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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

***EARLY LAFAYETTE ROADWAYS/BRIDGES

From the Lafayette Advertiser published on January 4TH, 1890:

THE PUBLIC ROADS.
Lafayette, La., Dec 24, 1890.

Editor-Picayune - The call issued by Hon. J. M. Foster, president of the police jury of Caddo for an assessment convention to be held at Baton Rouge for the purpose of considering some manner of equalizing the assessment of property throughout the state has been quite favorably received here and your correspondent has had the pleasure, through courtesy of Hon. C. P. Alpha, president of the police jury of this parish to peruse several letters written in reference to the subject, all approving the movement as one likely to result in much good to the state generally.

 Mr. Apha expresses himself enthusiastically in favor of the convention and will submit the matter to the police jury at its next session. In this connection the gentleman also spoke of the existing road law requiring twelve days labor each year of every able bodied citizen on the public roads which he not only considers onerous, but very defective in its application, and suggests that the convention take this matter into consideration also. The views entertained by Mr. Alpha in this regard are of course subject to modifications, but are given in the hope that the matter may receive the serious consideration of the various parishes and bring forth any criticism to which they may be liable. The following is an embodiment of his views in reference to an amendment or substitute to the present road law.

That the convention of assessment equalizers that will meet in Baton Rouge on Feb. 9, 1890, take into consideration the petitioner of the legislature to adopt a substitute for the present road law, which is a failure as far as this and the adjoining parishes are concerned.
The following would be a great deal cheaper and would work well in this section of the state.

First -
Impose a special road tax, either per capita on property and per capita, and make it a misdemeanor for failure to pay same. This would reach everyone, whether over age or non property holder.

Second -Amend the state laws for misdemeanors, and let work on public roads follow judgment.

Third -At the expiration of the penitentiary lease, the convicts, except those convicted of capital offenses, be confined within their respective parishes to be worked upon public roads, under the control of the police juries in said parishes, as obtains in Texas and other states.

Fourth - A law allowing each police jury the right to expropriate land for the purpose of draining public roads.

Fifth -Each parish appoint a civil engineer to be road, bridge and drainage supervisor, with a yearly salary, he to be held responsible the same as a road overseer by the present road law.

Sixth -Allowing police juries to lease out their convicts to the highest bidder, who must be responsible and give bond etc.


The following estimate, on a basis of ten convicts for one year and all expenses incident to their operation, is given.

Ten convicts, board at 40c per day $1,400

Two guards, $44 per month $1,080

Clothes and doctor's bill $400

Civil Engineer, $100 per month $1,200

Total $4,140
This parish has a registered vote of 3600. Lay a per capita tax of $2 on each voter, and there would be more that money enough to work the ten convicts. It can be said without the least doubt of contradiction that any man white or black would much prefer to pay $2 a year than to give 12 days work, equivalent to $12, which the present road law imposes. Another reason for the adoption of the above would be to lessen crime in each parish, as the example would be before the eyes of the evil doers daily and further, if a parish had not sufficient convicts to justify them being worked upon public roads, hire them out and let each parish reap a benefit, as really the parish has been wronged and has gone to the expense of conviction.

It would also do away with the middle man and the parishes would get the work done at actual cost. It convicts can enrich a contractor, why would not the same argument hold good and let them enrich each parish by working the public roads and enhancing the property value of property. It can be said with certainty that ten convicts worked on the public roads as they are worked on the railroads will do more and better work in one year than the entire available force subject to road duty in this parish under the present road law.

This subject is full of interest to the people of our state, not only from an economical point of view, but from human consideration for the convicts who are often maltreated by their avaricious (unreadable word) whose sole object is to enrich himself regardless of the feelings of the unfortunate enslaved under him.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/4/1890.



It is with pleasure that we announce the completion of a work of great public utility. The public road leading out of this town in a south-westerly direction, which has been for years impracticable, has lately been put in a fine traveling condition, including the building of a substantial bridge over Mine's coulee. The was much labor required to accomplish the work and some of it in the third ward, which was all performed by the good citizens of the second ward, irrespective of age, of which they would not avail themselves, under the direction of Mr. John S. Whittington, who furnished the necessary tools, carts, teams, &c. Those worthy citizens of the second ward and the public spirit of Mr. Whittington, deserve commendation and they have set an example which we hope will be followed in other portions of the parish. Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1878



The traveling public will be gratified to learn that the road at both ends of the bridge over Bayou Vermilion at Pin Hook has been thoroughly repaired. The credit of this good and important work is due to the citizens of the fourth and fifth wards, aided by contributions from the merchants of this town, and under the intelligent guidance of Mr. Lessin Guidry.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1878


Streets to be Shelled.

The Gazette is informed that the  City Council intends to use a portion of the present surplus in the municipal treasury to shell the streets, or rather as many of them as the funds will permit. The work already done with oyster shells has proven most satisfactory, and the Council feels safe in making a further investment in that direction. In Morgan City, where all the streets have been shelled, the results have given the utmost satisfaction. We do not know of a better way to utilize the public funds. Lafayette Gazette 1/12/1901.




Streets.
Notwithstanding the recent heavy rains, our streets are in first rate condition; all owing to the excellent system of drainage we have. Our country road overseers might take example by this. Good drainage would greatly improve our country roads. Lafayette Advertiser 1/12/1889.


Progressing Well. - The work of moving back the houses along Pierce and Jefferson streets is progressing well. Yesterday the moving of Prudhomme & McFaddin's store was completed. Contractor Thompson states that it will take about three weeks more to finish. Lafayette Advertiser 1/13/1904.




 Street Improvements. - Laborers have been hard at work on the streets grading them and cleaning the ditches They had been put in a bad condition by the prevailing rainy weather, but thanks to the thoughtfulness of the town authorities they now present a much better appearance. Lafayette Gazette 1/15/1898.


Work on the streets is progressing, the grass and weeds are removed from side ditches, and thrown upon the road bed, making the center higher, which will create a natural water drainage. If a heavy roller could be used, so as to pack this loose dirt, it was save us a great deal of mud, should the weather change to a watery spell.
Lafayette Gazette 1/15/1898.


Move to Widen Lincoln Avenue. A movement to broaden to the same width as Lincoln Avenue, the narrow street now leading from this Avenue to the Bank would, no doubt, create a considerable commotion among the property holders along the line, yet such a thing would be in the nature a decided improvement to the town as it would, also, greatly enhance the value of lots lining the route, for business purposes. We realize it would require a vast amount of moral courage on the part of our alder men to propose and carry out such a radical improvement, and yet nothing especially unreasonable is embodied in the proposition. The law of expropriation properly exercised would protect all parties at interest against irreparable loss, and the good results of such a measure to the community in general should be quite obvious. It is only by movements of this kind that towns and cities secure improvements of great and lasting benefit. Lafayette Advertiser 1/20/1894.



On account of the prevailing inclement weather, the roads throughout the parish and the streets in the town are in a very bad condition. The road overseers and the town authorities are doing their best to improve them. Lafayette Gazette 1/22/1898.




GOOD ROADS.
(Communicated)



Going from my work to my home, my eyes casting furtive glance about have discovered a satchel attached to the baluster of the piazza of one of our scientists bearing in large black letters the inscription "I WANT GOOD ROADS," and this quotation has so buried itself in my mind that I have concluded to take up the cry and repeat loud enough to be heard "I WANT GOOD ROADS."

From time immemorial, nations states and communities have prided themselves in having good roads. No one will deny, specially my country friends, that good roads are a scarcity in this section. The reasons for the non-abundance of this "necessity" are quite numerous. First, we have too many roads to be worked and kept in passable condition by the working contingent.

Though all roads lead to Rome, still it would be quite foolish for us to go around Australia to pay a visit to the capital of sun-shiny Italy, and yet, in a small scale, this is exactly what we are doing here. Through interested kindness, a citizen donates a part of his land for road purposes and taking him up we open a road for his own benefit, then, a few days later another citizen throws out the same bait and here goes the opening of another road. It has come to the point that we don't know where the roads are. As said before, "I want good roads, but, I want to know where to find them. Then the system of working our roads is defective.

Knowing many portions of this Continent as I do, I fear no contradiction in saying that we are behind the times in our road system, and yet if this Parish would consider how important and convenient to the farming class, good roads are, there could be a marked improvement in the management of this branch of the public service.
Let us have one road from one point to another conveniently located for the good of the greater number, and then let us put our whole working force to grade it, to drain it, to ditch it, and make it in a travelling passable condition; and by doing so, we will not only reap the thanks of our fellow citizens, but we will show care of our poor dumb beasts.You may say that my suggestions are impossible to perform, but I reply is that this old word is not to be found in my vocabulary.

Where "there is a will there is a way" and all we lack is the will to have good roads; and if we can bend our will on the road question, we shall certainly have good ones. Let us hope the gentlemen in charge of this service will take the heretofore advice and give the Parish a system of roads that will be a convenience to the farming population at large, and a lasting monument to their public service. Lafayette Advertiser 1/22/1898

Rain! Rain! Rain! we had it. Some of the streets were transformed into Bayous, street-crossing bridges were floating at the mercy of the waves, and we just lacked boats and gondolas to remind us that Lafayette had been moved to Venice.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/22/1898.

Quite a new idea was ventilated in our sanctum, while we had a flood in miniature. To require the Water works to lay a net of suction pipes from the streets into their resorvoir so as to take up the surplus water that our sewers are unable to carry off.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/22/1898.




The Heavens Rained Down. - The last week has been but a fit of the preceding one, the heaven's have been pouring incessant rain for the last two weeks, our country is flooded, the Vermilion, but a few days ago placidly sunk in its banks, has swollen into a turbid rolling tide sweeping over its sides and flooding the riparian proprietors, and the smallest stream of our prairies is either merged unseen in the boundless expanse of water covering the face of the country, or foaming and bounding within its contracted but deep laid, bidding caution to the traveler. Our roads are impracticable and the faces once so familiar are no more seen, and the town with its mired streets is thrown upon its own limited resources for sustenance. Never in the course of our experience have we witnessed such heavy and such continuous rains, and we must exclaim enough, enough mighty Jove, thou hast plentifully quenched the thirst of our parched fields. "Jam sat parata bibere." Lafayette Advertiser 1/23/1869


The Streets. - The contract for repairing the Streets of the Corporationwill be offered for sale on Saturday the 30th inst., at the Court House in Vermilionville.
Lafayette Advertiser `1/23/1869




Generally speaking, the streets of our town are in fact first class condition, as a consequence of the good and careful grading of them done in the past few weeks. Lafayette Advertiser 1/26/1895.





Police Jury Proceedings.

LAFAYETTE, LA., Jan. 7th, 1889.

The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: Messrs. C. P. Alpha, J. G. St. Julien, C. C. Brown, O. Theriot, Ford Huffpauir and A. A. Delhomme.

The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

Mr. Alpha, representing the committee appointed to contract for the building of a bridge across Bayou Vermilion, reported that the committee met at Breaux Bridge on the specified date and let the contract to E. H. Vordenbaumen for the sum of $475.

Under suspension of the rules Mr. Delhomme offered the following resolution, which was adopted:

Be it resolved, That the committee appointed to let the contract for the material and construction of the bridge across Bayou Vermilion and is hereby authorized to draw upon the Treasurer for the undivided half of the contract price, in full payment of Lafayette's indebtedness, when in its judgement the work shall have been satisfactorily perfomed.

Mr. Theriot, special committee on the Abbeville road, was granted further time to report.

Mr. Huffpauir submitted the following report from the 2nd Ward:

PARISH LAFAYETTE, Dec. 14, 1888.

To the Hon. Police Jury: Your committee on the Coulee de Noix bridge beg to report that they have examined said bridge on its completion, and have found is satisfactory according to contract; but finding it of insufficient length, we have added sixty feet, which makes the entire length two-hundred and ten feet. One half of the extension was built by Mr. Bacque for the sum of $14.00, the other half being built by road hands. Trusting that the above will meet with your approval, and that a warrant be issued to the above contractor for the sum of $12, being one-half contract price, we respectfully subscribe,
J. T. BROUSSARD, FORD HUFFPAUIR, HOWARD HUFFPAUIR, Committee.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/26/1889.





STREET WIDENING.
aka: history of Jefferson Street. 

We were present at an earnest discussion by some of our citizens provoked by the Advertiser's suggestion last Saturday that the street leading from the bank to Lincoln Avenue, be broadened to the width of the Avenue. The idea was admitted not to be a bad one and the gentlemen debating the subject were of the opinion that the undertaking should be carried out at a moderate cost right now when only a few buildings would have to be moved back some distance on the west side of the street. As matters stand at present no property concerned would be effected to an extent that would not be fully compensated by the very material enhancement in value for business purposes, that would result to the lots by this change. We understand that certain properties along the line would be rendered less desirable for residence purposes, but in the event the change we proposed would come to pass it would pay the owners of these properties to move to other quarters and speculate on their lots. We have strong faith in the decided benefits to the community, contained in the proposition.

Lafayette Advertiser 1/27/1894.




OUR PUBLIC ROADS.

 It need not be told that the system of working the public roads of this parish is an unqualified failure. The condition of all of our highways, with very few exceptions, is a disgrace pure and simple.

 The money expended by the Police Jury in paying the road overseers and for drainage and the building of bridges has been so thrown away. There isn't a thing to show for it. The principal roads -- those leading to Carencro, Broussard and Royville, have long since become impassable. The property-owners living along these roads are using them as canals for drainage.

 The roads in the second ward make one large mud hole. If any money has been spent there or if any work has been done, there is no sign of it.

 The present condition will not only eventually ruin the merchants, but it is bound to ruin the farmers also. The former can't sell their goods because the country people can't get to them and it is impossible for the latter to market their crops. It is as clear as anything can be that unless something is done, and done at once, the whole country will be severely crippled.

 Under the new constitution a special tax will be collected to be used exclusively to work the roads. It is believed that the revenues from this source will amount to about $4,000. Heretofore, every year about $4,000 were put aside in the budget for the purpose of building bridges and paying road overseeers. If the Police Jury will take these two amounts and put them together it will have $8,000 which can be used toward building our public roads. A great deal can be accomplished by a judicious expenditure of this sum.

 But $50,ooo spent in the old way will not amount to anything. In the hands of an incompetent, even though an honest man, this sum will not suffice to drain a single road. What is primarily need is a good, competent man at the head of the road system, who will be made to furnish bond for the faithful performance of his duty. The success or failure of the system will greatly depend upon the selection of the road overseer. It is not reasonable to expect that any Tom, Dick or Harry, who knows nothing of this business, can do the work properly. If you want to have an arm amputated you will surely not seek the services of a blacksmith. You will prefer to get a surgeon. For the same reason the Police Jury should secure the services of a man who understands the business of building and repairing roads. That ought to be clear enough to any mind.

 There is another thing which the Police Jury will have to understand if it really wants good roads. It will have to abandon the shortsighted policy of dividing the work among the different wards. It will have to be altogether. The money will have to be used for the whole parish, and in repairing, first, the principal roads, we mean the roads which are used the most. If every cross-road is to be worked and every property-owner, no matter how isolated he may be, must have a road leading to his home, the funds at the disposal of the parish will have to be fifty times larger than they will be. When the main roads will have been put in good condition it will be time to look after the little roads which are used only by a limited number of people.

 Eight thousand dollars spent in a judicious and business-like manner can not fail to be productive of good results. The same sum distributed as political favors and used by people who know as much about road-building as a pig does of theology. The system must be entirely divorced from ward politics if it is desired to be a success.

 The Gazette thinks that if the Police Jury will exercise some judgement in disbursing the money that will be appropriated for road purposes the people can hope to have better roads in the future. If not, they will have to get flatboats or stay at home. Lafayette Gazette 1/28/1899.   

    

THE BAD ROADS PROBLEM.

 The most vexing problem we have before us now is the problem of bad roads -- how to make them good? As usual following rainy weather, complaints begin to be made of the sorry condition of the public roads, which is good evidence that the main trouble is lack of drainage.


 Lafayette soil has just enough sand in it to make it pack firmly and will after a rain if the water rolls off promptly, and whenever we succeed in securing perfect drainage then the period of bad roads will have passed. But this most desirable condition will never be attained until property owners all over the parish heartily co-operate with the Police Jury. They must freely offer a right of drainage through their fields, refrain from turning water into the public roads, and stop damning up natural drains which carry the water across their land. Then the Police Jury can do the rest.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1905.



