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Monday, January 12, 2015

**JULY 24TH M C

 From the Lafayette Gazette of July 24th, 1897:

ONLY ONE SURVIVOR.
But One of the Eight Men Who Downed Knownothingism in Louisiana.

 [From the N. O. Daily States, July 17, 1897.]

 The New Orleans Daily States in its issue of the 22nd of December, 1891, published the following Democratic State ticket in the memorable political campaign of 1855 for the mastery between the Democratic and Knownothing or American parties in Louisiana:

DEMOCRATIC STATE TICKET.

 For Governor:
ROBERT C. WICKLIFFE,

of West Feliciana.

 For Lieut. Governor:
CHARLES H. MOUTON,
of Lafayette.

 For Secretary of State:
ANDREW S. HERRON,
of East Baton Rouge.

 For Auditor:
SAMUEL F. MARKS,
Of West Feliciana.

 For Treasurer:
C. E. GRENEAUX,
of Natchitoches.

 For Attorney General:
E. WARREN MOISE,
Of New Orleans.

 For Supt. of Education:
SAMUEL BARD,
Of Carroll.

 FOR CONGRESS:

 Second District:
MILES TAYLOR,
Of Ascension.

 And made the statement that of all the men whose names are on this ticket there was then only one survivor, viz: Robert C. Wickliffe. This was an error on the part of The States. In December, 1891, Charles H. Mouton, who was candidate for Lieut. Governor on the same ticket was then living in St. Martinville, where he was taking a very active part in organizing Democratic clubs throughout the parish against the lottery amendment; and when the old gentleman saw the name of Robert C. Wickliffe as the candidate for Lieut. Governor on the McEnery ticket it pained him very much, for the name of Robert C. Wickliffe brought to his mind reminiscences of many incidents of the campaign of 1855, when men, women and young people of all shades of political opinion and of religious faith would assemble in large crowds to hear Robert C. Wickliffe, "Blue Grass Bob," Charles H. Mouton, "the Creole Pony," Andrew S. Herron, "The Whole-souled Major," E. Warren Moise, "the plucky Jew and Ready Debater," discuss in free and joint debates with their opponents, religious tolerance.

 Mr. C. H. Mouton is yet living, and, we believe, is now the only one left of the eight men whose names are on the Democratic State ticket of 1855. He is practicing law in St. Martinville, La.; he is healthy and active. He comes to office every morning at 9 o'clock, sometimes afoot and sometimes on his pony. He goes to dinner at twelve and comes back to his office at two. He takes a lively interest in the political questions of the present day and although over 73 years of age, he hopes that in 1900 he will be able to help in striking a death blow to monopolies, trusts and class legislation. From the N. O. Daily States and in the Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


The Century Club.

 We publish below the program to be rendered at the celebration to be given by the Century Club at Oak Avenue Park:

 1st.  Mule race - All mules to be run by gentlemen entering same. All riders must be in jockey costume, of the colors adopted. Members of the Century Club alone to ride in this race; 2d race, riders to change mules, medal to mule coming in last; entries to be published. Committee: J. P. Revillon, R. W. Elliot.

 2d.  Horse race, one-fourth mile; entries to be published; committee:  J. C. Nickerson, Dr. F. E. Girard.

 3d.  Century Club sweepstakes, for ponies 14 hands and under;  1/2 mile, entrance $1; committee: Chas. Parkerson, Crow Girard.

 4th. Tournament - All riders to represent some character, either of fiction or history; committee: Baxter Clegg, Dr. F. E. Girard, Leo Judice, J. C. Nickerson.

 5th.  Boys' foot race, 100 yards dash, for boys years old and under; committee: J. Nickerson, C. O. Mouton.

 6th.  Fat men's race, 50 yards dash, for men weighing 200 pounds or over; entrance 25 cents, prize, medal; committee: Dr. J. F. Mouton.

 7th.  Foot race, 100 yards dash, match between I. A. Broussard, Joe Billaud and J. Nickerson; prize, medal; committee: Baxter Clegg, Dr. A. R. Trahan.

 8th. Throwing a base ball; entrance 25 cents; prize, base ball and bat; committee: Felix Mouton, S. R. Parkerson.

 9th.  Base ball game between Attakapas Club of Carencro and Century Club, nines to be published; prize, pennant; committee: Wm. Campbell, Chas. Parkerson, Felix Mouton, L. G. Stelly.

 10th.  Gander pulling; entrance 25 cents; one-half proceeds to winner; committee: H. A. Van der Cruyssen, C. C. Brown, L. G. Stelly.

 11th.  Climbing greased pole; prize on top of pole; entrance 25 cents; committee: Orther Mouton, B. Falk.

 12th. Bicycle races; one mile open; entrance $1; prize, medal; committee: Gus. Schmulen, Dr. N. P. Moss.

 Parties wishing to enter any of these events will please call on the committee on such event.

 Further particulars will be published next week.
Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


Death of Mrs. Anna M. Caffery.

 At Alexandria, on July 19, Mrs. Anna M. Caffery, widow of the late Jefferson J. Caffery, died at the residence of her son-in-law, Charles M. Kilpatrick. She was born June 9, 1830. Her death occurred after a few days illness and was a great shock to her family and friends. She was born and raised in this parish and with her husband and family resided here until about 1880. She was a daughter of the late Basil C.  Crow, one of the early settlers in this parish, a lawyer of distinction who practiced in this and adjoining parishes.

 Mrs. Caffery is pronounced by all who knew her to have been a woman of exceptionally fine traits of character; she was pre-eminently a Christian woman; in all the relations of life, whether as daughter or sister, wife or mother, she was kind, devoted and true. Her life was one of devotion and self-sacrifice for the good of others. She was charitable to a fault. She exemplified to a high degree all womanly virtues. The pattern of her life was the "Mother of Israel" because it was in that relation that none surpassed her. Indeed, it is true, "Her children rise up and call her blessed," for she has left them the estimable heritage of a glorious life; the memory of her to them must be one of the grandest ever left by parent to child.

 Three daughters and four sons survive her. She was a sister of Mrs. M. E. Girard, and the late Mrs. S. T. Irwin.

 Her remains were brought here and laid beside her husband and children who had gone before. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


LADIES' CLUB.
"An Echo from The Grove."

 Despite the inclemency of the afternoon, a few loyal club members on Thursday were cordially welcomed to the lovely home of Mrs. Baxter Clegg. Business was dispensed with and pleasure held full sway. Dainty printed cards were given each guest and on investigation proved to be a game of "characteristics" - a diversion both enjoyable and instructive.

