Jane." The story tells of the adventure of a young bachelor of prodigal ways, who secures money from the trustee of an estate by representing himself to be married. When the trustee suddenly appears on the scene, the young man, forced to provide a wife for the situation, makes a business arrangement with his housemaid, Jane, and from this plot of the morning, a housemaid becomes the wife of her master at noon, and has to account for two children, their offspring, at evening. The household and neighbors are all turned into base liars and deceivers, all for sordid gain and vain glory all in the morning, noon and night. As a farce comedy, however, it accomplishes its own and creates roars of laughter that are not for between. 

Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1895. 

 

Prisoner of Algiers.
At the Opera House.," "The Prisoner of Algiers," advertised for the 24th. inst. to occupy the boards at the Opera House comes to this town very highly recommended. From the Press clippings, it is a very good show. Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1901.


 




Faust's Minstrels. - Ted. F. Faust's Minstrels will appear at Falk's Opera House Jan. 28. This is said to be a high class company and those who are fond of a good minstrel show have a big treat in store. Laf. Advertiser 1/20/1904.


FAUST AT THE OPERA HOUSE.

The favorite Southers Tolson Co. will present the powerful Romantic Drama Faust at the Opera House next Thursday night Jan. 25 with Edwin Southers in his great masterpiece of Mephisto (The Devil,) supported by the clever southern actor. Mr. Chas. C. Tolson as Faust, Miss Madeline Price as the Dame Martha character and Miss Lorena Graves as the local Marguerite. Special scenery and electrical effects are carried by this company and a satisfaction performance is guaranteed. The Catholic Mass and Gloria in Vatria as sung by the Southers Quintette is a feature of the performance. Admission 25, 50, and 75 cents. Reserved seats at Falk's. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.



Ten Nights in a Bar Room. Although this play has been before the public for so many years, still there are a few plays that possess the drawing powers of this piece to-day.

The secret of its success is that the story is a popular one, and the incidents of the play are familiar to every man, woman and child in the country.

Geyer & Griswold have selected their large company with the greatest of care, employing only first class talent. Band concert at 7 o'clock nightly.

Everybody in the country can afford to see Ten Nights in a Bar Room played under a large water proof tent at the price of admission which is only 25 cents for adults, children 15 cents, children under six years free. So come and bring your whole family. Remember the date. Lafayette, Friday, Jan. 22.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1904.



MR. DEB'S LECTURE.

On Friday, Jan. 26, at Falk's hall, Eugene V. Debs, the most popular leader of the working classes in the United States, will deliver his famous lecture "Labor and Liberty." Wherever Mr. Debs has spoken he has created a very favorable impression of his ability to instruct and entertain his audience. He is a master of the English language and his strongest characteristic is his fearlessness. Even those who detest his doctrines concede that he is an honest and brainy man. It is to be hoped that the audience that will greet him at Falk's hall next Friday will be large and of a representative character. No admission will be charged, but we understand that those who have subscribed will be provided with reserved seats.
A committee, composed of the following gentlemen, has been appointed to receive Mr. Debs: Hon. Wm. Campbell, H. Church, Judge C. Debaillon, Jno. F. Bowen, B. J. Pellerin, Rev. C. C. Wier, F. H. Landry, Homer Mouton, Dr. F. R. Tolson, I. A. Broussard, H. L. Fontenot, Chas. D. Caffery, F. C. Triay, Crow Girard, Paul Demanade, A. M. Martin, H. Jagou, J. B. Coffey, Dr. N. P. Moss, J. B. Coumes, E. G. Voothies, E. W. Chase.
Mr. Debs will arrive on the afternoon train from the East. He will be the guest of the Crescent Hotel.
Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900.



At the Opera House. - Next Thursday, Jan. 25, "Faust" will be presented at Falk's Opera-house. The favorite Southern actor, Mr. Chas. C. Tolson, will play the role of "Faust." Miss Madeline Price will appear as Dame Martha and Miss Lorena Graves as Marguerite. The company carries its own sceneries and electrical effects. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1900

Eugene V. Debs.

The brilliant orator and fearless leader will lecture at Falk's Opera House Friday January 26th, 1900 at 8 p. m., subject Labor and Liberty. Expenses will be paid by a subscription and all who have so cheerfully subscribed and will be provided with tickets which entitles them to reserve seats. There will be no admission fee and a cordial invitation is extended to all.

COM. ARRANGEMENTS.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.





FAUST AT THE OPERA HOUSE.

The favorite Southers Tolson Co. will present the powerful Romantic Drama Faust at the Opera House next Thursday night Jan. 25 with Edwin Southers in his great masterpiece of Mephisto (The Devil,) supported by the clever southern actor. Mr. Chas. C. Tolson as Faust, Miss Madeline Price as the Dame Martha character and Miss Lorena Graves as the local Marguerite. Special scenery and electrical effects are carried by this company and a satisfaction performance is guaranteed. The Catholic Mass and Gloria in Vatria as sung by the Southers Quintette is a feature of the performance. Admission 25, 50, and 75 cents. Reserved seats at Falk's. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1900.



The Arlington Minstrels. - The famous Arlington Minstrels will appear at Falk's opera house, Thursday, January 25. The members of this company are all white and their delineations of negro character are smooth and refined, much better than a genuine negro minstrels. The company is a large one and comes highly recommended, are are sure of a full house as they will play at popular prices, 25, 35 and 50 cents. Seats now on sale at Falk's.

Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1894.









The A. M. Hill Comedy Company.

 The A. M. Hill Comedy Company gave a delightful performance at Falk's opera house last night. The performance consisted of three charming little one-act plays. The first one was called "Love's Victory." It is a remarkably sweet little piece told in the excellent language of Minnie Maddern Fisk. The story gave Miss Agnes Hill an excellent opportunity to display her talent, which is of the very highest order, while the other members of the company took excellent care of the characters assigned them. The second piece was the "Golden Goose," an uproariously funny piece written by Sutherland Edwards. The story and plot are most humorous and the audience was well nigh convulsed with laughter from the opening of the story to the fall of the curtain. The one that appeared to please most all, however, was "Brazen Born," the closing play. It lasted for about an hour and there was a laugh for almost every minute of the sixty. The situations are particularly ludicrous and errors occasioned by mistaken identity formed a wide field for the remarkably clever company to exhibit their art. So pleased was the audience with the performance that the management was prevailed upon to spend a second night in Lafayette. Accordingly this excellent company will be seen again to-night in Falk's opera house. Reserved seats for sale at Mr. Falk's store. Lafayette Gazette 1/20/1894.


Gorton's New Minstrels at Falk's.


At Falk's Opera House Jan. 22nd. Minstrelry is the most democratic of all amusements. It appeals alike to the merchant, clerk, mechanic, farmer, author, laborer, the clergy, the rich and the poor. They all thoroughly enjoy a good, clean minstrel entertainment.


Gorton's Minstrels has long been a success for over a quarter of a century. Innocent amusements without vulgarity will always wear, while those on an inferior quality last but a short time. In attending "Gorton's" you will see a complete, clean Minstrel company, up-to-date in every line, producing genuine minstrelry. You will see an enterprise that never issues exaggerated vaporings, relating to fabulous accounts of financial outlay, extravagant and visionary equipment.


You will see all that is advertised. The greatest Vocalists, Musicians, and Comedians traveling with Gorton's All White Minstrels.


Lafayette Advertiser 1/21/1899.





At Falk's. - The Chas. King Co., which appeared at Falk's Opera House
If manager Falk gives us always such attractions the success of the theatre will become a settled fact in Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 1/21/1899.




A First Class Company. - The Chas. King Co., which appeared at Falk's Opera House last Sunday in "Rip Van Winkle" and again Monday night in another section is a first class attraction. They were greeted both nights by a large public, and both plays were well received. If manager Falk gives us always such attractions the success of the theater will become a selected fact in Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 1/21/1899.
 

 




Amusements.

Charles King, the well-known and popular actor, played "Rip Van Winkle" to a large audience in Falk's Opera-house last Sunday and the following night appeared in "Cast Adrift." Mr. King delighted his audience in both plays, but he was particularly interesting as "Rip Van Winkle." Mr. King was well seconded by Jack Care, who is an actor of no mean ability. It is safe to say that everybody was pleased with both performances, although the one Sunday night were judging from the liberal applause, intensely interesting and greatly appreciated by all who witnessed it. Manager Falk, in obedience to the expressed desire of a large number of theatre goers, has prevailed upon Mr. King to return here with his company on the 29th of this month to present Monte Cristo to the people of Lafayette. It was Mr. King's intention to play Monte Cristo last Monday night, but he did not do so because the necessary stage scenery did not reach him in time. As Mr. King excels in the production of Monte Cristo the local theatre-goers can be sure to enjoy a splendid histrionic treat on the 29th.

Last night the Schubert Symphony Club entertained a large audience with excellent music. This troupe of musicians is composed of artists who can always be depended upon to give a good performance.

To-morrow night the Gorton Minstrels will perform. This company is said to be a very clever one. It is highly spoken of by the press and comes with splendid recommendations. A special feature of this company is the orchestra and from all reports it is deservedly popular. Lafayette Gazette 1/21/1899.



A DRAMATIC CLUB.

We understand that there is some talk of organizing a dramatic club of home talent to produce plays for the benefit of the high school fund. We believe that enough dramatic talent exists among our young people to enable them to produce a comedy or society drama in a creditable manner, and we sincerely hope that the idea will be carried out. The cause is a good one and an entertainment given in its interest should bring out a full house and net a neat sum for the school. A play followed by a dance would probably prove attractive. If our young people are willing to devote the time necessary for study and rehearsals, the people should certainly be willing to patronize them.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/21/1893.




A Rare Treat.

The amusement loving members of the community should not forget that Mr. Chas. F. Underhill will give his Recital of the great play "Rip Van Winkle" at Falk's opera house, February 2. The necessary guarantee for his presence here has been given by our public-spirited citizens, and thanks to them, Lafayette has a rare treat in store.

An idea of what the entertainment is can be gotten from the following:

"It is neither a reading nor a lecture nor a mere elocutionary programme. It is more. It is the complete story of the greatest and most popular drama of modern times told by one person, but one who has the rare gift of being able to appear like several. With none of the aids that changes of scenery and costume lend to dramatic expression Mr. Underhill gives the old legend of "Rip Van Winkle" in its dramatized form, depending on changes of vocal and facial expressions for individualizing the different personages, and they tell the story themselves, the characteristics of each one being brought out so vividly that after the first introduction there is no need of naming them, so easy it to recognize them on each re-appearance. Before the Recital is half finished, the audience has been made to feel as though actually in the presence of many people and shifting scenery owing to the gift of interpretation that goes with a really great Impersonator."
Lafayette Gazette 1/22/1898.


Home Minstrelry. - Mr. Geo. Wilson, a clever comedian, is in town, and is endeavoring to organize a local theatrical company. A rehearsal was held Thursday night, and everything points to a success in his venture. He comes well recommended and The Gazette hopes that he and our home boys will meet with nothing but success.
Lafayette Gazette 1/22/1898.

Opera House. The Krause-Stout Big Company will present the great new York sensational play, "The Police Inspector" at Falk's Opera-house, Sunday night, January 23. You can not afford to miss this, as it is a strictly first class company in every respect and will positively appear only one night. Don't forget the date.
Lafayette Gazette 1/22/1898.


Opera House.

The Krauss-Stout Big Company will present the great New York sensational play, "The Police Inspector" at Falk's Opera-house, Sunday night, January 23. You cannot afford to miss this, as it is a strictly first class company in every respect and will positively appear only one night. Don't forget the date. Lafayette Gazette 1/22/1898.

A Crowded House.
The opening performance of the Krause-Stout Company at the opera house last night was witnessed by one of the largest audiences ever assembled in Cleburne. Mr. Krause has with him this season probably the best repertoire company ever brought to this city, and the enthusiasm of the audience last night gave evidence of general satisfaction.

One of the most pleasing features of the evening's performance was the character singing by Miss Marie Fellows, illustrated with beautiful stereopticon views. This was something entirely new in Cleburne, and was vociferously applauded. --- Ex.
Lafayette Gazette 1/22/1898.



The Event Of The Season. - Manager Falk announces the coming of the ever popular Krause Stout Big Company for a special one night engagement at the Opera House, Sunday Jan. in the Great New York sensational play "The Police Inspector."
"This season there has been a lavish expenditure of money in selecting actors of recognized ability and plays that will meet the approval of the theatre going public. The recognized standing in the theatrical profession of this company is excellent and this season they have outdone all previous efforts in securing new plays, people, scenery, up-to-date singing, and carry a $1,000 stereoptician outfit for illustrated songs and calcium light effects. Extra engagement of Marie Fellows, the phenomenal contralto, illustrating all the best songs including "I Love Her Just the Same," "Just Behind the Times," "My Mother Was a Lady," "In the Baggage Coach Ahead," "The Rector's Daughter Neil," "The Organ Grinder's Serenade," "If I Could Only Blot Out the Past," and "When the Lights Went Out." All illustrated with beautiful life size colored pictures.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/22/1898.




Last Saturday's Entertainment.

As we predicted in our last issue, the entertainment given at Falk's Hall in the interest of the Lafayette High School was a decided success.

Early Saturday morning and even at noon the weather was threatening indeed; and, for a while it was feared that many would be unable to attend the play on account of rain. But, as night came on, the skies cleared up, sunken hopes arose again, and additional interest in our Opelousas friends was manifested.

Scarcely had the doors been opened when the crowd began to pour in, and , fully an hour before the time appointed for the raising of the curtain, it became apparent that the audience would be larger than had been expected at any time.

A large and appreciative audience was not anxiously awaiting the opening of the play. All preparations being completed, the intense desire of the crowd to see "Above the Clouds," was changed to undivided attention.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1897



Coming Feb. 6 & 7, Frank  Johns Company at Falk's. Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1897.