Filled the Holes. - The street committee secured some cinders last week and had the worst holes on Jefferson street filled up. The street was getting worse all the time, and the public was much gratified at seeing the work done, and they will considerably more gratified when the street is put in first class shape.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/1/1905.




A Call. 

All persons desirous of actively co-operating with the undersigned in the work of securing and perpetuating a system of public roads of a high standard in the town and parish of Lafayette, are requested to meet us at the City Hall Tuesday, Feb. 4, at 2 o'clock p. m., to organize at "Good Roads League." Please report at the City Hall at 2 o'clock sharp.

 Thos. B. Hopkins, P. L. DeClouet, John Hahn, F. E. Girard, J. R. Domengeux, T. D. Wier, T. M. Biossat, L. J. Stelly, F. E. Darby, F. R. Tolson, D. A. Dimitry, N. P. Moss, C. D. Caffery, Paul Demanade, F. Demanade, John O. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, L. F. Rigues, G. A. Martin, J. D. Trahan, W. W. Lessley, Chas. O. Mouton.

 The foregoing call has been handed to us with the request that it be published. It explains itself and nothing need be said in its favor. Everybody who desires better roads is invited to be present at the meeting which will be held at the City Hall at 2 o'clock p. m. on Tuesday, Feb. 4. The business men of this town are especially interested in the success of this move, for they, more than any other class, suffer from the present condition of the roads. We dare say that hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of dollars are daily diverted from our trade on account of the almost impassable roads leading to this town. The Gazette is informed that the purpose of this proposed league is not to antagonize in any manner the town and parish authorities, but rather to assist them. The Gazette believes that if the people interested in better roads will attend the meeting and join the league, a good deal can be done in the way of ameliorating our public highways, but they must get together and pull together and then substantial results will be bound to come. In our opinion nothing is more important than good roads, and we can not conceive of anything more necessary to the prosperity of our town or country. Our soil is of such a nature that comparatively little labor is needed to keep the roads in good order. Lafayette Gazette 2/1/1896.




THE PUBLIC ROADS.

As usual, there are many complaints about the condition of the roads. There seems to be no doubt, however, that the roads are better than they were under the old system.

 Two things are necessary to have good roads: First, money; second, intelligent supervision. Without these requisites the public high-ways will never be in thoroughly good condition.

 Under the laws enacted for that purpose enough money can be raised to work the roads. As to the right kind of supervision that can be had if the parish is willing to pay for it. We are not disposed to censure the members of the Police Juror is not an executive officer. His duties are rather of a legislative character, and it is not his business to work the roads. He is not paid to attend to such matters. No rational being will expect the Police Juror to give up his private affairs and devote his entire time in the service of the parish for a salary of about three dollars a month. If there a sane man in Lafayette who is willing to give all his time, or a considerable portion of it, to the parish for this munificent salary, be is a patriot whose picture should be placed in the Hall of Fame next to that the Father of His Country.

 But what about the road overseer? This much abused and roundly cursed individual gets exactly ten dollars a month. It is out of the question to expect reliable and intelligent supervision of anything for ten dollars a month. It stands to reason that such a thing is impossible.

 It is not surprising that under these circumstances the public roads are not in a better condition. We should  be thankful that they are not worse.

 Under the present system quite a large sum of money is spent in building bridges and repairing roads, and while we are confident that not a cent has been misapplied, the numerous complaints would show that the results are not satisfactory.

 The people should not expect to get good roads so long as some one is not well paid to attend to the work. Not much can be accomplished in anything unless there is a responsible head to see that the work is done. In every parish government there should be a department to look after the roads. Some authority that will direct the work and will be held responsible for any dereliction of duty. It is an old saying that too many cooks spoil the broth. That seems to be the trouble with the present system -- too many ill-paid and only poorly equipped overseers. Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1901.


THE MERCHANTS AND GOOD ROADS.

The merchants and all business men of Lafayette are very much interested in having good roads. During the closing season unusual activity was noticeable in the streets of the town, and we are sure that the business done by the merchants has been larger than ever before. This increase in the local commerce has been due, in a great measure, to the large quantity of cotton hauled here to be ginned and sold. Fortunately the roads were in good condition and farmers living many miles and were enabled to come here and secure the advantageous terms of the local gins and cotton-buyers. Without good roads a large portion of the cotton which found its way here would have been deprived of its just share of trade. The importance of improved highways can not be overestimated and it seems to us that the businessmen of Lafayette should do all in their power to have good roads for the next cotton season. How would it do to revive the Good Roads League? Lafayette Gazette 2/2/1901. 




The recent long spell of wet weather has caused a cessation of all farming operations, and the un-navigable state of the roads has for the time being almost made foreigners of our country friends. Laf. Adv. 2/2/1889.



The Police Jury met last Thursday with all members present.

Mr. Primeaux reported that the Olidon Broussard bridge was in a dangerous condition, owing to high water. A ferry had been established until the bridge could be repaired or rebuilt. Messrs. J. E. Primeaux, Prosper Broussard, Aurelian Primeaux and J. E. Kee were appointed to report upon the best plan to adopt relative to said bridge, and also confer with the authorities of Vermilion.

Mr. Campbell here appeared and submitted a proposition from Mr. Eloi Broussard to establish at his own expense a ferry at the Darmas Broussard crossing, collecting toll therefore, or in the alternative to maintain a public ferry built by the parish free of charge. No action was taken on the proposition.

The report of the jury of freeholders appointed to trace a road in the Landry settlement was accepted, thus ending a controversy of long standing occasioned by Mr. Homer Landry and wife.

The Cumberland telephone was notified to repair that part of the public road leading from Lafayette to Royville, obstructed and damaged by said company's line.

Mr. S. Bernard was reappointed keeper of Pin Hook bridge.
Laf. Gaz. 2/3/1900.



POLICE JURY
Mr. Durke reported that he had contracted with that he had contracted with Albert Denise for the keeping of Olidon Broussard bridge for 1894 at $70 per annum, one half to be defrayed by Vermilion parish.

 By motion the several juries of freeholders appointed to trace roads, were granted further time to report.

 The report of the jury of freeholders appointed to trace a public road from Lafayette to J. O. Broussard's store by way of Creighton's bridge, was laid over until next meeting. Laf. Gaz. 2/3/1894.



POLICE JURY.
The resignation of Felix Bernard as road overseer of the first ward was accepted and Basile Sonnier Jr. was appointed in his stead.

 The petition of Thos. W. Floyd and others, praying that a public road be established in the 1st ward was laid over for further information.
Laf. Gaz. 2/3/1894.



THE ROADS AGAIN.

In last week's Gazette our Royville correspondent, "Cherokee," suggests what appears to us a solution of the road question. It is that the parish should contract with reliable citizens and to the lowest bidder by sections of five miles of road with bond to be furnished and forfeited unless the work is pronounced satisfactory by experts, the payments to be made by the parish quarterly, semi-yearly or yearly as the case may be. We have interviewed several gentlemen from different parts of the parish, and without an exception, they expressed themselves as being favorably impressed with the wisdom and practicability of "Cherokee's" plan.

 Our police jurors, always disposed to do all in their power for the welfare of their constituents, have, upon different occasions, given this matter a good deal of their time and attention, and it is but just to say that it is not through any fault of theirs that our public highways are in such an impracticable condition.

 The necessity of good roads is apparent to every one. They are indispensible to the farmer, and the merchant can not prosper without them. No business man would allow for a moment a mud hole or rut before his place of business -- he could not afford to; how much less can a farmer afford poor,  roads ?  As matter of business he can not as well as can a merchant. It is  a fact well established that roads over which farmers carry their produce to market return the largest interest upon the cost of construction. A good road saves from 1/2 to 1/3 to the farmer, and oftentimes more, because in some places the roads in this parish can not be used at all. The only time they are good is in the summer when the farmers are engaged with their farm work. In the winter, when they are needed the most, they are an ocean of mud.

 Our pride as well as our personal interests demand that we make an effort to remedy this evil. If "Cherokee's" plan is not a good one, let some one else suggest another plan that may be more feasible. If we must have recourse to the present road law, which has been ineffective in the past, let it be enforced to the letter. Something should be done; we trust that our Police Jury will again give this vexatious question their thoughtful consideration. Lafayette Gazette 2/3/1894.


Labor for Street Working
[From the Crowley Signal.]

Shreveport, Monroe, Alexandria, and even our neighbor, Lafayette, has followed suit, have adopted a new and cheap plan to work and drain the streets, viz: All tramps and other persons who have no visible means of support, and all disorderly persons, instead of being fined a dollar or two for such offences, upon trial and conviction by the mayor are condemned to work five, ten or fifteen days on the streets as an admonitory penalty to leave the town to earn an honest living. It is claimed to be a sure way of getting rid of loafers and vagabonds, and a little of that kind of law would do good in Crowley. Let our mayor try it awhile anyway as an experiment. - Crowley Signal.

 For the information of the municipal government of Crowley we will state that the plan to work the tramps on the streets has accomplished one good thing. It has rid the town of a very undesirable element. It sufficed to put only a few hoboes at work. The warning was enough. If our Crowley friends will adopt the same plan they will not get much work out of the tramps, but they will no doubt get rid of a lot worthless fellows. Lafayette Gazette 2/4/1899.


GOOD ROADS.
Everyone should be interested in good roads, and it is to be hoped that the departure to be made by the Lafayette Police Jury from the old system which has proven so unsatisfactory, will result in the building up of good substantial highways all over the parish. The greatest care should always be used in the levying of taxes, for at best they are a burden to many. But if from a small per capita and vehicle tax enough money can be raised to put the public roads in good condition there will not be a tax-payer who will consent to go back to the old system that has been giving us bad roads twelve months in the year. Lafayette Gazette 2/4/1899.




CORRESPONDENCE.
Scott, La., Jan. 31st, 1899.

 Many of our farmers about this neighborhood have lately made efforts to plant their cane crop, but, the weather is so fickle and it rains so much, they have to desist. The ground being very wet, connoisseurs tell us that cane put down in such land will invariably turn out a "poor stand."

 The only piece of good road that we know of in the parish, is between Scott and Lafayette, five miles which in spite of the frightful rainy season we are having, remains in first class condition, fully demonstrating the possibility of good roads for Lafayette Parish, if only once they are well worked. Were it not that two or three points of drainage along the road have been neglected by the officers whose duty it is to attend to such matters, the traveling public would have as good as a shell-road between these two places. Incidentally, it may be said here that this five miles of road construction only costs the parish $50.00 thanks to the splendid management of Mr. Alcide Judice with Messrs. Billeaud and Martin doing the work of grading. Under the forthcoming new system of working the public highways, Messrs. Billeaud and Martin having proven what they can do as road constructors, why nor the Hon. Police Jury aim to secure the services of these gentlemen, pay them a living salary, turn the public roads of the parish over to their charge, and we dare say, it will not be long before the Police Jurors shall have reason to congratulate themselves upon their happy selection; at least this would seem the opinion entertained by those knowing Messrs. Billeaud and Martin.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/4/1899.


 

Where Do You Live?"Where do you live?" is a question often asked.

"I live in Lafayette," is all the reply a new comer can give.

This is rather vague but in the absence of more (unreadable word) information your enquirer must satisfy himself with the reply.
It seems to us that in a progressive town as Lafayette, anyone ought to be able to tell the street on which he lives. We are lacking something in this respect and we would respectfully call the attention of our city council to this lack of information, and we would suggest to them, to remedy this defect, to place at each street intersection a small board in a conspicuous place, bearing the name of the street; then the question at the head of this short complaint could be answered satisfactorily. Don't stop at the cost, gentlemen, this would be but a trifle, compared to the genuine satisfaction of knowing where one lives. And to further bring the great question before you, gentlemen of the council, we will add that not only new comers are in ignorance of the location of their quarters, but even older residents are sometimes puzzled to know the location of our streets. Now gentlemen give us this street directory and we think you will have well merited in supplying this needful innovation. And while we are on this subject we would call the attention of our Police Jury to the sign boards in the parish indicating the way to the various towns around us. It would greatly diminish the anxiety of the travelers by adding under the names of the localities the number of miles to each respective point. This would be quite a step in the march of progress and in muddy weather a fellow would have the satisfaction of knowing that relief would or would not come in a certain number of miles. Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1898.




 


City Council of Vermilionville.


Session of January 16th, 1869.

Members present: R. Dugat, President, B. A. Salles, Henry Landry, G. C. Salles. Absent: Ed. Pellerin.

 On motion it was resolved, that the Collector proceed immediately to the collection of all taxes due the Corporation for the years 1866, 1867 and 1868, and also all Licenses due for 1868 and 1869.

 On motion of B. A. Salles, it was resolved that a committee of three be and are hereby appointed to examine the streets of the town for the purpose of draining the same and report at the next meeting of the Council. The president appointed Messrs. G. C. Salles, H. Landry and F. Martin on said committee.


 On motion it was resolved, that persons residing within the limits of the Corporation and having hedges growing near the street, so as to obstruct the sidewalk in any way, are hereby notified to trim the said hedges, within the ten days next ten days next following the publication of this resolution; otherwise the same will be trimmed at their expense.

 On motion it was resolved, that all persons are hereby notified and forbidden not to obstruct the side walks in any manner, under penalty of a fine not less than five dollars; to be recovered before any court of competent jurisdiction.  
 
 On motion the Council adjourned to Wednesday the 20th. inst., at 3 p. m.
W. B. BAILEY, Secretary.
R. DUGAT, President.
Laf. Advertiser 2/6/1869.
 


Good Roads.

Mississippi throughout many of her counties has abandoned old ways and adopted the new plan of putting road work out upon contract. This system apparently far in advance of the old road overseer with his nigger and mule and a plow that is almost universal in the South. Under the contract there is responsibility and knowledge behind the work. Under the old law there is only politics and incapacity.

 So well has the contract plan operated in Mississippi that it has given rise to the hope of extending it so as to unite all the counties in the purpose of building and preserving one gigantic system throughout the State. -

From the Memphis Commercial Appeal printed in Lafayette Advertiser 2/8/1905.




AT THE POLICE JURY MEETING....
Mr. S. Bernard was re-appointed keeper of Pin- Hook bridge at the same salary.

 Mr. Blanchet reported that the Police Jury of Vermilion had agreed to continue the ferry at D. O. Broussard's bridge, provided Lafayette parish charged no further rent for ferry boat. Agreed to.


The Jury adopted the road ordinance levying a special vehicle and per capita tax. The same rates as formerly, due April 1, were fixed. Laf. Gazette 2/8/1902.
 






GOOD ROADS LEAGUE.

 Proceedings of the Meeting Held at the City Hall Feb. 4, 1896.

 The meeting was called to order by Dr. N. P. Moss, who requested Dr. J. D. Trahan to act as temporary chairman.

 In explanation of the object of the meeting Dr. Moss read the following declaration of principles, which he submitted as offering a suitable basis on which to organize a Good Roads League as was contemplated by callers of the meeting:

 Recognizing the extensive benefits to be derived from a perfect system of public roads in our towns and parish and having confidence in the efficacy of an organized movement for attaining this end, we, the undersigned, do hereby form ourselves into an association to be known as "The Good Roads League of Lafayette," the avowed and only purpose of which organization shall be the furtherance of all practicable measures tending to bring to the highest degree of perfection possible our public highways; and to this end we pledge our best efforts as individuals and as an organization, purposing to accomplish the object of our league by acting in concert with the town and parish authorities.

 OFFICERS.

 The affairs of this league shall be conducted by an executive committee of twelve, officered by a president, a vice-president, a secretary and a treasurer, to be elected annually by the members of the league from their own number. Five members of this committee shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business and and the committee shall have power to fill all vacancies.

 MEETINGS.

 Meetings of the league shall be held at regular intervals, depending on circumstances, the time and place of such meetings to be determined by the executive committee. The executive committee is required to hold sessions at discretion, but not less than once a month, at such a time and place as it may designate.

 After some discussion it was agreed to organize after the manner suggested in the paper read by Dr. Moss.

