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Monday, January 12, 2015

**JULY 24TH M I




From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 24th, 2015:

Three People Killed - Nine Wounded - Lone Gunman Opens Fire In Lafayette Movie Theater Thursday Evening.



Lafayette police confirmed shortly before 8 p.m. law enforcement officers responded to a call about an active shooter at the Grand 16 Lafayette at 3141 Johnston St.

Lafayette Police Chief Jim Craft confirmed at least three people were killed, including the gunman, who died from a self-inflicted wound.

Two victims were pronounced dead at the scene. Nine were transported to area hospitals, eight by ambulance and one by private party. One victim died at a hospital.

The suspect was described by several witnesses as a white, middle-aged male. State Police said the shooter, whose identity was not released late Thursday, was 58 years old.

Mayhem in the theater.

“We heard a loud pop we thought was a firecracker,” Katie Domingue of Carencro said. She was at the 7 p.m. showing of “Trainwreck” with her fiance, Joshua Doggett, in Theater No. 14. About 20 minutes into the movie, Domingue said, she heard a loud noise.

She said she saw “an older white man” standing up and shooting down, not in her direction.

“He wasn’t saying anything. I didn’t hear anybody screaming either,” Domingue said.

She heard about six shots, she said, before she and Doggett ran to the nearest exit, leaving behind her shoes and purse.

The scene in the theater parking lot reflected the mayhem of the evening. News media had been moved offsite and were reporting from in front of a nearby coffee shop, Johnston Street Java. The parking lot itself was filled with emergency vehicles, including a Haz-Mat unit.

Authorities also closed down the Grand 14 on Kaliste Saloom in what they said was an exercise in caution. The parking lot was cleared shortly before 10 p.m. there, with four State Police units on the scene.

Randall Man, Acadian Ambulance VP of marketing, said 10 ambulances and 26 paramedics responded to last night's shooting.

Three more ambulances were standing by for relief at a nearby Albertsons.
The first ambulances responded within 7 minutes of the initial call.

“We don’t know if this was just a random act or whether it was a domestic situation,” Craft said, saying the investigation was not far enough along.

Victims identities not confirmed.

Authorities would not confirm the identities of those who were shot. But unconfirmed reports said the wounded included longtime Lafayette oilman Dwight S. “Bo” Ramsay, chairman of the board of Aries Marine Corp., and his wife, Gerri. The extent of their injuries was not revealed.

Some of the wounded were critically injured, authorities said, others had lesser wounds.

At least some of those who were shot were taken to Lafayette General Medical Center, Acadiana’s largest hospital. Lafayette General spokesman Daryl Cetnar said that by agreement with police, Lafayette General could not reveal whether the victims were taken there. He said the hospital would release a statement Friday.

But what appeared to be family members and friends of the victim milled around inside the Emergency Room. A Catholic priest was on the scene.

Jindal: 'This is an awful night.'

Gov. Bobby Jindal called for prayers Thursday evening during a press conference.

“The best thing anybody can do right now is to think about them, pray for them,” he said. “We will get through this. We are a resilient community. This is an awful night for Lafayette. This is an awful night for Louisiana. This is an awful night for the United States.”

n an issued statement, U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, R-Lafayette, said, “I’m saddened at the terrible loss of life represented in tonight’s tragic shooting at a movie theater in my hometown of Lafayette. Bridget and I are praying for the families and friends of the victims at this difficult time. I will work with the Lafayette Police Department, local, state and federal officials to get to the bottom of what happened tonight.”

'Blood everywhere'

Jalen Fernell, 20, of Lafayette, was in the Grand Theatre watching “Southpaw” with friends when he heard gunshots.

“They were very faint over the movie. I thought it was part of the movie,” Fernell said. “About five seconds later, sirens went off and I realized it wasn’t the movie.”

A voice over the intercom told moviegoers to evacuate the theater, Fernell said. Patrons, unaware of what happened, took off running, he said.

Outside the theater, police were everywhere late Thursday.