The Georgia Big Eight, a minstrel aggregation of cheap wit and african (unreadable word) , perpetrated themselves on the public here two nights this week, the last night they were given an antiseptic reception interspersed with over (unreadable word) fruit. Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1897.  
Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1897.




Coming to Falk's Opera House. - After a night with "A Wise Member" an enthusiastic writer for the Cincinnati Enquirer says: "A Wise Member" not only tells a story which keeps the average auditor in constant anticipation but is filled with crispy, snappy, bright and witty lines, the cleverest up-to-date topical songs and catchiest "Coon" melodies ridiculously funny scenes and situations, vaudeville features that are absolutely new and startling girls, costumes that are gorgeous, yet in keeping and in good taste, scenery and stage accessories that appeal to the eye, terpsichorean achievements that cannot be excelled, a fund of humor that holds one in constant merriment from the rise to the fall of the curtain, and best of all, a case of unusually clever people. The second season of this play will undoubtedly be even a greater success than the first.
This attraction will be at Lafayette Opera House one night, Saturday Jan. 24.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/24/1903. 

At the Opera-house. - The performance given by the "Monte Cristo" troupe Sunday and Monday nights drew extra good audiences, who loudly expressed their high appreciation of the fine acting. It is an excellent company. Lafayette Advertiser 1/24/1891. 


Mr. B. Falk has erected an apparatus in the rear of his Opera House, and had made the necessary arrangements to have gasoline lights both in the Opera House and in his store. This is a big improvement over coal oil lamps.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/24/1891.

The performances given by the "Monte Cristo" troupe Sunday and Monday nights drew extra good audiences, who loudly expressed their high appreciation of the fine acting. It is an excellent company. Lafayette Advertiser 1/24/1891.




AT THE JEFFERSON THEATER.

Finnigan's Ball at the Jefferson Wednesday night proved to be a most entertaining "Ball." A large and fashionable audience was present, the house being almost full. Before the performance the Jefferson orchestra rendered a number of fine selections and played the score for the performance. The orchestra is an excellent musical organization and will compare favorably with city orchestra.
The performance, it can hardly be called a play, for there is practically no plot, just a lot of funny business swung on to tenuously gauzy connection, was decidedly amusing, a number of the acts evoking great laughter and applause. The company as a whole was very capable; in fact there was not a single "stick" on the stage; but Ed. F. Gallagher as Casey, J. J. Barret as Finnigan and Fred Wilson as the Widdie Garrity very easily occupied "center" in their roles. Miss Mayme Taylor as Mrs. Casey did well and made a big hit with her beautiful singing. The show was good all through and was well worth the price of admission.


Iris. - A large audience braved the bad weather Monday night to witness "Iris" at the Jefferson. It proved somewhat disappointing to some, but on the whole was pretty fair.


Manager Girard has secured the following attractions for the Jefferson, all of them high class companies.

Jan. 27 - Sandy Bottom.
Jan. 28 - A Chicago Tramp.
Feb. 3 - The Unwritten Law.
Feb. 4 - Creston Clarke in Monday Baeucaire.
Feb. 12 - Lewis Morrison in Faust.



SANDY BOTTOM. - "Sandy Bottom" is a play which appeals to the majority of people on account of its quietness, its heart interest - in fact, in combination of both pathos and comedy in a way which has so often been described as the "Laughter which chases away tears." A play, to enjoy lasting popularity, must possess these qualifications or else fail to long interest of fickle public. Like "The Old Homestead," "Human Hearts," "Alabama" and "Arizona," a play must be intense enough to hold the interest of the auditors, at the same time have sufficient pathos to touch the strings of the human heart.
"Sandy Bottom" is a simple, plain, truthful story - a story of the sun-kissed hills of Arkansas in the southeastern part of the State - a locality, where the latch string is always out and every man and woman honest until proven otherwise. The drama will be presented here under the management of Hampton and Hopkins who successful money-making trips. It is promised that it will be given in a superb manner by a company of unusual excellence. "Sandy Bottom" will be the attraction at the Jefferson, Friday, January 27. Balcony, 50 cents. Parquette, 75 cents.



A CHICAGO TRAMP. - Lovers of high class amusement will be afforded a rare treat in the form of an up-to-date sensational comedy drama. "A Chicago Tramp," which makes its appearance here on Saturday night, January 28, at the Jefferson. The show is replete with witty lines and sayings and abundant with side splitting situations. The cast is comprised of recognized performers fully capable of portraying their respective roles. The vaudeville olio of of a pure, clean nature, and one that is always sure to gain the hearty approval of all who witness it. All in all the show is one that will amuse, minus anything that might tend to offend the most fastidious. The Megaphone quartet will be one of the special features in the show while the appearance of Olga Schmoll Debaugh, a violin virtuoso of international repute, will be a grand treat to all lovers of good music. Don't miss seeing "A Chicago Tramp" when it comes to this city. Balcony, 50 cents; Parquette, 75 cents.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/25/1905.






Hart, The Laugh King.

Stanley Hart, the laugh king, will give some of his popular entertainments at Falk's hall. He will appear on the 26th, 27th, 28th and 29th of January. The Adairville (Kentucky) Banner has this to say of Dr. Hart:

Dr. Stanley Warde Hart, a graduate in hypnotism from the New York Institute of Science, closed a series of four entertainments at the opera-house in this city last Saturday night. Considering the unfavorable weather the performances were well patronized, and were highly amusing and instructive. Dr. Hart is a cultured gentleman, thoroughly reliable in every particular, and made many friends during his stay in our town. One of the most remarkable feats we have ever witnessed was performed by Dr. Hart. A committee of home men addressed a note to a business man in town, placed it in a blank envelope and put the envelope in a lock box in the post-office amongst other mail. The key to the box was then secreted under a roll of carpet at Rayburn and Smith's store, and a route was determined by committee, to be followed by Dr. Hart. When all was in readiness Dr. Hart took Marshal S. T. Benson, one of the committee, by the hand, and blindfolded he started from McGee Bros. & Co's., went direct to the key, traversed the route to the post-office, unlocked the box, selected the envelope and delivered it to Geo. D. Cregor, to whom it was addressed on the inside. Lafayette Gazette 1/25/1902.






The "C" Social.

 The people of Lafayette are reminded that the "C" social will take place at Falk's hall on next Tuesday night. Beginning at 6 o'clock, an elegant supper will be served at popular prices. At 8 o'clock the rendition of the following program will begin.

Piano duet ... Clara Clark, Clarissa Coleman.

 Song ... CeceliaClayton.

Recitation ... Cynthia Crow

Piano solo ... Clothilde Chachere

Mandolin and Guitar duet ... Cora Caldwell, Clara Carey.

 Recitation ... Celia Curtis.

 Piano duet ... Cleopatra Carrington, Cleopatra Conway.

 Song ... Clavie Cumington.

 Violin solo ... Carmen Cousa.
 Admission 10 cents.
Lafayette Gazette 1/26/1901.



A GOOD TROUPE. -  The Advertiser cheerfully recommends the Chas. Tolson Company to Lafayette theater goers and hope that this deserving Opera Company be given a large house at their Sunday night performance. The drama "Prisoners of Algiers" was rendered Thursday night to a large and appreciative audience and the comedy "Don't Tell My Wife" should receive the same patronage Sunday night. Don't forget to-morrow night at Falk's Opera House. Laf. Advertiser 1/26/1901. 
 
 
 


At Falk’s.

“Don’t Tell My Wife,” at Falk’s Opera House to-morrow night by Chas. Tolson company. Laf. Advertiser 1/26/1901.
A clean performance, a clever Farce Comedy, bright specialties and a magnificent Orchestra are some of the features of Wiedemann’s Big Show in “The Steam Laundry” at Falk’s Opera House at Falk’s Opera House, on January 30th, 1901. Lafayette Advertiser 1/26/1901.
Wiedmann’s Big Show in the Comedy Winner, “The Steam Laundry,” the attraction at Falk’s Opera House on Jan. 30th, presents the most unique street parade ever seen in the city, using two bands, the first in the uniform of the Prussian Cavalry and the second, the laughable conceit, “The Laundryman’s Outing,” a Chinese Band with native instruments. Lafayette Advertiser 1/26/1901.





Last Saturday's Entertainment.

As we predicted in our last issue, the entertainment given at Falk's Hall in the interest of the Lafayette High School was a decided success.

Early Saturday morning and even at noon the weather was threatening indeed; and, for a while it was feared that many would be unable to attend the play on account of rain. But, as night came on, the skies cleared up, sunken hopes arose again, and additional interest in our Opelousas friends was manifested.

Scarcely had the doors been opened when the crowd began to pour in, and , fully an hour before the time appointed for the raising of the curtain, it became apparent that the audience would be larger than had been expected at any time.

A large and appreciative audience was not anxiously awaiting the opening of the play. All preparations being completed, the intense desire of the crowd to see "Above the Clouds," was changed to undivided attention.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1897



There will be a grand ball at Falk's Opera house. Mardi Gras.
Laf. Adv. 1/26/1895.


A great treat is in store for all lovers of music, at the opera house next Tuesday night. The Schubert Symphony Club and Lady Quartette will give one (unreadable word) highly entertaining musicales that has been the delight of refined audiences at every place this company has visited. Laf. Adv. 1/26/1895.



A GREAT EVENT AT FALK'S.

In Louisiana, America's greatest sensational melodrama, at the Opera House on Sunday Jan. 31., is a beautiful story of Louisiana and Texas, and one of the most sensational plays ever produced on the stage.

There is a head-on collision between two trains in full view of the audience. In the distance you see two trains moving down the mountain side in and out of tunnels; all at once there is a crash and you see one of the most thrilling effects you ever witnessed.


The scenic settings of the four acts are all original and realistic. The names of the principals of the cast give promise of a strong dramatic production. The mechanical effects are all original. This play is assuredly one of the most interesting events of the entire season. Secure your seats early.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/27/1904. 




EUGENE V. DEBS
Arrives on the Afternoon Train and Delivers His Famous Lecture at night. 

Eugene V. Debs, the most popular leader of the laboring classes in America, and who, next to William J. Bryan, has the largest personal following in this country, arrived in Lafayette on the afternoon train yesterday. He was met at the train by a number of gentlemen and escorted to the Crescent Hotel where he registered. He was introduced to a large number of people with whom he chatted very pleasantly.

Mr. Debs spoke last night to a crowded house at the opera. Owing to the lateness of the hour we can not say as much about the lecture as we would like. He was given a flattering ovation by the audience and was greatly applauded throughout his lecture.
Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1900. 




At Falk's.

Billy Kersand's big mouth attracted a large audience at Falk's Opera House last Sunday night. The show was a good one, and we believe all who attended laughed for their moneys worth. Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1894.



Maude Atkinson.

 Everyone who witnessed the performance of last evening was unanimous in their conviction that this play is as instructive and entertaining as any one could wish for, and the moral that is drawn from the play as it is characterized by the wily "Iza" is one that cannot soon be forgotten. -- St. Louis Republic.

 Maud Atkinson will appear at Falk's Opera Feb. 1, 2, 3, and 4. Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1894.


The Clemenceau Case.

 Miss Atkinson was at her best last night in the role of Iza, in the French play, The Clemenceau Case. Her conception of the part was the true one -- that of a beautiful young girl, somewhat vain and foolish but not bad at heart, who was formed and fashioned by a scheming heartless mother, whom she loved, into a bold and designing woman, devoid of moral sense and full of guile and all sensual attractions; one who loved her husband up to her husband up to her full capacity, but who preferred to be his mistress rather than his wife in order to escape a wife's restraint. Miss Atkinson's acting was finished as well as full of power, portraying in a lifelike manner the commingled and changed feelings and emotions of her part.

 There was nothing in the presentation of the play that could offend the public taste or be detrimental to morals; it being on the other hand a powerful object-lesson sermon on the dangers and temptations of the world, the flesh and the devil. -- Evening Item.

 Maud Atkinson will open on Feb. 1 a four day's engagement at Falk's Opera House, with this popular and sensational play. Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1894.



The Arlington Minstrels played at Falk's Opera House Thursday night. With the exception of the contortionists, the show is of a decidedly inferior rank. Lafayette Gazette 1/27/1894.

 


Will Lecture. - Mrs. Ada Unruh, national organizer of the W. C. T. U., will be in Lafayette next week. On the 4th of February she will speak in Falk's Opera-house on a subject which should be interesting especially to the apostles of Single Blessedness and to those who have a soft place in their hearts for this abandoned portion of the human race to whom domestic felicity is known only through story and song. Mrs. Unruh, will give a humorous description of the bachelor's ancient and time-honored methods of looking after his household effects, which can not fail to be amusing to the laity, is not instructive to the order. The Sunday following she will deliver another lecture. The subjects, time and place will be announced on the bills and bulletin board. Mrs. Unruh is an able speaker and all who can should hear her lectures. No admission will be charged.
Lafayette Gazette 1/28/1899. 





A Good Show.

The Cyrene Novelty Company gave a pretty exhibition at the Opera-house last night and fully sustained all the good things said of it before its first appearance here.

 The company will appear at a matinee this Saturday afternoon at half past three and again to-night and Sunday night. To those who enjoy a good, clean performance, Cyrene and her associates will please immensely. The prices are extremely low. Reserved seats for adults twenty-five cents and children fifteen cents. Read the endorsements printed elsewhere in this paper.
Lafayette Gazette 1/28/1899.



Opera House.The Cyrene Co., will give a matinee at 3:30 p. m., today Saturday and will play again at night. This Company is a first-class one.
Laf. Advertiser 1/28/1899.  



