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Monday, January 12, 2015

**MAY 12TH M C





  From the Lafayette Gazette of May 12th, 1900:



'TWILL BE DARK.

 Operation of the electric light plant will be stopped at 12 o'clock to-night for the purpose of cleaning the boiler. Bear this in mind and if you should stay out late to-night and happen to run against a chair do not invoke the powers of the sulfurous regions to inflict eternal punishment on the engineer at the power house because the electric lamp refused to illuminate your bed chamber. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.



W. P. FIFE,


The Drummer Evangelist, Will Hold a Series of Meetings in Lafayette.

 Mr. W. P. Fife, the drummer evangelist, of North Carolina, will be in Lafayette Sunday. During his stay here he will hold a series of meetings. To-morrow morning at 11 o'clock he will hold the first meeting at Falk's hall.

 Mr. Fife is an evangelical preacher of national reputation. He is said to be a man of much eloquence and always be able to interest an audience. Wherever he has spoken the people of all congregations have turned out in large numbers to hear him.

 We are told by the press that Mr. Fife has persuaded thousands of hardened sinners to abandon the wicked ways of the world and seek salvation in the straight and narrow path. At Newville, Pa., Mr. Fife caused him hundreds of conversations and gave the whole town a thorough spiritual shaking up.

 One feature of the meetings which can not fail to please even those not religiously inclined will be the singing by a choir composed of a hundred trained voices. This department will be under the direction of Mr. R. E. Johnson, formerly of the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.









FIREMEN WILL TAKE PART.

 The fire department of the town held a meeting at Falk's hall last Monday with Judge Debaillon in the chair. The following resolution, given us by Secretary F. V. Mouton for publication, were adopted:

 Moved by Mr. Campbell, seconded by Mr. Schmulen, that the fire department of the town of Lafayette turn out in full uniform on the day fixed for the laying of the corner stone of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute.

 Resolved that it is the sense of the Fire Department of Lafayette, that all business houses be closed during the ceremonies of the laying of the corner stone of the Industrial Institute and that the chief of the fire department give public notice in the local press of the date and hour of the celebration. Be it further resolved that the chief here on that day to the fire departments of the neighboring towns of Southwest Louisiana. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.


 Painted the Town.

 Several young men became hilarious last Thursday night and proceeded to paint the town in a color of deep red. Bridges were turned topsy-turvy, inoffensive sign-boards were exchanged and other evidences were not wanting to show that the boys had indulged in their time-honored usages. Aside from the commission of these youthful indiscretions no damage was done. At this writing the town authorities are negotiating with the revelers and it is probable that a suitable indemnity will be paid to satisfy the municipal honor and incidentally to help defray the costs of running the town. Of course the young men who would indulge in high grade sports should be willing to pay the cost of court. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.



 Musical Lafayette.

 G. W. Peters, the energetic representative of Philip Werlein, has been in Lafayette this week. He has succeeded in selling some handsome pianos to citizens of the town. He has sold to Mr. C. D. Caffery the highest grade Mathushek upright piano, finished in French burl walnut. The Mathushek piano stands strictly upon its merits. Its enduring qualities, sweetness of tone, easy action, commend it to the public as being the piano best adapted to this climate. Messrs. A. E. and Thos. Hopkins, Jr., took advantage of Mr. Peters' presence here and bought beautiful high grade pianos.

 Mr. Peters is anxious to place many more patrons into this town and he will be please to entertain any propositions from the citizens of Lafayette. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.



HYPNOTISM.

 Prof. Laurence Kenner gave a hypnotic exhibition at Falk's opera-house last Tuesday. Paul Robichaud, a young man of this town, was hypnotized by Prof. Kenner at 2 o'clock in the afternoon and placed on a cot in one of Levy Bros'. windows where he remained until 9 o'clock, all the while being under hypnotic influence. At the hour of nine he was taken to the opera-house, placed on the stage and awakened, after having been asleep about seven hours. Several other young men were called to the stage. All, excepting two, were hypnotized and made to go through some amusing performances.

 If asked our opinion as to whether the boys were really hypnotized or not we will readily confess our inability to either deny or affirm.

 The Gazette does not pretend to be acquainted with things "beyond the veil" and is blissfully ignorant of the occult sciences. Prof. Kenner may be a hypnotist for that is possible, but we can not say if our young friend, Paul Robichaud, was sleeping or not. At any rate he performed a wonderful feat by remaining seven hours in the show window without opening his eyes and without once changing his position. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.



The Ladies' Club Entertained.

 The Ladies' Tea Club was most royally entertained by Miss Lizzie Parkerson on Thursday, May 10, and never was a more enjoyable meeting participated in that was this "Evening with Tennyson."

 The program consisted entirely of selections from this celebrated English poet, whose memory is so tenderly cherished by all, and whose sweet poems have become indispensable to every household whose inmates are lovers of the beautiful.

 A brilliant instrumental selection by Mrs. T. M. Biossat very fittingly opened the entertainment, after which a biographical sketch of Tennyson was read by Mrs. R. B. Raney, recalling to the minds of every one the sweet, pure life which he led amid rural scenes where he received his first inspiration, and where some of his grandest odes to nature were written. A vocal solo by Miss Lizzie Mudd was the next number on the program, which was followed by "The May Queen," read by Mrs. T. N. Blake in a most rhythmic manner, displaying the childish simplicity of this ever-familiar poem. Mrs. C. D. Caffery then favored the audience with a spirited march, at the conclusion of which guests repaired to the spacious dining room, where, amid the sweet odor of the bright-hued flowers and the mild glow of waxen tapers, cooling refreshments were generously partaken of. All agog with eager anticipation the guests reassembled in the parlor to witness the grand finale of the evening - a tableau representing Tennyson's "Dream of Fair Women."

 Soon the sweet strains of a violin duet accompanied by the minor chords of the piano, were heard and the heavy damask curtains rolled aside revealing Helen of Troy, "a daughter of the gods, divinely tall and most divinely fair," whose classic features assumed more and more the hue of marble, and the scornful tones of the stately Iphigenia fell upon her ear in withering reproach.

 Suddenly another voice, deeply musical, cried, "Come here that I may look on thee!" and as a small curtain was drawn aside, the Oriental beauty of the dusky Cleopatra was seen as she reclined on her couch in luxuriant indolence.