“I saw a woman lying on the ground outside with blood everywhere. She was shot in the leg,” Fernell said. “We didn’t know what to do. You’re scared to walk through the parking lot, You don’t know if the guy’s in a car, hiding in the parking lot.”

Additional police arrived at the scene and entered the building, armed with assault rifles, he said.

“I heard gunshots like a war going on,” Fernell said.

When the gunfire stopped, he heard from a police car radio that six people were down in Theater No. 14, he said.

More police arrived and charged inside; additional shots were fired. Fernell said he heard someone say the suspect was down; he had committed suicide.

In the theater where the shooting took place, Emily Mann, 21, was watching “Trainwreck,” seated in the second row from the top of the theater with a friend. He father, Randall Mann, said his daughter heard popping noises and noticed flashes coming from a gun that was held by a man in the same row on the other side of the theater.

Randall Mann is vice president of marketing and public relations at Acadian Ambulance. He said his daughter was not up to speaking about the incident Thursday night.

Mann said Acadian Ambulance transported eight patients to area hospitals. The company responded with 10 ambulances and off-duty personnel who heard about the shooting and showed up at the scene to help, he said.

The Grand Theatres in Lafayette and Broussard are owned by New Orleans-based Southern Theatres LLC.

The company operates multiplex stadium-seating movie theaters in Louisiana, Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

 Advertiser reporters Seth Dickerson, Jessica Goff, Claire Taylor, Herman Fuselier and Ken Stickney contributed to this report.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/2015.







Residents to Unite to Block Westboro Baptist Church From Picketing Victims' Funerals.



Lafayette residents have started a Facebook group to create a human wall around the funeral processions of two killed in a shooting at the Grand Theatre to keep the Westboro Baptist Church picketers away from the grieving families.
"It’s time to come together as a community," Lafayette resident Brandon Verret said. "There is no way we, as the Acadiana community, can allow Westboro to be anywhere near the funerals for victims of this tragedy. Our community does not deserve that, and more importantly the families do not deserve that."
More than 4,700 people had RSVP'd to the event as of 3 p.m. Friday.
The Westboro Baptist Church sent out a tweet earlier today implying that they are planning to picket the funerals of Mayci Breaux and Jillian Johnson, the two women killed Thursday night in the shooting at the Grand Theater. Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/2015.












From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 24th, 1907:


IMPROVEMENT OF VERMILION BAYOU.

Making it a Navigable Waterway from Railroad Bridge.

 Last Wednesday a committee from the Progressive League composed of Wm. Campbell, Dr. F. E. Girard, G. C. Babcock, T. M. Biossat, F. V. Mouton and W. A. LeRosen left on Dr. Girard's handsome gasoline launch to make an inspection of the Vermilion and to meet a committee from Abbeville to discuss measures to be taken looking towards improving the navigation of the bayou. Owing to a tree having fallen across the bayou about eight miles below Lafayette, the boat was unable to proceed to Hunter's Canal, the meeting place. The following day, however, the Abbeville committee was communicated with by phone and a report was then made to the League which adopted the following resolution:

 "Whereas, in section 2 of the Rivers and Harbors Bill passed by the second session of the Fifty-ninth Congress, it says;  "improving the channel, bay and passes of Bayou Vermilion and Mermentau River and tributaries, Louisiana, for maintenance, $25,000; section 3, that the Secretary of War is hereby directed to cause preliminary surveys or examinations to be made of the following localities: Bayou Vermilion to Lafayette, with a view of obtaining six feet of water, be it.

 "Resolved, That we, the Board of Directors of the Lafayette Progressive League, hereby respectfully ask and urgently request Captain J. F. McIndoe, U. S. A., to use his best endeavors to visit our section at his earliest convenience, and that he seriously consider our present necessity and give the matter his prompt attention; that the Secretary is instructed to send a copy of these resolutions to Captain McIndoe, with our pledge of any assistance in our power."

 Committees were appointed to report as soon as possible on the following subjects:

 Steamboat tonnage between Lafayette and New Orleans, via Morgan City and Houma; conference with similar committee from Abbeville for the purpose of securing six feet of water from Lafayette to the Gulf.