OPERA HOUSE. The Cyrene Co., will give a matinee at 3:30 p. m., today Saturday and will play again at night. This company is a first class one.
Laf. Adv. 1/28/1899.


Strict investigation will be made on the masqueraders at the Masquerade Ball to be given by the Fire Dept. at Falk's Opera House on Mardi Gras.
Laf. Adv. 1/28/1899.


Buy your tickets now for the Grand Masquerade Ball, Mardi-Gras.
Laf. Adv. 1/28/1899.


A Disappointment. It was announced both in The Advertiser and The Gazette last week that the people of Lafayette would be given a rich treat in the shape of an impersonation of that mythical play, Rip Van Winkle, by Chas. F. Underhill. We regret to say in this issue that Mr. Underhill will not be here on that date. The cause of the failure of Mr. Underhill to be here is briefly this. A letter was received from the Southern Lyceum Bureau of Louisville offering Mr. Underhill at the special price of fifty dollars. This money was raised by fifty men in the town who promised to pay a dollar a-piece towards making up the sum. But it took several days to make up this guarantee. As soon as the guarantee was made up, the Bureau was informed that we had made all the necessary arrangements to have Mr. Underhill here on February 2. Mr. Underhill is slated for Palestine, Texas, February 3. The Bureau made an effort to have Palestine change her date to the 7th, giving us the 3rd, but was unable to do so.
 
We were too late; that is all. However, the people of Lafayette will miss something good and we all may regret it. The Bureau informs us that for about the same guarantee, we can secure Col. Ham for early April. Col. Ham is one of the best humorous lecturers before the public to-day. Mr. Wm. Clegg had the pleasure of hearing him in Baton Rouge some time ago, and he informs us that he is well worth listening to. If the people of Lafayette get over their disappointment in our failure to get Mr. Underhill, we will make an effort to have Col. Ham here about the first of April.
 
We wish to express thanks in the people of Lafayette for having taken such an interest in these platform lectures, and for having contributed so well toward making up the guarantee fund.
Lafayette Gazette 1/29/1898.
 
 



Finnigan's Ball. - Wit and music galore will be found in "Finnigan's Ball," which will be seen at Falk's Opera-house, tonight. Instead of merely brushing and renovating the play, it has been entirely rewritten this season, and is now right up-to-date. The "Ball" is this season the liveliest, wittiest and prettiest collection of singers, dancers, clever comedians and graceful girls that has ever been engaged for this famous comedy.
Lafayette Gazette 1/31/1903. 




"Finnigan's Ball" by some thought he best of all Irish comedies will be the attraction at Falk's Opera-house to-night. The numerous chorus of beautiful girls in new gowns of the latest mode, is said to be one of the best singing aggregations now before the public. Lafayette gazette 1/31/1903.



The Stage. - During the past week three attractions were given at the Opera House; "Sandy Bottom, on Friday night, "A Chicago Tramp" Saturday night, and "In Louisiana" Sunday night. All were excellent and deserved good audiences, but owing to the prevailing grippe and bad weather very few people turned out.  Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1905.



MONSIEUR BEAUCAIRE.

When such reputable and influential news papers as the Atlanta Constitution, The Charleston News and Courier, The Jacksonville, Fla., Times Union, The Columbia State, The Norfolk, Virginia Pilot, The Norfalk Landmark, and others of equal standing devote unusual space in extolling the merits of "Monsieur Beaucaire" the comedy romance adapted from Booth Tarkington's delightfully entertaining novel, in which the renowned legitimate star player. Mr. Creston Clarke is appearing, it might readily be inferred that this attraction has been making a triumphant march through the south, and while consensus of opinion seems to indicate the utter lavishness of the production, from the standard of scenic and costume splendor, no little praise has been bestowed upon the artistic work of Mr. Clarke, and his admirable support.

 For many seasons Mr. Clarke, by virtue of his blood relationship to the late famous actors, John Sleeper Clarke, and Edwin Booth, has been identified with Shakespearean play, and the theatre going public have a very kindly remembrance of his masterful rendition Hamlet, and other serious roles, however, in the instance of "Beaucaire", he gives unmistakable evidence of having absorbed the spirit of his father's comedy talents, rather than the tragic embodiment of his uncle. Edwin Booth's historical efforts, and those who have witnessed Mr. Clarke's charming portrayal of Tarkington's creation, are inclined to believe that he has finally struck the proper vein in order to gratify his most ardent ambition.

 Educated in Paris, Mr. Clarke's knowledge of the French language stands him in good stead for the present undertaking, and those who have had occasion to witness Richard Mansfield's interpretation of the character now being assumed by Mr. Clarke, appear to have no hesitancy in proclaiming the latter superior in some respects and quite the equal of all others in fact that it is seldom that so many honors have been showered upon an actor as have been given to this most estimable favorite, and it is therefore not in the least surprising to note the uncommon interest being manifested toward the engagement of "Monsieur Beaucaire", which is announced for Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Jefferson.

 Those who have read the fascinating story of "Monsieur Beaucaire" with it's scenes and incidents laid in Bath, the famous English watering resort, during the reign of King George, will have some idea regarding the environment essential in order to lend the proper atmosphere, and it is needless to say that these details have been looked after on a scale of genuine magnifigance, thus affording a combination of play and stage settings which cannot fail to appeal to the average amusement friend.

 All in all, the appearance of Creston Clarke, in such an acceptable offering, will more than likely find a substantial reward in this city. -- By the press agent. Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1905.         


To-night at Falk's Opera House "Other People's Money" by Hennesy LeRoy and Co. and Monday next, "The Village Bride" by the Herald Square Co. Don't miss these two performances. Laf. Adv. 2/1/1902



"Other People's Money." Something over two years ago Hennessy Leroyle produced the farcical comedy, "Other People's Money," which will be seen at Falk's Opera-house to-night. On its first presentation the play and star both met with the most pronounced favor and since that time Mr. Leroyle has been portraying the central figure in this comedy, and his portrayal of the man of many peculiarities and characteristics has become mellowed and rounded out as it were with age.
 
The author has furnished the players with a series of highly amusing scenes and situations and it is in the proper exemplification of the several characters and the working out of the story told, that strong coloring is given to this merry play. Good parts make good actors, but on the other hand, how easy it is for a bad actor to spoil a good part. it is therefore necessary, to seek an element of excellence in both part and player as well. That Mr. Leroyle is an excellent artist is evidenced by the fact that the public has placed its approval upon his work and that too in the most hearty manner. For the present season he has succeeded in drawing about him the best supporting company ever seen in the play and those who delight in that manner of play that has a motive, which reeks with laughter, and fairly bubbles with fun should not fail to see the attraction above named.
Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1902. 


The Orchestra's Ball. 

 A ball will be given at Falk's hall to-night by the Lafayette Orchestra. The proceeds will go to that splendid musical organization to purchase some instruments. The members of the orchestra have never failed to respond when called upon by the people to assist at entertainments or celebrations of a public nature, and it is to be hoped that the people of the town will take advantage of this opportunity to show their appreciation. We dare say that no organization has ever shown more readiness to help the town than has the Lafayette Orchestra. Only a few days ago it generously volunteered its services to entertain the Agricultural Society, and it is no exaggeration to say that it contributed largely to the success of the session. Upon different occasions The Gazette was pleased to note the public-spirited displayed by the members of that association. Let the people of the town turn out en masse to-night and attend the ball, which promises to be a very enjoyable affair. The orchestra is composed of the following gentlemen: Walter Mouton, leader; Henry Van der Cruyssen, Charles Jeanmard, Charles Jannaro, Dr. Felix Girard, Henri Gerac, Prof. Von Hofe, Edward Voorhies, Wm. Campbell and George Melchoir.
Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1896. 
 


The "C" Social - Mrs. Sechrest, Missed Edra and Mary Sprole and Bertha Jenkins deserve credit for the success of the entertainment at Falk's hall last Tuesday night. The arrangements at the hall showed that the ladies had worked faithfully to make the affair worthy of the patronage of the public and the large number of people who attended was an evidence that their efforts exerted in behalf of a good cause were fully appreciated.
 
The "art gallery" was the skillful and ingenious work of Miss Bertha Jenkins. This feature of the entertainments afforded no little fun to the audience.
 
The tables were splendidly furnished with good things, all elegantly prepared and neatly served.
 
The program, though unpretentious, was decidedly interesting, all participants acquitting themselves in a most creditable manner.
 
The program was as follows:
 
Recitation - Mrs. Crow Girard.
 
  Instrumental duet - Mrs. Sechrest and Miss Clara Hebert.
 
  Instrumental duet - Misses Cora Desbrest and Aimee Mouton.
 
Song - Miss Jesse Laidlaw.
   Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1901. 
 



QUO-VADIS.

 The cleanest and most moral play ever written and a triumph of untarnished art is what is claimed for "Quo-Vadis" which is to be presented here on Friday, Feb. 22, at Falk's Opera-house by the Carpenter Dramatic Company. The play appeals strongly in setting forth a graphic picture of the period when the Roman empire under Nero was at its best. The incidents of the bool vividly brought out in the drama showing the desperate struggles of the Christians against the despot and his court. The scenes, consisting of eleven stage sets are striking and beautiful. The flight of the Emperor and the burning of Rome is an impressive stage picture. The burning of the Christians is also a scene that stirs the enthusiasm. The singing of the Christians and the prayer and benedictions of the Apostle Peter are solemn and effective, while the original music adds much to its success.

 "Quo Vadis" as a play has the honor of breaking all records as to receipts and attendance in Chicageo, New York and Philadelphia. The company is a strong one and the scenic effect elaborate and of the best. Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1901.  


Minstel's Coming. - Gorton's is the only white company traveling that produces genuine minstrelry. The "Gold Sextette" is one of the many features that no others can duplicate. The comedian's vocalists, dancers and specialists are all bright lights of the minstrel profession, producing more new features, new acts, more laughable oddities and better entertainment than any other similar enterprise. Thirty-two years constant traveling in America, West Indies, British Columbia and Canada, is only part of the record of the great Gorton's Minstrels. The leaders and producers of all that is new and novel in minstrelsy. At Falk's opera-house, Tuesday, Feb. 5. Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1901. 


A Good Show. - The Steam Laundry Company played at Falk's Opera-house Wednesdeay night to a large audience. This is one of the best shows that have visited Lafayette this season, and we are pleased to state that Mr. Falk has prevailed upon the manager to return here next week. Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1901. 



Cast with the strength of E. J. Carpenter's LARGE AND POWERFUL DRAMATIC CO. - Scenery by Thos. Neville. Elaborate and complete in detail. Costumes by the great London costumer, Desalchi. Correct and beautiful copies of those worn by the patrician at the Court of Nero. - NOTE - The universal praise bestowed upon this company by the press wherever they have appeared, has induced Manager Falk to spare no expense in securing them. Is it confidently expected that this will be the leading event of the season.
 
Prices - 50, 75 cents; sale of seats will begin at GARDRBLED'S Drugstore, Saturday morning, Feb. 16, at 9 o'clock.
 
Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1901.



ZONOPHONE ENTERTAINMENT.

 A zonophone entertainment will be given at Falk's Opera House to-night, Saturday, at 8 o'clock, and to-morrow, Sunday, at 3 and 8 p. m. This will be a two hours' entertainment superior to all phonographs and gramophones generally in use. Admission, 25c for adults; children under 12 years, 10c.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/2/1901.
  


Charles Tolson Not Funny. - Charles Tolson, in drama or tragedy, is an actor of no mean ability, but when he attempts comedy, The Advertiser is forced to admit him to be a dismal failure. In "Don't Tell My Wife" he was, using a street parlance, "bum." Charles Tolson is a favorite with Lafayette theater-goers, and The Advertiser give this tip hoping he will continue in the lines in which he excels.
Laf. Advertiser 2/2/1901. 


Coming to Falk's. - Among the many talented members of E. J. Carpenter's "Quo Vadis" Company, none attract more attention than a beautiful young girl named Millicent Evans. She is the daughter of a well-known clergyman in a large Western city. Her undeniable talent commands the interest of the audience from her first appearance, and her career will be followed closely by all who witness her charming portrayal of "Eunice" at Falk's Opera House Friday evening Feb. 22nd. Lafayette Advertiser 2/2/1901.


Gorton's Minstrels.

 Are the attraction at Falk's Opera House, Tuesday, Feb. 5th., and a great attraction they are. There is not a better troupe of artists in America to-day than those Mr. Larkin has gathered together this season. You will not listen to a collection of more popular songs, "past plantation" jokes than those of these artists. However, songs and jokes do not compose the program. There are stories to tell, speeches on the "issues of the times," which are given in an inimitable way, always calling forth roars of rippling laughter ;  the great Crescent City Quartette in its medleys, melodies and imitations, has no equal ;  musical artists and absurdities, athletic and acrobatic specialties, dancing by white and colored folks and all executed in a way that is eminently pleasing.

 Gorton's Minstrels are booked for one night only, and a large house may be expected, as the company give just what the public demands and what they advertise. It is the only guaranteed minstrel show in America. Lafayette Advertiser 2/2/1901.  


A Night at the Symphony.

The Schubert Symphony Club filled their engagement here last Tuesday night, according to announcement. There were some good artists in the company and the entertainment was much enjoyed by the few present who braved the inclement weather. The pleasure of the evening was somewhat marred by the restless spirit exhibited by a number of the auditors present, who seemed bent on showing their disappointment in the nature of the entertainment. It would be in so much better taste for such persons to request a refundment of their admission fee, if necessary, and retire from an audience assembled to enjoy a performance of its liking, than to remain for the obvious purpose, it would seem, of interfering with the pleasure of others. A performance given by this troupe a few weeks ago proved highly pleasing to theater goers here said it is quite probable a large house will again greet this favorite actress and her company, on their return. In this connection manager Falk has requested us to state that the opera house will always be heated whenever necessary for the comfort of patrons, in the future.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/2/1895.