 Scarce had her haughty tones died away ere the clear ring of a tambourine was heard, and a sweet vision of Jeptha's daughter, who died to save her father's vow, was disclosed to admiring eyes, and as the brave little Hebrew maiden went to her sacrifice joyously singing, "Glory to God," all hearts were touched. The graceful form of Rosamond "whom men called fair," now advanced shrinking from the "dragon eyes of angered Eleanor," who offered the choice of the poisoned cup of the dagger. In the background stood Joan of Arc with sword and shield uplifted, and near her stood the devoted daughter of the ill-fated Sir Thomas Moore in sombre robes, while kneeling and supporting the noble head of her husband, drawing forth the poison from his wound with her balmy breath, was Queen Elinor.

 So dazzling was the beauty of the scene, that for a few seconds after the curtain rolled back not a sound was heard, but when the audience recovered their bewildered senses round after round of applause attested their keen appreciation of the beautiful, and everyone felt that Alfred Tennyson has long since passed into the Great Beyond, he still lives in the "Dream of Fair Women."

 Mrs. T. B. Hopkins, Jr., was an ideal Helen and Mrs. DeLaney as Iphigenia was equally well adapted to her role. Mrs. Crow Girard was a typical Cleopatra, and Mrs. F. E. Girard a most charming representation of Jeptha's daughter. Miss Parkerson as Rosamond was indeed fair to look upon, while Mrs. T. M. Biossat exhibited with true histrionic talent the angered Eleanor. Mrs. W. A. LeRosen, as Joan of Arc, was most martial in her appearance, clad in military robes, and Miss Flo Ramsey was the true, sad-eyed daughter of Sir Thomas Moore.

 Mrs. T. N. Blake was indeed regal in her queenly robes, as Queen Elinor, while Mr. J. Caffery was a most excellent King Edward.

 The Club was very glad to entertain Mrs. J. Nickerson, Mrs. Wm. Clegg, Mrs. Biossat, of Alexandria, and Miss Lillie Kittredge, of Thibodaux, as their guests. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.






 Going Back to Italy.

 Felix Canatella, who has been in the employ of the Crescent News Hotel Company at this place, will leave to-morrow for his home in Italy which he has not visited since fourteen years. Mr. Canatella came here when a mere child and is so attached to the country that it is his intention to return after a stay of several months at his old home where his mother is still living. Mr. Canatella has not seen his mother since the year of the Chicago fair when she visited America. The Gazette wishes him a pleasant voyage. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.



THE FINANCES OF THE TOWN.

 At the last meeting of the Council the treasurer, Mr. F. V. Mouton, submitted an admirable report, showing the receipts and disbursement of the town during twelve months ending April 30, 1900. Mr. Mouton has evidently devoted much time to this work. It is gotten up in a manner that does him much credit.

 Be reference to Mr. Mouton's report we are permitted to see at a glance the financial condition of the town.

 During the year the revenues of the town amounted to $18,097.44. In this is included the sum of $4,085.20 derived from the special tax.

 In view of these handsome revenues one would naturally expect to be told that the town is in possession of considerable cash, but the absence of any good-sized balance in the municipal treasury is explained by the unusually heavy demands upon it. The treasurer's report shows that the smallpox epidemic cost the the $2,080.16. It became necessary to bore a new artesian well at the power-house, for which $1,010.60 were expended. Add to these two items the $700 appropriated for the Industrial Institute and it will be shown that these three unlooked-for expenditures make up $3,790.76. Had it not been necessary to spend this money to meet unavoidable exigencies, the town treasury would to-day be in flourishing condition.

 The Gazette would be pleased to print the report in its entirety, but it is unable to so and will give the following recapitulation of the different items in bulk:

 ------------------p.  2-----------------

 Since its induction into office the present Council has displayed conspicuous efficiency. The finance committee composed of Messrs. Geo. DeBlanc, C. O. Mouton and H. H. Horhorst, has been particularly diligent in the discharge of its very important duties. It has devoted much time to familiarize itself with the fiscal department of the town government and we have every reason to believe that it will soon have acquired a thorough knowledge of this most vital branch of the municipality.

 It is easily seen that with an annual revenue of $18,000, which will no doubt increase with the growth of the community, the authorities will be able to defray the running expenses of the town and make necessary improvements and appropriations improvements and at the same time pay the bonds as they become due. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.

  


A SUGGESTION.

 Before entering upon the discharge of their duties the members of the incoming Police Jury and School Board will do well to profit by the experience of their predecessors. There has been a tendency in these parochial bodies to leave to each member the administration of the affairs of his ward.

 The Police Jury is to the parish what the Legislature is to the State. A Police Juror represents his ward, but he is not clothed with the authority to legislate for that ward. It is very natural that his suggestion and recommendations respecting the affairs of his ward should receive consideration to which they are entitled, but there is no reason to accept them blindly and without looking into their merits. If the law intended to vest the Juror with unlimited power to be exercised without consulting the judgment of his colleagues there would be no need of holding meetings. That there has been an inclination among the present Police Jurors to allow each member to run thins as he deemed proper has been clearly shown on several occasions. However, we are pleased to state, that there has been a marked improvement in this respect within the last year. This method of carrying on the business of the parish leads inevitably to one result. A member who desires to do certain things in his ward will not deny to another member the same privileges lest he will be shorn of this power. The consequence is that every Juror is given authority never contemplated by the law. If not much injury has been caused by this policy or lack of policy it is because the majority of the Jurors are good men and did not abuse of their power. This is creditable to the Jury, but it is no recommendation of the method employed. Police Jurors should bear in mind that while they are elected to represent certain wards they are called upon to legislate for the whole parish.

 What we have said of the Police Jury is equally true of the School Board. In this body there seems to have been a tacit agreement among the members to allow each representative to name all the teachers in his ward. There is no reason why a School Director should appoint the teachers for his ward. In a matter so important, we believe it wiser to rely upon the judgment of the Board than upon the judgment of a single member who is at best but human and may be influenced by personal reasons. The selection of school teachers is a duty too serious to be trifled with and too grave to be neglected.

 The Gazette believes that if the incoming Police Jury and School Board will do away with this system or method which places into the hands of the ward representative powers which do not belong to him there will be no reason to complain of the change. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.



City Council Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., May 7, 1900. - The City Council met this day in regular session with Mayor Campbell presiding. Members present: C. O. Mouton, J. O. Mouton, F. Demanade, J. E. Martin, F. E. Girard, Geo. DeBlanc and H. H. Hohorst.