 The handsome dining table mirrored its decorations of a dainty centrepiece, doilies and cut flowers, cut-glass and silver sparkling under the rays of the setting Sun (as he with all the curiosity of the masculine gender peeped in to see "what the women were about") made most attractive the tempting menu of fruits, nuts, cakes and ices.

 All enjoyed the afternoon and congratulated themselves upon having "dodged the drops" since such pleasure was the reward. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


Base Ball.

 There will be two games of base ball at Pilette on Saturday, July 31, one between the Pilette Club and Berlucheau Cove and the other between the Pilette Club and the Red Hill team. At night there will be a ball at Pilette hall, for the benefit of the base ball club, at which prizes for best dancers will be given. Extensive arrangements have been made and a good time is assured to all. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.

 Mr. Ferguson Here.

 Mr. J.M. Ferguson and his attorney, Mr. Joseph Walton, arrived in Lafayette this week and will soon meet Mayor Caffery when the contract will be signed. There seems to be no hindrance in the way of an early agreement, and the people of Lafayette will soon have the satisfaction of seeing the electric lights and waterworks erected. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.





A Negro Killed.

 At a negro marriage feast near Royville last Monday evening, Joachim Broussard shot and fatally wounded another negro by the name of Emile Girouard.

 The two parties seem to have been on friendly terms and it is claimed the shooting was accidental. Girouard was shot in the abdomen and died the next day. Sheriff Broussard visited the scene of the shooting and lodged Broussard in the parish jail Monday evening. There were no immediate witnesses, but it is said the wounded man acknowledged that it was an accident, and Azenore Bosset. who went to the man as soon as he fell, says Girouard blamed Broussard only for the careless handling of his pistol. Broussard is still in jail.

 Coroner Trahan held an inquest Wednesday and the jury returned a verdict simply saying that the dead man had received a mortal wound from a pistol shot.

 It appears that the witnesses contradict one another and it is doubted whether the man shot himself or whether Broussard did, on account of the contradictory statements of the witnesses. As there was no actual witnesses to the deed, it is difficult to ascertain whether there was foul work or not, and the officers will have another mystery to unravel. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897. 

  

Dangers of Concealed Weapons.

 The shooting of the negro Girouard by another near Royville last Monday should be a warning to those who have contracted the bad habit of carrying concealed weapons. This dangerous habit has become too general and we again urge upon the proper officials to do their utmost towards checking it. Sheriff Broussard and his aids deserve credit for the stand they have taken trying to stop this growing evil, to which so many crimes and accidents can be traced. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


Out of Town Newspapers.

 Joe E. Mouton is agent for the following papers: New Orleans Times-Democrat, States, Bee, Picayune; New York World, Journal, Courrier des Etats-Unis; Louisville Courier-Journal; Houston Post; Atlanta Constitution; Brann's Iconoclast. Orders at catalogue prices for all books sold by "Le Courrier des Etats-Unis."
Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.





      
Century Club Smoker.

 There were quite a number of guests entertained at the club rooms of the Century Club last Monday night, among them quite a delegation from Carencro. Owing to a sudden death in the family of some of the members, the smoker program was not carried out, but the members present did all they could to entertain those who came and whole they had a quiet time, everyone expressed himself as having had a pleasant evening and all look forward with pleasant anticipation to another smoker. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897. 

      



On His Way Home.

 Readers of The Gazette may remember the case of W. J. Deady, who, in February, 1896, walked into the sheriff's office and delivered himself up to the authorities for having killed a man in Eureka, Ark., fifteen years before. He then stated that he could not stand the strain any longer and wanted to stand trial. He was lodged in jail by the authorities here awaiting the coming of the proper officials from Arkansas, who soon took him into custody, and who then expressed themselves favorably as to his chances of acquital.

 A few days ago Mr. Deady passed through town on his way to Houma, where he has a wife and two children.

 He says he had no trouble in getting clear, and that he was treated with all possible courtesy by the Arkansas officials. He stopped in Lafayette to again return thanks to the officers here for the kind treatment he received at their hands, while incarcerated in the parish jail. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


The Scott Fair.

 Our readers will see in our Scott column that there will be a grand fair at Scott to-day and to-morrow for the benefit of the church, which the good people of that progressing town and vicinity are determined to erect. The railroads have agreed to sell tickers at one and one-third fare.

 The people of Lafayette parish should respond to the deserving efforts of our sister town to make  success of this laudable enterprise, and, no doubt, they will do so. Extensive preparations have been made to accommodate visitors, and provide for their amusement and entertainment. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


AT SCOTT
News Items Picked Up by The Gazette Correspondent.

 We are sorry to hear that Miss Leda, the charming daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Delhomme, was taken seriously sick during the week. Miss Leda was working hard and vigorously for the future welfare of all Christians of Scott. She was working faithfully and with all energy, soliciting in order to get enough funds for the benefit of a worthy edifice, a house of God, when she, in her dutiful work, was stricken with congestion of the brains. But the Almighty is good and knows his faithful workers, and he has saved her to finish her task. She is doing well and we hope to see her up soon.

 Mrs. M. A. Thomas sent us a stalk of sugar cane with 9 red joints, raised on her farm south of Scott. How's this for July and Scott? Where does The Gazette sugar cane come in now ?

 Preparations have been made in grand style, and the Scott people are fully prepared to receive the several thousand strangers who will attend the grand fair. To-day (Saturday) and Sunday will be gala days of which the people of Greater Scott will feel proud. It will be two days when energy, money, enterprise and amusements will be cast before the people, showing what can be accomplished by a good, noble and christian population. It will be an example showing what great good a church is and what education it can send forth to our children, likewise a great many gray-haired citizens. The people of Scott have cried for a church, prayed for one, and that gentle prayer has been answered. The Almighty wants a house in every community for the shelter of his people, and Scott must and will have one. The people at large are helping us, and for that good and kind deed we bow and say thanks. We are having bad weather, but our large water-proof pavilion will hold us out, and we have arranged with the weather man to hold up with rain for a few days.

 We wish to state to your many readers, that free transportation will be granted to each and every on to and from the fair grounds. The committees have arranged for 100 double teams and will be ready to transport everybody in all parts of the city to see the sights.
     (Signed) ORTON.
(The Gazette's Scott Correspondent.)
Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


CARENCRO NEWS.
Items of Interest Gathered by The Gazette Correspondent at Carencro.