The Emma Warren Company. - The popular actress, Miss Emma Warren and her company will appear at Falk's Opera House on the 17th instant in the play of "Henrietta." The New Iberia Enterprise speaks very highly of this company. It says:
 
The one week's engagement of the Emma Warren Co., concluding with to-morrow night's presentation of "East Lynne," has been one the artistic successes of the season. Appearing against strong attractions, both present and future, Miss Warren has drawn good houses, the audiences increasing with each successive performance. A more meritorious, talented and personally agreeable theatrical combination has never come to New Iberia, it will leave behind most pleasant recollections. Miss Warren is a talented young actress, with a brilliant future, and one can but wish her the acme of fame in her chosen profession. Mr. Garside, the musical director of the company and his excellent corps of musicians deserve the highest econiums. Do not forget that the engagement closes with "East Lynne" to-morrow night.
Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1895. 
 



Let it be Stopped.

The conduct of some people at the Opera house is, to put it mildly, an unbearable nuisance. For instance at the last entertainment some persons were ridiculous in their demonstrations and made a foolish display of themselves, showing that they had no respect for the ladies present, but on the contrary, seemed to delight in annoying those who desired to enjoy the performance. We believe that some steps should be taken to prevent the recurrence of this reprehensible practice. Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1895.


"THE VIRGINIAN,"
At Falk's Opera-house Sunday Night.

The Krause-Taylor Company supporting the popular favorite, Jack C. Taylor, will present Bartley Campbell's beautiful comedy drama, "the Virginian," at Falk's opera house, Sunday night, Feb. 4. This company is under the management of Otto H. Krause, who is probably one of the best known theatrical men who visit our city, and always brings us good attraction. The specialties introduced by the members of the company are all new and up-to-date. One of the principal features are the illustrated songs introduced by Mr. Hugh Morrison. Prices for this engagement will be 25, 50 and 75 cents. Seats are on sale at Gardebled's drug store. Lafayette Gazette 2/3/1900.


At Falk's. Mr. Chas. Tolson's company played to a good house at Falk's last Wednesday night. The theatrical attractions have been exceptionally good this season, and it is only fair to say that this company has given more general satisfaction than other which has visited us. We hope that Mr. Tolson will come again. Lafayette Gazette 2/3/1900.



The Simia Seance.

 A great many people will be asking why, if Sir Henry Turpia in "The Simla Seance" can read the minds of his auditors and reply to their queries - whis is that he cannot read the minds of great financiers, foresee the fluctuations of the stock market etc., and profit by his deductions. If he could do all that he naturally would have no end of money, but his power or foresight is limited to an uncertain number of people nightly whose mental impressions are given to him most willing and who are anxious for satisfactory result. He has no power over, and cannot make any mental connection with the minds of people with whom he does not come in contact by their entire will, or of people who oppose and attempt to confuse him in his telepathic impressions. The question he answers and the results he gets are the natural outcome of entire sympathy with, and of faith in him. All else is negative to him. Besides he chooses and delights in his own way of life, is very successful in it and is beyond all possible chance of financial tangle. It's away out of the question with him. This marvelous man begins his manifistations in this city at Falk's Opera House Sunday, Feb. 7.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/3/1904.       
 

Don't forget that there will be a Grand Calico and Masquerade Ball at Falk's Opera House, Tuesday the 6th inst. Laf. Adv. 2/3/1894.





The Maud Atkinson Company, passed through on Sunday en route for Iberia to fill her engagement at that place. We are pleased to state it was both a pleasant and profitable time for the company. Laf. Gaz. 2/3/1894.




At the Opera-house. Maude Atkinson and her excellent company played the Clemenceau case at Falk's Opera House Thursday night. Maude Atkinson is very popular in Lafayette and never fails to draw a good house. Last night she appeared in the laughable comedy entitled "Soloman Isaacs." Laf. Gaz. 2/3/1894.


"After The War."

This truly Southern play, which will be produced at the Opera-house on Feb. 8 must not be confounded with many of the war plays that are now touring the country. There are no battle scenes, no Cubans, no Spaniards, and no mock heroic situations, but a story of heart interest, beautiful dialogue and clean comedy. The plot is intensely interesting and holds the attention of the audience to the finish. "After the War" has already achieved a distinct success in the North, and the press has been most eulogistic in its criticisms. An exchange says: "After the War" is undoubtedly the finest production we have had this season. It is a beautiful story well told. It is replete with interesting dialogue, and the audience was spell-bound at the intensity of the different situations. At the end of the third act, 'the escape from the Georgia prison,'  the players received a perfect ovation and the curtain was raised four times. "After the War" is a success and its author is to be complimented. It is a play that does the South justice." Lafayette Gazette 2/4/1899.

Charles King will play Monte Crisco at Falk's opera-house to-morrow night. Laf. Gaz. 2/4/1899.

The Chas. King Co., will appear to-morrow night at Falk's Opera House in Monte Christo. Laf. Adv. 2/4/1899.

Grand Ball, Feb. 14, at Falk's Opera House. Laf. Adv. 2/4/1899.





IF JOHN L. SULLIVAN KNOCKED PETER JACKSON

 Out in 8 rounds it would not create as much excitement as the arrival of

PARDO'S GREAT WHEEL

World and Operatic Comedians
AT
Falk's Opera House
ON
Saturday, February 4th.

Admission at Usual Prices.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/4/1893.





 
A Grand Masquerade Mardi Gras Ball will be given by a joint committee, on Tuesday, February 14th, at Falk's opera house. The Breaux Bridge string band has been engaged for the occasion, and all who attend can be assured of a pleasant time. Laf. Adv. 2/4/1893 


The meeting of the Business Men's Association announced to take place at Falk's Opera House, the 7th. instant. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898. 


Hon. Henry Watterson, the ablest editor of the South, will lecture at Falk's Opera House to-night. General admission, 50 cents, no reserved seats.
 Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898




Falk's Opera-house Notes:

 Don't fail to hear Henry Watterson to-night.

 Every body should attend the lecture to-night. It will be an intellectual treat.

 Henry Watterson in "Money and Morals" to-night at Falk's Opera House. Tickets for sale at the Advertiser, Gazette and post-offices.

 Henry Watterson will lecture to-night at Falk's Opera House. The subject will be "Money and Morals." Admission is fifty cents. No reserved seats.

 Henry Watterson was the mouthpiece of the United States government at the opening of the World's Exposition at Chicago in 1893. His masterly oration at that time electrified the whole country. He in the South's greatest editor. Don't miss hearing him to-night. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.




Mardi Gras for Lafayette.

 
Last Monday a club was organized with the object of preparing some form of celebration for Mardi Gras, and especially to attend to getting up Parades.

 The work was divided into two sections and two executive committees appointed to superintend arrangements.

 There is a called meeting for Saturday at 4 p. m. at the Opera House when plans will be discussed and permanent arrangements made.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/6/1897.





Fine Display Room.

The Falk Mercantile Co., have converted the opera house into a show room and have now on display an elegant and beautiful line of furniture and house furnishing goods. Heretofore, owing to the lack of room the could not display their handsome stock to advantage, the discontinuance of their opera house gives them a spacious room for the purpose. Lafayette Advertiser 2/8/1905. 

The Falk Mercantile Co., Ltd., want to dispose of the scenery, fixtures, chairs, etc., of their opera house, and will sell at a big bargain. Laf. Adv. 2/8/1905.


At Falk's. - The Hawthorne Sisters will appear at Falk's opera-house to-night and present the well-known and popular comedy, "My Uncle from New York." This company is accompanied by a band and orchestra and comes to Lafayette highly recommended. A number of singers, dancers and musical artists will entertain the audience between the acts.
Lafayette Gazette 2/8/1902. 


NOTICE: - All those indebted to the estate of the late B. Falk are most urgently requested to settle same in 30 days from date.
MRS. B. Falk. Lafayette Advertiser 2/8/1902.



"My Uncle from New York" at Falk's Opera House to-night.   Laf. Adv. 2/8/1902.
 

 The Herald Square Co., presented Girofle Girofla here last Monday night, and it proved to be one of the best performances of the season. Owing to the inclement weather weather but a small audience had the pleasure of enjoying his delightful play.

Laf. Adv. 2/8/1902

The Roaring Comedy," My Uncle from New York" will be at the Falk's Opera House Saturday Feb. 8th, and promises to be the leading attraction of the season. The piece as represented by the Celebrated Hawthorne Sisters is a pretty story told clean, neat and moral in every sense of the word. Abounds with funny situations, Eccentric comedians, Pretty Girls, Elaborate costumes, Pretty Songs, Artistic Dancing, and Entrancing Music. The company carries a band and orchestra and promises a treat in music alone. Special attention being called to the Hawthorne Sisters, high class musical act. Specialties will also be introduced by Gen. Kane, Edgar G. Benn, R. H. Broiler, Marx Regan, N. F. Wilson, Belle Earle, Mirtie May Williams and the Hawthorne Sisters, you will make no mistake in paying this attraction a visit as it is one of the best companies on the road. Seats on sale at the usual place.

Laf. Adv. 2/8/1902


An Oyster Supper. - The local gourmets will be delighted to learn that next Thursday night at Falk's hall, there will be an oyster supper of unsurpassed excellence. The supper will be prepared and served under the personal supervision of the Ladies' Episcopal Guild, which is a guarantee that it will be lacking in nothing. The proceeds to be turned over to the new church fund. Lafayette Gazette 2/9/1901.


Notice to Firemen.
 The annual meeting of the Fire Department will take place at Falk's Opera House, Monday, March 11, 1901, 8 p. m., for the election of officers.
   F. V. MOUTON,
 Secretary Fire Department.
 Laf. Gazette 2/9/1901.



AT THE OPERA HOUSE.

 
Coming Sunday (matinee and night) Feb. 10th, the New York Humpy Dumpty Company in the latest sensation of "Humpty Dumpty on a Farm." This is the original cast and company that played a four month engagement at Viblos Garden in New York City. Mons. Viblo the funny clown of the company, is a son of the famous proprietor of Viblo's Garden and is the original "Humpty Dumpty" clown. Don't fail to see him to-morrow.



 The gifted actress, Emma Warren, and her talented company will render "Henrietta" at Falk's Opera House Sunday the 17th inst. The play is an interesting one so do not forget the date and make your arrangements, accordingly.


 A grand ball will be given Mardi Gras night, at Falk's Opera House. The arrangements contemplated for the occasion will ensure an enjoyable time to all who will participate.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1895.   


Don't fail to see Emma Warren and her accomplished company at Falk's Opera house to-morrow night. The plat was to be presented in an interesting one.
La. Adv. 2/9/1895. 


Remember that Emma Warren will play "Henrietta" at Falk's Opera House on the 17th inst. Laf. Adv. 2/9/1895.





The principal feature of the Humpty Dumpty Co., which will appear at Falk's Opera House Sunday night, is the cloud band that will parade the streets. Matinee at 2 p. m. and night performance at 8 o'clock. Prices as usual. Lafayette Gazette 2/9/1895.




The Helen D' Este Troupe did not arrive in time to play on Monday night, as announced. The company performed on Tuesday, but as it was not generally known, the spectators were not very numerous. We hope that Mr. W. B. Gray, the Manager, will have better luck next time and receive the patronage which that excellent combination so richly deserves.
Laf. Adv. 2/9/1878.



Euchre Thursday Evening. - The ladies of the Jewish Aid Society gave another of their delightful euchre parties at Falk's Opera House Thursday evening. A large crowd was present and enjoyed the occasion greatly. The prizes were won as follows: First ladies prize, Mrs. J. A. Martin; second, Mrs. Hector Prejean; third, Mrs. Arthur Bonnet; booby, Miss Corrine Guidry. First gentleman's prize, Mr. A. S. Clark; second, Mr. Felix Mouton; third Mr. Vic Levy; booby, Mr. Will Levy. Laf. Advertiser 2/10/1894.





Hayden Concert.

Wm. Hayden, the accomplished blind musician, who has completed a course at the National Conservatory of Music, New York, will give a farewell benefit concert, before his departure for New York, at Falk's Opera House Friday, February 12, 1904. Mr. Hayden is already well known to the people of Lafayette, and those who attend know that they will enjoy a musical treat, besides assisting a most worthy young man. A number of the best local talent have volunteered their services, and this will be one of the most enjoyable events of the season. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1904. A number of the young ladies of Lafayette have issued invitations to a dance at Falk's Opera-house Sunday night. Laf. Gaz. 2/10/1900.


A number of the young ladies of Lafayette have issued invitations to a dance at Falk's Opera-house Sunday night. Laf. Gaz. 2/10/1900.




There will be another grand calico and masquerade ball given at Falk's Opera House on St. Joseph night, March 19th. All are respectfully and cordially invited to attend. Admission 50 cents.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.

 

There will be a meeting at Falk's Opera-house to-night. All interested in the organization of fire companies are requested to be present.
Laf. Adv. 2/12/1898.



The New Opera House. - The work of clearing the ground for the new brick opera house, was begun this week. The blacksmith shop occupied by Mr. Bernard Miller has been purchased by him from Mr. F. E. Moss, and is being removed to a lot adjoining his residence on the South. It is expected to break ground for the Opera house within the next 30 days, and the work of construction will be pushed rapidly to completion. The projectors of the enterprise have decided to install their own electric light plant to illuminate the theater building so as to be able to get the best results for the spectacular electric light effects that now form such an important feature in the staging of high-class plays. Provision will also be made for heating the building by steam.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/14/1903.


Remember that Tuesday the 17th instant is the day on which the grand masked and fancy dress ball is to come off at Hebert's Hall in Vermilionville.

Laf. Adv. 2/14/1874.