 The minutes of last meeting were read and approved with the following correction:

 Moved by Geo. DeBlanc, seconded by F. Demanade, that petition of citizens from McComb addition praying for a crossing on Second street be accepted and a committee of three be appointed to take immediate action on same and report to the Council at next regular meeting.

 Moved by C. O. Mouton, seconded by J. O. Mouton, that further time be granted committee on railroad crossing and in invitation be extended Mr. W. F. Owens, Supt. of the Southern Pacific railroad, to attend the next regular meeting. Motion carried.

 Moved by J. O. Mouton, seconded by F. E. Girard, that treasurer's report be accepted and placed on minutes. Motion carried.

FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT.

 Lafayette, La., April 30, 1900. - To the City Council of the town of Lafayette, La. - Gentlemen: Your finance committee respectfully report that they have this day examined the books of the collector and treasurer, checked off and cancelled the warrants of the latter office, finding all correct. The collections and disbursements since our last preceding report, Jan. 31, has been as follows:


----------------p. 4---------------------

 The collector has collected and paid into the treasury in taxes and licenses $1,338.80, which amount the Council should issue warrant in payment to date.
                         CHAS. O. MOUTON, GEO. DEBLANC, H. H. HOHORST.

 MAYOR'S REPORT.

 Lafayette, La., May 7, 1900. - To the Honorable the City Council of Lafayette, La. - I beg leave to make this my report of fines collected and bazaars from May 26, 1899, to May 7, 1900, as follows:

 --------------------p. 4------------------

 WM. CAMPBELL, Mayor.

 The following bills were approved:

 ---------------------p. 4-----------------

 Moved by C. O. Mouton, seconded by Geo. DeBlanc, that Dr. Girard be authorized to rent the land at the pest-house. Motion carried.

 Moved by Geo. DeBlanc, seconded by F. E. Girard, that the fireman at the waterworks plant be paid $5 a month more for wages. Carried.

 Moved by C. O. Mouton, seconded by Geo. DeBlanc, that the following resolutions be passed. Motion carried.

 At a meeting of the mayor and City Council of the city of Lafayette, La., duly called and held on the 7th day of May, 1900, at which a full chorum of the Council, together with the mayor and secretary of the city were present, the following resolution was duly passed and spread upon the records of said city:

 Whereas, The city of Lafayette, La., heretofore executed and delivered its waterworks and electric light bonds, in the aggregate sum of thirty-six thousand ($36,000) dollars, dated Sept. 1, 1896, being seventy- two (72) bonds of the denomination of five hundred ($500) dollars each, and bearing interest at six (6) per centum per anum, payable March 1, each year; and
    Whereas, The principal of bonds of said issue numbered 8, 9 and 10 due and payable March 1, 1899, and the principal of bonds of said issue numbered 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 due and payable March 1, 1900, all for five hundred ($500) dollars each as aforesaid and aggregating four thousand five hundred ($4,500) dollars, have not been paid and there is not sufficient funds in the treasury of said city which can be appropriated to the payment of the principal of said bonds;
   Now therefore be it resolved, That the mayor and secretary of said city be and they are hereby authorized and directed by and with the consent of the holder of said bonds, now past due as aforesaid, to execute and deliver to the holder of said bonds, new and additional coupons to be attached to said bonds, whereby the payment of the principal thereof shall be extended and become due as follows:

   Bond No. 8 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1901.
   Bond No. 9 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1902.
   Bond No. 10 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1902.
   Bond No. 11 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1903.
   Bond No. 12 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1903.
   Bond No. 13 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1904.
   Bond No. 14 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1904.
   Bond No. 15 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1905.
   Bond No. 16 shall be extended and become due March 1, 1905.

 And the mayor and secretary are hereby authorized and directed to execute said new and additional interest coupons for each for the years which intervene between March 1, 1900, and the new maturities, hereby affixed as above, for the payment of the principal of said numbered bonds, and when so executed, shall deliver said coupons to the owner of the said bonds.
WM. CAMPBELL, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.









 Police Jury Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., May 3, 1900. - The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: R. C. Landry, C. C. Brown, Alfred Hebert, Alonzo Lacy, Jno. Whittington, M. Billeaud, Jr., and Jno. E. Primeaux.  Absent: Ben Avant.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 Mr. Picard, of Vermilion, appeared and on behalf of the Vermilion authorities offered to purchase half interest in ferry at Olidon Broussard's. It was resolved that the proposition should not be accepted but that Vermilion parish should pay 50c. per day for the use of said ferry from the date of its establishment.

 Messrs. Picard and Laodis Broussard were appointed to dispose of all lumber and iron of the old bridge, not reserved for the use of the respective parishes.

 Messrs. C. C. Brown and R. C. Greig were appointed to examine the offices of the parish treasurer and tax-collector, cancel all vouchers and grant the collector and treasurer quietus on verification of their books and accounts.

 By motion the following was adopted: Resolved, That in view of the nonpayment of the special road and per capita tax, that each member be urged to collect said delinquent taxes through his respective road overseer with all costs and penalties provided.

 The sum of $16 was ordered paid to L. Allemand out of special fund, 3rd ward. The sum of $63.82 was ordered paid Jno. Landry and L. Broussard out of 4th ward special fund.

 To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of the parish funds since my last report:

------------------p. 3--------------------------

 Respectfully submitted,
                 J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.
Lafayette, La., May 3, 1900.
   
To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of special road tax since my last report:

 ------------------p. 3----------------------

 Respectfully submitted,
             J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.
Lafayette, La., May 3, 1900.

 The following accounts were approved:



-------------------p. 3------------------------


 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.





 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 5/12/1900.

 Of the many neat dwelling that have been built in Lafayette one of the neatest is that of Mrs. Frank Gardner. Contractor Anderson has recently made some additions to it making it one of the coziest and most comfortable homes in the town.

 The pastor and the officers of the Methodist Sunday School request the teachers and pupils to be present at the church at 10 o'clock on Sunday, May 13.

 Coca-Cola is a refreshing drink. Each year we find it to be more popular than the last. Moss Pharmacy.

 Ticket agents of Southern Pacific Sunset Route will sell excursion tickets to New Orleans, May 20 and 21, good to return until May 29, at unusually low rates, account Travelers' Protective Association convention.

 There will be a meeting of the Young People's Christian Temperance Union Sunday evening at 5 o'clock at the Methodist church. A large attendance is desired. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1900.