 A number of our young men with a full knowledge of the amount of real fun and pleasure there is in an old fashioned "hay-ride," organized a part last Friday and drove out to the hospitable home of Mr. and Mrs. Louis G. Stelly, where they received a royal reception, and spent several hours dancing and feasting. The following comprised the party: Misses May and Nita Scranton of Royville, Misses Millandon, Edna Watterson, Celeste and Susie Block of New Orleans, Misses Birdie Palmer, Sarah Brown, Graziella Francez, Miss Brun of Carencro and Miss Gardner of Grand Coteau; Mesdames C. C. and Geo. E. Brown, Mrs. Geo. Melchoir and Mrs. F. D. Andrus; Messrs. Wm. Salles, Theo. I. Gelvan, E. M. Heath, Sam P. Brown, Wilfred Reaux, Geo. Melcoir, Leonce Dupuis, Felix Andrus, Frank and George Jeanmard and Harry Lessley.

 Mr. Henry Crouchet returned home last Friday after spending several days at Leesburg.

 Mr. A. O. Guilbeau was in Breaux Bridge for several days this week, visiting friends.

 There was a surprise party at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Dimitry a few night since. The young ladies and gentlemen participating appeared to enjoy themselves very much.

 Mr. V. E. Dupuis, our ward member of the School Board, attended the convention of parish superintendents, held in New Orleans on the 13th and 14th of this month. He reports the gathering a perfect success and that much important work transacted.

 Miss Sarah and Mr. S. P. Brown returned home last week after spending several days in Royville.

 The Carencro Sugar Co. have commenced the repair and improvement of their refinery, and the work will be pushed so that everything will be in readiness to take off the present crop. This company have contracts that will give them a full "running" season.

 Mr. Simon Mathieu while returning from a picnic given at the springs some days ago, fell from a wagon in which he was riding, the wheels of which passed over one of his legs. causing a compound fracture. The attending physicians, Drs. J. P. Francez and U. Prejean have expressed the opinion that he will recover.

 It is evident that the people of Scott intend making their church fair on Saturday and Sunday a grand success. They will leave nothing undone that will provide for the pleasure and comfort of visitors. There will be all kinds of field sports and several amusing contests, as well as dancing, so all tastes may be gratified. The entertainment is given for a worthy purpose and should receive the support of all.

 Mrs. Philbert Crouchet of Lafayette was in Carencro last week visiting relatives.

 There has been on exhibition at the Southern Pacific depot for the last ten or twelve days, a stock of cane showing six fine red joints. The cane was raised by Mr. Mamaire on his place near Carencro.

 The cane and cotton crops are in excellent condition, and in fact have never been in better shape at this seaon of the year.

 Mr. Walter Block of New Orleans is in Carencro visiting relatives.

 Miss E. Watterson who has been spending several weeks with the family of Mr. Geo. E. Brown, left for her home in New Orleans Monday last.

 Col. C. C. Brown, Carencro's champion heavy weight sprinter, has gone into active training for the foot race contest that is to take place on Sunday at Scott. Those who have placed any bets on his opponents, had better "hedge" while there is yet time. Dollars to doughnuts Carencro will carry off the prize.

 Mrs. O. P. Guilbeau has been spending several days with relatives at Breaux Bridge. From the Carencro Reporter to The Lafayette Gazette. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.


Attended Funeral.

 Dr. Russel Caffery, Capt. and Mrs. Dowdell, Mrs. Pancost and Mr. D. Caffery, of San Antonio, Mr. Ned Caffery and wife of Sorrel, and Mr. C. M. Kilpatrick, of Alexandria, attended the funeral of their mother, which took place from the residence of Mr. Chas. Caffery last Tuesday. Lafayette Gazette 7/24/1897.

  




  





 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 7/24/1897.

 Dr. Albert Voorhies of New Iberia, was in town this week visiting relatives and friends.

 Mrs. S. T. Givens is visiting her sister, Mrs. T. Magill, in New Iberia.

 Farmers who are out of corn will do well to call on J. C. Nickerson at his feed store near the depot. He has a large quantity of corn and oats on hand, which he will sell at very low prices.

 W. R. Foote made a trip to Lafayette Sunday.

 Dr. N. P. Moss traveled Thursday to Rayne on a business trip. He had not been in Rayne for fifteen years.

The new caboose on the "tap" is a "dandy" sure enough, and the train boys can flow enjoy a little comfort. 


 Constable Cummings, of Ridge, sports a new saddle and also an injured hand.

 Dr. M. L. Lyons is at Sour Lake, Texas, for the benefit of this health.

 An arbor has been built around the Indian Bayou school to protect the pupils from the scorching sun.

 We are glad to say that news from James Lewis, the unfortunate young man who attempted to commit suicide in Opelousas several days ago, are encouraging and the many friends of the popular young man have hopes of his recovery.

 Reward. - Lost a lady's gold watch and chain. Liberal reward for return to Allie Sprole or this office.

 Rev. Mr. Watson and daughter, and Miss Dubose, of Houston, after a short visit to the family of Mr. T. D. Wier, left Tuesday.

 Messrs. Leo Judice and A. Trahan were here from Scott Thursday.

 Mrs. Oliphant and little son are visitors at the home of Mrs. H. Kennedy.

 Mr. Alvin Price, of Opelousas, visited friends on last Sunday.

 Miss Mary Saint, of Shuteston, spent last Sunday with the Misses Mudd.

 Mr. Gus Kennedy, an Opelousas gallant, drove down to visit friends on Sunday.

 Mrs. John Clegg visited in Franklin during the past week.

 Mr. Wm. Clegg, after a few days' hunting on Jefferson Island, is again at home.

 All aboard for Scott to-day and to-morrow! Grand fair and concert. Excursion rates on the Southern Pacific Railway, Supper and dinner, 25 cents.

 Coca-cola, the refreshing and invigorating summer drink, is daily increasing in popularity at the Moss Pharmacy soda fountain.

 Misses L. Mudd and M. Mouton, Messrs. Girard, V. Mouton and J. C. Nickerson attended the "rehearsal" in Scott Thursday night.

 Miss Annie Latham is a visitor at the Crescent Hotel.

 Mr. Tom Hopkins, of Galveston, visited his parents during the past week.

 Mr. Tom Hopkins, of Galveston, visited his parents during the past week.

 Mr. Chas. Caffery was called to Alexandria last Sunday to be at the death-bed of his mother.