 The League strongly endorsed the course of Hon. R. F. Broussard in securing appropriations for this work, and expressed their appreciation of his tender of acceptance. A resolution complimentary of Hon. H. L. Gueydan was also adopted, and that gentleman thanked for his valuable service in furthering this and other public enterprises.

 The trip down Vermilion bayou showed that a comparatively small cost, the bayou could be made a valuable stream. From the railroad bridge down a width of from fifty feet to one hundred feet was easily possible and sufficient depth to render it navigable the year round.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/1907.

       



From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 24th, 2015:


Three People Killed - Nine Wounded - Lone Gunman Opens Fire In Lafayette Movie Thursday Evening.



Lafayette police confirmed shortly before 8 p.m. law enforcement officers responded to a call about an active shooter at the Grand 16 Lafayette at 3141 Johnston St.

Lafayette Police Chief Jim Craft confirmed at least three people were killed, including the gunman, who died from a self-inflicted wound.

Two victims were pronounced dead at the scene. Nine were transported to area hospitals, eight by ambulance and one by private party. One victim died at a hospital.

The suspect was described by several witnesses as a white, middle-aged male. State Police said the shooter, whose identity was not released late Thursday, was 58 years old.

Mayhem in the theater.

“We heard a loud pop we thought was a firecracker,” Katie Domingue of Carencro said. She was at the 7 p.m. showing of “Trainwreck” with her fiance, Joshua Doggett, in Theater No. 14. About 20 minutes into the movie, Domingue said, she heard a loud noise.

She said she saw “an older white man” standing up and shooting down, not in her direction.

“He wasn’t saying anything. I didn’t hear anybody screaming either,” Domingue said.

She heard about six shots, she said, before she and Doggett ran to the nearest exit, leaving behind her shoes and purse.

The scene in the theater parking lot reflected the mayhem of the evening. News media had been moved offsite and were reporting from in front of a nearby coffee shop, Johnston Street Java. The parking lot itself was filled with emergency vehicles, including a Haz-Mat unit.

Authorities also closed down the Grand 14 on Kaliste Saloom in what they said was an exercise in caution. The parking lot was cleared shortly before 10 p.m. there, with four State Police units on the scene.

Randall Man, Acadian Ambulance VP of marketing, said 10 ambulances and 26 paramedics responded to last night's shooting.

Three more ambulances were standing by for relief at a nearby Albertsons.
The first ambulances responded within 7 minutes of the initial call.

“We don’t know if this was just a random act or whether it was a domestic situation,” Craft said, saying the investigation was not far enough along.

Victims identities not confirmed.

Authorities would not confirm the identities of those who were shot. But unconfirmed reports said the wounded included longtime Lafayette oilman Dwight S. “Bo” Ramsay, chairman of the board of Aries Marine Corp., and his wife, Gerri. The extent of their injuries was not revealed.

Some of the wounded were critically injured, authorities said, others had lesser wounds.

At least some of those who were shot were taken to Lafayette General Medical Center, Acadiana’s largest hospital. Lafayette General spokesman Daryl Cetnar said that by agreement with police, Lafayette General could not reveal whether the victims were taken there. He said the hospital would release a statement Friday.

But what appeared to be family members and friends of the victim milled around inside the Emergency Room. A Catholic priest was on the scene.

Jindal: 'This is an awful night.'

Gov. Bobby Jindal called for prayers Thursday evening during a press conference.

“The best thing anybody can do right now is to think about them, pray for them,” he said. “We will get through this. We are a resilient community. This is an awful night for Lafayette. This is an awful night for Louisiana. This is an awful night for the United States.”

n an issued statement, U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, R-Lafayette, said, “I’m saddened at the terrible loss of life represented in tonight’s tragic shooting at a movie theater in my hometown of Lafayette. Bridget and I are praying for the families and friends of the victims at this difficult time. I will work with the Lafayette Police Department, local, state and federal officials to get to the bottom of what happened tonight.”

'Blood everywhere'

Jalen Fernell, 20, of Lafayette, was in the Grand Theatre watching “Southpaw” with friends when he heard gunshots.