 By motion of Mr. Wm. Clegg, seconded and carried, a committee of three, composed of Messrs. A. D. Landry, E. G. Voorhies and O. C. Mouton, was appointed by the chair to select twelve persons to serve as officers and members of the executive committee. The committee of three presented the following report:

 To the President and Members of the Lafayette Good Roads League:

 We, your undersigned committee, appointed to suggest twelve names to constitute the executive committee of said league, beg leave to submit the following:

   President, Dr. Thos. B. Hopkins;
   Vice-President, Dr. F. F. Girard;
   Secretary, Dr. N. P. Moss;
   Treasurer, Wm. Clegg;
Dr. J. D. Trahan, Alcide Judice, Benj. Avant, D. A. Dimitry, Dr. Roy Young, Ed. L. Storge, J. Ed. Mouton, J. S. Whittington, Sr.
       Respectfully submitted,
          A. D. LANDRY,
          ED G. VOORHIES,
          ORTHER C. MOUTON.
   The above report was accepted and the following members were enrolled as members of the league:

J. Nickerson, J. S. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, N. P. Moss, Wm. Campbell, H. Vander Cruyssen, F. E. Darby, Orther C. Mouton, T. M. Biossat, Chas. D. Caffery, Wm. Clegg, T. A. McFaddin, J. K. Grier, Alfred Hebert, F. E. Girard, J. Ed. Mouton, C. Aug. Mouton, A. D. Landry, Thos. F. Webb, A. L. Bourg, Jno. I. Bell, Homer Mouton, J. D. Trahan, P. L. DeClouet, D. A. Dimitry, Benj. Avant, Ed. L. Estorge, Dr. Roy O. Young, J. S. Whittington, Sr., Thos. B. Hopkins, Alcide Judice.

 By motion of O. C. Mouton, duly seconded, the executive committee was instructed to prepare and publish an address stating the object of the league.

 It was moved by O. C. Mouton, and the motion was carried, that all members of this league relinquish all exemption from public road duty.

 The league then instructed the executive committee to solicit subscriptions from the business men of Lafayette to a cash fund to be used to the best advantage in repairing, at once, the main roads leading to the town of Lafayette.

 After a general and spirited discussion of the complex problem of public roads, the meeting was adjourned subject to the call of the executive committee.

 J. D. TRAHAN, Chairman.
P. L. DECLOUET, Secty pro tem.
Lafayette Gazette 2/8/1896.
            
 



AT THE POLICE JURY
The petition for a bridge at Darmas Broussard's ferry and the offer by Mr. Broussard to build the bridge at his own cost and await payment by the Police Jury, was considered and by motion action thereon was postponed until the next regular meeting.

 The resignation of Road-overseer Fred Webb, of 3rd ward, and or Road-overseer Filias Boudreaux, of the 4th ward, were accepted.

 By motion Capt. J. C. Buchanan was appointed Road-overseer of the 3rd ward, vice Fred Webb resigned, and Fizmen O. Broussard appointed overseer for the 4th ward, vice Filias Boudreaux, resigned. 

 Agreeable to a petition of citizens from the 2d ward praying for the establishment of a public road beginning at Eloi Broussard's and running to Dr. M. L. Lyons', the following jury was appointed to trace and lay out a public road forty feet wide according to law and assess all damages to proprietors: Onezime Trahan, Chas. McDonald, Eloi Broussard, Alexie LeBlanc, Eraste Hebert and Raymond Trahan. Said road to be accepted by the Police Jury without cost to the parish. 

 By motion the right to erect telephone lines along the public highways of the parish was granted unto the Great Southern Telephone and Telegraph Company for a period of fifteen years -- provided that said lines shall be so constructed as not to interfere with public traffic upon any of said highways, and provided further that the poles for said lines shall be place on the outside limits of said public road.

 The keeping of Pin Hook bridge for the year 1896 was awarded to Sigismond Bernard at $5 per month, subject to the conditions advertised.

 Mr. Hebert was authorized to take steps to put Pin Hook bridge in satisfactory repair.
Lafayette Gazette 2/8/1896.


AT THE POLICE JURY MEETING.
On motion, one hundred dollars was appropriated for material to repair the Royville road, and R. Leblanc was authorized to contract to have the work done.
 Laf. Adv. 2/8/1873.



BAD BOG HOLES.
  (Communicated)

 Bad bug holes at different places, on the Carencro and Scott roads, which have been forming and never were attended to and now are in a dangerous condition. Why not attend and have them fixed at once? The tax-payers are now complaining very bitterly against those in charge of the public roads, as a certain sum of money has been set aside for the purpose of road works, and practically nothing has been done in that way. Thanks to kind Providence if things are not in worse shape, for it is due to no one's efforts if we had good roads since last summer, but only a providential blessing. Hence, we look upon our Police Jurors of the 3rd ward to go and see for themselves and remedy the much needed places in order that the public may reach town without peril of life.
    Respectfully,
     A-TAX-PAYER.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1901.


NOTICE. - Notice is hereby given that the Street Committee of the City Council are ready to receive bids for the grading of Johnston Street to the Industrial School. Bids will be opened Wednesday, 20th., inst. 4 p. m.
   F. DEMANADE, Chairman.
   Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1901.

At Police Jury
Mr. Delhomme reported not adjustment in regard to the public road across the property of Mr. Theovic Trahan, and asked to be discharged from further service in the matter granted. Laf. Adv. 2/9/1895.


AT POLICE JURY:
The secretary was authorized to have printed 10,000 road notices.
By motion the report of the fury of freeholders appointed to trace a public road from Duson Station to the land of Messrs. Thos. W. Floyd and J. G. Parkerson was referred back to the jury through the member from the 2nd ward, the said report not being acceptable. Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1895.


And still the good work goes on - we mean the work of grading the streets of the town.
Laf. Adv. 2/9/1895.


 We learn from the printed proceedings of the police jury of the Parish of St. Martin that Mr. Albert Martin, a member of that body, has been authorized to begin work on the public road leading from Breaux Bridge to Lafayette. It is fortunate that this work has been placed in the hands of Mr. Martin, as we know it will have the proper and will be carried on to the satisfaction of all parties interested. Now that St. Martin parish has taken the initiative in this important matter, especially to us of Lafayette, we hope to see our own police jury fall promptly into line to do its share toward putting the entire distance between the towns in a prime condition for travelling. Laf. Adv. 2/9/1895.


AT POLICE JURY MEETING.
Among other business....

On motion of Mr. St. Julien the following was adopted.

 Be it resolved, That the President is hereby authorized to purchase two Sanborn Road Machines, one for the East and the other for the West side of Bayou Vermilion. He is further authorized to draw a warrant for the purchase price of said machines if they prove satisfactory.


 The following introduced by Mr. Delhomme was adopted:

 Be it resolved, That a jury of six freeholders be appointed to lay out and trace a public road and assess the damages to the 1st ward. This road to run north from Scott Station in accordance with the recommendation of the committee appointed at a previous meeting.

 The President appointed the aforesaid jury as follows: Jules Guidry, Bazile Sonnier, Jos. C. Broussard, Silvian Richard, Jean Hebert and P. A. Delhomme.

 It was resolved, That the President be empowered to employ the Parish Surveyor to locate the public road from the land of Pellerin to bayou Vermilion between the properties of Arthur and Aurelien Dugas. The said road having been donated to the parish by the above seven parties. It was also resolved to survey the road commencing at a point near J. S. Whittington's and running to Coulee des Noix bridge. Laf. Advertiser 2/9/1882.


Police Jury Meeting.
Parish of Lafayette, Jan. 7th.

 Among other business....

 The committee appointed to trace and open a road from Olidon's ferry to Royville made their report, and on motion, said report was adopted.

 On motion resolved, that a committee of five be and is hereby appointed and that full power be and is hereby given to said committee to confer with the members of or a committee appointed by the Police Jury for the Parish of St. Landry for the purpose of making all repairs and other work which in their estimation they deem necessary to put in traveling order the bridge over bayou Carencro.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs Theodule Hebert, jr., M. G. Broussard, Jean Vigneaux, Ernest Potier and Alfred Peck.

 Resolved, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the president of the Police Jury of the parish of St. Landry for action thereon by that honorable body.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to make an estimate of the probable expenses of the parish for the current year, said committee to be guided by report of the committee appointed to draft rules to attain an equitable distribution of the funds of this parish. On said committee were appointed Messrs. Ed. E. Mouton, M. F. Rigues and M. E. Girard.

 On motion resolved, that the president of this Police Jury be and is hereby authorized to draw on the treasurer of this parish, the sum of sixty dollars as as much thereof necessary, for the purchase of three record books for the Recorder's office.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to lay out and trace a road leading from the new bridge built on Mine's coulee to the old bridge on Isles des Canes lying near Wm. Guidry's plantation.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. John S. Whittington, Jules Guidry, Jules Duhon, Antoine Guidry and Cleobule Doucet.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to trace a road from the bridge lying near Montgomery's plantation leading to the Mermentau river.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Jules Guidry, Ed. Louviere, Dr. Cunningham and Theophile Breaux.

 On motion resolved, a committee be appointed to consider the possibility and to advise the proper means of opening and tracing a public road leading from Vermilionville to Isle Pilette, and said to join the public road southwest of the town near Messrs. H. Eastin and McBride's plantations.
On said committee were appointed Messrs. Lessin Guidry, Drozin I. Broussard, Valory Breaux, H. Eastin, Alcide Judice, Arelien Primeaux and Adolphe Comeaux.

 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
ONES BROUSSARD, President.
J. N. JUDICE, Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1878.



Police Jury Meeting.
Parish of Lafayette, Jan. 7th.

 Among other business....

 The committee appointed to trace and open a road from Olidon's ferry to Royville made their report, and on motion, said report was adopted.

 On motion resolved, that a committee of five be and is hereby appointed and that full power be and is hereby given to said committee to confer with the members of or a committee appointed by the Police Jury for the Parish of St. Landry for the purpose of making all repairs and other work which in their estimation they deem necessary to put in traveling order the bridge over bayou Carencro.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs Theodule Hebert, jr., M. G. Broussard, Jean Vigneaux, Ernest Potier and Alfred Peck.

 Resolved, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the president of the Police Jury of the parish of St. Landry for action thereon by that honorable body.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to lay out and trace a road leading from the new bridge built on Mine's coulee to the old bridge on Isles des Canes lying near Wm. Guidry's plantation.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. John S. Whittington, Jules Guidry, Jules Duhon, Antoine Guidry and Cleobule Doucet.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to trace a road from the bridge lying near Montgomery's plantation leading to the Mermentau river.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Jules Guidry, Ed. Louviere, Dr. Cunningham and Theophile Breaux.

 On motion resolved, a committee be appointed to consider the possibility and to advise the proper means of opening and tracing a public road leading from Vermilionville to Isle Pilette, and said to join the public road southwest of the town near Messrs. H. Eastin and McBride's plantations.
On said committee were appointed Messrs. Lessin Guidry, Drozin I. Broussard, Valory Breaux, H. Eastin, Alcide Judice, Arelien Primeaux and Adolphe Comeaux.

 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
ONES BROUSSARD, President.
J. N. JUDICE, Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/9/1878.
 



FOR GOOD ROADS.

It sometimes happens that with the very best of intentions, just the opposite result is obtained from that expected or desired. This is equally true of public bodies as of individuals. Success can only be obtained by a very careful consideration of the end which is sought to be obtained. A false start is often made, and experience has demonstrated that it is hard to overcome, for which reason it is much better to make haste slowly.

And it also frequently happens with public bodies as with individuals, that the false start and the mistakes develop through a poor selection of those whom they may choose to serve them.

It is certainly to be hoped that this will not be the case with the recently elected Police Jury, who can be of such great aid and assistance in many ways to the parish. The Advertiser believes that a a fine selection has been made and that as a body we many expect good things from them; but to just what extent, depends largely upon their selections of those who shall serve them. And we think there need be little doubt upon that score, as we feel convinced that the gentlemen of the Police Jury will exercise due care, and let their choice be governed strictly upon fitness and merit. With a good Police Jury and assistants, it remains for the citizens to unite and give them their fullest and heartiest support that we may all together do everything that can be done for the welfare and best interests of the parish.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1904:

 
 
 



ABOUT GOOD ROADS. 

 A Bill Before Congress to Appropriate $24,000,000, to Assist the Different State in Improving Their Roads.

 At the last session of Congress, a bill was introduced by Mr. Brownlow of Tennessee, making a liberal appropriation to assist the States in the construction of better roads. The bill had strong support from all parts of the country, and but for the rush of business during the last days of the session it would probably have passed. It has been reintroduced at the present session, carrying an appropriation of $24,000,000 and is again being pressed, with every chance of success, unless the Republican majority in Congress becomes infected with the craze of economy in order to help. Mr. Roosevelt in his presidential ambitions. The splendid results coming from the objection of the Federal government in the matter is fully recognized. It has set aside a small sum each year to be used in a propaganda, to demonstrate the value, from a financial point of view, of better roads, to give the people practical lessons in road building and to assist in holding conventions to discuss the subject.
A number of these conventions have been held, one met in New Orleans a short time ago, it will be remembered - and the field has been well worked up. The Brownlow bill proposes to go a step further and assist in the construction of better roads, as there can be no surer or more practical demonstration of the value of good roads than the actual construction of several thousand miles of them. The farmer will appreciate how much he is benefited by traveling over highways in perfect order for better than he can possibly learn from a paper argument of the question. It is, of course, not proposed that the Federal government should construct all the roads in this country, but it is hoped by assisting in the work, to encourage more of it. New Jersey has accomplished much in this line by the State agreeing to assist any county constructing new highways, and the public interest has thus been aroused. Federal assistance will have the same effect, for once the people see and become accustomed to good roads they will demand them on all the main lines of transportation. It is not forgotten that the Federal government by similar assistance encouraged the building of the steam railways which have done so much to get rid of our old post roads, for in this matter we actually retrograded and our highways, as a whole, are not as good as they were a half century ago. We have grown so dependent on the railways for transportation that we have overlooked our highways, which are tributaries to them.


 Under the Brownlaw bill, Louisiana will receive $400,000 from the Federal Treasury to assist it in road construction. Its roads are about as bad as those of any State in the Union, and while a few parishes have done something in this connection by special taxation or appropriations made by the police jury, most of our highways are bad at all times and well nigh impassable during a rainy season, entailing an onerous tax on both farmer and merchant. Louisiana has shown a deep interest in good roads and has held several conventions or conferences on the subject. All it needs is encouragement and stimulation; and there can be no better way of giving this encouragement than through the Brownlow Bill. -
From the N. O. Times-Democrat and re-published in the Lafayette Advertiser on 2/10/1904.


CITY COUNCIL.

Among other business....

 The mayor reported that the work of widening Pierce and Jefferson streets is progressing favorably and asked the ratification by the Council of the following contracts made by him with abutting owners to-wit:

 Contract with Mrs. Fannie Schmulen also contract with Mr. Antoine Deffez dated Jan.29, 1904 and thereupon that it was moved seconded and carried that same be and is hereby ratified by Council. Also extra money in the sum of One Hundred Dollars over contract price paid L. H. Thompson for work in moving Mrs. Schmulens buildings, is approved, also item of $45.00 paid for moving J. J. Mouton's store sideways.

 Petition from property owners on Lee avenue praying for cement walk on south side received and accepted, and the following ordinance adopted:

 Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, La., that under and by virtue of an ordinance adopted and by virtue of an ordinance adopted October 5, 1903, entitled "An ordinance relative to sidewalks in the town of Lafayette, La.," and in accordance with the provisions of Act No. 147 of the acts of the Legislature of this State, of the year 1902, and considering that the public interest requires it, that a cement walk six feet in width, and the necessary curbing thereto and otherwise according to specifications in possession of the street committee of this Council, be built along the following routes, to wit:

 1. Starting from Vermilion street and its intersection with Lee avenue, and going thence on the east side of said Lee avenue to Sixth street to Grant avenue, and thence on the southwest side of Grand avenue to the Crescent City Hotel.

 2. Starting from Main street in said town at its intersection with Lafayette street and going north on the west side of Lafayette street to Vermilion street/

 Be it further ordained that public notice be given ten days of this ordinance and moreover calling for bids to do said work, and that the contract for said work shall be let to the lowest responsible bidder who bidder who shall give satisfactory security to the street committee in a sum to be determined by them for faithful performance  of said contract and the completion of said work.

 Be it further ordained that the entire cost of said walk shall be paid by the owners of the real estate abutting the same on the basis of the respective frontage of said real estate which amounts shall be due and collectible within ten days after the completion of the work and its acceptance by the City Council of this town, and if not paid within ten days the Council shall proceed by suit against the said owners and said real estate to collect said delinquent assessment and for the payment of said sums so assessed.