 From the Lafayette Advertiser of May 12th, 1894:


A PUBLIC FISH AND MEAT MARKET.




 Does Lafayette want to move forward? If we read aright the minds of its citizens they would at all times welcome innovations by the city fathers that could be looked upon as published improvements. If an innovation can be utilized as a source of public revenue at the same time that it contributes to the comfort and convenience of the residents of a community, it is to be regarded as doubly desirable. Can anyone deny that a public market-place in Lafayette would prove of inestimable value to the community? Aside from the great  convenience to the people that would be afforded by a bringing together for their inspection and accommodation the meat and fish intended for their daily consumption, is it not advisable, from a sanitary stand point, to place under police surveillance premises where are kept sale food matter subjected to composition? Proper regulations to insure the utmost cleanliness would be adopted and enforced to correct the disagreeable and unwholesome odors that almost always emanate from private meat and fish markets scattered indiscriminately about the town, especially during the hot months. We commend to our city council a serious consideration of the subject as it is to be regarded by them not so much in the light of a public convenience as a public requirement. Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.   



Lusted's Invention.

 Last Thursday morning a trial was made of Mr. Charles Lusted's invention for cutting grass off railroad beds. The experiment was conducted under the guidance of the inventor and in the presence of road master Watson and an intimate friend. The cutting apparatus was attached to an ordinary hand car and by eight o'clock, everything being in readiness, the little party pulled out of the Lafayette yard going eastward. Several patches of grass and weeds were promptly mowed down as the car with its ingenious attachment proceeded along and, while the first experiment showed that a number of features connected with the machine were capable of improvement, it also fully demonstrated, it also fully demonstrated that the working principle of the invention is correct and perfectly practical. Mr. Lusted, the inventor, who is one of Lafayette's highly esteemed citizens, is satisfied with the test made, which was intended to point out any defective features about his grass cutting machine, and does not doubt that he can readily remedy, these when he will give to the world the most useful and economical machine exact for cutting grass off railroad beds. Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.     


To Practice in Houston. - Dr. Roy Young, of Royville passed through Lafayette last Saturday, on his way to Houston, Tex., where he went to conclude all necessary arrangements preparatory to assuming his duties as an attaché of the hospital located in that city. It is the doctor's intention to make Houston his home. Laf. Advertiser 5/12/1894.
(It was St. Joseph's Hospital and was Houston's first and only hospital in 1894.) 


Greeting the Excursionists. - The Reception Committee appointed to meet the excursionists Sunday will please be promptly at depot on arrival of train. The excursionists will be conducted to the fair grounds where an address will be delivered.
Laf. Advertiser 5/12/1894. 


Tamping Dust for Excursionists. - To contribute to the greater comfort of the excursionists to-morrow, arrangements have been perfected for drenching Lincoln Ave. from the railroad track to the bank building, Vermilion street from the bank building to Washington street and Washington southward to main Street, thus ensuring a riddance of the great annoyance that would be occasioned by the dust on the principal and most direct route from the railroad station the church fair grounds. Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.





Advertiser on Drainage.

 At the last meeting of the Police Jury Mr. Ford Hoffpauir withdrew the resolution offered by him authorizing the appropriation of $400.00 to each ward in the parish, to be expended in  repairing the public roads. In lieu thereof the Police Jury adopted the report submitted by a committee on drainage appointed by that body some time ago. That committee suggested a division of the parish into eight drainage districts appointed by that body some time ago. That committee suggested a division into eight drainage districts corresponding with the eight wards of the parish, etc., (see the published proceedings in this issue) and to carry out the intention of the measure an appropriation of $200.o0 to each drainage district has been made and committees appointed to utilize the appropriations to the greatest advantage possible. This is moving in the right direction, and if the plan that stands adopted at present does remain open to some objections as viewed from our standpoint, nevertheless, it is a decided step forward in the matter of securing a more satisfactory system of public roads.

 Much of the good to be expected from the operation of this latest measure relative to the roads must depend on a proper understanding of the particular requirements of the different localities represented by the eight drainage districts, on the part of the persons on whom will devolve the duties explained in the resolution, and in their endeavor to carry out the ends of the means that have been chosen by the parish authorities let us hope that the several committees will act in entire unison and work with the utmost success.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.
     





MOUTON - BAULARD.

 Mr. Walter J. Mouton, of this place, and Miss Ann Eloise Boulard, of Galveston, were united in the hold bonds of marriage on the evening of the 7th inst. The ceremony was performed in the cathedral at Galveston, and much brilliancy was lent to the occasion by a large and fashionable attendance. The bride was attired in a beautiful silk costume of snowy whiteness, and, with the handsome groom in his becoming suit of black presented a truly attractive spectacle.

 After the ceremony the bridal party repaired to the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. C. L. Baulard, and partook of a most luxurious repast that had been prepared for their enjoyment. Gaeity, wit and good cheer reigned supreme until the hour of parting came, when, accompanied by a host of relatives and friends, the happy couple wended their way to the railroad depot, and at 7:30 o'clock, amidst a showering of good wishes, departed for their elegant home in Lafayette.

 The bride Miss Baulard, to whom the community extends a warm and cordial welcome, is a charming young lady of high connection in the city of Galveston, Texas. The groom, Mr. Mouton, belongs to one of the oldest and highly esteemed families and is a rising young business man of Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.




 City Council Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., May 7, 1894.

 The following members were present to wit: Wm. Campbell, Mayor; Andre Martin, A. T. Caillouet, Felix Demanade, A. Cayard and Henry Church.  Absent: John O. Mouton and A. Delahoussaye.

 The minutes of the last meeting and the report of the Finance committee were read and approved.

 Moved by Henry Church seconded by Alb. Cayard that the stock law be repealed for day time, and upon taking the vote it stood thus. Yeas:  H. Church and Alb. Cayard.  Nays: A. T. Caillouet, A. Martin and F. Demanade and said motion was lost.

 To the Hon. Mayor and Council of Lafayette, La., the undersigned Finance Committee having examined the books and reports of the treasurer and collector for the quarter ending April 3o, 1894, beg leave to make the following report to-wit:

 The treasurer's books show a cash Balance from last report Jan. 31, 1894 of ... $36.29

 Cash from John Vigneaux col. ...$250.00

 Cash from Wm. Campbell, mayor ... $126.50

 Cash from J. Vigneaux, Constable ... $700.00
                          Total $1,426.79.


Cr.