“They were very faint over the movie. I thought it was part of the movie,” Fernell said. “About five seconds later, sirens went off and I realized it wasn’t the movie.”

A voice over the intercom told moviegoers to evacuate the theater, Fernell said. Patrons, unaware of what happened, took off running, he said.

Outside the theater, police were everywhere late Thursday.

“I saw a woman lying on the ground outside with blood everywhere. She was shot in the leg,” Fernell said. “We didn’t know what to do. You’re scared to walk through the parking lot, You don’t know if the guy’s in a car, hiding in the parking lot.”

Additional police arrived at the scene and entered the building, armed with assault rifles, he said.

“I heard gunshots like a war going on,” Fernell said.

When the gunfire stopped, he heard from a police car radio that six people were down in Theater No. 14, he said.

More police arrived and charged inside; additional shots were fired. Fernell said he heard someone say the suspect was down; he had committed suicide.

In the theater where the shooting took place, Emily Mann, 21, was watching “Trainwreck,” seated in the second row from the top of the theater with a friend. He father, Randall Mann, said his daughter heard popping noises and noticed flashes coming from a gun that was held by a man in the same row on the other side of the theater.

Randall Mann is vice president of marketing and public relations at Acadian Ambulance. He said his daughter was not up to speaking about the incident Thursday night.

Mann said Acadian Ambulance transported eight patients to area hospitals. The company responded with 10 ambulances and off-duty personnel who heard about the shooting and showed up at the scene to help, he said.

The Grand Theatres in Lafayette and Broussard are owned by New Orleans-based Southern Theatres LLC.

The company operates multiplex stadium-seating movie theaters in Louisiana, Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

 Advertiser reporters Seth Dickerson, Jessica Goff, Claire Taylor, Herman Fuselier and Ken Stickney contributed to this report.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/2015.







Residents to Unite to Block Westboro Baptist Church From Picketing Victims' Funerals.



Lafayette residents have started a Facebook group to create a human wall around the funeral processions of two killed in a shooting at the Grand Theatre to keep the Westboro Baptist Church picketers away from the grieving families.
"It’s time to come together as a community," Lafayette resident Brandon Verret said. "There is no way we, as the Acadiana community, can allow Westboro to be anywhere near the funerals for victims of this tragedy. Our community does not deserve that, and more importantly the families do not deserve that."
More than 4,700 people had RSVP'd to the event as of 3 p.m. Friday.
The Westboro Baptist Church sent out a tweet earlier today implying that they are planning to picket the funerals of Mayci Breaux and Jillian Johnson, the two women killed Thursday night in the shooting at the Grand Theater. Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/2015.





 From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 24th, 1907:

LECTURE ON LIQUOR TRAFFIC.

 Dr. S. A. Smith, of the Anti-Saloon League of New Orleans Speaks Sunday Night at the Court House.

 He Presents the Advantages of Prohibition and Solicits Subscriptions for Aiding the Work of the League.

 Dr. S. A. Smith, of the Anti-Saloon League of New Orleans delivered an interesting lecture on the liquor traffic Sunday night at the court house. Only a small audience was present. Dr. Smith made a brief statement of the spread of the prohibition movement showing the extent in the United States that liquor had been voted out, saying the sentiment against the liquor traffic was growing rapidly. He then spoke of the extent of prohibition in Louisiana, stating that with the exception of Shreveport and Monroe and small strip of Mississippi, every part of the State north of Red River was dry, and further that agitation for prohibition in the southern half had begun and in the near future several more parishes would become dry. He then went on to show wherein prohibition, the figures being almost double under prohibition. He also stated that businessmen declared that business was much better without liquor and that they would not be willing to again have liquor sold in their parishes. He also spoke of the evil effects of the liquor traffic, asserting that it was responsible for most of the crimes committed and that it cost the parishes more than the revenue derived from it. He declared that the objection to prohibition that it did not prohibit was not a valid one, for if it were then the law against murder should also be repealed for it did not prevent murder and further there are other laws which are violated and applying the same reasoning as against prohibition, those laws should not be enacted. Laws are made to be enforced and the officers can enforce them, therefore the prohibition laws van not be enforced as other laws. That does not necessarily mean that no "blind tigers" will exist, for some men will violate laws, we must simply have officers that will punish all violators of the law.