 This Council shall have a special privilege on said property, with six per cent annum interest thereon from the expiration of said ten days until paid, which lien shall be the first privilege over all the claims except taxes, and shall effect third persons, from the date of the registry of the assessment in the Mortgage Book of the parish of Lafayette.

 Be it further ordained that the street committee of this Council may and are hereby authorized in their discretion to accept said work, or any part thereof, by sections of one or more blocks.

 Be it further ordained that in case no satisfactory bid is received for the construction of said cement walk, then that said street committee is hereby authorized and empowered to proceed without delay to construct the same, or cause the same to be constructed, as provided by said Act No. 147 of 1902.

 Be it further ordained that this ordinance shall take effect immediately after promulgation.

 Moved seconded and carried that it is hereby prohibited for all owners of wagons and carts and other vehicles to back the same against the cement walks of this town or to unload  their freight in such a way as to injure or damage the said walks and that a fine of not less than $2.50 not more than $10.00 is hereby imposed for each and every violation of this ordinance.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
 CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1904.



POLICE JURY. - Mr. Sig. Bernard was reappointed bridge keeper at Pinhook at the same salary.

Mr. Lacy was authorized to complete the road and canal from Scott to Duson.
Laf. Adv. 2/10/1904.

Police Jury - The special road tax was made payable Mar. 1 and delinquent July 1. Mr. Mouton opposed changing the date, but his amendment was lost. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1904.  






POLICE JURY = Mr. Primeaux reported the dangerous condition of the bridge at Olidon Broussard and the establishment of a ferry there until the bridge could be repaired or rebuilt. The following committee was appointed to confer with the Vermilion authorities and report upon measures necessary in the premises: J. E. Primeaux, Prosper Broussard, Auerelien Primeaux and J. E. Kee.

 Wm. Campbell appeared representing Broussard Eloi Broussard and submitted propositions to establish a ferry at the old Darmas Broussard bridge, Mr. Broussard proposed first to build and maintain a ferry at his own expense provided the parish gave him license to charge toll or in the alternative the parish to build a public ferry and same be operated by Mr. Broussard free of charge. No action taken.

 The following report of jury of free-holders appointed to trace and lay out a road in the 5th ward was read and by motion duly made and adopted, the same declared a public highway and the sum o $85.00 appropriated and set aside to meet the damages therein assessed.




STATE OF LOUISIANA,
PARISH .


 We, A. L. Broussard, A. D. Girouard, J. H. Bernard and Albert Landry, do solemnly swear that I will lay out the road now directed to be laid out by the Police Jury of the parish of Lafayette, to the greatest ease and advantage of the inhabitants, and with as little prejudice to enclosures as may be -- without favor or affection, malice or hatred, and to best of my skill and abilities. So help me God. And furthermore, that I will truly assess all damages to proprietors, caused by said road, to the best of my judgment and ability. Alphone L. Broussard, Onezine Langlinais, Ambroise Broussard, A. D. Girouard, J. H. Bernard, Albert Landry. Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 20th, day of January, 1900.
             ED. G. VOORHIES, Clerk of Court.

REPORT

 We, the undersigned Jury of Freeholders of the parish of Lafayette, duly appointed by the Police Jury of said parish, to trace and lay out a public road leading from the western limit of Rosemond Landry estate and Joseph Caruthers running east to the public at the corner of Mrs. Baptiste Malagaire and J. G. St. Julien, through the lands of the following proprietors, to-wit: Rosemond Landry estate, Joseph Caruthers, R. C. Landry, Mrs. Edmond Landry, Albert Landry, Marie Peronelle Langlinais wife of Homer Landry, Mrs. Alida Bernard wife of Aurelien Olivier, and the said Aurelian Olivier and the said Aurelian Olivier, Mrs. Widow Charles D. Landry, J. A. Roy, Henri Bernard, J. G. St. Julien; to the public road leading from Broussardville to Lafayette having been notified of our appointment; and having severally taken and subscribed the foregoing oath, and having given notice to each and every one of the aforesaid proprietors in writing, at least three days previous of the time and place of meeting and of the intended laying out of said road through the lands of said proprietors, did meet on the 20th day of January, 1900, at Mrs. Homer Landry, the place designated in said notices, and did then and there, in presence of the following named of said proprietors, to-wit: Mrs. Widow Charles D. Landry and Mrs. Homer Landry proceed to trace and lay out said public road said public road as follows: Beginning at the western limit of the estate of Rosemond Landry and Joseph Caruthers and running thence through the lands of the aforenamed proprietors for the distance of three miles taking a strip of fifteen feet wide off of the land of each one along their common boundary line, which boundary was mutually agreed upon by setting stakes and plowing furrows, so as to be easily visible and recognizable, and thence through the lands of Rosemond Landry estate, Joseph Caruthers, R. C. Landry, Mrs. Widow Edmond Landry, Albert Landry, Mrs. Homer Landry, Aurelien Olivier and Alida Bernard wife of Aurelien Olivier, Mrs. Widow Charles D. Landry, J. A. Roy, Henri Bernard, Gustave St. Julien, and up to the corner of the land or Mrs. B. Malagarie to the public road leading from Broussardville to Lafayette, the termination of said road, which road is thirty feet wide throughout its length, and was so traced and staked out as to be plainly visible throughout its entire course; and we have cause to be made of a plat of said road showing the location and course of said road, and the location of the lands of the different proprietors through which said road runs, and the distance and quantity of land expropriated from each owner of said road, which plat is annexed to this our report of said road reference.

 And we further report that we, said jury of freeholders, did on the oaths aforesaid, assess the following damages to proprietors in compensation for their land so taken and expropriated for said road as follows, to-wit: To Marie Peronelle Langlinais, wife of Homer Landry, seventy-five dollars ($75) to estate of Rosemond Landry, ten dollars ($10) and to the other proprietors no damages were assessed for the reason that they have donated said public road, as will be fully shown by act of donation hereto annexed and made a part hereof. Done at the parish of Lafayette, this 20th day of January 1900. Alphonse L. Broussard, Onezime Langlinais, Abroise Broussard, J. H. Bernard, Albert Landry, A. D. Girouard. Witnesses:--Ed G. Voorhies, Luc Langlinais.


ENDORSEMENT OF CONSENT.

 I, one of the proprietors named in the written report, do hereby consent to the location and direction of the road as described in the written report, and accompanying accompanying plat; and hereby agree to accept the amount of damages by me sustained, by reason of the expropriation of my land for the use of said road. Signed and dated this 20th day of January 1900. Marie Peronelle Langlinais, Homer Landry to authorize his wife. Witnesses:--G. Mouton, Ludovic Billeaud.

STATE OF LOUISIANA, PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.

 Know all men, by these presents that we, the undersigned, do hereby give, donate, transfer and deliver with full guarantee of title unto the parish of of Lafayette, Louisiana, herein represented by R. C. Landry president of the Police Jury, here present accepting same donation for said Parish, the strip of land of fifteen feet wide off of the land of each one along our common boundary lines, and thirty feet wide wherever said public road passes through our respective lands, all in accordance to the plot hereto annexed and made a part of the this act, and as located by the jury of freeholders of the parish of Lafayette duly appointed by the Police Jury to trace and lay out a public road leading from the western limit of the estate of R. Landry up to the public road at a point near Mrs. B. Malagarie. Which said road has been duly traced and designated on setting stakes, on this January 20, 1900. Said act of donation to form part of the act of expropriation, and of laying out of said public road. Said strips of land this day donated to the parish of Lafayette, La., to be used as a public road. Done and passed this 20th day of January, 1900, in presence of the undersigned competent witnesses. Albert Landry, R. C. Landry, A. Olivier, Marguerite Bernard, A. Olivier, to authorize my wife, A. G. St. Julien, Mrs. Charles D. Landry, Henry Bernard, Geo. Malagarie, agent for J. A. Roy, Louisa Comeau. Witnesses:--Albert Landry, Onezime Langlinais.

STATE OF LOUISIANA, PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.

 Before me, the undersigned authority, on this 19th day of January, 1900, personally came and appeared before me, Albert Landry, one of the subscribing witnesses to the foregoing act, who being duly sworn deposes and says that said act was signed in his presence of Onezime Langlinais the other subscribing witness thereto, by R. C. Landry, A. Olivier, Marguerite Bernard, J. G. St. Julien, Mrs. Chas. D. Landry, Henry Bernard, Geo. Malagarie, agent for J. A. Roy, and Louisa Comeau, on the day and date mentioned therein and that the words "twenty and forty" erased and "fifteen and thirty" substituted before signing.
ALBERT LANDRY.

 Sworn to subscribed before me this 29th day of January, 1900.
 ED G. VOORHIES, Clerk of Court.

 A change of the public road in the 2d ward adjoining the properties of Hineas Trahan, Hiliare Hebert, Euclid Bourg and Philebert C. Hebert, was approved and ordered recorded.

 The sum of $15 was allowed Capt. Robt. Gillen for work on Olidon Broussard's bridge. Laf. Gaz. 2/10/1900.

POLICE JURY.
S. Bernard was reappointed bridge keeper at Pin Hook.
Laf. Gaz. 2/10/1900.




The ADVERTISER directs the attention of the town authorities to the following facts the street bridge nearest town hall is in a very defective condition: the foot crossing at the corner of Edouard McBride residence property stands in need of immediate repair, the plank walk contains a number of shaky and unsafe places between Biossat's store and Leo Doucet's establishment. Laf. Advertiser 2/10/1894.


A scene that proved itself an object of great amusement and one that was particularly appropriate to the purpose in hand, was that presented on our streets Mardi Gras day in the shape of a large flat boat drawn by a pair of mules. Fastened to standards on either side of the boat were pieces of white cloth bearing this inscription: "This is the way we travel Lafayette parish roads," and to emphasize further the significance of the design, a much dilapidate two wheeled vehicle was made to closely follow the flat boat, bearing as an excuse for its badly crippled condition the explanation on canvas "Bad roads did this." The whole affair was certainly a capital 'get off' on the present miserable condition of the parish roads, and citizens of Lafayette are bound to regret that these should ever be in such a state as to furnish just occasion for jest or ridicule of this nature. Lafayette Advertiser 2/10/1894.




POLICE JURY. - The Jury resolved to meet informally sat Darmas Broussard's Feb. 22, to investigate the condition of said bridge and determine what disposition shall be made of the road and bridge.


 The Jury examined plans and specifications for a bridge at Jno. Whittington Jr., submitted by the New Jersey Steel and Iron Company. No action, however, was taken toward accepting bids for said bridge or advertising for same.


 Judge Mouton appeared and addressed the body in regard to the Darmas Broussard bridge, arguing in favor of retaining said bridge in the interest of the inhabitants on either side of the stream.
 Laf. Adv. 2/11/1899.




POLICE JURY.
Pin Hook Bridge was relet to S. Bernard at $39 per annum.


 A petition from the citizens of Broussard and vicinity praying for the reopening of the Bernard and St. Julien public road was read and a committee consisting of Messrs. M. Billeaud, Jr., and R. C. Greig was appointed to ascertain whether said road has ever been abandoned by the parish or not.
Laf. Adv. 2/11/1899.



POLICE JURY. - It was resolved that the time for payment of the special road tax be extended until March 1st after which date the treasurer's office cancel his vouchers etc., submitted the following report which was adopted.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/11/1899.

 

POLICE JURY....The committee appointed to examine and report upon the advisability of accepting the donation of a public road between the properties Mrs. Frank Gardner and Chas. A. Mouton, submitted a report recommending the acceptance of the donation, and establishment of the proposed public road.
 
By motion of Mr. St. Julien, the Stock Law, together will all amendments thereto, was ordered posted throughout the parish, and the president authorized to carry out the objects of this enactment.
 
By motion Mr. Brown was appointed a committee to confer with a like committee from St. Landry parish, and authorized to contract for the construction of a bridge over Bayou Vermilion, at the public road leading to Opelousas.
 
The attention of the Police Jury being called to the waste of old and refuse bridge materials, in various parts of the parish, it was ordered that the road overseers for the different wards be and are hereby instructed to preserve all such material, and use the same in repairs upon the public roads.
 
A petition from the citizens of the 8th ward praying for the establishment of a public road, was read and action deferred.
 
The contract with Mr. Marquis for the keeping of Pin Hook bridge was extended one year at the same rates per month, to-wit: -- $10.00.
Laf. Advertiser 2/11/1893.
 


POLICE JURY. - Complaints have been made to the Police Jury relative to the bad condition of the public roads under contract. It is hereby resolved that the road contractor, Mr. I. N. Satterfield, be and is hereby instructed to take prompt measures to remedy the matter.
 
Mr. Brown was appointed a committee to confer with the committee from St. Landry as to the construction of a bridge across Bayou Carencro at Boagni's place.
Laf. Adv. 2/11/1893.



POLICE JURY - By motion of Mr. Avant the jury of freeholders composed of David Spell and others was discharged and the following jury of freeholders appointed to trace and lay out a public road from lands belonging to David Spell and Jonas Weild to Bayou Queal Tortue to meet the public road traced in Acadia parish: Silas Hoffpauir, Ellis Hoffpauir, Jules Bavoni, Oneal East, Claiborn Avant Joachim Leger. The said road according to law.

 Messrs. Ben Avant, Jno. Whittington, Jr, and Antoine Broussard were appointed to repair the Simeon Cormier bridge.
Lafayette Gazette 2/12/1898.


POLICE JURY. The contract for keeping Pin Hook bridge was let to S. Bernard for the sum of $39.00 per annum, under same conditions as previous contract.
Laf.  Adv. 2/12/1898.


 
POLICE JURY - By motion of Mr. Avant the Jury of freeholders composed of David Spell and others was discharged and the following jury of freeholders appointed to trace and lay out a public road from, lands belonging to David Spell and Jonas Weild to Bayou Queue Tortue to meet the public road traced to meet the public road traced in Acadia parish; Silas Hoffpauir, Ellis Hoffpauir, Jules Bavoni, Oneal East, Claiborne Avant, Joachim Leger. The said jury to assess all damages and trace said road according to law.
Laf. Adv. 2/12/1898.


POLICE JURY: Mr. Jean Begnaud appeared and complained of obstruction in the public road near Alex Martin's and Mrs. P. Gerac's plantations in the first ward. Messrs. Lacy and Begnaud were thereupon appointed to investigate the matter as well as complaints relative to the road near Dominique Bonot and Vincent P. Domingue.

By motion of Mr. Mouton the committee appointed to confer with the Vermilion authorities to appoint a new conference committee provided the Police Jury of Vermilion shall likewise change the personnel of its identical committee. President Billeaud then then appointed on said conference committee Messrs. F. G. Mouton, P. R. Landry and Harrison Theall and urged an immediate endeavor to reach some satisfactory understanding as to the site of said bridge in order to accommodate public travel so seriously affected.

Mr. Blanchet was authorized in conjunction with Vermilion to rent a ferry for the D. O. Broussard crossing pending the reconstruction of the old ferry boat.
Laf. Adv. 2/14/1903.



On Feb. 3rd, Police Jury Rejects Olidon Bridge.  Gentlemen: The Olidon bridge committee met this day by call of C. D. Stewart, contractor, at the bridge built over Vermilion Bayou, and for the purpose of examining said bridge. After examining the same, we found it to be about three feet too low, and also that the piling for the turn-table was not in the proper place as designated by your committee. We therefore refuse to receive the bridge, and refer the same in your Honorable Body for further action in the matter.
Signed O. Cade, Chmn.


Lafayette Advertiser 2/15/1890.

 


 


A WAGON MARKET. 
Six Thousand Bales of Cotton Sold in Lafayette This Season. 