The Rose Stillman Company will give a matinee to-day at 2:30. Admission: adults, 25 cents; children 15 cents. Little Lord Fauntleroy will be played.
Laf. Gaz. 2/16/1901.   




In Hard Luck. - The Humpty-Dumpty people have been in pretty hard luck. They had been advertised to play at Falk's Opera House Sunday night, but the weather was so cold that no one showed up at the performance and they were compelled to postpone the entertainment. The next day it appears that the manager skipped on the early morning train with all the cash and left the other members of the troupe without a cent to pay for their board and to get them out of town. In order to secure payment, Mr. D'Orsay, of the Orleans Hotel, went to Judge McFadden's office and caused an attachment to be issued for the troupe's baggage and other articles in their possession. Then the company divided in two and succeeded in raising enough money to redeem their baggage, etc. One part of the company left on the afternoon train Wednesday to play at Lake Charles and the rest of the members who remained in this town advertised that they would give "benefit" performances Wednesday and Thursday nights, but owing to the inclement weather they met with very little success. The Gazette wishes them better luck in the future.
Lafayette Gazette 2/16/1895.

  

Humpty Dumpty's Fall. The Humpty Dumpty Comedy Company billed to play here last Sunday night not only became stranded on striking our town, but were snow-bound as well. The treasurer of the company "skipped out," leaving the members without money and the extremely unpropitious weather that prevailed here following the arrival of the company made a miserable failure of the most heroic efforts of the boys to raise a fund with which to leave town. The stranded company succeeded in patching up some kind of an arrangement that enabled them to "pull out" Thursday afternoon, after having been our unwilling guests for nearly an entire week.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/16/1895.

A Dance To-Night. - The Gazette received an invitation to attend a dance at Falk's Opera House to-night. It is to be given by the young men of Lafayette and judging from the names  of those connected with it, it is safe to say that it will be a very enjoyable affair. The following young gentlemen are in the invitation committee: Florestal Guidry, chairman; C. T. Bienvenue, E. T. McBride, Raoul Pellerin, Henry Fontenot, Louis Lacoste.
 
 Since the above was put in type it has been decided to postpone the dance to Wednesday night on account of the snow storm. Lafayette Gazette 2/16/1895.







THE HAYDEN CONCERT.

 The Hayden Concert at Falk's Opera House Friday night was a very successful and enjoyable affair. Mr. Hayden, as was expected, delighted the audience with his fine rendition of a number of masterpieces, showing that he made progress in his musical studies. Mr. Hayden is a true artist and his concerts are always a treat to music lovers. He was assisted by local talent who contributed greatly to the pleasure of the evening.

 The following entertaining program was rendered:

PROGRAM.

Improvisation - Piano, Wm. Hayden.

F. V. Mouton - Baritone, The Mansion of Aching Hearts.

Prof. Florent Sontag - Violin, Spring Song.

Wm. Hayden- Piano, II Tovatore.

Little Miss Eva Mouton - Piano, Selected.

Miss Leah Gladu - Piano, Selected.

Melancon and Durand - Coronet Duo, Selected.

Wm. Hayden - Piano, Selected.

F. E. Girard - Tenor, Mary Dear.

Wm. Hayden - Piano, Ballade Op 47 Chopin. 
Lafayette Advertiser 2/17/1904.



A RETURN DATE.

 The Krause-Taylor Company To-Night.
 The Krause-Taylor Company which made such a hit here several weeks ago, will play a return date at Falk's opera-house to-night, presenting the fantastic comedy, "A Home Affair." The pathetic incident of mythology, Niobe turned to stone from grief, is made a foil for the ludicrous incidents of the play. Niobe, supposed to have been extracted from the ruins of Thebes after remaining there for three thousand years, is sold to an enthusiastic antiquarian as a curio. He leaves his trophy with an insurance company, the manager of which removes it to his house for safe keeping. Worment who are putting in electric wire when they finish their day's work, to get the loose end out of the way, twist them about Niobe's feet. When the lights are turned on Niobe returns to life and then the fun begins.
 The company carry their own special scenery for this play, using none of the opera-house scenery at all. The prices will be 25c, 50c, and 75c. Seats are on sale at Gardebled's drugstore. On account of being on Saturday night the curtain will not rise until 8:30.
Lafayette Gazette 2/17/1900.




Ball St. Joseph's Night.
We are requested to announce that there will be a grand calico and masquerade ball, at Falk's Hall on St. Joseph's night, Feb. 19. A general invitation is extended to the ladies. Gentlemen will be charged 50 cents admission. Laf. Gazette 2/17/1894.


Mardi-Gras Ball.

 Notwithstanding the very disagreeable weather of last Tuesday quite a number of people attended the Masquerade Ball at Falk's Opera House, but the attendance was not as large as in preceding years. The maskers were few and besides three or four costumes there was no attraction in the sight.

The firemen of Crowley, La., to the number of twenty-four having accepted the invitation of their colleagues of Lafayette were present lending an added attraction to the ball.

Their coming was highly appreciated and without doubt the firemen of Lafayette will sometime return the compliment.

The grand march was executed by all the firemen present in full uniform and the sight was grand to behold.

In the name of the Fire Department, the Hon. Wm. Campbell in words well chosen thanked the firemen of Crowley for their presence. Reply was made by one the visiting firemen.

The prize offered by Mr. Falk, a gold medal for the best Lady and Gentleman dancers was awarded to Miss Isaure McDaniel, of Lafayette, and Mr. Ivick, of Houston, Texas.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1899.  
 


 
The Quaker's City Comedians.

 "The Quaker's City Comedians" have been at the Opera House during the week. W. A. Dean, Ernes Holmes, S. M. Tibbs, Emil Terrel, tenor and Prof. A. W. Ross, pianist are stars of this company and have given perfect satisfaction. Laf. Advertiser 2/18/1899.



All members of A. O. U. W. are requested to meet at Falk's Opera House Wednesday Feb. 23rd. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.




Aimee! - Aimee the pretty serpentine and fire dancer, assisted by Hilliard the clever prestidigitateur, will give a performance to-morrow night at Falk's opera-house, for the benefit of the Lafayette Orchestra  and Symphony Club.
Lafayette Gazette 2/21/1903.


THE STAGE.

"The Marriage of Kitty" at the Jefferson Sunday night proved to be a most delightful function and those invited guests who stayed away missed the event of the season. It was a delightful play and was enjoyed immensely by those who braved the weather and attended. But there are some other good plays still to come and maybe Old Pluvius will take a night off and give us a fair night for a change.

 "That Little Swede Company" is the next attraction at the Jefferson and is dated for Tuesday, Feb. 28. The press notices we have seen speak very highly of it as an amusement giver and theater goers may reasonably expect a good show.

"That Little Swede"
Devoid of situations that tax the credulity of common sense of the spectator. "That Little Swede" is a play that appeals to all classes of society. Its scenes are laid in the Northwest and the story while simple and unpretentious tells itself with directness and clearness. It is distinguished by singular charm of manner and wonderful character drawing. It is a play to lure one back to every gentle memory of the past. "The old swimming hole" and other delights of boyhood days are brought vividly to mind. The play is one which a competent critic has seen fit to remark that one is better for having seen and heard. The company presenting it this season is said to be a remarkably clever one and the production is one of real worth. At the Jefferson, Tuesday, Feb. 28. - Press Agent. Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1905.




Don. C. Hall, who is playing a week's engagement at the Opera House, was a caller yesterday. We were glad indeed, of his acquaintance and aside from being a fluent talker, is a gentleman whom it is a pleasure to meet. He uses none of the "shelfworn" slang so common with theatrical people, and you will find him perfectly qualified to discuss any and all of the leading questions of the day - Kansas, (Kearney County) Advocate - Will be here March 15.
 Laf. Adv. 2/22/1902




AT THE OPERA HOUSE.

March 15.

The Dan C. Hill Co. will produce that great moral drama, in 5 acts. - "Ten nights in a Bar Room."

Guaranteed to be the best production of the play ever given by any company, introducing the transformation scene with little Mary in Heaven. And other new and pleasing features.

Seats for sale at D. V. Gardebled's Drug Store.
  Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1902.


 


The grand ball given by the Knights of Labor, at Falk's Hall, last Saturday night, was another splendid success added to their credit and prestige. It was largely attended, and the enjoyment of the affair was complete. The supper was pronounced to be one of the most elegant and sumptuous spreads ever seen in the Hall. The Knights are no ways backward in expense when it comes to making their ball popular and attractive. Laf. Adv. 2/22/1890



FIREMEN ATTENTION!  - The annual meeting of the Fire Department of Lafayette will take place at Falk's Opera House, Monday, March 12th, 1901, at 8 - p. m.
F. V. Mouton, Sec. F. D.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/23/1901.



Buy your tickets now for "Ten Nights in a Bar Room."
Laf. Adv. 2/23/1901


The Emma Warren Company. - The Emma Warren Company played to small houses at Falk's Sunday last. "East Lynne" was rendered in the afternoon and Henrietta" at night. Of the many troupes that have visited our town during the season this is one of the best. The orchestra was splendid and contributed very much to the entertainment of the audience.  Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.



At the Opera House. - The Emma Warren company, that may be justly regarded as one of the best theatrical troupes that visit Lafayette, did not meet with great financial success here last Saturday. The weather, it is probable, prevented many persons from attending. Laf. Advertiser 2/23/1895.


 
Nice Ball. - The ball at the opera house Wednesday night was a highly enjoyable affair. The management was excellent; the music, by the Five Landry Band, was good, and the beaus and belles were handsome. Every element was present to make it the success that it was. Lafayette Advertiser 2/23/1895.

At Falk's- The Emma Warren Company will appear at Falk's Opera House in the great comedy, "Married in Haste."
Laf. Gazette 2/25/1899.


Carnival Association.
A meeting was held at Falk's Opera-house for  the purpose of organizing a carnival association with a view of celebrating next Mardi Gras in a fitting manner. The meeting was well attended and the new organization seems to have a very good beginning. The following officers were elected: Dr. F. E. Girard, president; C. O. Mouton, vice-president; F. E. Moss, secretary; Wm. Campbell, treasurer; H. A. VanderCruyssen, artist. The following board of directors were selected: J. T. Allingham, E. Pellerin, Gus Lacoste, Paul Castel, Ben Falk, Victor Levy and Homer Mouton. A small monthly fee will be collected from members which will create a nucleus of the fund necessary to defray the expenses to be incurred by the association in carrying out successfully its project. There is no reason why Lafayette should not have a Mardi Gras parade of its own and we hope the association will meet with the encouragement that it deserves. Lafayette Gazette 2/25/1899.




THE CARNIVAL ASSOCIATION.


A large number of our citizens met last Tuesday night at Falk's Opera House to organize an association having in view to celebrate hereafter Mardi-gras in Lafayette.

All those who were in attendance manifested the greatest desire to see the enterprise succeed, and consequently the association was organized on a sound and safe basis.

Until now 42 members have joined the association and it is expected that very soon it will have 200 members or more.

After some discussion as to the various plans to follow for the raising of funds the association voted a monthly due of 50 cents to each member payable in advance.

The following officers have been appointed:
President, Dr. F. E. Girard
Vice President, C. O. Mouton
Secretary, F. E. Moss
Treasurer artist, H. A. Van der Cruyssen.

Governing Board.
J. T. Allingham, E. Pellerin, Gus. Lacoste, Paul Castel, B. Falk, Victor Levy, Homer Mouton.

All those who wish to become members of the association are requested to hand in their names to the secretary F. F. Moss or to a committee consisting of E. Mouisset and H. A. Van der Cruyssen.

It us unnecessary for us to point out the many advantages that are to be derived by a Mardi-Gras celebration.

With the push and energy of the citizens of Lafayette there is not a valid excuse for not entertaining the crowds who seek pleasure and amusement at that particular time of the year.

As to the financial benefits, any business man will readily acknowledge that they are many, and therefore the business men will be backing the enterprise.

With the set of officers at the (unreadable word) the association, it is bound and will succeed.

The next meeting will be held on Wednesday next, March 1st, at Falk's Opera House and all those who have the intention to join the Association are respectfully invited to be present at this meeting.

 Lafayette Advertiser 2/25/1899.
 





The last performance of the Emma Warren Co., to-morrow night at Falk's Opera House.
Laf. Adv. 2/25/1899.


At the Opera House. - Arrangements have been made with Mr. H. R. Lucas, of Virginia, to present his stereopticon exhibit at the opera house Friday night, March 4. The program is well selected and can not fail to be very interesting. "Ten Nights in a Barroom," the great temperance masterpiece, "Pied Piper of Hamlin-town," the "Beauties and Wonders of the World" and the many humorous transformations are calculated to please any audience. The Selma (Ala.) Times says of this entertainment: "Scenes intensely brilliant, audience delighted." The Meridian (Miss.) News says that the views are charmingly realistic and the coloring artistic. Admission, 25 cents; reserved seats, 35 cents children 15 cents.
Lafayette Gazette 2/26/1898.






Opera-house. - Mr. H. R. Lucas, of Virginia, the well known stereopticon exhibitor, has been secured to present one of his superb exhibitions at the Opera House Friday night March 4th. The program, Ten Nights in a Barroom, Piece Paper of Hamelin town etc., cannot fail to please any audience. Admission 25 cts. Reserved seats 35 cts. As this attraction will be instructive and of special interest to children, the reduced price of 15 cents is made to the pupils of the school. Lafayette Advertiser 2/26/1898.




The Grattan Stock Co., at the Jefferson Theatre, March 2, 1905.