 Dr. Smith is an entertaining talker and held the interest of his audience closely during the hour and half he spoke. He lectured here with the purpose of creating interest in the work of the Anti-Saloon League and securing subscriptions for its support.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/24/1907.

      







...News from Exchange Papers...

A TRIAL OF STRENGTH.  A Montreal, Canada, dispatch thus reports the trial of strength between Cyr and Miller: 'The great contest between Louis Cyr, the champion strong man, and Sebastian Miller, attracted a large crowd on June 30th.

 Both men were admitted to be men of mighty strength, and the struggle for supremacy was eagerly looked forward to by many Montrealers. The scales, upon which were weighed the barrels of iron lifted by the men, showed that Miller tipped them at 214 pounds and Cyr at 301 pounds. Miller's dumb bell weighed 232 1/2 pounds, and this he raised with both hands. Yet it waa easy work for Cyr to lift it above his head no less than four times in quick succession with only one arm. In commencing the back lift both men raised 1,700 pounds, then 2,000, then 2,400, and here Miller quit, while Cyr piled on the weight until he lifted 3,192 pounds. When it came to lifting a barrel of cement Cyr easily put 314 pounds upon his shoulder with one arm and without the help of his knees. The stone breaking contest and lifting of a heavy barrel by the chime was, won by Miller. In these cases, however, it was evident that Miller had carefully practiced the tricks required to win the contest, and Cyr readily acknowledged that his opponent could do better than he. The champion Cyr, beat his opponent without any trouble in all contests which required main strength, and no one can as yet be found who dare question Cyr's claim as the strongest man the world knows to-day.


Original source unknown. Published in the Lafayette Advertiser 7/18/1891.     
  

       

The Recruitment of Indians.

The original proposition to recruit a regiment of Indians for the regular army has already been modified to raising a few companies of 100 men each, to be regularly uniformed, drilled and disciplined.

 This change,  the New York Times thinks, is evidently an improvement, "because the duties required of the Indians are not of a kind to demand a regimental organization. On the contrary, the presence of a whole regiment of red men in or near a white community would be a source of uneasiness, and the prevailing sentiment of our people would not countenance their being used in warfare against any but their own race. It is therefore apparent that their field or usefulness is limited, even if within that field, and particularly in trailing, their excellence is beyond dispute.  Modified as it is, the experiment will be interesting. Two troops of Indian cavalry are to be raised, the first by Lieutenant E. W. Casey, Twenty-second Infantry taking his existing company of about a dozen scouts at Fort Keogh as a nucleus, and recruiting it to about a hundred from the Northern Cheyennes of the Rosebud and Tongue River Reservation near by. A similar troop may be raised in General Merritt's department. This plan will require no change in the existing laws, since a still greater body of Indian scouts is now authorized by statute."

 Published in the Lafayette Advertiser 7/12/1890.




FEMALE JURISTS. - Chief Justice Fuller's daughter, Mildred, who was graduated the other day from Wellesley, is to study law under her distinguished father, and to appear, like a second "Portia," in the courts of Justice. Two or three women lawyers have been admitted to practice before the Supreme Court, and no doubt pretty Miss Mildred will be found "duly" qualified to practice law before the Honorable, the Supreme Court of the United States." Senator Wade Hampton's daughter is studying to be a professional nurse ;  Judge Kelley, the "Father of the House," has a young daughter who is a regular practicing physician ;  Representative Breckenridge has one who is a trained teacher in the public schools ; and if these young women keep up, there will have to be a fund to support the professional men who have been crowded out of a living by them. The Chief Justice's family are going to New Rochelle in July for the summer, where Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland will be there guests.

 From the New York Press and in the Lafayette Advertiser 7/13/1899.






A ROUNDABOUT CALL.
Waking a Sleepy Operator by a Cable Dispatch.