The Importance of Good Roads. 
 Many persons in Lafayette will no doubt be surprised to know the large number of bales of cotton ginned in this town during the season which is drawing to a close. The special advantage offered to farmers by the local gins have induced cotton-growers from adjoining parishes to haul their cotton to be ginned and sold. Then gins operated by the Lafayette Compress and Storage Company and Gerac Bros. are about to close a most successful season. The number of bales ginned by each nearly reaches three thousand. This speaks well for the management of both concerns. It is strong evidence that their methods are acceptable to the farmers. And it must not be overlooked that this record was made despite the shortness of the crop. Right here we desire to call the attention of the business men of Lafayette to the great importance of making a wagon market of this town. Only a few years ago little or no cotton was brought to this place to be sold, and if so much has been accomplished in so short a period without any effort on the part of the business community, it can easily be demonstrated how much can be done if the intelligent co-operation of the people is enlisted in a movement to make this point what it should be - the best wagon-market in South Louisiana. It is safe to say that every man who brings his cotton to this place does not leave without spending some money here, and if he is well treated, as he is sure to be, there is every reason to believe that he will come back to do his trading. Six thousand bales of cotton sold here means nearly $250,000 put into circulation at this place. It means that almost half of the crop of the parish was brought to be sold here. This, we submit is an item worthy of the most serious consideration of the business men of the town. But it should not be ignored that this could not have taken place it propitious weather and not given us good roads. There isn't a community on earth more interested in having good roads than Lafayette. Without them the trade of the town is deprived of its main sustenance, for even though cotton may be a dethroned monarch elsewhere, it still holds undisputed away in this bailiwick.

 Lafayette Gazette 2/16/1901
.


 



POLICE JURY; -
Pin Hook bridge was placed in charge of S. Bernard as keeper of $40 per annum, Mr. Bernard obligating himself to keep approaches in repair, levees excepted.

 Agreeable to a petition from the citizens of the 5th ward the following committee was appointed to investigate and report on the advisability of opening a public road from heirs of Edward Fabre to some point on the public road, in order to give outlet to petitioners: A. A. Labbe, Geo. Malagarie, Ambroise Broussard, Guillaume Bernard and Alex Billeaud.

 Agreeable to a petition from citizens of the 4th ward the following committee was appointed to trace a public road from Royville public road toward the limit of the parish near Cade's Station: Sosthene Mallet, Sr., Jules Langlinais, Sr.,  and Charles S. Young.

 Mr. Buchanan nominated Sidney McFaddin as roadoverseer for the 3rd ward. Thereupon the matter was referred to Messrs. Mouton and Buchanan representing said ward until next meeting.
Laf. Advertiser 2/16/1901.




POLICE JURY.
Jan. 7, 1878.

Among other business....

 The committee appointed to trace and open a road from Olidin's ferry to Royville made their report, and on motion, said report was adopted.

 On motion resolved, that a committee of five be and is hereby appointed and that full power be and is hereby given to said committee to confer with the members of or a committee appointed by the Police Jury of the Parish of St. Landry for the purpose of making all repairs and other work which in their estimation they may deem necessary to put in traveling order the bridge over bayou Carencro.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Theodule Hebert, jr., M. G. Broussard, Jean Vigneaux, Ernest Potier and ands Alfred Peck.

 Resolved, that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the president of the Police Jury of the parish of St. Landry for action thereon by that honorable body.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to lay out and trace a road leading from the new bridge built on Mine's coulee to the old bridge on Isle des Canes lying near Wm. Guidry's plantation.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. John S. Whittington, Jules Guidry, Jules Duhon, Antoine Guidry and Cleobule Doucet.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to trace a road from the bridge lying near Montgomery's plantation leading to the Mermentau river.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Jules Guidry, Ed. Louviere, Dr. Cunningham and Theophile Breaux.

 On motion resolved, a committee be appointed to consider the possibility and to advise the proper means of opening and tracing a public road leading from Vermilionville to Isle Pilette, said road to join the public road southwest of the town near Messrs. H. Eastin and McBride's plantations.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Lessin Guidry,  Drozin I. Broussard, Valery Breaux, H. Eastin, Alcide Judice, Arelien Primeaux and Adolphe Comeaux.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/16/1878.  

    



MORE ABOUT THE ROADS. 

 While we are complaining bitterly of the condition of our public roads, justice demands that we should not be too hasty in passing judgement upon the acts of the Police Jury, and throw all the blame, if blame there be, on the gentlemen composing that body. It is very true that it is their duty to see that the roads are worked; but is it not also true that the present system of working the roads has proven a complete failure wherever tried ? We are reliably informed that in most of the adjoining parishes the roads are no better than ours. This is not offered as an excuse for the poor roads in this parish, but we mention this fact simply to show that we are not the only ones who are deprived of the great necessity - good roads. Some time ago the writer visited a very progressive town in this State and found out to his great surprise that it was impossible to travel the main thoroughfare of the town. The town authorities had done all in their power to have good roads, but had failed.
 
Thousands of men can make good roads in their minds, but it requires practical statesmanship to suggest a change which the people can be made to try, and which will produce beneficial results.
 
There are no better roads in the world in dry weather, but when rainy weather sets in they become almost impracticable, and unless thoroughly drained and kept in repairs by men who understand their business this state of affairs will continue, causing much vexation to all the people and working great injury to every industry in the parish. Good roads have more effect toward building up a town than perhaps any other one enterprise, and they are indispensable to the prosperity of the rural districts. All agree about that; it is a fact which will continue to stand the test, and the sooner we realize it the better it will be for us.
 
We have no plan of our town to offer, but it strikes us that the five-mile contract proposed by "Cherokee" is the most feasible at the present time. This plan is practical, shocks no long standing prejudice, attempts no impossible reform, is a moderate step in advance, leads directly to the accomplishment of all that is now possible under the existing circumstances.


Lafayette Gazette 2/17/1894. 
 




The street crossing between Mr. Gus Lacoste's building and Mr. Albert Delahoussaye's bakery stands in great need of repairs. Laf. Adv. 2/17/1894.



The Weather. - Now that the weather has been fine and the roads are drying off,we would advise our gallants to drive the young ladies and visitors out to the new "pinhook" bridge. It is well worth seeing. It is an evidence of progress, and is the finest structure of the kind in this section of the State. Laf. Advertiser 2/18/1888.




POLICE JURY: The committee appointed to examine and report upon the advisability of accepting the donation of a public road between the properties of Mrs. Frank Gardner and Chas. A. Mouton, submitted a report recommending the acceptance of the donation, and the establishment of the proposed public road. Laf. Adv. 2/18/1893.


POLICE JURY: By motion Mr. Brown was appointed a committee to confer with a like committee from St Landry parish, and authorized to contract for the construction of a bridge over Bayou Vermilion, at the public road leading to Opelousas. Laf. Adv. 2/18/1893.

The interviews with some of our citizens, in this issue, showing "which way the wind blows" on the sidewalk question were intended by our reporter for publication in our last issue, and were collected by him prior to that time, when the streets were in terrible condition. Some of the statements of the condition of the streets were very applicable then, and must be read as referring to that time, and not to the present. Just now our sidewalks are hard and dry - until the next rain. Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1888.

Last Tuesday, accepting the courtesy of Mr. Arthur Greig, we drove with him in buggy to look at the new "pin-hook" bridge across Bayou Vermilion. We were much pleased with the appearance of the bridge and the soundness of the work.Lafayette Advertiser 2/18/1888.


We call the attention of our Police Jury to a bridge which has been washed away last Thursday night a week ago on the Breaux Bridge road about two miles from town, leaving a gap quite dangerous to cross. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.


Mr. Felix Salles, of the firm of Mouton and Salles and Rev. Isaac T. Reams took a trip on their wheels last Tuesday about 33 miles. They report our parish roads in a good condition for "ducks" but not for wheelmen. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.



Lucien Allemand, road overseer of the 3rd ward,having requested the wagon drivers of the town to repair the road leading to the refinery, only three of them, Mentor Richard, Louis Chopin, and Ulysee Duhon have heeded this appeal, and Mr. Allemand return to them his sincerest thanks. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.

 
There is but one mud hole between here and Breaux Bridge and its length is about 5 miles. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.


We record with pleasure the increasing number of "wheels" in Lafayette. With bicycles will come the demand for better roads in our parish. Laf. Adv. 2/19/1898.








ROADS! ROADS!
To Editor Feb. 10, 1897.

DEAR SIR:
 It has been my misfortune a few days ago to be compelled to go to Breaux Bridge, and to say the least, I was not overpleased with the state of that road. In fact, I couldn't help but to pity the poor mail carrier and his two mules, compelled every day to be confronted with that glorious stretch of road.

 Since then I have read in the Advertiser in an article from the Valley, reproduced with comments by the editor of this paper. This article is to the point, and you cannot but be complimented on your earnest desire to procure to your town the best facilities to communicate with its neighbors. You are arranging the business men's association, but although this association has been incorporated with a view to improvements it seems to us that this is more of the road overseer's business than of the association. From Lafayette to Breaux Bridge you have only two bad pieces of road, one on each side of the Vermilion. These two stretches cannot be worked now, but, if the Breaux Bridge contractor on one side, and the Lafayette overseer on the other, select the proper time to repair the road. I am positive that very nice work can be made. The only thing needed is drainage and on the Lafayette side is (unreadable word) lacking. Let these gentlemen make good ditches, and if possible raise the middle of the road and it will become passable in every season and weather, which will be a genuine surprise to most of us.

 Excuse me, Sir, for this encroachment on your privileges, but the press being free in this country, it seems to as if every citizen has the right to express his views, and I am glad to be permitted to praise you when you are doing so good work in the interest of both communities.

 The last trip I have made to Breaux Bridge was a revelation to me. Accustomed as I was to see everything in your parish, I was surprised as much as pleased to see you are improving at a great rate. Your roads are positively good, and I have heard that your people are obtaining lands bought with the idea of giving them to an industry which would be willing to cast its future. It is unfortunate that you have no railroad to facilitate communications, but with the spirit of enterprise, which your citizens are endowed, it is only things being considered, an oil mill, (unreadable words) but are only (unreadable word) industries and need much development yet to be able to undertake to carry operations with the people of your parish. But any baby is born to grow, and permit me to hope these very young plants will grow large enough to be able to extend you a helping hand.

                Yours truly,
                        Neighbor.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/20/1897.

 
 

Grand Jury Report. 
 

 To the Honorable Judge of the Twenty-fifth Judicial District in and for the Parish of Lafayette:
   In regard to the roads their conditions are such, as to warrant us in suggesting to the Police Jury, to see to it, that the Road Overseers be forced to do their duty and for this measure; we would advise the Police Jurors in their different wards to report and prosecute criminally any road overseer, who is inefficient in his road district; it is true that the roads, are not in some places even passable, but this condition, we attribute not alone to the negligence on the part of the road overseer, for we believe that the present protracted rain, is enough to make the best road bad. Lafayette Advertiser 2/21/1891.




Our Street Committee is doing some good work now, filling in low places on the streets with brickbats. The bats will soon grind up and make a solid road bed. Laf. Adv. 2/21/1891.


Our streets are again in fine condition, dry and hard, and driving upon them is a pleasure; owing all to our excellent drainage. Laf. Adv. 2/21/1891.



POLICE JURY
On motion it was resolved, that the resolution passed on the 19th of Nov. 1878, authorizing the Treasurer to transfer to the Road and Bridge fund twenty per cent of the of the different monthly amounts of money paid to him by the parish tax collector, be paid to John I. Gardner, Dominique Cayaret, John S. Whittington and Edouard Febre, be and the same is hereby repealed.
Laf. Adv. 2/22/1879




City Council of Vermilionville.

 Regular Meeting of Feb. 3d 1873.

On motion it was resolved, That a committee of three be and is hereby appointed to make an estimate of the lumber necessary to repair the bridges within the limits of the corporation of Vermilionville, and to purchase the same on terms most favorable to said corporation. The Mayor appointed Messrs. R. L. McBride, J. J. Revillon, and Aug. Monnier on said committee.

 On motion it was resolved, That the same committee be and is hereby authorized to make and receive proposals of contracts, for repairing and keeping in order the bridges within the Corporation, during the year 1873, subject to the approbation of the City Council. Lafayette Advertiser 2/22/1873.




The Road to Breaux Bridge.

 The Advertiser made mention last week, of the fact that the police jury of St. Martin parish had authorized one of its members, Mr. Albert Martin, to repair and rehabilitate the public road leading from Breaux Bridge to Lafayette, as far as the parish line. A well conditioned highway properly maintained between Breaux Bridge and Lafayette would prove of incalculable benefit to both towns. Whilst serving as a most essential convenience to Breaux Bridge, only 7 miles distant, it would open up to Lafayette a field of trade on considerable importance. To be of real and lasting advantage toe road in question would have to be kept in first class condition for twelve months in the year and the expense of maintaining it would be paid back ten-fold to both locality's interests. Even though Breaux Bridge had direct railway communication with the outside world, a good dirt road from that point to Lafayette would be found of great utility for purposes of trading and The Advertiser appeals to the business sense of the police jury of this parish and to the public authorities of the municipality of Lafayette to combine and join forces with the parish of St. Martin to push to a rapid completion the public road that links together the towns of Breaux Bridge and Lafayette. An expenditure of public money for this purpose is bound to meet with public approval in view of the wide scope of the benefits to be derived. We call on the public authorities give to this subject the earnest attention it deserves.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/23/1895.





 Some of our streets have been repaired and much improved. Madison street, on which our office stands, is now being put in excellent condition. We hope the authorities will continue the good work on all the streets and in such a manner as to facilitate rapid and thorough drainage. Laf. Adv. 2/23/1878
 




  POLICE JURY - The committee appointed to trace and open a road from Olidin's ferry to Royville made their report, and on motion, said report was adopted.

 On motion resolved, that a committee of five be and is hereby appointed and that full power be and is hereby given to said committee to confer with the members of or a committee appointed by the by the Police Jury of St. Landry for the purpose of making all repairs and other work which in their estimation they may deem necessary to put in traveling order the bridge over bayou Carencro.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Theodule Hebert, jr., M. G. Broussard, Jean Vigneaux, Ernest Potier and Alfred Peck.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to lay out and trace a road leading from the new bridge built on Mine's coulee to the old bridge on Isle des Canes lying near Wm. Guidry's plantation.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. John S. Whittington, Jules Guidry, Jules Duhon, Antoine and Cleobule Doucet.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to trace a road from the bridge lying near Montgomery's plantation leading to the Mermentau river.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Jules Guidry, Ed Louiviere, Dr. Cunningham and Theophile Breaux.

 On motion resolved, a committee to consider the possibility and to advise the proper means of opening and tracing a public road leading from Vermilionville to Isle Pilette, said road to join the  public road southwest of the town near Messrs. H. Eastin and McBride's plantations.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Lessin Guidry, Drozin I. Broussard, Valery Breaux, H. Eastin, Alcide Judice, Arelien Primeaux and Adolphe Comeaux. Lafayette Advertiser 2/23/1878.




A Road Tax.

 In view of the strong desire now existing for supplanting the present unsatisfactory of caring for the public roads, by a more practical and effective and as the popular wish seems to tend toward the creating of a special road fund by means of taxation, we publish the law governing the first measure in such a procedure, for the information of those who may care to take the initiative in the move. The law provides that whenever one third of the property tax payers of any parish, shall petition the police jury to levy a special tax in aid of public improvement, the said police jury shall order a special election for that purpose and I submit to the property tax payers entitled to vote under the general election laws of the State the rate of taxation and the purpose for which it is intended.

 So. if a move of this kind is contemplated it will be necessary to obtain the signatures of one third of the property tax payers in the parish, to a specific petition addressed to the police jury, before that body can feel authorized to submit the question to a vote in the regular way. In such cases the law limits the rate to five mills on the dollar for any given improvement intended. A five mill tax at the present total assessments of property in parish, $1,600,448 would realize $8,002.24 as a special fund for any purpose, and three mill tax would provide a fund of $4,801.84, and so on.

 Should the special road-tax idea as some definite form, persons who desire to actively interest themselves in the movement will be able to obtain at the ADVERTISER office, suitable petition blanks for securing signatures. We will take pleasure in preparing any number of these we may be called on the furnish, and will gladly and the movement in every other way at our command. Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1894.



Road Overseers and Public Roads.
(Communicated)

 Editor Lafayette ADVERTISER:

 For some weeks past the readers of the ADVERTISER have been entertained by a series of articles on the Public Roads, and, possibly, it would  be a good idea now for the Road Overseer to account for himself.

 As road-overseer of the 3rd, ward, I have done all that I could do under the circumstances since my appointment, and the public can rest assured I will always do all in my power for the roads and will give the parish full value in time and services for all of its money received by me.