 The Grattan-DeVernon Stock Company who open an engagement of three nights at the Jefferson in this City on Thursday, March 2, is recognized as one of the best organizations on the road. Their engagements this season include three in San Diego, California, six weeks in San Antonio, and three more successful months in Dallas.
The company is headed by Miss Vail DeVernon and Mr. J. Richard St. Vrain, two well known leading people with established reputations. Miss DeVernon is well and favorably known throughout the East and North, as an emotional actress of more than ordinary ability and her success at the News American in Chicago, the Majestic in Utica, and other theatres of like high standard all prove this. Her charming stage presence and delightful personality never fail to win the audience at once, and her admirers are without number.
Mr. St. Vrain is a leading man of versatility and his fine stage appearance combined with his fine voice always make him a favor. The supporting company is the best that can be secured and is composed of actors and actresses who have had plenty of experience in the best stock companies and who are all top notchers in their respective lines of work. The policy of the company is to present only the highest class royalty plays, and to present them in a proper manner. During their engagement in this city such well known successes as "Shamus O' Brien", "The Colorado Girl", "A Prince of Liars" etc., will be presented. The theatre goers of this city are thus assured of some excellent plays, properly produced by a company that has time and again proven itself capable of doing this. By the Press Agent.
Popular prices will prevail during this engagement, 25, 35, 50 cents. Seats now on sale at Moss Pharmacy.

 Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.




The Falk Mercantile Co., Ltd., want to dispose of the scenery, fixtures, chairs, etc., of their opera house, and will sell at a big bargain.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1905.
 



At Falk's Opera-house. - J. Z.'s Little's "World" Company will give one exhibition only, at Falk's Opera House, Sunday, March 2nd. When this Company was here during the winter the weather was so bad that but few ventured out to attend the performance. Those who dis see it praise it highly. Their scenic effects are the most attractive ever produced on this stage and are intensely realistic. The play itself is a fine conception, full of interest throughout, which is seldom the case in the plays of these days. Altogether, it is a most interesting performance, and we would advise all or our readers to attend. We are glad that Mr. Little has given our citizens another opportunity to see this beautiful play. Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1890.



GOOD NEWS. -  Mr. B. Falk tells the Advertiser that he is closed a contract for a complete overhauling of his Opera House. A new curtain will be painted, the present stage will be enlarged so that the largest traveling companies may be able to appear to Lafayette theatre goers. An advertising drop curtain will also be one of the improvements, the diagram of which will appear in the next issue of this paper. Mr. Falk has already booked several companies for next season, and as he leaves for Chicago in a few months for additional booking, Lafayette may expect good troupes next fall. Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1901.



The annual meeting of the Fire Department of Lafayette will take place at Falk's Opera House, Monday, March 12, 1901, at 8 p, m. for election of officers.
Laf. Advertiser 3/2/1901.































The Stage.
 Years have tended only to ripen, not wither the sweetness and genuine interest which surround the events marked out with such a true and masterly precision aimed at by James A. Herne in his favorite play, "Shore Acres."
 The company which presented the play at the Dallas Opera House last night, and will be seen here again at matinee to-day and to-tonight, is under the management of the author's wife, Mrs. James A. Herne, and the cast includes some of those who played with Mr. Herne in its original production. They, too, have ripened with the years and give their parts a homelike delineation so finished that the listener loses sight of the dual character and finds himself in the midst of the rural New England life.

 The New England people, so sturdy of mold, have furnished impetus for most of the plays which deal with American home life, and while the type is confined to the East, still the peculiarities, the combined coldness and sentiment, gives the best picture of what is typically American. "Shore Acres" can not soon outlive its beauty and interest, and by its homeliness and simplicity will appeal to and please humanity after plays more sparkling and brilliant will have paled.

 James J. Galloway, as Nathaniel Berry, "who had played second fiddle" to his younger brother since boyhood, was entirely sympathetic with the character. The scenes change from rural peacefulness to restiveness and storm and again to absolute peace in the last act, when Uncle Nat locks up, creaks up to bed and leaves the kitchen lighted only by embers in the stove. The end is the crowning note of the entire production and fulfills itself the motive of the writer in giving a true picture of homely farm life.

 The play is beautifully staged and well cast, the four children doing their parts so naturally and well as to be enthusiastically encored.
Dallas News, March 11, 1905.





Press Release for "Shore Acres." - Unquestionably the most successful of the late James A. Herne's plays is "Shore Acres," which has become a veritable classic, and assuredly in the pastoral field its stately beauty overshadows all its prototypes. There is so much that is original and uncommon in this unique comedy-drama that its remarkable success can readily be explained, and the play deservedly promises to hold the attention of theatre-goers for many years to come. One of the most enjoyable features of "Shore Acres," which is announced for production at the Jefferson Theatre Wednesday, March 22, is the faultless manner in which it has always been placed before the public. The acting company is always comprised of first-class artists and the careful attention given to details affords the lover of refined stage art much pleasure. For this season, Mr. Ernest Albert, a well-known scene painter of New York City, has furnished entirely new scenery and several other novelties have been added to make the entertainment attractive. - Press Agent. Laf. Adv. 3/15/1905.      





The celebrated Mexican band will here to-morrow and will play in Falk's Opera House after the arrival of the excursion.
Laf. Adv. 4/7/1894








A COMPLETE SUCCESS.

A Splendid Entertainment by the Now Famous Black Diamonds.

 Never in the history of Lafayette has an audience been more agreeably surprised than the one which witnessed the entertainment given by the Black Diamond Minstrel Company, in Falk's Opera House last Wednesday night.

 About three hundred of our leading people had gathered in the hall to witness the performance, many attending simply to help the high school fund, believing that the performance would be like the majority of amateur entertainments, and furnish very little amusement ;  but all those who were so fortunate as to attend, can testify to the delightful surprise encountered by the audience, which added materially to the enjoyment of the occasion, for it is well known that unexpected pleasures are the sweetest.

 The curtain rose about 8:15 o'clock and disclosed to the view of the audience, who had been on the qui vive for fully an hour - having gone early so as to secure desirable seats - the famous Black Diamonds in all the glory and splendor of cork and high collars.

 The first part consisted of a grand olio, solos, duets and "gags," and furnished unlimited amusement to the audience, who responded to the efforts of the performers with hearty applause.

 Act II consisted of songs and melodies, and was most heartily enjoyed by the audience, the performers all doing remarkably well in their several parts.

 In Act III the laughable sketch, "The Ticket Taker," was rendered, the entire company taking part ;  and we have witnessed many productions by professionals which could not compare with it.

 The entertainment concluded with an old-fashioned negro dance, which was one of the most enjoyable features of the evening.

 Between the third and fourth acts the audience enjoyed a rare treat which was not down on the bills, but which added an additional guest to the pleasure of the evening. The charming and talented Miss Emma Falk, with her usual graciousness, consented to favor the audience with a song. She had chosen from her repertory that popular song, entitled, "Oh-Won't You Come Out and Play," and rendered it in a manner most pleasing and graceful. We have heard the song rendered by many different professional soubrettes, but seldom have we heard it sung with better effect. Miss Falk certainly possesses remarkable talent, and the audience as well as the Black Diamonds owe her their thanks for rendering the song. She was accompanied on the piano by Miss Bendel. After the stage performance was concluded, the chairs were removed and dancing was indulged in until a late hour, the Lafayette string band discoursing their sweetest music.

 Taken all in all the entertainment was a complete success, and  the performers deserve great praise for their work, and we trust that it will not be long before we have the pleasure of seeing the Black Diamonds again.

 The entertainment will give a net profit of about $100, which sum will be turned over to the trustees of the high school building.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/8/1893.


 The Lafayette Orchestra will give for their benefit a grand concert at Falk's Opera House, on May 20th. The program of this musical event will be published later on. We may expect very fine music as the orchestra is composed exclusively of musicians who each one in his sphere is a soloist.
Laf. Adv. 4/8/1899.



 The ADVERTISER acknowledges receipt and return thanks to Messrs. Louis Lacoste, Ralph Voorhies, Vic Levy, Charles Debaillon - invitation committee - to attend a dance at Falk's Opera House, Tuesday evening, April 18, 1899. Laf. Adv. 4/8/1899.




HON. HENRY WATTERSON.


To-night at Falk's Hall the great Kentuckian and Southerner, Hon. Henry Watterson will deliver a lecture on "Money and Morals." He is known to all of our readers as the distinguished Confederate veteran, American statesman and one of our country's foremost citizens.As the manner of getting Col. Watterson to lecture here may not be understood by all, we believe, it best to explain it. It is simply this. About seventy-five of our citizens have guaranteed the payment of one hundred dollars for the lecture, that being the price exacted by him. Those who so guarantee that amount pay as the others to hear the lecture. The money taken at the door goes toward refunding the guaranteed amount pro rata.

This is a rare opportunity offered to our people and we hope that it will receive encouragement.
Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.




The New Opera-house. - There was a conference held Thursday between Mr. Sam Stone, Jr., and Mr. Frank R. Moss and his associates in the new brick opera-house enterprise, looking to an early beginning of work. Mr. Stone is a member of the architect firm of Stone Bros. of New Orleans who planned and directed the erection of the Crescent and Tulane theaters in New Orleans. Mr. Stone inspected the Industrial School building whilst in Lafayette and called on Mr. A. E. Mouton, the contractor, to obtain certain information with reference to building material and brick structure in this locality. The cost of the proposed new opera-house will exceed $20,000.
Lafayette Gazette 2/7/1903.  


Harverley's Mastadon Minstrels. - Manager Bendel of Falk's opera-house wishes to announce to the theatre going people of the town and parish that on February 13, one of the best and largest minstrels on the road, Harverley's Mastadon Minstrels will give a performance at this theatre. Judging from notices in different newspapers, Mr. Bendel personally recommends this attraction as being one of the best in the minstrel line. Lafayette Gazette 2/7/1903. 
 


Remember that Tuesday the 17th instant is the day on which the grand masked and fancy dress ball is to come off at Hebert's Hall in Vermilionville. Lafayette Advertiser 2/7/1874.

ALBA HEYWOOD'S BI-CHLORIDE OF FUN.

 Will cure everything [including the blues.] He treats the entire system through the eye and ear. Throats examined while you laugh. No pain, except in the side. You yell; but it don't hurt. You cry, but it is from laughing. Heywood is supported by a company of artists, all the best in their line. Not a dull moment, but a merry-go-round of fun. To appear here on the evening of February 12th.
Laf. Advertiser 2/9/1901.



ALBA HEYWOOD.

 Heywood and his clever artists entertained a small but appreciative audience at Falk's Opera Hall Tuesday night. Alba Heywood is a comedian of high character, his acting from the sublime to the ridiculous was proof of his great talent. The Advertiser would like to have Heywood visit Lafayette again as such clever performances are both entertaining and instructive.
Laf. Advertiser 2/9/1901.
 

Alba Heywood, "a first class concert company, at Falk's Opera House, Monday, March 11th, 1901, at 8 p. m. Election of officers.
     F. V. MOUTON, Sec., F. D.
Laf. Adv. 2/9/1901.

 

Buy your tickets now for Alba Heywood's concert.
Laf. Adv. 2/9/1901.

At Falk's.

 E. J. Carpenter's production of "Quo Vadis" will be a revelation to all who will go to Falk's Opera House, Wednesday February 22nd. The scenery is by Thos. Nelville, and every set is a gem of the painter's art. The costumes are designed by Descalschi, the famous London costumer, and are rich and elegant. The furniture and draperies are perfect copies of those preserved in the British Museum. Mr. Carpenter's Company is a large and expensive one, and gives a fine representation of Sienkiewicz's masterpiece. The date is fixed for Friday, February 22nd. Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1901.

 

The scenery displayed in the production of E. J. Carpenter's production of "Quo Vadis" consists principally of the of the Peristyle in the House of Petronius, the Statue Scene, the Garden of Aulus Plautius, Nero's Palace, Rome; interior of the Marmertine Prison, the Coliseum, the Roman Ampitheatre and Arena; the Burning and Destruction of Rome, and the Death of Nero, the Sign of the Cross and the Dawn of Christianity. While the theme of the play deals principally without somber subject, the wit of Petronius and Chilo, the Greek philosopher, together with the overweening vanity of Nero, cause much amusement. This remarkable play will be seen at Falk's Opera House Tuesday Feb. 22nd. The stage will be cleaned to make room for the special scenery. It will be a great treat, and a packed house is reasonably expected. Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1901.

Performing in Lafayette: - The Humpty Dumpty Comedy Company billed to play here last Sunday night not only became stranded on striking our town, but were snow-bound, as well. The treasurer of the company "skipped out," leaving the members without money that prevailed here following the arrival of the company made a most miserable failure of the most heroic efforts of the boys to raise a fund with which to leave town. The stranded company succeeded in patching up some kind of an arrangement that enabled them to "pull out" Thursday afternoon, after having been our unwilling guests for nearly an entire week. Laf. Adv. 2/9/1895.  
 




WATER AND LIGHT. 
A Large Meeting Held at Falk's Hall - Waterworks and Electric Lights Discussed. 

About 300 persons, among whom were many ladies, assembled at Falk's Opera-house last Monday night to hear discussions by local speakers upon the question of water-works and electric lights. The meeting was not as large as expected, but the 'earnestness visible on all hands and the enthusiasm which prevailed gave unmistakable signs of the popularity of the movement. The audience was of a representative character, a feature which may always be taken as a good omen for the success of any undertaking of this kind.
 
C. O. Mouton, Esq., president of the Business Men's Association, in a brief talk explained the object of meeting and introduced to the audience the Rev. Father E. Forge, who was the first speaker. The reverend gentleman delivered a very sensible address. He dealt at length upon the great necessity of protection from fire. He said that any further procrastination in this matter was little short of criminal on the part of the people of this town. He said he would support the measure with all his energy and would use his influence toward the success of the move just inaugurated. At the conclusion of his address Father Forge handed to the president of the B. M. A. a one hundred-dollar bill to be used for the proposed plant. Short addresses were then made by Messrs. Wm. Campbell, Chas. D. Caffery and Julian Mouton.
 