 Amount of warrants paid and cancelled by Finance Committee from Nos. 397 to 429 inclusive amounting to ... $1,023.79
       Cash on hand ... $413.79

 The collector's report shows amount of taxes collected on roll of 1892 ... 14.19 1/2
1893 ... 334.45 1/2

 Collected on Dog Tax and stock ... $5.00
 Licenses collected year 1894 ... $1,297.50
                      Total $1,651.15.

 Credit.

 March 9 by cash to treasurer ... $250.00
 March 17 ... $700.00
 April 30 ... $700.00
       Total $1,650.94

 Amount brought over ... $1,650.94
   By error ... $0.21
           Total ... $1,651.15

 We also find that the collector's commission on $1,651 at 6 per cent entitles him to $99.06 and that a warrant should be issued in his favor for that amount.

 We also find that the mayor has collected during last quarter 
   April 30, 1894: the sum of $37.00 which is to be accounted for by him ... $12.50
    Total ... $49.50

 Respectfully submitted,
         A. F. Caillouet, A. F. Cayard, Members of finance Committee.

 The following accounts were approved to-wit:

  John Vigneaux, salary 1 month - April 1894 ... $50.00
  Emile Romero, salary 1 month - April 1894 ... $50.00
  E. Campbell, salary 1 month ... $50.00
  E. Campbell and E. Romero hauling 18 dogs ... $9.00
  J. Vigneaux, handling 5 loads brick ... $2.50
  Aug. Degrez, lumber ... $13.56
 W. Clegg, cutting glass, burners &c., ... $6.30
  F. Demanade wicks and oil ... $4.45
  Lafayette Pub. Co, for quarter ending April 30 and printing blanks ... $45.75
  A. Nevue, quarter ending April 30 ... $37.50
  Gus Lacoste, 2 spades ... $1.70
  R. Rand, attending lamps ... $25.00
  I. N. Satterfield, hauling 15 loads of bricks ... $11.25
 W. Campbell, mayor salary 6 months ending Apr. 30, 1894 ... $75.00
 R. L. McBride, making bridge, repairing plank walk ... $43.10

 On motion the Council adjourned.
W. CAMPBELL, Mayor.
A. NEVUE, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.




MORE ON THE ROAD TO ABBEVILLE.
From Police Jury Proceedings
Continued From Last Week--May 5th, 1894.


 Then taking twenty feet on the northern line, of Odiede Mouton, wife of J. S. Mouton, along its about one arpent's length, which she hereby donates and dedicates to the parish for use as a public road from E. to F.
Signed :  Odeide Mouton, J. S. Mouton.

 Taking forty feet, across the property of Odeide Mouton, in a southernly direction along its five arpents length which she hereby donates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from E. to F.
Signed : Odeide Mouton, J. S. Mouton.

 Then taking forty feet on the property line of F. Lombard, following the R. R. from F. to G., along its about four arpents length, which he hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road as it now exists.
Signed F. Lombard, Witness Ed. G. Voorhies.

 Then taking forty feet, across the R. R. line, to Mrs. J. O. Mouton, about two arpents of F. Lombard's property from letter F. to G. which he hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road as it now exists.
Signed :  F. Lombard, Witness, Ed. G. Voorhies.

 Then taking forty feet, across the property of legal representatives of S. R. Wallace, along its four arpents length, which we hereby appropriate and dedicate to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $20.00 from letter G. to H.
Signed :  J. Wallis.

 Then taking forty feet across the property of Mrs. Oscar Dupuis along its one and a half arpents length which she hereby appropriates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from Letter H. to I.
Signed :  Estelle Comeaux Dupuis. Witness J. S. Broussard, Aymar Comeaux.

 Then taking forty feet, across the property of Baptiste Dupuis, along its one and half arpents length, which he hereby appropriate, and donates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter I. to J.
Signed :  Baptiste Dupuis, Witness Ed. G. Voorhies, J. O. Broussard.

 Then taking twenty feet on the southern line of Baptiste Dupuis along its one half arpent length which he hereby donates, and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter J. to K.
Signed :  Baptiste Dupuis. Witness, Ed. G. Voorhies, J. O. Broussard.

 The taking twenty feet on the northern line of Sevigne Sonnier, along its one half arpent length, which he hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter J. to K.
Signed :  Sevigne Sonnier. Witness :  Ed. G. Voorhies, J. S. Mouton.

Taking forty feet across the property of Sevigne Sonnier, in a Southerly direction along its four arpents length, which he hereby donates to the parish of Lafayette, for public use as a public road from letter K. to L.
Signed :  Signed Sevigne Sonnier. Witness :  E. G. Voorhies, J. S. Mouton.

 Then taking forty feet across the property of Onezime Broussard, southerly direction along its three length, which he hereby appropriates and donates, to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter L. to M.
 Signed :  Onez Broussard. Witness, Ed. G. Voorhies, A. Landry.

 Then taking twenty feet on the Southern line of Onezine Broussard easterly direction, along its twenty-one arpents length, which we hereby appropriate and dedicate to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $42.00 from letter M. to N.

 Then taking twenty feet on the Northern line of Mrs. Oscar Dupuis, direction easterly, along its twenty one arpents length which she hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road, from letter M. to N.
Signed :  Estelle Comeaux Dupuis. Witness J. S. Broussard, Aymar Comeaux.

 Then taking twenty feet on the southern line of Arthur Guidry direction easterly its six arpents length, which he hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter N. to O.
Signed :  Arthur Guidry, Onezine Broussard. Witness Ed. G. Voorhies, J. S. Mouton.

 Taking twenty feet on the northern line of William Meaux direction easterly along its six arpents length which he hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $12.00 (unreadable words) N. to O.
Signed : Alex Meaux Agt. Witness A. D. Verrot, Felix Meaux.

 Then taking twenty feet on the eastern line of William Meaux, direction southernly along its one and half arpents length, which he hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $3.00 from letter O. to P.
Signed :  Alex Meaux Agt. Witness A. D. Verrot, Felix Meaux.

 Then taking twenty feet on the eastern line of Alex Meaux direction Southerly along its one and half arpents length which, he hereby appropriates and donates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter P. to Q.
Signed :  Alex Meaux.

 Then taking twenty feet on the western line of Adolphe Comeaux along its three arpents length, which be hereby appropriates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $6.00 from letter O. to Q.

 Then taking twenty feet on the Southern line of Adolphe Comeaux, direction easterly along its five arpents length which we hereby appropriate and dedicate to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $10.00 from letter G. to R.