 As to success, I do not think we will ever have good roads under the present system, for many reasons. Firstly, the parish pays an overseer $120.00 a year and requires him to look after the road and bridges of a distance of over thirty miles. With upward of 300 men to work, were the overseer to work these men 12 days in the year it would take more than 8 months of the year to do this. Now, I ask can a man afford to put in so much time and use of horseflesh (for it requires to keep him going) on a salary of $120 a year. Secondly, the law operates unjustly; a poor laboring man may be called 12 days in the year to work the roads. This man's labor is his capital. Allowing 300 working days to the year, this man pays a road tax of four percent, while the property holder -- the one who is most benefitted, whose property is much enhanced in value by good roads and the one who uses the roads to the greatest extent, contributes much the least in proportion, and, if a non-resident, as often happens, actually does not pay a single cent toward keeping the roads. Owners of lands in the parish who live in town and land owners who are excused from road duty on account of debility from sickness or old age do not pay anything for keeping the public roads. Those who do not know better would be surprised to learn how many property holders of the kind I have named, do nothing for the parish roads. Thirdly, the labor cannot be equalized fairly. A good, strong man goes to work by the side of a feeble, or indolent neighbor and does four times as much which dissatisfies him and causes him, also, to slack up, and so it goes on from bad to worse. Good or bad, supposes the present system cannot be changed. If it could, though; I believe a far better way would be to make every one pay a poll-tax and an additional tax according to value of property earned. Then let the roads be worked under paid contract as already been proposed.
                            Yours for better roads,
                               (unreadable name)
Lafayette Advertiser 2/24/1894.



Road Maintenance.

The "Cherokee" plan for working the public roads is a good one; the only change we could suggest which we believe might be an improvement on it, would be, that instead of dividing the work into five mile contracts, let it be apportioned by wards. Have it understood between the parish, and the several contractors that the work will be paid for after completion, and acceptance by a suitable committee to be appointed by the police jury. This proposition would accomplish three purposes. The contractors would in  the first place hasten to finish and submit their work; secondly the parish would risk nothing. "No work, no pay" a rule that governs every legitimate undertaking; lastly these contracts would very likely be awarded to residents of the wards through which such roads lead and can be conducive to a to a certain rivalry that would prove beneficial to the public at large. In addition to the regular rate agreed upon, let the police jury offer a premium of a certain amount to the contractor doing the beat work.
Lafayette Gazette 2/24/1894.




THE PUBLIC ROADS AGAIN.


 The Gazette is informed that there is a disposition on the part of our police jurors to use the money derived from the special tax in the different wards independently of one another. We regret to note this inclination of our parish legislators.

 

Heretofore every police juror has acted as a sort of superintendent of road work in his ward. He has had the selection of the road overseer of his ward, and through him was expended the money appropriated for bridges and drainage. It is needless to speak of the utter failure of that system. The condition of the roads not only for this year, but all preceding years, is the most eloquent condemnation of the methods employed by the Police Jury.

 

Even though the members of the Police Jury are both competent and willing to attend to the work of repairing and building roads, to expect them to do so would be asking to much. They have their own affairs to look after and they can ill-afford to neglect their personal interest to attend to the public business. As members of the Police Jury they have certain duties to perform. If they undertake more, they will be simply biting off more than they can chew and the public business will suffer just as sure as fate.

 

If we are going to have good roads we have got to pay for them. Somebody, who knows this business, must be paid to do the work. Otherwise nothing will be done and the money will be spent just the same. The parish must administer this department of the government - the road department - just as it does with other departments. It must do in this matter just as it does in other matters. We had hopes that the jurors had taken this view of it when they made up their minds to collect a special road-tax. In every well-regulated government there are several departments. In each department there is a head who is placed there because he is believed to be fitted for the duties which he will have to fulfill. In order to keep the machinery of our parish government in operation the services of a judge is needed. A man, qualified by experience and education is selected. He does his work and he is paid for it. A district attorney, a clerk, a sheriff are required. If the machinery is impeded by the neglect or incompetency of one of these agents the people know where to kick and who to kick against. In this way if the people are not themselves derelict in the discharge of their duties of citizenship the evil is rectified and the man who has failed to do his duty loses his job. In the past our public road system could have been likened to an animal with neither head nor tail, but with a splendid capacity for swallowing down everything in the way of public money appropriated for drainage, bridges and all the concomitant etceteras. A system with an interminable number of road overseers, without any head and no one to be held responsible. The result is a deplorable condition of affairs. The roads are impassable and every branch of commerce, agricultural and mercantile, is paralyzed. Unless a change is brought about no one can correctly estimate the dire consequences that will follow.

 

The Gazette knows very well that the funds at the disposal of the Police Jury will not be sufficient to put all roads in first-class condition in one, two or even three or four years, but it believes that if the money available is judiciously expended and the work is done along good business lines our roads will be greatly improved from the start. Lafayette Gazette 2/25/1899.

 

 

Special Road Tax.
 The Police Jury is collecting the special road tax from persons living in this and the other incorporated towns of the parish. As the municipal authorities work the streets with money collected from the taxpayers living in town it is questionable if the parish has the right to enforce  the collection of the road  tax from those who already paying from those who are already paying their share of taxes. It seems to us that if the Police Jury can collect a tax from people living in town to work the roads in the parish the City Council ought to be vested with the authority to collect a tax from people living in the parish for the purpose of the working the streets of the town. The Gazette does not know what the law is in this case, but it has serious doubts as to the right of the parish authorities to collect this tax from the property-owners in the town. If however the Jury is in earnest and means to work the roads no one ought to object to the payment of the road tax as every cent available is badly needed. Lafayette Gazette 2/25/1899.


The attention of the street committee is called to the protruding nails on plank side walks which is a great nuisance on shoe soles. Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.


The attention of the street committee is called to a dumping ground on Lincoln Avenue opposite the Landry Hotel. This speaks very badly to a stranger walking this main thoroughfare. Laf. Adv. 2/26/1898.





GIVE US BETTER ROADS!
Lafayette, Parish, Feb. 23, 1891.

 Editor Advertiser: I will give you and your many readers a few sketches  about our section. Our people, as is generally well known, have had that good ole "la grippe," but are now all about well.

 I know we have mighty bad roads. I went to Lafayette Tuesday, accompanied by a friend. We came to a place where my friend thought it best for him to get down and walk around and let me drive over. But I didn't drive over. The horse and sulky went under. Had it not been that my friend was very active and caught the little pony by the tail, and I jumped out and caught the sulky by the wheel, sulky and pony would have been gone; but we managed to save them both. I think if the people of this parish ever expect to have good roads they will have to petition the police jury to levy a tax of so many mills on the dollar for road purposes, then that will exempt nobody from working the roads. As it is now, some are too old to work, some are crippled, or some other excuse. By so doing there will be no grumbling; every taxpayer will pay according to his assessment. Then let the police jury let the work out to the lowest bidder, in each ward - say a mile to one man; he to take it as so much, and he to hire men at whatever he could per day, also give security to keep such piece of road in good repair for twelve months, or two years; then give some one else a chance. In the present condition of the roads no work would do any good; we must wait until the ground dries.

 Readers and friends, think a little about the roads! Don't only think, but try to do something in order to have better roads, for they are in a deplorable state. Come, now, good old citizens, let us put our shoulders to the wheel and see if we can't change that! and instead of bad roads, let's have good roads. I will close for this time, for fear I weary your readers.

 By the way, what has become of Mr. Tugmutton, and Mr. Oberon, and others? We miss them.
             Yours truly,
               LITTLE HATCHET.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/28/1891.    



City Council Proceedings.
 Lafayette, La., Feb. 19th, 1891:

 A special meeting of the City Council was held this day, and there were present, W. B. Bailey, Mayor, A. J. Moss, J. G. Parkerson, F. Lombard and John O. Mouton. Absent - Ed. Pellerin and P. Gerac. The Mayor stated the object of the meeting to be to consider the petition of certain citizens and taxpayers of the corporation, asking for the opening of Congress street to Lafayette St, which said petition was read and after discussion thereon, the following was adopted.

Resolved, that the Mayor be and is authorized to appoint a committee of three to consider the expediency of opening said street as prayed for, and said committee is hereby instructed and empowered to negotiate with owners of lots necessary for the opening of said street, and to obtain from them such portions thereof needful for the continuation of said street at such prices as may seem just and reasonable to said committee.

The Mayor appointed on said committee Messrs. John O. Mouton, A. J. Moss and Leo Doucet.

The Council thereupon adjourned.
W. B. BAILEY, Mayor.
C
HAS. D. CAFFERY, Secretary.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/28/1891.



ORDINANCE.

 "An Ordinance prohibiting the obstruction of sidewalks, streets or other public passage ways within the corporation."

 Section 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of Lafayette, that from and after the passage of this ordinance, it shall be unlawful for any and all persons to congregate and obstruct the same in any other manner.

 Section 2. Be it further ordained, etc., that it shall be unlawful for all persons having no business relative to the service of the railroads to congregate at any railroad station on the arrival and before the departure of all passenger trains and obstruct the free passage way to and from said trains, within the corporate limits of this corporation.

 Section 3. Be it ordained, etc., that it is hereby made the duty of the police officers of this municipality to clear all such unlawful obstructions, and any person failing to comply with the orders of said obstructions, and any person failing to comply with the orders of said police officers, shall be arrested and brought before the mayor for trial, and on being found guilty will be fined not exceeding ten dollars or imprisoned not exceeding ten days, or both, at the discretion of the mayor.

 Section 4.   Be it further ordained, etc., that this ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage.

 Unanimously carried.

 Moved by T. M. Biossat, seconded by B. Falk, that a committee of three be appointed by the mayor (including himself) to secure public place for the public police telephone box at the depot.

 The mayor appointed to serve in connection with himself the following gentlemen; Dr. J. D. Trahan and O. C. Mouton.

 The Council then adjourned.
                   A. J. MOSS, Mayor.
Lafayette Gazette 2/29/1896.    



    
City Council of Vermilionville.
Regular Meeting of February 3d, 1873.

Present: Wm. O. Smith, Mayor, and Messrs. R. L McBride, H. Landry, Aug Monnier and R. Gagneaux. Absent: B. A. Salles, J. J. Revillon and J. N. Judice.

 The Mayor called the meeting order.

 On motion it was resolved, That a committee of three be and is hereby appointed to make an estimate of the lumber necessary to repair the bridges within the limits of the Corporation of Vermilionville, and to purchase the same on terms most favorable to said Corporation of Vermilionville, and to purchase the same on terms most favorable to said Corporation. The Mayor appointed Messrs. R. L. McBride, J. J. Revillon and Aug Monnier on said committee.

 On motion it was resolved, That the same committee be and is hereby authorized to make and receive proposals of contracts, for repairing and keeping in order the sidewalks, streets and bridges within the limits of the Corporation, during the year, subject to the approbation of the City Council.

 On motion the Council adjourned to the next regular meeting.
   H. M. Bailey, Secretary.
   W. O. Smith, Mayor.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/1/1873.  




Vermilion Street To Be Widened.

 Another valuable improvement which is contemplated and practically assured is the widening of Vermilion street fourteen feet on the south side from St. John street to Lee Avenue. The initiative of the move is due to Mr. Gus Lacoste who assisted by Judge O. C. Mouton and Mr. Will Levy have seen the different property owners and secured their consent to donate the ground. They are now soliciting contributions from property owners on the north side and have met with a ready response. They will lay a petition before the Council next meeting requesting that the street be ordered widened, which without doubt the Council will do. Mr. Lacoste and the gentleman assisting him and all those donating or contributing deserve the thanks of the people of Lafayette for this public spirited move.
  Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1904.


Dangerous and Reckless. - About the most reckless proceeding which has taken place in Lafayette in many a day took place Saturday night, when two men for some reason unknown to the average citizen, raced down Jefferson street in buggies. That it is very dangerous, especially in such a narrow street, is self evident, and it is a great pity that some of the office were not on hand to arrest them. Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1904.
 




City Council.

 Lafayette, La., February 26, 1904.

 A special meeting of the City Council w

Lafayette, La., February 26, 1904.

 A special meeting of the City Council was held this day, Chas. D. Caffery, Mayor, presiding. Members present: A. E. Mouton, M. Rosenfield, Felix Demanade, D. V. Gardebled.  Absent: John O. Mouton, H. Fontenot.

 The Mayor stated that the object of the meeting was to make a final settlement with Mr. L. H. Thompson, for moving buildings on Pierce and Jefferson streets, and thereupon Mr. Thompson presented to the Council the following document.

 We the undersigned, proprietors respectively of the buildings, fences, etc., moved by L. H. Thompson contractor having in charge the mowing of the buildings back from Pierce and Jefferson streets, certify hereby that the said work of removal has been done by the said Thompson in a satisfactory manner to ourselves; the said buildings and fences, etc., having been placed in position similar to that in which they stood at first.
                
JEROME MOUTON, MRS. B. FALK, MRS. FANIIE SCHMULEN, MR. C. JEANMARD, MR. LOUIS ROHEE, JULES J. MOUTON, IDA MOUTON, W. H. ADAMS, JEAN BRUIN, J. E. TRAHAN



 There being no further business, meeting adjourned.
                      CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
       LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1904.




BAD ROADS. - The roads leading to this town are in a horrible condition, and unless proper attention is immediately given, it will yet be months before they are passable. The Royville, Scott and Carencro roads are disgracefully bad. Will they ever be worked is now the question? Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1901.




Police Jury Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., Feb. 25th, 1895.

The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry, H. M. Durke, A. A. Delhomme, J. G. St. Julien and Alfred Hebert.
Absent: C. C. Brown and J. W. Broussard.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

Mr. Durke reported having contradicted with Albert Denise for the keeping of Odilon Broussard's bridge at $45.00 per annum to date from Jan. 1st, 1896, approved.

By motion, Sigismond Bernard was appointed keeper of the Pinhook bridge at a salary of $5 per month, said contract to date from March 1st, under 1895 to Jan. 1st 1896, and is made under the same terms and conditions as the Marquis contract.

The sum of $20 was ordered paid to E. Marquis, for keeping the Pinhook bridge from Jan. 1st. to March 1st. 1895.

By motion duly made R. C. Landry was unanimously elected permanent president of the Police Jury vice Ford Hoffpauir resigned.

By motion of J. G. St. Julien, J. E. Langlinais was appointed to act in conjunction with a like committee from St. Martin parish, in the repairing or rebuilding the St. Julien's bridge over Bayou Tortue. The secretary was directed to communicate with the authorities of St. Martinville, and notify them of the foregoing resolution. ......
Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1895.



POLICE JURY PROCEEDINGS.
Parish of Lafayette, Jan. 7th., 1878.

  Among Other Business....

 The committee appointed to trace and open a road from Olidon's ferry to Royville made their report, and on motion, said report was adopted.

 On motion resolved, that a committee of five be and is hereby appointed and that full power be and is hereby given to said committee to confer with the members of or a committee appointed by the Police Jury of the Parish of St. Landry for the purpose of making all repairs and other work which in their estimation they may deem necessary to put in traveling order the bridge over bayou Carencro.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Theodule Hebert, jr., M. G. Broussard, Jean Vigneaux, Ernest Potier and Alfred Peck.

 Resolved that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the president of the Police Jury of the parish of St. Landry for action thereon by that honorable body.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to make an estimate of the probable expenses of the Parish for the current year, said committee to be guided by report of the committee appointed to draft rules to attain an equitable distributions of the funds of this parish. On said committee were appointed Messrs. Ed. E. Mouton, M. F. Rigues and M. E. Girard.

 On motion resolved, that the president of this Police Jury be and is hereby authorized to draw on the treasurer of this parish, the sum of sixty dollars or as much thereof as necessary, for the purchase of three record books for the Recorder's office.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to lay out and trace a road leading from the new bridge built on Mine's coulee to the old bridge on Isle des Canes lying near Wm. Guidry's plantation.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. John S. Whittington, Jules Guidry, Jules Duhon, Antoine Guidry and Cleobule Doucet.

 On motion resolved, that a committee be appointed to trace a road from the bridge lying near Montgomery's plantation leading to the Mermentau river.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Jules Guidry, Ed. Louviere, Dr. Cunningham and Theophile Breaux.

 On motion resolved, a committee be appointed to consider the possibility and to advise the proper means of opening and tracing a public road leading from Vermilionville to Isle Pilette, said road to join the public road southwest of the town near Messrs. H. Eastin and McBride's plantations.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Lessin Guidry, Drozin I. Broussard, Valery Breaux, H. Eastin, Alcide Judice, Arelein Primeaux and Adolphe Comeaux.

 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
       ONES. BROUSSARD, President.
 J. N. JUDICE, Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/2/1878.

 













Widen the Streets of Lafayette.  