 Dudley Dunbar and Charley Irving, of St. Martinville, were in Lafayette this week, on business bent. They paid us a pleasant call.

 Pierre and Henry Gerac made a trip to Jeanerette last Tuesday on business.

 Thomas Dupuis and T. Dupuis went to Leesburg Thursday with the intention of spending several weeks there.

 Miss Virginia Winn, who has been the guest of the Cottage Hotel for several weeks, went to Bunkie this week to spend several days.

 Miss Bertie McCord came in from her country school last Friday to remain until Sunday.

 There will be a grand excursion given by the Houma Hook and Ladder Fire Company No. 1, from Lafayette to Lake Charles, on August 8. The fare from here is $1 for the round trip.

 Father Laforest, accompanied by Dr. Perrault, of Carencro, was in town Monday.

 Mrs. J. C. Couvillon left on Sunday's train to visit her parents and relatives in Avoyelles parish, where she will spend a few weeks.

 Mr. Shirley T. Lacour, the brother of Mr. L. E. Lacour, of this parish, left last Sunday for his home in Avoyelles, after spending a few weeks here, the guest of his brother.

 Alley Sprole and Ed Mathews went down to St. Martinville for the fair last Sunday, the former with his wheel and the latter with his "gun." On account of the inclement weather, few features of the program were rendered.

 Mr. J. C. Couvillon, sent us last week on open boll of cotton raised on his Carencro farm, the first sample we have yet seen.

 Miss Medora Thompson, of Floresville, Tex., is here visiting her cousin, Mrs. C. M. Parkerson.

 Mr. Alcide Judice, of Scott, was in Lafayette Monday. Mr. Judice informed The Gazette that the church fund was largely increased, by contributions from New Orleans merchants, who responded very generously to the call for aid.

 Miss Mary Sprole left Wednesday for New Iberia to visit friends.

 Judge Felix Voorhies of New Iberia was in town this week.

 Among those who boarded the excursion to Galveston at this place last Monday were Messrs. Harry Durke, Caillouet and Homer Mouton.

From the Lake Charles Commercial. - Miss Agnes Breaux, a pretty little miss from Lafayette, returned home Tuesday morning after a pleasant visit here as the guest of her brother, Mr. Philip Breaux.

 W. P. Miller, of Vermilion, was the guest of the Cottage Hotel.

 Postmaster Duclose, of Rayne, made a flying trip to Lafayette Thursday.

 Mrs. G. Dejean, of Opelousas, is the guest of Mrs. A. E. Mouton.








  



  





    

  


   


   























From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 24th, 2015:

Three People Killed - Nine Wounded - Lone Gunman Opens Fire In Lafayette Movie Theater Thursday Evening.



Lafayette police confirmed shortly before 8 p.m. law enforcement officers responded to a call about an active shooter at the Grand 16 Lafayette at 3141 Johnston St.

Lafayette Police Chief Jim Craft confirmed at least three people were killed, including the gunman, who died from a self-inflicted wound.

Two victims were pronounced dead at the scene. Nine were transported to area hospitals, eight by ambulance and one by private party. One victim died at a hospital.

The suspect was described by several witnesses as a white, middle-aged male. State Police said the shooter, whose identity was not released late Thursday, was 58 years old.

Mayhem in the theater.

“We heard a loud pop we thought was a firecracker,” Katie Domingue of Carencro said. She was at the 7 p.m. showing of “Trainwreck” with her fiance, Joshua Doggett, in Theater No. 14. About 20 minutes into the movie, Domingue said, she heard a loud noise.

She said she saw “an older white man” standing up and shooting down, not in her direction.

“He wasn’t saying anything. I didn’t hear anybody screaming either,” Domingue said.

She heard about six shots, she said, before she and Doggett ran to the nearest exit, leaving behind her shoes and purse.

The scene in the theater parking lot reflected the mayhem of the evening. News media had been moved offsite and were reporting from in front of a nearby coffee shop, Johnston Street Java. The parking lot itself was filled with emergency vehicles, including a Haz-Mat unit.

Authorities also closed down the Grand 14 on Kaliste Saloom in what they said was an exercise in caution. The parking lot was cleared shortly before 10 p.m. there, with four State Police units on the scene.

Randall Man, Acadian Ambulance VP of marketing, said 10 ambulances and 26 paramedics responded to last night's shooting.

Three more ambulances were standing by for relief at a nearby Albertsons.
The first ambulances responded within 7 minutes of the initial call.

“We don’t know if this was just a random act or whether it was a domestic situation,” Craft said, saying the investigation was not far enough along.

Victims identities not confirmed.

Authorities would not confirm the identities of those who were shot. But unconfirmed reports said the wounded included longtime Lafayette oilman Dwight S. “Bo” Ramsay, chairman of the board of Aries Marine Corp., and his wife, Gerri. The extent of their injuries was not revealed.

Some of the wounded were critically injured, authorities said, others had lesser wounds.

At least some of those who were shot were taken to Lafayette General Medical Center, Acadiana’s largest hospital. Lafayette General spokesman Daryl Cetnar said that by agreement with police, Lafayette General could not reveal whether the victims were taken there. He said the hospital would release a statement Friday.

But what appeared to be family members and friends of the victim milled around inside the Emergency Room. A Catholic priest was on the scene.

Jindal: 'This is an awful night.'

Gov. Bobby Jindal called for prayers Thursday evening during a press conference.

“The best thing anybody can do right now is to think about them, pray for them,” he said. “We will get through this. We are a resilient community. This is an awful night for Lafayette. This is an awful night for Louisiana. This is an awful night for the United States.”

n an issued statement, U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, R-Lafayette, said, “I’m saddened at the terrible loss of life represented in tonight’s tragic shooting at a movie theater in my hometown of Lafayette. Bridget and I are praying for the families and friends of the victims at this difficult time. I will work with the Lafayette Police Department, local, state and federal officials to get to the bottom of what happened tonight.”

'Blood everywhere'

Jalen Fernell, 20, of Lafayette, was in the Grand Theatre watching “Southpaw” with friends when he heard gunshots.

“They were very faint over the movie. I thought it was part of the movie,” Fernell said. “About five seconds later, sirens went off and I realized it wasn’t the movie.”

A voice over the intercom told moviegoers to evacuate the theater, Fernell said. Patrons, unaware of what happened, took off running, he said.

Outside the theater, police were everywhere late Thursday.