 Taking twenty feet on the northern line of Alex Meaux, direction easterly, along its ten arpents length, which he hereby appropriates and donates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter G. to S.
Signed :  Alex Meaux.

 Then taking twenty feet on the Southern line of Joseph Crader, easterly direction along its five arpents length, which we hereby appropriate and dedicate to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road, and assess the damages at $10.00 from letter R. to S.

 Then taking twenty feet one the eastern line of Alcee Meaux direction southernly, along its three arpents length, which he hereby appropriates and donates, to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter P.
Signed Alex Meaux.

 Then taking twenty feet on the eastern line of Joseph Meaux, direction southernly along its four and half arpents length which he hereby donates to the parish of Lafayette, for public use as a public road from letter T. to U.
Signed :   Joseph Meaux. Witness Ed. G. Voorhies, A. Landry.

 Then taking twenty feet on the eastern line of Rosemond Landry, direction southernly along its four and a half arpents length which he hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter U. to V.
Signed :  Rosemond Landry. Witness Ed. G. Voorhies.

 Taking twenty feet on the eastern line of Valsin Landry, along its four arpents length, which we hereby appropriate and dedicate to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $8.00 from letter V. to X.

 Then taking twenty feet on the eastern line of Chas. Broussard, direction southerly, along its three arpents length, which we hereby appropriate and dedicate to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $6.00 from letter X. to Z.

 Then taking twenty feet on the western line of Rosemond Landry, direction southerly along its three arpents length which he hereby appropriates and donates to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road from letter S. to T. 

 Signed :  Rosemond Landry. Witness Ed. G. Voorhies. Then taking twenty feet on the western line of Adolphe Comeaux direction southerly along its fourteen and half arpents length which we hereby appropriate and dedicate to the parish of Lafayette for public use as a public road and assess the damages at $29.00 from letter F. to Y.

 Then taking twenty feet on the western line of J. Omer Broussard direction southernly along one and half arpents length which he hereby donates and dedicates to the parish of Lafayette, for public use as a public road, from letter Y. to Z.
Signed :  J. O. Broussard.

STATE OF LOUISIANA, PARISH OF LAFAYETTE.

 We, the undersigned jury of freeholders appointed and sworn, to trace and lay off a public road, from the public road, at J. Omer Broussard to the corporate limits of Lafayette, by way of Creighton bridge in said parish and to assess whatever damages may be done through whose land said road may pass, have traced and laid off said road as per report and respectfully ask to be discharged ;  J. O. Broussard, Albert Landry, A. Olivier, T. S. Singleton, Rosemond Landry, A. Olivier, T. S. Singleton, Rosemond Sevigne Sonnier. Sworn to and subscribed before me on this 4th day of August 1893, Ed. G. Voorhies Notary public.

 By motion the following jury of freeholders to-wit: Ursin Babineaux, Clemile Cormier, V. H. Dupuis, Victor Couvillon, Alcee Broussard, L. G. Stelly was appointed to trace and lay out a public road not less than twenty-five feet wide, according to law, between Lessin Dugas and Carencro.

 By motion the following jury of freeholders to-wit: Hugh Hutchinson, Sladous, Willie Post, Thompson Hoffpauir, Robert Hoffpauir and Treville Guidry was appointed to trace and lay out a public road forty feet wide according to law. From Duson station to the limits of Acadia parish to connect with the Rayne road in Acadia.

 By motion the following Jury of freeholders to wit: Alfred Breaux, Faustin Vincent, Pierre Simon, Louis Whittington, John Louis, William and John Nugent was appointed to trace and lay out a public road forty feet wide from the property of John Nugent south to the limits of the parish of Lafayette, there to connect with Vermilion public road.

 The following enactments submitted by the committee on drainage were read and unanimously adopted.

 SECTION 1.  That the parish of Lafayette be and the same is hereby divided into the following Drainage Districts for the purpose of the more readily draining the lands in said parish under the provisions of act No. 107 of the regular session of the General Assembly of the state of 1888 approved July 12, 1888 as amended by act No. 83 and 142 of 1890.

 SECTION 2.  The parish of Lafayette is hereby into eight drainage districts, whose limits and boundary is hereby fixed the same as the Police jury wards of the parish,
    Be it further resolved that the following land owners residents of the respective drainage districts be and are hereby appointed commissioners for their respective districts to-wit :

 1st. District - P. A. Chiasson, P. A. Delhomme, Jean Begnaud.

 2nd District - Jos. W. Broussard, Ford Hoffpauir, Dr. M. L. Lyons.

 3rd District - Thos. F. Webb Jr., Alcee Landry, Jos. A. Breaux.

 4th District - Octave Theriot, Olivier Blanchet, Adrien Theall.

 5th District - Jules Langlinais, A. Olivier, Lucas Bernard.

 6th District - Homer Durio, W. E. Dupuis, Numa Breaux.

 7th District - J. O. Broussard, Lucien Broussard, Onezine Langlinais.

 8th. District - L. G. Breaux, John Landry, A. D. Landry.

SECTION 3.  Be it further ordained that the duties of said commissioners shall consist in opening and draining all the natural drains in their respective districts ; they shall have full power to make contracts for that purpose ;  and approve and accept the same from parties with whom said contracts are made ;  they shall likewise have the power of cutting and opening new drains where deemed necessary ;  provided that where in the estimation of said commissioners it is necessary to cut and open new drains the matter shall be submitted to the property tax payers of said district, who shall decide on the advisability of same on the manner and location which said drains shall be cut and opened the opinion of the majority of all said tax payers shall govern in all such cases, said opinion to be expressed either by ballot or by petition duly signed.

 SECTION 4. Be it further ordained, that when the parties with whom the district commissioners shall have contracted, shall have fulfilled the conditions of their contract, the said commissioners shall give a written approval of the work done and shall certify that said parties have complied with their contract and that the amount claimed for said work is correct and upon presentation of said certificate of approval to the president of the police jury he shall draw a warrant for the same, upon the funds appropriated for that purpose.

 Be it further ordained ;  that should it become the necessary to carry out the provisions on all the property assessed in each district not to exceed five mills on the dollar and in order to levy said tax the commissioners of each district shall submit to a vote of the land owners of their respective districts once a year for every (10) years the tax it is proposed be levied in said district, and should two thirds in value and number of all the land owners in said district be in favor of said tax the said tax shall be levied and collected by the police jury as other taxes and placed to the credit of said district to be used for the purposes designated in this ordinance.