There is a good story about a telegraph operator who once worked the land wires in the Duxbury (Mass.) cable office, going to sleep one night and a message having to be sent six or seven thousand miles to wake him up. The operator is now a practicing physician in Cambridge, Mass., but before annexing M. D. to his name was one of the gilt-edge telegraphers of the country.

 One night while on duty in the Duxbury office he fell asleep at his key. The sleep was a sound one. The New York operator called till out of patience, when he sent a message to Boston requesting the chief operator in charge to tell Duxbury to answer New York. The sleeper, however, was as deaf to Boston's "Di," "Di," as to the impatient characters flashed on from New York.

 In the cable-room next to the sleeping operator was the cable artist. The room was dark and he was watching the mirror for the tiny sparks that in those days went to make up a message. To him the Morse alphabet was all Greek, so the sleeper slept on.

 Seeing no other way out of the muddle and thinking the operator asleep, New York called Canso in Nova Scotia, and addressed a message to the cable operator at Duxbury. The message read:

 "Go into the other room and wake up that operator."

 Canso sent it to Heart's Content in Newfoundland ;  Heart's Content rushed it across to London, thence to Dover, and across the channel to Calais and to Brest. Brest kept it moving on to Miquelon, and Miquelon gave the cable operator at Duxbury a unique surprise. The sleeper was then aroused, about eleven minutes having been taken by the grand round of the cablegram. He tried to explain matters by telling New York that he was out of adjustment. The story didn't impress the officials as being truthful, and in a day or two there was a vacancy in Duxbury.

 From Donohue's Magazine and in the Lafayette Advertiser 7/14/1894.






BOTTLE PAPERS.
Obtain Knowledge of Ocean Currents for Marine Charts.

In order to add to the exact knowledge of ocean currents there are forms which are called "bottle papers." On these little papers an invitation, in six languages, is extended to the masters of vessels to enter occasionally upon the proper lines of the form the name of the vessel and her captain, the date, and the ship's position; and then to seal the paper in a bottle and cast into the sea. In other lines of this form a request is made, in the same six languages, that the finder will write clearly the exact place where, and date when, any bottle was picked up, and by whom, and then forward it to the hydrographic office at Washington, or to any of our consulates abroad. These bottles, of course, drift in the ocean currents. Some are picked up soon after they are thrown overboard, others drift for more than a year before being recovered. They furnish valuable records for more correctly fixing the currents already known.

 Day after day these reports are received by the meteorological office; each one is acknowledged promptly, and then given to the staff of workers known as nautical experts.

 The result of their labor is that on the last day of every month is issued a chart on which appears all the information received during the month that has gone. The chart, then, and a forecast for the month that is to follow.

 The prevailing winds to be expected, and their strength, as foretold by men of many years of experience, are also given for the month to come. The various sailing-routes best adapted for that month are mapped out, as well as the steamship routes adopted by the principal trans-Atlantic Steamship companies. Every floating wreck, with its position when last reported; each iceberg in its place as met with during the previous month, and the fog-banks, determined in the same way, are fixed and shown by marks. Besides all this, the latest charts that have been issued by the office, and the last "Notice to Mariners," are mentioned. In the upper left-hand corner is either a little chart prepared in addition on some subject of timely interest, or some further remarks about things upon the great chart itself.

 From Lieut. Commander Sturdy, in St. Nicholas and published in the Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1893.







Texas Militia and Repudiation.

 By an outrage unparalleled in the history of Texas legislation, a majority of one in the Senate has passed an infamous measure for the oppression of the people of that body; was opposed to the standing army, falsely called a militia bill. It is openly charged, and generally believed, that corrupt influences were used to bring over Senators who were susceptible of corrupt influences. It certainly is suspicious that the brother of Senator Mills was appointed to a lucrative office just before his change of heart. It was a strange sight to see the executive of the State, his wife and a hired lobby, on the floor demeaning themselves and desecrating the chamber and their lobby work. Tell us not that the people of Texas are rough -- Tell us not that they are uncouth -- cow boys, the most untutored among them, the roughest that ever drove cattle to Abilene would blush and hide his face to see such indecency committed by those who are his officers.