 The value of broad thoroughfare, especially for purpose of traffic, cannot be overestimated. The old corporation of Lafayette is most unfortunately situated in their regard. In the laying out of the original town no allowance was made for the possible demands the development of after years might bring about for wide streets and, the consequence is that now, when a want is being felt for these, we find the possibilities of obtaining them is attended by many difficulties. Yet, the obstacles surrounding the means of securing a few more feet of width to some of the principal streets, are not to be considered insurmountable. However, with each day, the accomplishment of such a feat grows less feasible, and it is for that reason the Advertiser strongly urges on our more serious minded citizens the importance of adopting immediate steps for this purpose. Especially should action be taken at an early date to increase the width of the street from the terminus of Lincoln Avenue to the Guidry bakery, and treat likewise Vermilion street from Demanade's grocery to Gerac Brothers corner. The streets to be broadened should receive attention in the order of their importance, and all are ready to admit what those who have named are at present, and promise to always be the two principal business streets of the town. The discussion of such an undertaking naturally brings up for consideration the means through which it might best be accomplished.


 The benefit that would inure from a widening of the streets named, as well as others in the old corporation, is of a public nature, hence the work of broadening them should be carried out at the public's expense. Whilst a number of property holders "along such streets might, and, no doubt would, be disposed to donate the extra land required on account of the consequent advancement of the value of such property, yet, there are others of whom this would be asking too much. The latter class would place a reasonable figure on the portion of said lots to be given up, and, and in all, a material widening of the street could be secured at a very reasonable cost to the town. Of course, undertakings of any magnitude whatever, cannot be carried out without an expenditure of money. This is a lesson that we, of Lafayette, have not yet learned, it does seem. We would care to have many improvements, but we are just as unwilling to pay for them. It is high time that we should recognize this inexorable law that controls all human undertakings. We need not ever expect to get "something for nothing." That is an impossibility. The man who speculates on merchandise must first buy and pay for his merchandise before he can realize a profit on it. The butcher has to first acquire his beef before he is able to sell meat to his patrons.
We should be just as willing to go down into our pockets for public improvements as for all other things that (unreadable word) can be expected, and as (unreadable words) we refuse to submit to this inevitable law we shall remain in the back (unreadable word) whilst more enterprising and public spirited communities make rapid strides forward.

 Why not begin to sow the seed now, (unreadable word) so certain to bear abundant fruit, though we cannot undertake an unreasonable number of reforms at one time, but we can make a start in that direction by widening, first the present narrow street and is a continuation of Lincoln Avenue onward. A few serious and important steps of this sort carried out by (unreadable words) of Lafayette, would open (unreadable words) kind of life to them and stimulate them into further greater and more pretentious public measures, that after the passage of time would repay tenfold (unreadable words) of time and money involved (unreadable words). We must help our selves, if we expect to prosper and keep apace in these times.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/17/1894.



IN DISTRICT COURT....

Concerning the public roads, we are gratified at being able to state that there has been a marked improvement in their condition in the last few years; but we are of the opinion that there is yet a large margin for obtaining still better results. To reach that end, we believe the roads should be worked by contract instead of the system now in use; the funds to be raised by the per capita tax, and the tax on vehicles, but each ward to have at its disposal its pro rata of funds and the police jury either collectively, or each member for his ward, to sell out to the lowest bidder under well defined specifications, the working of the roads; the contractor furnishing satisfactory bond. An additional reason for favoring this contract system is that to our knowledge certain road overseers in the parish, at times when the roads require their attention have been known to be attending to their crops to the detriment of the roads. We are convinced that by this system the desired results would be obtained with the available funds, without burdening the people with additional taxation; and besides, we have the bright prospect of the United States Government and State aid in the building and maintenance of public roads, but to be worthy of this aid, we must begin by aiding ourselves. Lafayette Advertiser 3/30/1904.




 The Five-Mile Plan For Public Roads.  

The suggestion of sub-dividing the parish roads in lengths, or sections of miles and contracting by the year, with as many different persons for the maintenance of these five-mile tracts, in a satisfactory condition, is one of a number of propositions that have been submitted for the consideration of the Lafayette police jury and the people, within the last few weeks. This plan embodies some good features, and we find met with favor with the police jury of this parish as far back as 1891, the personnel of that body at that time, with the exception of C. P. Alpha, deceased, and O. Theriot, being same as now.

 We extract from the printed proceedings of the police jury, of July 8th, 1891, the following section of "An Ordinance to impose a Road Tax" offered by Mr. Ford Hoffapauir.
 4th - That the public roads of the parish be
laid out in districts and let by contract to the lowest bidder.
 

 The minutes of the police jury of Aug. 20, '92 show the same plan being advocated again by Mr. Hoffpauir, this time as an independent measure (that is not associated with a special road tax as in the first instance) and, being carried, the police jury advertised for bids under the ordinance.
  However, as much as it was desired to give system a trial this was prevented from the fact that no proposals were submitted; nobody, apparently caring to interest themselves as contractors under the arrangement proposed. It was after this that the police jury, as a last resort concluded to execute a contract with Mr. I. N. Satterfield, the nature of which is already known to the readers of The Advertiser. 

  Whilst we recognize that the "five-mile" plan presents a number of advantages over the present or "sunshine" plan we fear it may not accomplish all that is expected of it on the part of some persons, but, of course, there is nothing like giving it a fair and impartial trial. If the plan proves a success, so much the better; if it results in failure, we will know it. As for our part, we believe in doing a thing right, in the first place. Half way measures are always putative in results. The matter of maintaining good parish roads is of sufficient importance to the welfare of a people to justify any means that will accomplish the ends. The public must pay a large enough contract price for the keeping of the roads to make it an object to a responsible and capable individual or firm to take the contract. The time of a good man is bound to be valuable, or he would not be a good man. Pay such a person according to the worth of his time and services, and secure good roads. I would be interesting to know just how much money is being virtually thrown away under the present "sunshine" plan. It is barely possible we are spending nearly enough to guarantee good roads if the same amount was expended in some other way. At any rate it might not cost a great deal more to have satisfactory roads, and it may be that it is because we do not spend this difference that we do pay out is wasted. Lafayette Advertiser 3/31/1894.





Completed.  - Lafayette street from Vermilion to South Main has been widened and the concrete walks on both sides have been completed.
Laf. Adv. 4/5/1905.




Calls for Serious Reflection.

 Bad roads are a much farther reaching evil than some may be willing to acknowledge, as the following extract from The Valley of the Teche witnesses: 

 The roads from Breaux Bridge to Lafayette are in such bad condition that the planters of this section who used to deal in Lafayette for plowing machineries, etc., are compelled now to go to our sister town, St. Martinsville. Lafayette should do something to remedy this, or she will lose all her trade from this section.

 Seeing that the parish authorities deemed it not advisable to undertake such a work at the public expense, The Advertiser had thought of inaugurating a new move some months back, to repair the worst places in the parish roads at the private expense of citizens. Our idea was to raise a fund for this purpose by private contributions, the merchants of Lafayette to be the principal donors, for as they were the ones who were suffering the greatest injury from the wretched condition of the roads, likewise they would be the ones to derive the largest benefit from a removal of the evil. We agitated, in a quiet way, the movement until we saw it would not meet with liberal support to successfully carry it out. Most of the persons approached on the subject believed it would really prove a good business investment to the local merchants but only a very few were willing to back up their judgment with money. It is the same old story. Everybody wants a good thing
providing no money is to be paid out.

 No one doubts that the town of Lafayette has lost many thousands of dollars of business during the past six months, due entirely to the impassable condition of the public roads, and our merchants would do wisely to profit by the lessons of the past and learn how to help themselves by cooperation in all future similar emergencies where the public authorities appear to be unequal to the task, no matter of how good intention the authorities may be. The best of intentions fail to accomplish the slightest amount of good, unless they be backed by some energy. Lafayette Advertiser 4/7/1894.
 




 The street commissioners have had good foot bridges built on each side of Lincoln Avenue, and the "work of improvement goes bravely on."
Laf. Adv. 4/5/1893.


We are glad to see that the streets committee of the city council has commenced the work of clearing out the ditches and repairing the streets. They have five or six gangs employed in different portions of the town, and the work is progressing rapidly. The weather has been clear and cool, and highly favorable for this work. Laf. Adv. 4/13/1889



 Mr. Alfred Hebert will sell old lumber from the Pin Hook's bridge at 4 o'clock Saturday evening at Pin Hook's bridge. Laf. Adv. 4/16/1898



Another Improvement In Lafayette. - At an informal meeting last Wednesday Meesrs. Chas. O. Mouton, Crow Girard, J. E. Trahan, S. R. Parkerson, T. M. Biossat and N. P. Moss associated themselves as co-partners in the investment of a windmill and sprinkler for street sprinkling purposes, and effected arrangements with Mr. Alfred Hebert for a supply of water to be obtained from his large well on the canning factory lot.

 A large number of persons have already agreed to pay a regular price per month for having the dust laid on the streets on which they reside, and it will not be long before every one can secure the use of the sprinkler will gladly avail themselves of its benefits. It is to the merchants especially this should prove a great boon for, aside from its great discomfort, the dust is so destructive to every class of merchandise that the amount of loss each year from this cause alone amounts to considerable percentage of the profits.

 The gentlemen who have interested themselves in this beneficent enterprise deserve the thanks of the community.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/21/1894.
  





THE PUBLIC ROADS.

 THE POLICE JURY WILL ACT WITH REFERENCE TO THEM. 

 The information conveyed in the published proceedings of the meeting of the police jury, held last Saturday, that the first step has at last been taken toward definite action in the matter of improving the general condition of the public roads in this parish, will be received with a high degree of satisfaction by the people. The resolutions bearing directly on the question and offered by Mr. Hoffpauir, the president of the police jury, is "that the some of $400.00 be and is hereby appropriated to each police jury ward for the purpose of working and repairing the public roads of the parish. And it is further provided that the police jurors for the respective wards, together with two citizens appointed by the Police Jury, shall constitute committees in the several wards for superintending the work and applying the said appropriations as deemed most advantageous in working and repairing said roads."

 Under the rules the resolution just quoted must lay over until the next regular meeting of the police jury and its merits may be discussed and established or disproved. That the roads of the parish stand now, as for several months past, in dire need of attention is too patent a fact to call for argument, but that the method it is now proposed to employ for improving them is advisable, from an economic standpoint, is debatable indeed. A modification of the plan submitted by Mr. Hoffpauir is one The Advertiser persistently advocated all along, and an application of that plan in the beginning would have proven of immense benefit to the traveling public for these many months. As much as we recommended such a measure we attached no further value to it than it might render as a palliative, nor did we wish to be understood as advocating the expenditures of one soul in this way, more than was absolutely needed to make it possible and safe to travel over the roads. It would be the easiest matter to spend a large sum of money in the manner now suggested, with results that would prove very unsatisfactory in the end, and this brings us back to the old starting point. A uniform system of working the roads must be employed to ensure permanent good results, and to proceed on any other plan would be a falling back into the mistakes of the past, and could be characterized only as the purest imbecility. Let us build a solid foundation, first, then we may expect a solid superstructure, likewise. Past experience should be enough to deter us from ever building castles on sand banks. The true key to the situation as regards good public roads in Lafayette parish is drainage- intelligent and thorough drainage, and how this is the most important question at issue. If the police jury cannot devise a better way, it should adopt the one we took occasion to suggest in or last issue. Employ a competent surveyor to determine the natural lay of the land in the parish. Divide the parish into drainage districts subject to the operation of one general system of drainage and work all roads in conformity with this system. It will transpire under such conditions, that work done in one locality will not conflict with work in progress in another section, but on the contrary, a direct relationship will exist between working operations in the different districts, all tending toward the same end. Every dollar expended under such a system would be attended with good effect and there would be no more digging of one hole to close another, as in the past.  Under this general system such as we have (unreadable word) is adopted in our parish, money and time will necessarily be (unreadable word) to no real purpose, and it is (unreadable words) doings that have brought (unreadable words) their present pass.

Lafayette Advertiser 4/21/1894.
 



A Dangerous Practice.

We wish to call the attention of our street commissioners to the banquet in front of the property of Mr. Allingham, on Lincoln avenue, north of the railroad track. Two ditches have been dug across the banquette, leading from the garden in the road, for the purpose of draining the garden, probably. The ditches are eighteen inches or two feet deep and uncovered, and are very dangerous. A person walking there on a dark night, being unaware of the ditches, might easily break a leg or arm from a fall caused by stepping on them. The city should attend to this at once, and either compel the owner of the property to put a cover over the ditches or fill them up. It seems to us that some one must be very negligent or their duty; when a man can dig ditches of this sort on one of our public streets with perfect immunity, and in so doing make it absolutely dangerous for a pedestrian to pass after dark. Certainly if our public officers were alive to the responsibility of their office and did their duty, a property owner would not dare to dig such ditches; but it really seems that at present every one feels that they have a license to do as they please, without fear or being called to account for their actions. Lafayette Advertiser 4/26/1893.



THE GOOD ROADS MOVEMENT.

 Nothing becomes a necessity until its absolute need is felt, and it is not strange that good roads were not classed as a necessity until lately for, people have just begun to appreciate what a costly luxury bad roads really are. In the past the isolation of country life, the few and poor schools and the mud holes in the roads were accepted as a fact, and as facts are hard to overcome, but little exertion was spent in attempting to alter conditions. Of recent years, however, hand in hand with the educational wave, a movement for good roads has spread across the entire country, and in the South especially, has a determined campaign been entered upon for good roads. Conventions have been held time and again to discuss the best methods, road making has been demonstrated, and much helpful literature been disseminated. This has aroused among the people generally an earnest demand for good roads and they have everywhere either placed a special tax upon themselves or secured or secured appropriations from county boards and police juries for that purpose.

 As yet, though, while funds in various amounts have been provided, a satisfactory system of expending these funds to obtain results has not been determined upon. Different communities have different ideas, which is even the case where adjoining counties or parishes have absolutely the same formation; but they practically all get the same results, bad roads.

 But the agitation still goes on and is increasing. The people are evidently seriously bent on having good roads and it can only be a question of time when some uniform effective method will be adopted which will at a minimum cost accomplish the object desired. Meantime, however, there will naturally be continued bad roads.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/3/1905.



The Abbeville Highway.
Culled from reports of Police Jury Proceedings details on the beginnings of "The Road to Abbeville."

...."By motion the said road was declared a public highway, and ordered opened and worked by the Road Overseers of the respective wards. All documents were ordered filled and recorded.

 The jury of freeholders appointed to trace a public road from J. O. Broussard's land, to the land of P. A. Duplex and others known as the Abbeville road, made the following report which was accepted and adopted:

State of Louisiana Parish of Lafayette.

 We Darmas Broussard, Sarrazin Trahan, Sigiamond Bernard, Eugene Baudoin, L. S. Broussard, Adrien Theall, A. D. Verrot having been appointed a jury of freeholders to trace a public road from the intersection road, starting from J. O. Broussard land, to the land or road of, P. A. Duplex, and Alcide Savoy being the Abbeville road and to assess whatever damages may be done to the parties through whose lands said road may pass do solemnly swear that we will, trace and lay off said road to the best advantage of all parties in the neighborhood and to assess whatever damages may be done to the land owners at its actual value to the best of our knowledge and ability so help us God."
Lafayette Advertiser 5/5/1894.     



GOVERNMENT ROAD DEMONSTRATION.

 There is no subject at the present time occupying a larger share of public attention than that of good roads. Their value both in economy and convenience has come to clearly recognized and a determined and persistent effort is being made all over the country, especially in the South, to solve the problem or road construction to effect the best results with the least expenditure of time and money. And in this effort the Federal government through the Department of Agriculture has been an active participant. For a number of years experiments with all kinds of soil under all kinds of conditions have been conducted to ascertain the most effective method of building permanent roads in every section of the Union.

 From this experimentation the government has obtained data which enables its expert road builders to give demonstrations of road building showing a practical solution of the question, and the services of these government experts are offered free to any parish or county that deserves them.

 Recently upon the request of the people of Baton Rouge, while the State and National Good Road's Conventions were in session, the Department of Agriculture had their experts build a piece of good road there. An extract from the Baton Rouge Times published in another column states that the work was highly successful, the road remaining firm notwithstanding heavy rains and heavy traffic.