The speakers explained that petitions would be presented to the tax-payers for their signatures for the purpose of asking the City Council to call an election to see if the required number of people are willing to be taxed 5-mills on the dollar to raise the necessary amount to build the water-works and electric light plant. A number of signatures were obtained before leaving the hall. Well-informed persons are of the opinion that the opponents to the tax will not be sufficiently numerous to defeat the measure and it is hoped when the question will be thoroughly explained there will not be any opposition worth mentioning. Lafayette Gazette 2/15/1896.
 
 


Remember the Knights of Labor ball at Falk's Hall, to-night. They have made elaborate preparation, and as they always do, give a most hospitable entertainment, where every facility in afforded for mirth and enjoyment. They give these entertainments every season, and they are always liberally patronized. Go and enjoy it.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1890.



"Quo Vadis." E. J. Carpenter's production of "Quo Vadis" will be a revelation to all who attend at the opera-house when they appear. The scenery is by Thos. Neville, and every set is a gem of the painter's art. The costumes are designed by Desalschi, the famous London costumer, and are rich and elegant. The furniture and draperies are perfect copies of those preserved in the British Museum. Mr. Carpenter's Company is a large and expensive one, and gives a fine representation of Sienkiewicz's masterpiece. The date is fixed for Friday, Feb. 22.
 Lafayette Gazette 2/16/1901.


The masked ball at Falk's Hall last Saturday evening was well attended (unreadable words) the young people from this and adjoining towns, who gathered to participate in and enjoy the whimsical costumes, extravagant masks and the merriment such affairs always affords.
Laf. Adv. 2/18/1888.



The Ruby Lafayette Co. in a four act drama, at the Opera House Sunday.
Laf. Adv. 2/20/1897.


Let us bake your cakes for you, it is just about as cheap and saves you trouble. - Wischan & Domengeaux. Laf. Adv. 2/22/1905
Crowley Artist in Laf. - Wylie M. Phillips, the Crowley Artist, will be in Lafayette for a few weeks to paint scenery on the curtains at Falk's Opera House. During his stay here Mr. Phillips will give his attention to sign painting. Parties can leave orders at the opera house. 
Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.  


Wednesday's Dance.   
The dance at Falk's Opera House Wednesday night was beyond doubt one of the most successful parties given by our young people this season. The perfect manner in which everything was carried out reflects great credit upon the young men  in charge of this affair. The grand march in which about thirty couples took part presented a beautiful sight. Mr. Louis Lacoste and Miss Cecile Fortune, a pretty and charming young lady from Berwick, led the march, which opened the ball. The Landry String Band furnished the music and as usual gave entire satisfaction. Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.




Masked Ball.
There will be a masked ball at Falk's Opera House on Mardi Gras. night. The gentlemen in charge of this ball request The Gazette to state that the best order will be preserved and that everything will be secured for the pleasure of the guests. No cards have been sent out, but a general invitation is extended to the ladies by the management. Good musicians have been engaged, handsome and neat programs have been printed, the floor will be waxed, and a pleasant time is assured to all.
Lafayette Gazette 2/23/1895.



Mardi Gras Ball. - A grand masquerade and calico ball will  be at St. John's night, Sunday March 19th, in Falk's opera house, under the direction of the employes of the Southern Pacific railroad. A general committee consisting of Messrs. F. C. Tuay, H. J. Church, J. B. Coumers, R. Coffey, and W. E. Bowen have charge of the arrangements, and it is needless to say they will be perfect. The proceeds will be turned over to the high school fund. The object is a worthy one and should meet with a hearty support from everyone.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/25/1893.

Over forty musical numbers in "A Southern Kid" at the Opera House Saturday and Sunday nights Feb. 26th. and 27th. Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.


La Petite Eileen, only 6 years old plays the title role in the roaring musical farce comedy "A Southern Kid." She is supported by a clever company and they come highly recommended. Don't miss it. Opera House Saturday and Sunday nights Feb. 26th. Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.

$1,000 worth of musical instruments played on at the Opera House Saturday and Sunday nights, Feb. 26th and 27th - "A Southern Kid."
Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.



The manager of the New Iberia Opera House was arrested last week for violation of the law which prohibits ladies wearing high hats during any performance at the theater. It seems that he was absent and that his employees requested the ladies to remove their hats but they did not comply with the request. Hence the arrest which will test the law.
Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.



At Falk's. - Last week at Falk's Opera House,at the close of Long's show performance, the bantam champion Mr. Kid Wilson, and his trainer Mr. Lonly SouBrady, gave a large audience an opportunity of witnessing a sparring match with soft gloves between professionals. Mr. Wilson stands high in boxing circles in New Orleans and Mr. SouBrady ranks well as a scientific and successful trainer, and as this was the first exhibition of the kind ever held here, much interest was manifested. The boys gave a pretty exhibition of scientific sparring, and the "Kid" is evidently a clever boxer. Some were disappointed because they did not knock down and drag each other out; but that was not the object of the performance. It was more on the order of the young fellow in "Georgia Scenes," who was trying to "see how he could'a fout." Others thought it was too tame, and expected to see them climb all over each other, tearing out handfuls of hair and hide. Now, what they did looks very easy, but just "put yourself in his place" and try it.

The only fauz pas made was when the "Kid," (as SouBrady claims,) wishing to show off before the ladies, reached under and handed SouBrady a vicious upper-cut, pasting a funeral notice on his left eye. Messrs. Wilson and Brady left for Texas Monday, where the "Kid" has a glove fight "on" for seven hundred dollars.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/28/1891.


The talented and popular young actress, Maude Atkinson, supported by her excellent company, will render the exciting drama "Woman against Woman," at Falk's Opera House to-morrow (Sunday) night. Miss Atkinson has appeared here before, and is quite a favorite with our people. Laf. Adv. 2/28/1891. 


Blind Tom will appear at Falk's Opera House, Monday night, March 2nd. We would advise everybody to go if you wish to hear a phenomenal idiot give expression to the one light of his soul - music. Blind Tom will most probably never have a successor in this world; and as he is growing old, if you miss seeing him now, you may never hear his divine melody. The Evening Times, Little Falls, N. Y., says "Perhaps the greatest musical prodigy the world has ever known in Blind Tom, the colored pianist. He has played before the sovereigns of Europe, the great masters of Europe have heard him, and they all have been amazed by his extraordinary gifts. Blind Tom appeared in Little Falls a number of years ago, and he will give another exhibition of his extraordinary skill - if a natural gift can probably be called skill - at the Opera House, on Thursday of next week. A fine programme will be offered and no doubt every lover of good music that is not surpassed anywhere - will attend the entertainment.
 Lafayette Advertiser 2/28/1891.



AIDEN BENEDICT'S "QUO VADIS"

 The history of the stage has not recorded the production of a play equal in religious motive to that of Chas. W. Chase's dramatization of "Quo Vadis" with the single exception of the Passion play, which in the judgement of many Christians is too sacred for a stage impersonation. No such sacrilege is attempted in "Quo Vadis" although the scene and varied incidents take place shortly after the death of the Divine Master, and one the principle characters in the play is that of the Apostle Peter, simple, aged and venerable, telling of his association with Christ discoursing upon his patience, suffering and humility and creating an atmosphere of sublimity, never before realized upon any stage, and entirely without the slightest suggestion of profanation. In fact it may be said that both audience and actors during the representation of this wonderful play, seem to be permeated with a deep religious fervor, so strong, so vital that these stage pictures of the struggles of the early Christians must live as an instrument of good. If more such plays were presented it would be better for the stage in particular and for the world at large. "Quo Vadis" is one of the most moral, dramatic and interesting plays ever produced upon any stage. At Falk's Opera House March 11th. Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1901.

Admission tickets to the Firemen's ball at Hebert's Hall next Monday night, can be obtained at the principal stores and public places in town. Laf. Advertiser 3/2/1878.

The anniversary celebration of Lafayette Fire Company No. 1, next Monday the 4th inst., will be very attractive and arrangements for the occasion, have been perfected. We expect to see people pouring into our town from all directions, to witness the procession, the ceremony of christening of the Truck, and to participate in the Grand Calico Ball at Hebert's Hall. Laf. Advertiser 3/2/1878.

        

















GRAND OPERA TO-NIGHT!! 


Given by Lafayette Fire Co. No. 1, at Falk's Opera House.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.
 
Let our people be out in full force to-night at the ball. A worthy cause and help must not be lacking. Lovers of the dance will be gratified. The Breaux Bridge band will be on hand.

The following are the committees:

RECEPTION COMMITTEE;
Lafayette Fire Co. No. 1.

 B. Falk, Jno. Marsh, Homer Mouton, J. P. Revillon, Ike Plonsky, A. J. Le Blanc and Chas. Debaillon.

 
Home Fire Co.Dr. G. A. Martin and T. M. Biossat.
 
Lafayette Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1.A. E. Mouton and M. Rosenfield.

FLOOR MANAGERS:
LAFAYETTE FIRE CO. NO. 1.Gus Lacoste, F. E. Moss, Judge O. C. Mouton, Dr. F. E. Girard and A. J. Sprole.

 Home Fire Co.
Frank G. Mouton and Gus Schmulen.
Lafayette Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1.Emmanuel Pellerin and Geo A. DeBlanc.
Laf. Adv. 4/16/1898.




LAFAYETTE'S GALA DAY A GRAND SUCCESS:

 Gala Day in Lafayette was a great success. The firemen ought to be proud of their achievement. It shows what a united people can do. Last Sunday will for ever linger in the memory of every one who participated in the ceremonies.
 As arranged, the fire department met at the Court House Square at 12:30 and went in a body to welcome the excursionists who reached Lafayette about 2 o'clock. The fire trucks were gayly decorated for the occasion.

  Home Fire Co.'s truck was a canopy of flowers pulled by three white feathered birds and driven by a little girl (Lillian Van der Cruyssen) who was surrounded by three others, (Michael Martin, Bessie Trahan and Hinder Schmulen.)

 Lafayette Fire Co. No. 1 showed apparatus as a bower of flowers surmounted by a golden and silver arch under which was a little fireman (Antoine Lacoste.)

 Lafayette Hook and Ladder Co.'s apparatus was not in the parade owing to lack of time in decorating it.

 As soon as the large crowd of excursionists arrived the parade was formed marching towards Falk's Opera House where the address of welcome was delivered by Mayor Caffery.

 The militia and a fireman company of New Iberia, the Breaux Bridge's band participation in the parade.

 The Century Brass Band of Lafayette, organized a few years prior of Gala Day decided not to take part in the parade not having a reasonable time to present itself.

 The matinee began soon after the address of welcome was delivered and not a corner was to be found which was not occupied. The Matinee and banquet were well patronized by an appreciative (unreadable word) audience.

 To enliven the afternoon an impromptu ball was organized between the matinee and 6 o'clock the time of departure of the excursionists.

 At 6:30 p. m. the fire department met again in body to assist at the christening of Home Fire Co.'s Hose apparatus which took place at St. John Catholic church.

 To the pealing of bells a vast crowd estimated at 2,000 entered the edifice. There is no recollection of such a crowd ever having entered St. John's.

 The christening of Home Fire Co. celebrated with great pomp. The sponsors were Mrs. John O. Mouton and Dr. G. A. Martin.

 As soon as this vast crowd was seated and if by magic the whole church poured forth a river of variegated electric lights whose brilliancy and beauty had never been witnessed and the surprise was so genuine and intense that the vast throng gave vent to its feelings by a well hearted exclamation.

 This fairy scene will be engraved in the memory of all those who had the privilege of being present.

 The choir sung the Veni Creator after which the Rev. Father Forge delivered an address suited to the occasion.

 "The City of Lafayette," said he, "has a right to be happy to-day."

 Since a long time our city was at the mercy of an element which though necessary to human life becomes, when unrestrained, a danger ;  an element which in its rage spread desolation and ruin.

 Whilst enjoying sleep to obtain new strength for the next day's work a cry in the silent hours of the night awakened us to find our ourselves surrounded by smoke and columns of fire.

 In a few minutes the labor of good many years were reduced to a pile of ashes.

 Happy, yet, if we had not deplored the loss of a dear one.

 To-day the city of Lafayette welcomes a friend, a powerful friend who will fight advantageously the common enemy.

 Powerful as they are, these apparatus are useless, they have need, to conduct and direct them, of an intelligence and will. The guns need soldiers, you are, gentlemen of the fire department, that intelligence and will. While forming three you must walk but under the same flag and upon it I would like to see inscribed:

 'Union, Courage, Devotedness.' The wisdom of the nations, said, "Union is Strength" and if I would employ a more authoritative voice than the one of the wisdom of the nations, the voice of Him whose resurrection we celebrate today. It would say: "ANY HOUSE DIVIDED AGAINST CHIEF WILL FALL," It is Him who to unite men has brought with him this heavenly daughter that St. Paul put above all virtues, CHARITY. Courage, - I will not make insult to your generous heart in defining it I am speaking to brave men, to volunteers; are you not, gentlemen, at least some of you, heroes sons who fought and spilled their blood to defend a principle, are you not the sons of those who in their defeat were more glorious than their victors. Devotedness, - it is not of this world which is essentially selfish, it comes from above.

 It is a mixture of spirit, of sacrifice and love for his neighbor. I am assured that this noble sentiment beats in your hearts, but gentleman, if guns can't peel forth their thundering sounds without intelligence and will which directs them; neither can guns, intelligence or human will do anything without the superior intellect and will of Him who spoke to the Ocean. "Thou shalt go no further," and who by His will can command the destructive element.

 You have understood this, gentlemen, and your presence here in this building is an act of faith, a grateful act to Him who is the creator and preserver of all things.