“I saw a woman lying on the ground outside with blood everywhere. She was shot in the leg,” Fernell said. “We didn’t know what to do. You’re scared to walk through the parking lot, You don’t know if the guy’s in a car, hiding in the parking lot.”

Additional police arrived at the scene and entered the building, armed with assault rifles, he said.

“I heard gunshots like a war going on,” Fernell said.

When the gunfire stopped, he heard from a police car radio that six people were down in Theater No. 14, he said.

More police arrived and charged inside; additional shots were fired. Fernell said he heard someone say the suspect was down; he had committed suicide.

In the theater where the shooting took place, Emily Mann, 21, was watching “Trainwreck,” seated in the second row from the top of the theater with a friend. He father, Randall Mann, said his daughter heard popping noises and noticed flashes coming from a gun that was held by a man in the same row on the other side of the theater.

Randall Mann is vice president of marketing and public relations at Acadian Ambulance. He said his daughter was not up to speaking about the incident Thursday night.

Mann said Acadian Ambulance transported eight patients to area hospitals. The company responded with 10 ambulances and off-duty personnel who heard about the shooting and showed up at the scene to help, he said.

The Grand Theatres in Lafayette and Broussard are owned by New Orleans-based Southern Theatres LLC.

The company operates multiplex stadium-seating movie theaters in Louisiana, Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

 Advertiser reporters Seth Dickerson, Jessica Goff, Claire Taylor, Herman Fuselier and Ken Stickney contributed to this report.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/2015.







Residents to Unite to Block Westboro Baptist Church From Picketing Victims' Funerals.



Lafayette residents have started a Facebook group to create a human wall around the funeral processions of two killed in a shooting at the Grand Theatre to keep the Westboro Baptist Church picketers away from the grieving families.
"It’s time to come together as a community," Lafayette resident Brandon Verret said. "There is no way we, as the Acadiana community, can allow Westboro to be anywhere near the funerals for victims of this tragedy. Our community does not deserve that, and more importantly the families do not deserve that."
More than 4,700 people had RSVP'd to the event as of 3 p.m. Friday.
The Westboro Baptist Church sent out a tweet earlier today implying that they are planning to picket the funerals of Mayci Breaux and Jillian Johnson, the two women killed Thursday night in the shooting at the Grand Theater. Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/2015.












From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 24th, 1907:


IMPROVEMENT OF VERMILION BAYOU.

Making it a Navigable Waterway from Railroad Bridge.

 Last Wednesday a committee from the Progressive League composed of Wm. Campbell, Dr. F. E. Girard, G. C. Babcock, T. M. Biossat, F. V. Mouton and W. A. LeRosen left on Dr. Girard's handsome gasoline launch to make an inspection of the Vermilion and to meet a committee from Abbeville to discuss measures to be taken looking towards improving the navigation of the bayou. Owing to a tree having fallen across the bayou about eight miles below Lafayette, the boat was unable to proceed to Hunter's Canal, the meeting place. The following day, however, the Abbeville committee was communicated with by phone and a report was then made to the League which adopted the following resolution:

 "Whereas, in section 2 of the Rivers and Harbors Bill passed by the second session of the Fifty-ninth Congress, it says;  "improving the channel, bay and passes of Bayou Vermilion and Mermentau River and tributaries, Louisiana, for maintenance, $25,000; section 3, that the Secretary of War is hereby directed to cause preliminary surveys or examinations to be made of the following localities: Bayou Vermilion to Lafayette, with a view of obtaining six feet of water, be it.

 "Resolved, That we, the Board of Directors of the Lafayette Progressive League, hereby respectfully ask and urgently request Captain J. F. McIndoe, U. S. A., to use his best endeavors to visit our section at his earliest convenience, and that he seriously consider our present necessity and give the matter his prompt attention; that the Secretary is instructed to send a copy of these resolutions to Captain McIndoe, with our pledge of any assistance in our power."

 Committees were appointed to report as soon as possible on the following subjects:

 Steamboat tonnage between Lafayette and New Orleans, via Morgan City and Houma; conference with similar committee from Abbeville for the purpose of securing six feet of water from Lafayette to the Gulf.

 The League strongly endorsed the course of Hon. R. F. Broussard in securing appropriations for this work, and expressed their appreciation of his tender of acceptance. A resolution complimentary of Hon. H. L. Gueydan was also adopted, and that gentleman thanked for his valuable service in furthering this and other public enterprises.

 The trip down Vermilion bayou showed that a comparatively small cost, the bayou could be made a valuable stream. From the railroad bridge down a width of from fifty feet to one hundred feet was easily possible and sufficient depth to render it navigable the year round.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/1907.

       



From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 24th, 2015:


Three People Killed - Nine Wounded - Lone Gunman Opens Fire In Lafayette Movie Thursday Evening.



Lafayette police confirmed shortly before 8 p.m. law enforcement officers responded to a call about an active shooter at the Grand 16 Lafayette at 3141 Johnston St.

Lafayette Police Chief Jim Craft confirmed at least three people were killed, including the gunman, who died from a self-inflicted wound.

Two victims were pronounced dead at the scene. Nine were transported to area hospitals, eight by ambulance and one by private party. One victim died at a hospital.

The suspect was described by several witnesses as a white, middle-aged male. State Police said the shooter, whose identity was not released late Thursday, was 58 years old.

Mayhem in the theater.

“We heard a loud pop we thought was a firecracker,” Katie Domingue of Carencro said. She was at the 7 p.m. showing of “Trainwreck” with her fiance, Joshua Doggett, in Theater No. 14. About 20 minutes into the movie, Domingue said, she heard a loud noise.

She said she saw “an older white man” standing up and shooting down, not in her direction.

“He wasn’t saying anything. I didn’t hear anybody screaming either,” Domingue said.

She heard about six shots, she said, before she and Doggett ran to the nearest exit, leaving behind her shoes and purse.

The scene in the theater parking lot reflected the mayhem of the evening. News media had been moved offsite and were reporting from in front of a nearby coffee shop, Johnston Street Java. The parking lot itself was filled with emergency vehicles, including a Haz-Mat unit.

Authorities also closed down the Grand 14 on Kaliste Saloom in what they said was an exercise in caution. The parking lot was cleared shortly before 10 p.m. there, with four State Police units on the scene.

Randall Man, Acadian Ambulance VP of marketing, said 10 ambulances and 26 paramedics responded to last night's shooting.

Three more ambulances were standing by for relief at a nearby Albertsons.
The first ambulances responded within 7 minutes of the initial call.