 An actual demonstration of how to build such a piece of road, and the road is said to last ten years with but little repair, should be of the greatest value to any community. And as the roads in Lafayette parish lack much of being what they should be, to say the least, without doubt the people of the parish generally will learn with satisfaction that the School Board and Police Jury have both passed resolutions asking that the government experts be sent here. Should the request be granted as in probability it will be, neither their services nor the use of the road machinery which will be forwarded here, will not cost the parish one cent. The government gives all free. Absolutely the only expense will be for ordinary labor and material, which, of course, the people here will have to pay for, and as to how much money will be required for those purposes depends entirely upon how long a stretch of road is wanted built. To assure the building of a sample piece of road and provide that the necessary material and labor be secured, in case the government responds to the request of the parish bodies, the jury appropriated $250; for which progressive spirit and wise effort to obtain valuable instruction in dealing with the road problem, they deserve special commendation. 

 The Jury and School Board have made the proper move towards this demonstration work, now it remains,m should the government send its experts here, for the people of the town and parish to contribute individually and liberally to purchase material to build a sufficient length of road to absolutely test the work. Lafayette Advertiser 5/10/1905.


Lincoln Avenue to Be Drenched. - To contribute to the greater comfort of the excursionists to-morrow, arrangements have been perfected for drenching Lincoln Ave. from the railroad track to bank building to Washington street southward to Main street, thus ensuring a riddance of the great annoyance that would be occasioned by the dust on the principal and most direct route from the railroad station to the church fair grounds. Lafayette Advertiser 5/10/1894.
 

...Now That We Have Telephonic Communication with Breaux Bridge....

 The Valley of the Teche calls a special attention in its last issue, to the bad condition of the public road between Breaux Bridge and Lafayette. It is to be regretted that this, our only avenue of communication with that town, does not receive the attention it deserves from the police juries of the two parishes interested. If the proper road facilities were furnished, Breaux Bridge could be made a valuable feeder to our town, the more so since telephonic communication has been established between the two places. Even with present drawbacks Lafayette does considerable traffic with Breaux Bridge, but for want of more inviting roads most of the trade of the latter place is diverted to New Iberia. We believe that great benefit, in a business way, can be derived by us by protecting trade relations with our little sister town, and we trust that our Business Men's Association will see the advisability of directing the attention of the police jury, in a special way, to the advantages to be gained by maintenance, in good condition, of the public road connecting the parish seat with the town of Breaux Bridge.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/13/1893.

Improved Road Scraper. - There is now on exhibition at Mr. Gustave Lacoste's an improved road scraper, patented by Mr. Paul Blanchard, of Arnaudville, which is a great improvement over any other scraper on the market. The ordinary size of the scraper is four or five feet wide and weighs about 180 pounds. The scraping part is of iron about a foot wide. It is drawn like a cutaway harrow, and two horses easily draw it. It is very easily handled and operated, and will undoubtedly become a very popular machine. If you are in need of anything of the kind go and examine it at Mr. Lacoste's.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/13/1893.



 CONVENTION.
For the Attakapas Region to Convene in Lafayette, Wednesday, June 14th.
 
 In another column will be found a call for a road and immigration convention to meet in this city on June 14th, to be composed of delegates from the parishes which constitute the Attakapas region. The state immigration convention, of recent date, adopted many resolutions, and listened to many flowery speeches, besides providing for the appointment of a state executive committee, whose duty it should be to encourage the organization of local or parish immigration societies; but as nothing has been accomplished, and it has been deemed wise by our Business Men's Association to call this convention with the object of doing some practical work. The convention will be conducted on purely business lines, leaving politics severely alone. A series of questions will be formulated and sent to each delegate as soon as they are appointed, and they may give the different subjects some thought and attention and come to the convention prepared to work. In this manner it is earnestly hoped that much good may result.

 It was thought best to combine the two questions - better roads and immigration - which are two of the important matters confronting our state to-day. With our present poor roads, it costs our planters as much, if not more, to haul the products of their farms to the railroads as it does for the freight to the market towns or cities. The present system of working roads must be done away with and a new and better method adopted. What this new and better method adopted. What this new and better system shall be is yet to be determined. The plan now in vogue of calling men out to do a certain number of days work on the roads is a farce. It is safe to say that instead of doing ten days work, as provided by law, that not one out of a hundred does one full day's work. About the only practical plan would be to have a direct road tax and then contract for the road work. The planters would be reimbursed a hundred fold for every cent paid out in the manner; their property would increase in value as the roads improved; with good roads they could haul more at a load and thus save much valuable time. We do not need more railroads as bad as we need better wagon roads. Therefore, it is wise to thoroughly discuss the question, that some feasible plan may be adopted and action taken by the next Legislature.

 Now the question of immigration.







 It is generally admitted that our state needs immigrants and capital. The question is how to attract them. We do not particularly want foreign immigrants; but what we do want is a class of intelligent western and northern farmers. And we can get them, too, if we go the right way about it. We do not believe that the idea suggested at the recent State Convention, of having descriptive pamphlets printed to be given away a the Chicago Exposition would produce much effect, for the simple reason that there will be hundreds, aye, thousands of pamphlets, circulating, etc., advertising every imaginable thing under the sun, given away there, and were a visitor to retain a hundredth part of what will be handed him there each day, he would need several large boxes to take them home in.

 In advertising our country we must bear in mind two things.

 First. - That our country is practically unknown to the majority of the people of the north, and,

 Second. - That as a rule the people of those sections believe that a great amount prejudice and ill-will still exists in the South against Northerners.


 This idea has been kept alive by selfish politicians and must be overcome before we can expect any large exodus to our State. There are hundreds and thousands of desirable families who would be only too glad to leave the cold north and come to us if they only knew our great resources and kindly feelings. To illustrate: Monday morning as we were going to the city we sat in the seat with a gentleman who we noticed was intently gazing out of the window. Just after we left New Iberia he turned to us and said: "God and nature have certainly done all that it were possible to do for a country here. I never had an idea that there was such a country on top of earth." We learned that he was from Dakota and on his return from a trip to Mexico. He asked us what land was worth, and when we informed him that it could be had from $20 to $25 and acre, he would hardly believe it. "Why," he said, "I had to pay $25 an acre for prairie land in Dakota four years ago, and if we net $8.00 an acre from it we think we do well." He had intended to go right home, but said he was going to stop over at New Orleans and come back and have a look at the country. He further said: "But if a northern man moves in here, the people don't treat him well do they?" We simply told him to make a visit back and converse with the people, and he would learn that he would be accorded with the most hospitable treatment, and that it would be from the heart, too. We have told this simply to show the general idea held in the North of the Southern people, and to show what we must overcome if we wish to induce people to move here.

 We believe one of the best plans that could be adopted would be to have published a series of letters in the country papers of the north and west, describing our people, their feelings and our lands. Such letters written in an interesting manner would be published by many papers for nothing, and would do more good than all the pamphlets that could be printed.
When the convention meets all these matters can be discussed and some practical plan adopted. Let each delegate devote some thought and study to the question before coming to the convention, so that when it does meet it will not be a repetition of the State Convention, but rather a working convention of men with practical ideas.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/17/1893.


Road and Immigration Convention. - Realizing the great benefit that would be derived by the people of our State from the incoming of a desirable class of immigrants and improved public roads the Business Men's Association decided to call a Road and Immigration Convention, composed of delegates from the Attakapas district, to meet in Lafayette on Wednesday June 14th.

 The Association earnestly request and invite the Presidents of the different Police Juries, the Mayors of the different towns and cities, or the people in mass meeting to appoint delegates to attend said convention, and sincerely hope that the call will meet with a hearty response from the people of the district. 
   C. O. Mouton, President.
A. C. Ordway, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/20/1893.



Great need is being felt for a new street bridge to replace the old one running east and west at Moss Bros. & Co.s corner. A stranger in the town who was badly tripped by one of the several pieces of plank nailed over this bridge to strengthen weak points, was heard to remark that the town must be hard up to compel one of its principal bridges to wear as many patches as does this one.
 Laf. Adv. 5/26/1894. 


From the Vermilionville City Council 5/15/1869
On motion, it was resolved that a committee of three, be and is hereby appointed to ascertain the probable cost of removing obstructions from that portion of Lafayette street near Mrs. E. Mouton's property. The Mayor appointed Messrs. Smith, B. A. Salles and G. C. Salles, on said committee.

 On motion, resolved, that a committee of two be and is hereby authorized to ascertain the cost of building a bridge across Lafayette street near the lower corner of Mrs. E. Mouton's property. Messrs. G. C. Salles and R. L. McBride were appointed on said committee. Laf. Adv. 5/29/1869




Police Jury Meets Monday. - Next Monday is the regular time for our Police Jury to meet. Among the matters which claim attention, we would make special mention of the necessity of providing safe and free crossing at the Vermilion bridge and causeway, and of raising the means of, at least, defraying the and necessary expenses of the parish, also of the long needed repairs to the Court House, the continued neglect of which will eventually cause the parish much expense. Stopping the leaks in the roof of the building is most pressing and a small outlay would effect it.

 The importance of these matters are self evident and we hope, will receive the prompt consideration of those who have charge of our parochial affairs.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/30/1874.


Street Cleaned Up.
Jefferson street from Vermilion to Congress is beginning to show its improved good looks. Last week all the debris obstructing the street was removed and the street leveled by filling the holes. It isn't as nice as if will be, when the proper grading will have been done and the concrete walks finished. Lafayette Advertiser 6/1/1904.






ST. JULIEN'S BRIDGE.

The committee appointed to trace the public road from Lafayette to St. Julien's Bridge, made the following report which was accepted and approved. 


STATE OF LOUISIANA PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.  

 L. St. Julien, Albert Landry, J. S. Bonin, Thos. F. Webb Jr., J. O. Broussard, Don Louis Uerpin, R. W. Bernard do solemnly swear, that I will, lay out the road now directed to be laid out by the Police Jury of the parish of Lafayette to the greatest ease and advantage of the inhabitants and with as little prejudice to enclosures as may be without favor or affection, malice of hatred, and to the best of my skill and abilities, so help me, God, and - furthermore that, I will truly assess all damages to proprietors caused by said road to the best of my judgement.

 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 5th day of March 1894. Ed. G. Voorhies.

 

REPORT.
 






 We the undersigned Jury of freeholders of the parish of Lafayette, duly appointed by the Police Jury of said parish to trace and lay out a public road, leaving from Lafayette to St. Julien's Bridge through the lands of the following proprietors to wit; hereafter specially named, to Josephine, St. Julien, at St. Julien's Bridge, having been notified of our appointment and of the time and place of meeting by the person first named in said order of appointment and having severally taken and subscribed the foregoing oath and having given notice to each and every one of the aforesaid proprietors in writing, at least three days previous of the time and place of meeting and of the intended laying out of said road, through the lands of said proprietors which notices were given were duly served on said proprietors did meet on the 28th day of May 1894 at Lafayette the place designated in said notices, did then and there, in the presence of the following names of said proprietors, to wit : J. O. Broussard, L. St. Julien and S. C. Landry, proceed to trace and lay out said public road as follows :   Beginning at Lafayette and running thence through the lands of the proprietors hereinafter named, for a distance of about eleven miles taking a strip twenty feet wide off the land of each one along their common boundary line, which boundary was mutually agreed upon and shown us by said proprietors, and by them designated to us by setting stakes, and plowing furrows, so as to be easily visible and recognizable, and thence through the lands of the Hebrew Graveyard Association, A. T. Caillouet, Alex Mouton, Mrs. Frank Gardner, Crow Girard, C. A. Mouton, Felix Girard, the Protestant Graveyard Association, Alfred Hebert, Acadia Gun Club, P. Girard, E. Lane suc of Isaac Chatman (Price), E. Marquis, J. H. Knite, Mrs. B. Dupuis, Sy. Landry, Lessin Meaux, Old Betsey, Sigismond Bernard, R. Landry,  Ernest Smith, Chas. Broussard, J. O. Broussard, Francois V. Comeaux, Adolphe Comeaux, R. C. Landry, Horace Comeaux, Chas. S. Landry, & Sy. Landry, Mrs. Edmond Comeaux, Alphonse Broussard, Albert Landry, Homer Landry, Mrs. Olivia Landry, Eraste Guidry, Edgar Guidry, Alex N. Guidry, Dr. Geo. Scranton, Raphael Guidry, Mrs. J. B. Malagarie, N. Melancon, Mrs. Emilie Montet, Valsin Broussard, Mrs. M. E. Bernard, J. G. St. Julien, Martial Billeaud, Jos. Girouard, Eraste Landry, Jules Girouard, Mrs. St. Julien, Therence Girouard, Agelique Louis Sam, L. St. Julien, Marie Virginie, Jean Louis, Jules Mouton, Jos. Girouard, Israel Jean Louis,Lucius Duhon, T. Girouard, S. C. Landry, M. Billeaud, Mrs. Elizabeth Aubry, Mrs. Marie Boudreaux, Mrs. Marthile Broussard, Estorge & Billeaud, P. B. Roy, Willier Potier, Mrs. Josephine St. Julien, Edgar Breaux and the St. Julien Bridge, the termination of said road which is forty feet throughout its entire length and was so traced and staked out as to be plainly visible throughout its entire course, and we have caused, to be made a plat of said road showing the location, and course of said road and the location of the lands of the different proprietors, through which road runs, add the distance and quantity of land expropriated from each for which said road is annexed to this our report, of said road for reference.

 And we further report that we said jury of freeholders did on our oaths aforesaid assess the following damages to proprietors, in compensation for their land so taken, and expropriated for said road as follows to wit : Taken from the Rihoskey drawn in the year 1857, with exception of a few changes authorized by the Police jury since  then and to the other proprietors no damages were assessed as in our opinion the benefit of said road fully compensates the value of the land taken and the parish having a previous title : Done at the Parish of Lafayette this 28th day of May 1894.

 Signed. - J. O. Broussard, S. C. Landry, R. U. Bernard, L. St. Julien, Thos. F. Webb Jr., S. Bernard, J. C. Bonin - Jury of freeholders.

Lafayette Advertiser 6/2/1894.

Who said street sprinkler - don't all speak at once gentlemen.     Lafayette Advertiser 6/3/1893.
  
Laf. City Council:
In regards to the working of streets running East from the crossing at Vordenbaumen's lumber yard the matter was referred to the street committee...."
Lafayette Advertiser 6/6/1896.


A petition was read from residents of the 3rd ward asking the Council to co-operate with the Police Jury in opening a ditch down the east side of the railroad to the bayou to drain McComb addition and carry off water coming from the Torian and Buchanan place. The street committee to which the Mayor was added was instructed to appear before the Police Jury in regard to the matter and also act with a committee from the Jury should one be appointed. A communication from the Fire Department asking that the Council recognize as chief, Mr. A. E. Mouton, and as assistant chief, Mr. C. W. Breeding, whom the department had elected, was read and the Council by resolution complied with the request.Lafayette Advertiser 6/7/1905.


Mud Hole. - There is considerable complaint about a good sized mud hole on the road to Scott in the third ward. It is reported to have been there nearly a year, and could be very easily fixed, the whole trouble being a lack of drainage.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/8/1904. 

Persons who have contracted with Mr. Alfred Hebert for sprinkling of the street, in front of their residence properties are enjoying much relief from the disagreeable and suffocating dust that abounds so plentifully in our town.
Laf. Adv. 6/9/1894



Road and Immigration Convention.

 Realizing the great benefit that would be derived by the people of our State from the incoming of a desirable class of immigrants and improved public roads the Business Men's Association decided to call a Road and Immigration Convention, composed of delegates from the Attakapas district, to meet in Lafayette on Wednesday, June 21st.

 The Association earnestly request and invite the Presidents of the different Police Juries, the Mayors of the different towns and cities, or the people in mass meeting to appoint delegates to attend said convention, and sincerely hope that call will meet with a hearty response from the people of the of the district.
C. O. Mouton, President.
A. C. Ordway, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/10/1893.







Vermilionville City Council - 1869.
Among other items of business....

"....On motion it was resolved, that a committee of three, be and is hereby appointed to ascertain the probable cost of removing obstructions from that portion of Lafayette street near Mrs. E. Mouton's property...."

 "...On motion, resolved, that a committee of two be and is hereby authorized to ascertain the cost of building a bridge across Lafayette street near the lower corner of Mrs. E. Mouton's property. Messrs. G. C. Salles and R. L. McBride were appointed on said committee...." 

Lafayette Advertiser 6/19/1869.

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