 With gratitude and confidence, the city of Lafayette, put into your hands to-day this apparatus blessed of God, to be used for its protection and prosperity.

 The great concourse of people who came from neighboring towns and parish to take part in this gala day renders Lafayette twice happy and I believe to be only its interpreter when I say "Thank you."

 I will conclude, gentlemen, by a vow from the bottom of my heart as a priest and citizen:

 May these powerful means to be always as to-day decorated with flowers, may they be used as to-day to triumphantly ride about these earthly angels who are the future of Lafayette and who like our city throw themselves trusting into the arms of its protectors."

 The christening ceremony which was very elaborate and imposing was performed by the Revs. Father Forge, de Stockalper, Baulard and Grimaud.

 Two large blue ribbons descending from the canopy were held by each of the sponsors.

 The night concert was also a great success. There was an immense and appreciative audience. This terminated one of the most beautiful and successful of gala days.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.
 




Opponents of Gala Day. 

 It is with regret that we are obliged to relate that some persons were opposed to gala day and that they have worked to lessen the success which was desired by the majority of the population.

 As to us, we don't believe there was ill will, but only a lack of knowledge or lack of reflecting. But if with a full knowledge they have worked in opposition to the success of gala day, we will say that they have acted without judgement that they have shown to be devoid of sentiment and above all they have been guilty of laboring against a people who in case of conflagration is ready to sacrifice itself not only to save the property but the life of others; against a people that sustain a cause which has for object to fight the most destructive element which sometimes brings death and consternation.

 These persons knew perfectly well that the fire department had for a long time planned the program of gala day and that to assure the success of it a great outlay of  one had been disbursed without counting the trouble occasioned. Until the day before no other advertisement had appeared besides the firemen's gala day, when all of a sudden and underhanded came the advertisement of a baseball game to be held at Oak Avenue Park. All arrangements had been made by the promoters of this underhanded process, to allure the most people at the track to the detriment of the firemen, but we are happy to say that their success has been very lean and that the only thing they can boast of is the rebuke given them by the population and if we speak thus it is but what we have heard repeated a thousand times during last Sunday.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.


 King's Dramatic Co. visited Lafayette Friday and presented the laughable comedy "My Mother-in-Law" ;  they returned Sunday and gave Little Roy Fontleroy to an appreciative. Laf. Adv. 4/19/1893


 SPECIAL ATTENTION. - At Falk's Opera House, Wednesday the 25th inst., the WONDERFUL MIND READER.
 Laf. Adv. 4/21/1894

 The play of Damon and Pythias was quite a treat to the citizens, and also to a goodly number of the members of Lafayette Lodge who had never seen the sublime lesson of friendship from which the order was founded, on the stage.  Laf. Adv. 4/21/1894





The Pan American Electric Carnival Coming.

 At Falk's Opera House, Monday and Tuesday, May 5th and 6th.

 Many of our citizens will be delighted to learn that the PAN AMERICAN ELECTRICAL CARNIVAL will visit our city on May 5th. This company comes highly recommended by the press from our large cities. It is said to be truly marvelous, surpassing anything of its kind ever seen in America. By means of electricity and animated photography they have practically boxed up the Pan American Exposition so that those who go to the Opera House next Monday and Tuesday night will be given a delightful trip to the grounds of the Pan-American Exposition to see the magnificent buildings, etc., and also pay a visit to some of the leading shows that were on the great midway. It happened that this Company had their moving picture Camera at work the day of President McKinley's visit to the Pan American Exposition and there recorded many incidents of the greatest tragedy of modern history, so people in any part of the country may be able to see our late President delivering his last speech in public life, as also the awful assassination which shocked the whole civilized world, and the solemn funeral scenes of Canton and Washington for which the whole world went into deep mourning; many people traveled more than a thousand miles to see the great funeral procession at Washington; so this one feature alone should more than repay one for a visit to the Opera House. There will also be many other subjects of a highly interesting character providing an entertainment that cannot be surpassed in genuine interest, high educational value and as being an example of what is being accomplished through the scientific application of electricity and photography. Lafayette Advertiser 4/26/1902.



Interesting Exhibition.
 

The exhibition given in our town Wednesday afternoon and night, by Mr. Paul A. Johnstone, the wonderful Psychologist, were of a kind of well calculated to convince the more skeptical that mind reading is possible. Mr. Johnstone's performances were most surprising, to say the least of it, admitting that artifice may be employed to great advantage in such doings. Persons who witnessed his operations no doubt were glad of an opportunity of seeing such remarkable manifestations. It is to be regretted that larger audiences are not attracted to exhibitions of this character in our midst, that are at one time interesting and instructive. We should all desire to have attractions of a high order come to town for our pleasure and enlightenment, but we cannot expect them unless we patronize such exhibitions more liberally.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/28/1894.






 Miss Richard with the help of her pupils and local talent will give a Grand Concert on May 28. We bespeak for Miss Richard a large audience. The concert will take place at Falk's Opera House. Laf. Adv. 4/30/1898.


At Falk's Opera House. - Mr. Geo. W. Scott played to a large crowd at Falk's Opera House last Sunday presenting the well known and popular drama, Roanoake. The performance was good throughout and held the close attention of the audience from start to finish. The company was an excellent one and as a whole acted their parts satisfactorily.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/2/1903.


Remember may 28th. Miss Richard with the help of her pupils and local talent will give a grand concert at Falk's Opera House. The success of the concert is already assured. Laf. Adv. 5/7/1898


Lafayette Needs A Fire Alarm System. 


 The concert to be given on Saturday May the 28th and the matinee on Sunday the 29th by Miss Richard and pupils assisted by local talent promises to be the hit of the season. Not only will a grand success be scored artistically but we do hope that the financial side will not be overlooked, as the proceeds of both Concert and matinee are to form a nucleus to provide Lafayette with fire alarms; consequently it behooves every citizen to be present and help to start this fund.

 Excuses of continuous money demands must not even be heard as every one realizes that in case of fire time is salvation and we never can expect the fire department to respond quickly on the very spot unless there is an efficient system of fire alarms.

 This is a cause that affects every body and we therefore sincerely hope that Falk's Opera House on Saturday night and the matinee will be filled to overflowing.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/14/1898.



 The local brotherhood of railroad trainmen will give their annual ball at Falk's Opera House, May 22. Remember the date. Laf. Adv. 5/17/1902.

 The closing exercises of the Lafayette High School will take place on Friday night, May 30 at Falk's Opera House. Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1902.


 On June 3rd. next, the young men of Lafayette will give a grand ball at Falk's Opera house. Preparations are under way to make it a very pleasant and notable occasion. Laf. Adv. 5/19/1894.



Une Mere,Saturday night May 27th, at Falk's opera house. Be sure and attend.
 Laf. Adv. 5/20/1893


The comedy by Judge Felix Voorhies entitled "Le Jardinier Grand Seigner" was quite successfully presented here for the benefit of the Catholic church, notwithstanding adverse circumstances. By this we refer to the very unnecessary and disagreeable noise in the hall where large numbers of people were prevented from hearing, and to the very poor acoustic properties of the hall. It is a matter of sincere regret that such should have been the case because the play is generally considered by competent judges a work of great merit, and the presentation of it was quite creditably done by the amateurs. It is to be hoped that at some future time it may be produced under more auspicious circumstances. Laf. Adv. 5/26/1894.







Une Mare - Falk's to-night.
Laf. Adv. 5/27/1893:

Tableaux Vivants at Falk's to-night.
  Laf. Adv. 5/27/1893




An Excellent Company.

The three performances given at the opera house Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights by the Frederic Lorraine Stock Co., were excellent, in fact, measure up to any that have appeared here this season. Mr. Lorraine is a capable actor and he has surrounded himself with a strong support, which insures a successful presentation of whatever play is selected. The company will return here shortly and those who enjoy a good play should by all means attend. Lafayette Advertiser 5/31/1905.


HOTEL AND OPERA HOUSE.Contracts Let Saturday and Work to Begin Next Monday. 

Saturday contracts were let for the new hotel and also for the opera house. The brick work on both buildings was let to T. J. Gelvin, the carpenter work on the hotel to G. B. Knapp, and on the opera house to J. A. Vandyke. Work will begin next Monday, if not before. The hotel will cost about $50,000 and the opera house $25,000.

 The hotel will be erected on the corner of Vermilion and Jefferson and the opera house next to it on Jefferson street, and are to be completed by November 1.

 Both buildings will be very handsome in appearance and will add materially to the town.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/1/1904.


HIGH SCHOOL. - The popularity of the High School and the interest shown with which it is regarded was shown last Friday night by the immense crowd that gathered at Falk's Opera House to witness the closing exercises. The house was packed to its fullest capacity, and it is estimated that more than 200 people were turned away for lack of room to admit them. A very interesting program had been prepared and was executed by the children in a manner to reflect credit upon themselves and their teachers. There was not a dull number on the program, and the singing which was excellent, was indeed a surprise to the audience. The drill was a beautiful sight and was one of the most attractive features of the evening. "Selecting a Jury" was a laughable burlesque and was done nicely by the pupils.

 The Pantomine from Hiwatha was a piece of real art, and showed both excellent training, and high intelligence in the children. Mayor Caffery's address was short and good. He spoke about education and the need of every one to be alive to the necessity of doing more for our schools. In the course of his remarks he paid a deserved compliment to our school board and to the teachers of the High School and urged the people to wake up to the importance of education and the support of the schools. "The Little Gleaners," a charming song by six girls and six boys closed the program.

 The High School has just closed one of the most successful years in its history. The work in all departments has been most excellent as the program Friday night testified.

 Great credit is due to the Principal, Prof. W. A. Rosen and his able assistants Misses Devall and Christain for their splendid years work.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/7/1902. 

  

Watch for that big flag over Falk's Hall next Thursday, and remember the Lafayette School exhibition. Laf. Adv. 6/9/1894


 The Nashville Jubilee' Singers Georgia Colored Minstrels are booked to appear at Falk's Opera House on the 24th. inst. This company is composed of 30 people - band and orchestra - and its performances are unsurpassed.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/10/1899.


Go down deep in your pocket and fish up that insignificant little quarter; them take it around to Falk's Hall next Tuesday night and give it to those Convent girls who have got spunk enough to build a side walk. They have succeeded in their training better than was expected, and their programme is lengthy and interesting. The naire and winning little sprite Miss Emma Falk is going to sing "Mama. Buy Me That." and her mother ought to do it. The children also give a matinee Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock, so as to give other children and their mothers an opportunity of attending. A variety of refreshments will be furnished at the Hall. Now turn out and show how much you appreciate spirit and enterprise like this. Laf. Adv. 6/14/1890.



Firemen's Parade. Thursday the firemen, assisted by the Breaux Bridge fire department, gave their annual parade. A large crowd gathered along the streets to witness the parade. The Breaux Bridge firmen preceded by the Breaux Bridge Band led the parade, followed by the Sontag Military Band and the Lafayette firemen. After passing over the principal streets, the parade disbanded in front of Falk's Opera House , where a "smoker" was given the firemen, at which they all had a most agreeable time. At night there was a dance at the court-house for which the Breaux Bridge and Sontag orchestra furnished inspiring music.  Lafayette Advertiser 6/20/1903.



MISS ROSE IVY.

Appears Two Nights at the Jefferson and Exhibits Marvelous Powers. Monday night Miss Rose Ivy, the New Zealand Wonder, entertained a fair size audience with a demonstration of her mysterious and wonderful powers; such as lifting heavy men from the floor by touching the chair in which they were seated, with her open palms, holding a rod lightly that strong men could not push from her hand, standing erect and baffling repeated attempts to raise her from the floor. What this power may be none present could guess and those who suspected that some trick is involved couldn't start even a guess to the construction or character of the trick.

 Miss Ivy gave another exhibition last night and left her audience equally as puzzled and astonished as the night before.

 In addition to her seemingly marvelous powers Miss Ivy possesses an unusually fine voice and her singing was delightfully enjoyed.

Lafayette Advertiser 6/21/1905.



A Gratifying Success.


The entertainments given Tuesday by the pupils of Mount Carmel Convent, at Falk's Hall, for the purpose of extending the plank walk system to the Convent. were a most gratifying success, far exceeding their most sanguine expectations.  Our kind citizens generously responded to their efforts, and both afternoon and night greeted them with large and interested audiences. The acting of the children throughout was splendid, and was greeted with unfeigned applause, they all deserve much credit, and little Miss Emma Falk again carried off the palm, being heartily encored. The profits realized are $110.00, which it is thought will be sufficient for the purpose. In returning their thanks to the public for its appreciation and support, the pupils desire particularly to notice Mrs. W. B. Bailey and Miss Alix Judice for their efficient and untiring services in preparing their entertainments and training them so successfully; to Mesdames Ed. Pellerin, John O. Mouton, E. Delmouly, Floriany Cornay, Edward E. Mouton, Phillibert Revillon, Franklin Gardner, and Miss Marie Revillon, for kind services and valuable donations; Mr. B. Falk for the donation of the use of his hall; and to Messrs. Wm. Clegg and D. V. Gardebled for the beautiful display of fireworks. Also to Messrs. Pierre Gerac, Alfred Mouton and Isaac Bendel for appreciated assistance. Wednesday Dr. N. P. Moss sent the pupils a contribution of $5.00 cash, which swells their fund to $115.00.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/21/1890.



Improvements.
 Work on the First National Bank building, the hotel and the opera house is going forward rapidly. A large force of men is employed and that corner presents a lively appearance. The concrete walk on both sides of Moss & Co.'s store is about completed. There are now concrete walks finished from the Crescent News Hotel on both sides of the street to Moss's corner, and on Vermilion street, north side, from Morgan & Debaillon's to Dr. J. F. Mouton's office.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/22/1904.



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