“We don’t know if this was just a random act or whether it was a domestic situation,” Craft said, saying the investigation was not far enough along.

Victims identities not confirmed.

Authorities would not confirm the identities of those who were shot. But unconfirmed reports said the wounded included longtime Lafayette oilman Dwight S. “Bo” Ramsay, chairman of the board of Aries Marine Corp., and his wife, Gerri. The extent of their injuries was not revealed.

Some of the wounded were critically injured, authorities said, others had lesser wounds.

At least some of those who were shot were taken to Lafayette General Medical Center, Acadiana’s largest hospital. Lafayette General spokesman Daryl Cetnar said that by agreement with police, Lafayette General could not reveal whether the victims were taken there. He said the hospital would release a statement Friday.

But what appeared to be family members and friends of the victim milled around inside the Emergency Room. A Catholic priest was on the scene.

Jindal: 'This is an awful night.'

Gov. Bobby Jindal called for prayers Thursday evening during a press conference.

“The best thing anybody can do right now is to think about them, pray for them,” he said. “We will get through this. We are a resilient community. This is an awful night for Lafayette. This is an awful night for Louisiana. This is an awful night for the United States.”

n an issued statement, U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, R-Lafayette, said, “I’m saddened at the terrible loss of life represented in tonight’s tragic shooting at a movie theater in my hometown of Lafayette. Bridget and I are praying for the families and friends of the victims at this difficult time. I will work with the Lafayette Police Department, local, state and federal officials to get to the bottom of what happened tonight.”

'Blood everywhere'

Jalen Fernell, 20, of Lafayette, was in the Grand Theatre watching “Southpaw” with friends when he heard gunshots.

“They were very faint over the movie. I thought it was part of the movie,” Fernell said. “About five seconds later, sirens went off and I realized it wasn’t the movie.”

A voice over the intercom told moviegoers to evacuate the theater, Fernell said. Patrons, unaware of what happened, took off running, he said.

Outside the theater, police were everywhere late Thursday.

“I saw a woman lying on the ground outside with blood everywhere. She was shot in the leg,” Fernell said. “We didn’t know what to do. You’re scared to walk through the parking lot, You don’t know if the guy’s in a car, hiding in the parking lot.”

Additional police arrived at the scene and entered the building, armed with assault rifles, he said.

“I heard gunshots like a war going on,” Fernell said.

When the gunfire stopped, he heard from a police car radio that six people were down in Theater No. 14, he said.

More police arrived and charged inside; additional shots were fired. Fernell said he heard someone say the suspect was down; he had committed suicide.

In the theater where the shooting took place, Emily Mann, 21, was watching “Trainwreck,” seated in the second row from the top of the theater with a friend. He father, Randall Mann, said his daughter heard popping noises and noticed flashes coming from a gun that was held by a man in the same row on the other side of the theater.

Randall Mann is vice president of marketing and public relations at Acadian Ambulance. He said his daughter was not up to speaking about the incident Thursday night.

Mann said Acadian Ambulance transported eight patients to area hospitals. The company responded with 10 ambulances and off-duty personnel who heard about the shooting and showed up at the scene to help, he said.

The Grand Theatres in Lafayette and Broussard are owned by New Orleans-based Southern Theatres LLC.

The company operates multiplex stadium-seating movie theaters in Louisiana, Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

 Advertiser reporters Seth Dickerson, Jessica Goff, Claire Taylor, Herman Fuselier and Ken Stickney contributed to this report.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/2015.







Residents to Unite to Block Westboro Baptist Church From Picketing Victims' Funerals.



Lafayette residents have started a Facebook group to create a human wall around the funeral processions of two killed in a shooting at the Grand Theatre to keep the Westboro Baptist Church picketers away from the grieving families.
"It’s time to come together as a community," Lafayette resident Brandon Verret said. "There is no way we, as the Acadiana community, can allow Westboro to be anywhere near the funerals for victims of this tragedy. Our community does not deserve that, and more importantly the families do not deserve that."
More than 4,700 people had RSVP'd to the event as of 3 p.m. Friday.
The Westboro Baptist Church sent out a tweet earlier today implying that they are planning to picket the funerals of Mayci Breaux and Jillian Johnson, the two women killed Thursday night in the shooting at the Grand Theater. Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/2015.





 From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 24th, 1907:

LECTURE ON LIQUOR TRAFFIC.

 Dr. S. A. Smith, of the Anti-Saloon League of New Orleans Speaks Sunday Night at the Court House.

 He Presents the Advantages of Prohibition and Solicits Subscriptions for Aiding the Work of the League.

 Dr. S. A. Smith, of the Anti-Saloon League of New Orleans delivered an interesting lecture on the liquor traffic Sunday night at the court house. Only a small audience was present. Dr. Smith made a brief statement of the spread of the prohibition movement showing the extent in the United States that liquor had been voted out, saying the sentiment against the liquor traffic was growing rapidly. He then spoke of the extent of prohibition in Louisiana, stating that with the exception of Shreveport and Monroe and small strip of Mississippi, every part of the State north of Red River was dry, and further that agitation for prohibition in the southern half had begun and in the near future several more parishes would become dry. He then went on to show wherein prohibition, the figures being almost double under prohibition. He also stated that businessmen declared that business was much better without liquor and that they would not be willing to again have liquor sold in their parishes. He also spoke of the evil effects of the liquor traffic, asserting that it was responsible for most of the crimes committed and that it cost the parishes more than the revenue derived from it. He declared that the objection to prohibition that it did not prohibit was not a valid one, for if it were then the law against murder should also be repealed for it did not prevent murder and further there are other laws which are violated and applying the same reasoning as against prohibition, those laws should not be enacted. Laws are made to be enforced and the officers can enforce them, therefore the prohibition laws van not be enforced as other laws. That does not necessarily mean that no "blind tigers" will exist, for some men will violate laws, we must simply have officers that will punish all violators of the law.

 Dr. Smith is an entertaining talker and held the interest of his audience closely during the hour and half he spoke. He lectured here with the purpose of creating interest in the work of the Anti-Saloon League and securing subscriptions for its support.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/1907.


 From the Lafayette Daily Advertiser of July 24th, 1918:

THE YELLOW DOG CLUBBERS CLUB BEING FORMED.

 "I heartily endorse the efforts of my friend, S. R. Biossat, in organizing an Antibellyache society in Lafayette, and I take pleasure in asking him to join with me in my efforts to start the Yellow Dog Clubbers Club," said P. C. Bennett, one of the valued employes of the Southern Pacific Railroad Co., to a reporter for The Advertiser this morning.