 Be it further ordained that the ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage.

 Be it further ordained that the sum of two hundred dollars be and the same is hereby appropriated out of funds not otherwise appropriated to each drainage district just established said amount to be used for the purpose of opening the natural drains by which the public roads may be drained in each respective district.

 Be it further ordained that said district commissioners be and are hereby authorized to contract or let same out as they may elect.

 Mr. Hoffpauir by consent withdrew his resolution relative to apportioning $400.o0 to each of the different wards for the purpose of repairing the public roads.

 By motion the above road was declared a public highway, and ordered opened and worked by the road overseer. The sum of $136.00 was appropriated and set aside for the payment of all damages allowed by the jury of freeholders in tracing of said road.

 By motion it was resolved that Article 1. of the Stock-law adopted Jan. 2nd, 1890  be and is hereby amended as to read: It shall be the duty of the constables of their respective wards of the parish to take into their possession and keep, in accordance with the requirements of the Stock-law, all stock they may find roaming at large as well as stock delivered to them by private individuals upon proper showing that said stock were roaming at large.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.




CITY COUNCIL.

...among other business...

 Moved by Henry Church seconded by Alb. Cayard that the stock law be repealed for day time and upon taking the vote it stood thus. Yeas: H. Chuch and Alb. Cayard.  Nays: A. T. Caillouet, A. Martin, and F. Demanade and said motion was lost. Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.






Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 5/12/1894.

 Mr. T. M. Biossat made a flying business trip down the Morgan road, this week.

 Mr. George Derouen formerly of this place was here during the first days of the week.

 A special meeting of Hope Lodge No. 145 A. F. and A. M. will be held this evening. Members are requested to take notice.

 A fresh coat of paint is being applied to the attractive residence of Mrs. P. D. Beraud.

 Villere & Tanner are doing a first class job of painting on Dr. Martin's house, but as they know their business if not to be wondered at. Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.



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 From the Lafayette Gazette of May 12th, 1894:

THE SUGAR REFINERY.

  A meeting attended by a number of business men of Lafayette and a few planters of the parish, was held last Saturday at the Court-house, to see what could be done to secure the necessary capital to build a sugar refinery here. A gentleman, representing a foundry in St. Louis, spoke to the assembly and made a statement, illustrating the fact that it was in the power of the people of this section to have a refinery before the close of 1894. He said that if the planters agreed to raise an adequate quantity of cane to run the mill he would attend to the part of getting capitalists willing to invest their money in such an enterprise. The gentleman we believe, was in earnest and knew whereof he was speaking. The gentlemen present at the meeting discussed the proposition, exchanged views upon the subject and adjourned to meet at the court-house to-day. We are informed that Col. Breaux and other gentlemen from New Orleans will be present at this meeting.

 Our people seem determined to get a refinery and they are alive to the importance of acting together and at once. There is no time to lose. If we have no refinery the actual cane crop in this parish, will be disposed of with considerable difficulty. The refineries are assured of an adequacy of cane, and are not as solicitous of buying our cane as they have been heretofore.


Let us hope that as to-day's meeting some satisfactory conclusion will be arrived at. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.


THE STOCK LAW.

 Lafayette, La., May 8, 1894.
 [To the Lafayette Gazette.]

 Will you kindly inform your correspondents if there is a provision in the stock ordinance which allows certain stock, or of a certain size, or of a certain sex, to roam. It seems so, for your correspondent has called the marshal's attention to the roaming of two steers, and they still roam. If ther is such a provision I am ignorant of the fact, and if there is no such provision, there are some ones that do not attend to their duties. From the vote of the councilmen of the last session I see a majority voted for a continuance of the ordinance; they should at least see that it is enforced, yes, strictly enforced.

 However it may be, your correspondent knows that nearly every corporation, even though they have no stock ordinance, prohibits the roaming of steers.

 By giving the desired information you will greatly oblige.
                         (Signed)  A. PETITIONER.

 As far as The Gazette could learn the stock ordinance prohibits the roaming of stock without any distinction. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.


 In a Bad Fix.

 Sheriff Broussard lodged in jail last Wednesday a negro named Leonard Antoine, who had been found lying by the railroad track near Scott badly mutilated, evidently by being run over by a train. He was seriously hurt about the shoulders and his feet were badly mangled. His wounds were dressed by Drs. Gladu and A. R. Trahan. A St. Landry deputy sheriff, who saw the negro, informed Sheriff Broussard that he was wanted in St. Landry for robbery and requested that he be held in custody. He was taken to Opelousas Thursday evening. His recovery is doubtful. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.





Mouton - Baulard Nuptials.

 Last Monday evening, at 4:30, there were gathered together a fashionable throng of relatives and friends to witness the nuptials of two prominent young people. The occasion occurred at St. Mary's Cathedral at Galveston. The scene was one of pomp and splendor, surrounded by the young and beauty of the Texas city. The impressive marriage ceremony of the Catholic Church, with its pronounced and hallowed language, and its solemn benediction, only lent the more to its interesting surroundings.

 The two young people who were centre of attraction, were to become man and wife, and with the usual invocation became such. Father McSorly officiated.

 The contracting parties were Miss Heloise Baulard, of Galveston, and Mr. Walter J. Mouton, of Lafayette. The maid of honor was Miss Rose Tierman; first bridesmaid, Miss Lillian Dalian; second bridesmaid, Miss Blanche Tufiley. First groomsman, C. P. Baulard; second groomsman, Tom Ratto.  Ushers, Chas. Boddecker, Jos. Gengler, Harry Outtlerider and Geo. Leinback.

 Upon entering the church the bridal party was preceded by the flower girls, Miss Mathilde Reickerzer and Laura Heffron, dressed in tarlatan, bearing beautiful flowers that not only gave a picturesque appearance, but pervaded the enclosed atmosphere with a sweet fragrance. Then followed in succession, the second bridesmaid, dressed in white silk nulle, trimmed with white satin ribbon; first bridesmaid, dressed in China silk, trimmed with lace; maid of honor, dressed in muslin silk, trimmed with bangles; bride, dressed in satin duchesse, trimmed with lace and pearl ornaments, who was accompanied by her brother; Mrs. Baulard and the groom.

 After the ceremony the bridal party retired to the residence of the bride's mother, Mrs. C. L. Baulard where a bounteous repast was spread before the guests, and the usual toasts were given for the future welfare of the happy young couple.