 We know that fourteen members were arrested, and five released to make a quotum. These five voted against the bill. They should have stood mute in their places. They ought  never to have permitted themselves thus to be used. Does any man suppose that the free people of Texas will submit to such measures? Does any man suppose that they will meekly sit still while their Senators are in prison ;  while fifteen men, some of them fresh from the rebel ranks, are wielding yokes upon their necks? If they do, they deserve it. If they do not exhaust every power that is given by the Federal constitution to American citizens ;  if they do not appeal to the Federal Government for protection ;  if they do not pledge themselves to repudiate every debt that is incurred in behalf of this or any similar law - and then they deserve to be ground between the mill-stones of tyranny ;  they deserve to have soldiers quartered at their houses, eat at their tables and sleep in their beds. If they submit to all this, they will deserve every indignity, for they will be slaves, not freemen. We are a law abiding people, but these are no laws, for they do not emanate from the source of law - the consent of the governed. Never was there an act of greater tyranny performed than just consummated ;  never an act of greater oppression perpetrated.

 Thank God, we hold the purse !

 From the Galveston Bulletin - Republican and in the Lafayette Advertiser 7/16/1870.







A STORY FOR YOUNG MEN. - Several years ago a youth of sixteen years, of good sense, and a fair English education, not having profitable employment at his father's home in Kentucky, sought for employment among his enterprising neighbors a few miles distant ;  and although wages were low in those days of gold and silver currency, he saved from his first year's wages $70. He was then seventeen years old, healthy, lively looking, aspiring and ambitious to become useful, noble and perhaps great. He had already learned that money loaned at high rates of interest was oppressive to the borrower, and reacted on the loaner, and in the falling of prices of nearly all articles in the commercial world ;  that men sought justification for their bankruptcy and delinquency in the fact that they had paid large rates of interest. Feeling, therefore, that a liberality, as well as justice, was necessary to every man's leading with his fellow men, he loaned his $70 to an exemplary, enterprising, and prosperous standing man in his neighborhood, at the lowest rate of interest known in business in that State, viz :  six per cent per annum. He worked another year, clothed himself in neat Kentucky jeans and other cheap but neat articles of apparel, and went to a country school three months in the winter of that year, and learned the rudiments of Latin and something of the higher branches of mathematics, working to a prosperous and liberal farmer of evenings to pay the board, and at the end of the second year, or when he was eighteen years of age, he had saved $96 more. His character of industry and integrity began to be better known in the neighborhood, and his services were sought for.

 He worked on a farm and rode as collector for trading men and the sheriff of his county ;  and at the end of his nineteenth you had saved $110 more. With the interest accumulated on his other two years' wages he had now $300, was comfortably clothed, and had a good business education, which he improved from one winter to another, till he became a scholar, both literally and scientifically. His influence and usefulness increasing he had, at the age of twenty years, $48o. At twenty-one he had accumulated $650, and was known for his activity of life, as a young man intelligence, virtue, and usefulness, as well as being a young man of very at attractive manners and ways.

 He moved to a western State where land was cheap, and entered 100 acres by a land warrant, which he purchased with $150 of his money. He made a good selection of land, in a good region of country ;  he used a portion of the balance of his money in improving his land, buying a little stock, and a few implements for farming, and the second year he raised a small crop.

 Having gone to his new neighborhood with about $400 in money, and used it cautiously, by degrees he gained the name of a responsible citizen and a good paymaster, and his influence rose gradually from his appearance among his new and scattering neighbors. Year after year he raised a crop, continuing to read the best newspapers, periodicals, and books which still further improved his mind, till sheep, cattle and other stock grew up in flock around him, more land adjoining him being purchased from time to time, till now he finds himself, when scarcely arrived at the middle of life, a gentleman fumer of wealth, surrounded by comfort and many luxuries, esteemed by neighbors both far and near, and would receive the suffrage of those who know him to any office for which he might be nominated, irrespective of party politics, so firm in their confidence in both his ability and integrity.

Original source unknown.  Published in the Lafayette Advertiser 7/17/1869.



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