 "The purpose of the club is set forth as follows: The absolute starvation of German propaganda for lack of food to feed upon - for lack of tongues to pass the tale along. When you hear a Hunn-built tale, demand the authority therefor. Ask the teller how he knows. He never really knows. Then tell him the tale of the Yellow Dog and the club and pledge his support. He'll become a clubber right away.

 "Like the Antibellyache Club, there are no dues, no offices, no banquets, just an entire working body of genuine Americans helping to tie a can to the yellow dog. Perhaps I can no better explain this club, its purposes and its means of operation than to reproduce its modest announcement:

 Briefly: "The Yellow Dog Clubbers Club" is an informal but effective "CLUB" devoted to beating out the life of German propaganda in this country.

 This propaganda is spreading like a prairie fire. It leaps from New York to Seattle in a week. And why? Because of inspired assistance? Because of an organized movement to promote its growth? Not entirely.

 WHY HUN PROPAGANDA THRIVES.

 Pro-German propaganda exists and thrives today because of the innocent aid lent it by honest-to-goodness Americans like yourself.

 To illustrate -
 Jim, your friend, drops in for a chat. Business gossip is traded, and then he leans over and says, "Say Bill, did your the 'latest'? I got it pretty straight that a German submarine sank a transport just outside New York Harbor."

 Immediately that tale has gained another tongue. Maybe you don't believe it, neither does Jim, but you whisper it once, twice - and it is off on its way. Another week and it has spread across the entire country.

 THE RESULTS.

 In its wake, hundreds of mothers shiver in dread for their enlisted sons, fathers curse a careless convoy, dissatisfaction and criticism become rife, stocks quiver - and somewhere a German propagandist laughs at "those fool Americans."

 Though that tale was a transparent falsehood, its growth and damnable results would have been utterly impossible without the widespread promotion lent it by us unthinking tale-bearers.

 Sheer rumor - fanned and speeded on its way by such as you and me - impeded enlistments of 1917, hampers the Red Cross in 1918, and, if unchecked, bids fair to hamstring the country with fear and falsehood in 1919. Lafayette Daily Advertiser 7/24/1918.


 From the Lafayette Daily Advertiser of July 24th, 1968:

BUILDING DELAYED FOR USL STADIUM.

 By JIM BRADSHAW.
Advertiser Staff Reporter.

 Contractors for construction of the proposed new athletic stadium for the University of Southwestern Louisiana say there will be a delay.

 An August 1 target date had been set for the groundbreaking for the new stadium, but a spokesman for the Milton Womack Construction Co., Baton Rouge, told The Advertiser that he has not yet received the green light to begin construction, and that they have yet received no word.

 He said funding proposals have to be reviewed by the state before permission is granted for construction. This review is now in progress?

 He could not comment when this review would be finished, but said it would be several weeks after they receive permission before construction could begin.

 He indicated the holdup was just normal red tape and that the program was not in jeopardy.

 Officials at the university had no official comment, but confirmed that it would be almost impossible to begin on the anticipated date.

 Indications are that the state board will have to approve the interim funding proposal under which construction could begin. The board meets again August 7.

 If action is taken by the board at that meeting, construction could begin about August 20.

 Womack was low bidder for the stadium at $3,980,000. A total of 4.1 million has been approved by the legislature for the athletic complex.

 Additionally, the legislature has approved a measure that would allow USL to sell bonds secured by Evangeline Downs race track at an interest rate of (unreadable words).

 There had been a limit of 5 per cent on the interest rate, making proposed bonds inequitable with the present market situation. Lafayette Daily Advertiser 7/24/1968.



LA.'S LARGEST EDUCATIONAL TV STATION SET AT USL THIS FALL.

 The largest and most sophisticated education television station in Louisiana will be on the air in this academic year at the University of Southwestern Louisiana, according to Dr. Clyde L. Rogeou, USL president.

 In addition to televising and telecasting educational lectures in freshman mathematics, English and nursing, the TV facility will also serve to train USL students in production techniques, in newscasting traffic or continuity writing.

 Plans also are to send the USL TV signal to All Channels Cable company from 6 to 9 p. m. for cultural and enrichment programs for its subscribers.

 Bernard W. Crocker, USL assistant professer of speech, radio and television, will serve as producer - director of the USL television curriculum. He has been at work for the past three and half years on the project to institute the USL television curriculum.

 "The USL Educational Television Station is and will be the only 2500 MHz system in the state which simply means that by broadcasting high up in the spectrum of 2500 MHz it is possible to microwave tele-courses and programs instead of of using cable," Cocker said. "It also means that we will be able to broadcast four programs simultaneously by microwave and one additional channel can be used by meas of cable with the studio."

 By means of microwave it will be possible to serve many of the surrounding  parishes with in-school courses. At the present time USL is formulating plans with St. Landry Parish to work in close cooperation with the USL Educational Television Station. Other parishes are showing interest and it is anticipated that within two years this installation could be serving five parishes with in-school courses with an emphasis on French.

 The USL educator explained that by putting the tele-courses (Nursing 100, Math 101 and English 102) on tape it will be possible to serve numerous sections of a particular course at the same time, thus conserving time and space. It is anticipated that the tape machines will be in almost constant operation twelve hours a day.

 The professor of a telecourse will be available in the classroom for possible direct questions by students following the viewing of his telecast.

 The entire TV facility the control room and studio, which is 36 by 45 feet, is now being set up in the Vernon L. Wharton medical sciences building. Crocker said that the studio will accommodate six sets or scenes at one time.

 The control room is 15 feet above the studio and is so designed for teaching purposes for the many USL radio and television majors learning the art and techniques of television production.

 Directly behind the control room is a 30-seat viewing area for students, faculty and visitors to observe through four monitors (receivers) every step taken in producing a live program. This is accompanied by a speaker system so that observers may also hear the director's commands as the program is developed on the studio floor.

 A Video Tape and Film Chain Room is on one side of the control room and houses a large commercial two-inch tape machine. There are also two 16 mm projectors and a slide drum accomodating 48 (two by two) slides.

 The TV facility will also have a complete set and scene shop as well as a TV Graphics shop.

 Certain areas of the Vernon L. Wharton Medical Sciences Building are equipped to receive television programs. There are also 21 rooms in Maxim Doucet Hall equipped for closed circuit TV reception.

 New courses will be added as well as channels as it becomes possible to expand the TV project and more classrooms will be equipped so that TV lectures may be beamed them, Dr. Rougeou said.