 Mr. and Mrs. Mouton were the recipients of many valuable and beautiful presents, among the most prominent of which were:  One full set of silver table ware, Mrs. C. L. Baulard; silver berry set, Miss Lillian Dalian; silver urn with four silver glasses, from the four ushers; silver water pitcher and cups, Miss Rose Tierman; silver castor, Dr. and Mrs. F. J. Mouton; silver waiter, Mr. John O. Mouton; one dozen coffee spoons, Mrs. Heffron; one dozen silver oyster forks, Dr. A. A. Dyer; burnt china ice dish, Dr. Randle; gold sugar scoop, Mr. Ratto; one box silver table ware, W. S. Torian; silver castos, Mrs. Dupau; a berry spoon, Miss Katie Zeigler; silver sugar bowl, John Cameau; one gold thimble, Mr. Reicherzer; pair of beautiful statuaries, Mr. Hebert of New Orleans; silver powder box, Mrs. Pat Tiernan; silver hair-pin dish, Miss Yolande Mouton; furniture including piano, Mrs. John O. Mouton; other beautiful presents from O. Duvernet, Numa Domengeaux, Miss Rambuhl, Mr. Rousset, Messrs. Burkson & Bros., Joe Carr (unreadable name).

 The bride is an accomplished young lady of the city of Galveston and the groom is a promising young business man of Lafayette; both are very estimable young people. They arrived Thursday morning in Lafayette and took possession of their beautiful home. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.


 Working the Roads.

 The road near Couvillon's store is now being put in good order, with substantial ditches on each side. The work is being done by the prisoners sentenced to the parish jail at the last term of court. A few more prisoners and our roads will soon be in a better condition. This is certainly the best way to utilize the labor of the prisoners and at the same time it shortens their terms and consequently saves money to the parish. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.


 Will Refine Sugar.

 Mr. M. Billaud, Sr., has purchased a vacuum pan which will soon be added to his already large sugar house. Mr. Billaud will refine his own sugar. It is a pity that more of our planters can not see their way clear to the building of sugar refineries. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.


Ice !  Ice !

 Messrs. Harnisch & Pefferkorn have opened the ice depot opposite Mr. Pellerin's store whether they will handle ice manufactured by the Opelousas Ice and Bottling Works. If you desire, ice will be delivered at your domicile two or three different times a day. Orders left with the above named gentleman at their depot will be promptly attended to. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.

 The Stock Law.

 At the session of the Town Council held last Monday, it was moved by Henry Church, and seconded by Albert Cayard that the stock law be repealed for the day time. The motion was defeated the councilmen voting as follows: yeas: Henry Church and Albert Cayard; nays: A. T. Caillouet, A. M. Martin, F. Demanade. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.



 Broke His Arm.

 Last Sunday, Edmond Couret, while riding on his mother's plantation, had the misfortune to be thrown from his horse, causing a fracture of the right arm. Dr. J. P. Francez was called to attend him, and we are glad to announce that the young gentleman is doing as well as could be expected under the circumstances. Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.


 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 5/12/1894.

 H. Hilderdrand, M. C. B. of Algiers, was here Wednesday in the interest of the Company.

 Mr. J. C. Couvillon has on Mr. Arthur Greig's farm near town the finest corn of the season.

 By a telegram received from Houma it is learnt that nearly 800 people of that section are getting ready to come to Lafayette to-morrow.

 Mr. C. T. Higgins and wife will leave to-morrow for Algiers, their future home. Mr. Higgins was formerly employed in the round house of this place and now has employment in the Southern Pacific machine shops of Algiers.

 A branch of the American Railroad Union will be organized here in the near future. Eugene V. Debs, the president, will address the meeting and a large attendance will be expected. This is the youngest branch of Railway organization in the country.

 Messrs. C. F. Latiolais, I. A. Broussard and Julian Mouton leave to-day for New Orleans. The latter will continue on the Baton Rouge to take his seat in the Legislature.

 Mr. Ed. J. Perrault, a medical student of Tulane University, was a visitor in Lafayette this week, and called at Dr. Gladu's. Mr. Perrault is an intelligent man with a bright future before him, and will some day be an honor to his profession.

 Mrs. James Chachere; Mrs. Dr. Theogene Chachere, from Opelousas and Mrs. Brooks from Crowley, passed through Lafayette Thursday en route to Opelousas where Mrs. Brooks will spend a few days visiting relatives and friends.

 Tuesday our local sports had a very interesting cock fight in the old canning factory, between Jack Burke, belonging to O. Hebert, and Wild Bill, belonging to G. A. Landry. Wild bill was the winner.

 Mr. and Mrs. John O. Mouton, Judge Debaillon and Dr. Mouton returned Tuesday morning from Galveston where they had gone to attend the Baulard-Mouton wedding.
Lafayette Gazette 5/12/1894.





Lagniappe:
VERMILION BAYOU
For the Advertiser.

  Roll on thou little river' thou oft has
    borne,
 
  The Indian canoes onward in their
    way;
 
 Floated away with the tide down to
    the bay,
 
 Where are those canoes now, fair
    stream, oh, say?
 
  Do they still onward sweep in all their
    pride?
 
  No! distant far, they sank into decay.
  
  Their keels long since lost, neath the
    swollen tide--
 
  Such are the troubles in which men
    confide!
 
  Thou roll'dst then on, when feeble first
    and few,
 
  Into thy waters a warrior band there
    came--
 
  But they were fearless, and their hearts
    were true.
 
  And soon their leaders won a deathless
    name,
 
  Above them soon, high, the standard
    of Fame,
 
  Was proudly to the southern breeze
    unfurled;
 
  And on that banner they inscribed a claim
    claim,
 
  That proud defiance to all nations
    hurl'd--
 
  Civilization is the queen, and sways a
    captive world,
 
  Still do they leesen'd waves roll to the
    sea;
 
  But where are now the noble and the
    brave,
 
  That trod thy banks--the bondmen and
    the free--
 
  The mail-clad warrior and the fettered
    slave?
 
  They moulder on thy, or 'neath
    they wave--
 
  From the white tents and wigwams they
    are fled--
 
  They sleep in death--all rest in one
    dark grave;
 
  Whilst, thou rollest in they ancient bed,
 
  Thou, alone art left beside thy mighty
    dead.                                         G. T.

Lafayette Advertiser 5/12/1894.
    

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