 Plans are to eventually have four channels able to operate simultaneously with USL televising into parish schools in cooperation with parish school teachers on the elementary and high school levels.

 The USL Educational Television Station, designed and created by Crocker, was made possible by money offered from two areas from the USL Mathematics Department through the incorporation of TV into Maxim Doucet Building, was able to offer money for the purchase of equipment for the station, and from the College of Nursing, which gave a large share of funds for the purchase of equipment as well as providing space in the nursing area of Vernon L. Wharton Building.

 Other members of the USL speech, radio - television facility who will be on the staff of the USL TV station will be W. Ernest Vincent, assistant professor, who will serve as producer-director and director of art, and Peter Mayeaux, instructor, news director and studio supervisor. It is anticipated that news casts will be possible through UPI.

 Crocker said that all crews on the studio floor and control room of the film chain will be students majoring in television. Lafayette Daily Advertiser 7/24/1968.


'LAFAYETTE DAY' IS SUNDAY IN HOUSTON'S ASTRODOME.

 The Houston Astros have scheduled eight special added attractions for their long 16 game homestand that begins this Friday (July 26) and continues through Sunday, August 11.

 Saturday, July 27 will be the "Louisiana Days" celebration with each fan receiving an autographed picture of New Orleans native Rusty Staub, and a pre-game musical show by the Astroworld Dixieland Band is set for 7:00 p.m. Louisiana Governor John McKeithen's representative will throw out the first ball and more than 100 Louisiana mayors will be in attendance. San Francisco's Juan Marichal is slated to start the Saturday night game for the Giants.

 Sunday will be "Lafayette Day" at the Dome with the City of Lafayette, La., ad its residents having the carpet rolled out for them on that day.

 Tickets are available in Lafayette at Sears, Roebuck and Co.

 The ducats are available in four different price ranges.

 Sunday, July 28, Sunday August 4 abd Sunday August 11 will all be "Family Days" with all children, 16 or under and accompanied by a parent, receiving a dollar reduction on box and reserved seats.

 Tuesday July 30 will be a special "Family Day" as the children receive the same discount, but there will be a prize of a color TV set to the largest family at the game. A "family" is defined as mother and father and their own children. The starting time for this game is 7:00 p. m., one half hour earlier than usual.

 Saturday, August 3 will be "Surprise Night" as the Astro take on the Philadelphia Phillies.

 Saturday, August 10 will be "Country Music Night" featuring a show at 6:30 p. m. by Buck Owens, country's No. 1 entertainer, sponsored for the Houston show by Houston's KIKK radio. The August 10 date with the Pittsburgh Pirates calls for a day game at 1:15 p. m., a night game at 7:30 p. m., which is a make up game previously postponed, and then a repeat of the Buck Owens show at the conclusion of the game.

 Sunday, August 11 will conclude the home stand and will be highlighted by a "Father-Son Game" as the Astros' players take on their own boys in a contest at 1. p. m.

 "Ladies Nights" are scheduled for each Wednesday with ladies receiving a dollar reduction on all tickets.

 Tickets are now on sale at the Astrodome, all five Foley's stores in Houston and Pasadena, most Trans-Texas Airways counters throughout the Southwest, and by writing: Tickets, Astrodome, Box 1691, Houston, Texas, 77001. Box seats are $3.50, reserved seats $2.50, enclose 25 cents for handling. Lafayette Daily Advertiser 7/24/1968.


FRESHWATER BAYOU CHANNEL SLATED FOR COMPLETION THIS SATURDAY.

 19.8-Mile Outlet To Gulf Completes 8-Year Project.

 ABBEVILLE - The 19.8-mile Freshwater Bayou channel outlet to the Gulf of Mexico will be dedicated to the development of a rich, oil and gas and agricultural  area in Vermilion Parish Saturday.

 Saturday will mark the culmination of construction work on the channel proper which was initiated on April 7, 1963, with the award of a channel-dredging contract.

 Saturday will mark the realization of a "dream for progress" which began July 14, 1960, when the 86th Congress approved the Freshwater Bayou project and the President signed it into law.

 The project for which completion ceremonies will be staged at an appreciation banquet in Abbeville Friday night and at the channel dedication program on the site Saturday morning is a 12-foot deep by 125-foot wide water route extending from the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near Intracoastal city to the Gulf of Mexico.

 The waterway, authorized by Public Law 86-645, generally follows the existing channels of Schooner Bayou Cutoff, Schooner Bayou, Six Mile Canal, Belle Isle Canal, and Freshwater Bayou.

 The national importance and dollar value of the oil-gas-sulpher-rich offshore area of the Gulf of Mexico are said almost incalculable, and the development of this offshore area is a marine operation, and, as such, demands a large number of specialized craft and personnel. The Freshwater Bayou area has been designated as the base from which such operations will be conducted economically, the base from which to handle materials, equipment, and personnel and perform necessary administration and control operations.

 In establishing a further need for the project, engineers declared that the Gulf shore from the mouth of the Atchafalaya River to the mouth of the Calcasieu River, a distance of about 125 miles, had no connection with the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway of sufficient depth to accommodate vessels used in offshore oil development. The lack of an adequate channel had resulted in the use of longer routes to the inland areas and consequent increased operation and transportation costs.

 Engineers long ago plugged for the channel by declaring that the Gulf area south of the waterway provides a quicker route to certain areas in the Gulf and gives fishermen a speedy avenue of refuge in the event of storms. The channel also opens additional areas to menhaden fishing.

 The project was designed by personnel of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers' New Orleans District and constructed under the supervision of Col. Thomas J. Bowen. The channel-dredging contract was let to William-McWilliams Industries Inc. A contract was awarded on June 29, 1065 to Farrell Construction Co. Inc., for the construction of the navigation lock. The estimated cost of the lock is $4,235,000.

 The estimated total cost of the project is $9,576,000, of which approximately $9.4 million was federal and $206,000 non-federal. Additionally, the U. S. Coast Guard provided navigation aids at a cost of approximately $23,000.

 Saturday will mark the realization of several well-meant efforts. The Vermilion Parish Police Jury has furnished assurances covering all requirements of local cooperation on the project. The jury as acquired all rights-of-way necessary for construction and have made them available to the United States.

 The operation of the Port of Abbeville Harbor and Terminal District, a duly authorized agency of the State of Louisiana. Lafayette Daily Advertiser 7/24/1968.

     





      










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