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Monday, January 12, 2015

**MAY 11TH M C

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of May 11th, 1904:

PARISH INSTITUTE.
Saturday One of the Most Interesting Ever Held in this Parish. Elementary Agriculture in the Schools Principal Topic.

 A more than ordinarily interesting parish institute was held at the Industrial Institute Saturday. The subject was agriculture, which hereafter will be a part of the course in every school of the parish, particularly as it has been ordered taught in all the public schools of the State Board of Education. There were about forty-five teachers present, including Institute teachers, and from the close attention given with frequent questioning by the teachers, it was quite evident that they were all interested in the subject. In fact it was brought out that a number of teachers had already gained interest in and knowledge of the subject by making gardens in connection with their school work.

 The first on the program was a model lesson on agriculture by Miss Zelia Christian. She developed the subject, "The Plow," in an admirable manner and a fascinating way, which won high encomiums from all present. There isn't a particle of doubt, judging from this model lesson, but that elementary agriculture can be made highly attractive and instructive to children.

 Prof. V. L. Roy followed with a lecture of some length, but which never became tiresome for one moment. He illustrated with many simple experiments, which possessed novelty and instructiveness, and showed how the minds of children could be developed through observation, interest, and reasoning. As he put the subject, it has a wise usefulness in the scheme of education and at the same time arouses a love for tilling the soil, by awakening artistic appreciation of nature's wonders joined with the scientific spirit of experiment and research.

 At 12:30 Supt. Alleman requested Prof. Roy to postpone the conclusion of his lecture, and invited all present to dine at the Dormitory, which invitation was promptly and unanimously accepted.

 Dr. Stephens requested the teachers to assemble on the front steps, so he could take their pictures, which they did.

 At the close of dinner, which was a good one, by the way, Supt. Alleman called upon Judge Julien Mouton to say a few words, which the Judge did in his usual felicitous style. In the course of his remarks he urged the necessity for instruction in civil government. When he closed Supt. Alleman made a neat little speech supplementing Judge Mouton's talk about civil government, and also about agriculture in the schools.

 The afternoon session began about 2 o'clock. Prof. Roy continued his lecture and experiments, receiving enthusiastic applause on its conclusion.

 Miss Fadra Holmes followed with a fine paper on the "School Garden." The subject was well handled and made very attractive.

 Prof. W. J. Avery then read a paper on "A Visit to the Farm," in which he spoke of the advantage to a student, its instuctiveness and value. He also told of the scenes on a farm, about its work and the various methods used, particularly in North Louisiana was the last on "Valuable Matters to Supplement the Text." He spoke briefly, but gave much good information for the assistance of the teachers in taking up a new subject; after which the institute adjourned.

 Among the visitors present were: Judge Julien Mouton, Alex Delhomme, member of School Board, Jerome Mouton and W. A. LeRosen. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.



TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION
Will Convene at Lafayette Christmas Week. Five Hundred Teachers Expected to Attend.
[Special to the New Orleans Picayune.]

 Alexandria, La., May 7. - The Executive Committee of the State Teachers' Association of Louisiana met here this afternoon for the purpose of preparing a programme, fix date of meeting and attending to other matters connected with the annual meeting of the Association.

 The following compose the Committee:  Nicholas Bauer, Secretary, of New Orleans; J. H. Harris, Baton Rouge; Miss Marion of Marksville; E. L. Stephens, of Lafayette:  E. B. Stover, of Crowley; C. E. Byrd, of Shreveport, and J. E. Keeney, of Natchitoches. President Stephens, of Lafayette, was not at the afternoon session, but attended the morning session.

 It was decided to hold the next State Convention at Lafayette during Christmas week, December 27, 28 and 29.

 The main subject for discussion during that session will be "The Problem of the Rural School." Speakers will include Hon. J. B. Aswell, C. E. Byrd, J. McIven, of the University of North Carolina, and Hon. John Marks of Napoleonville.

 The feature of the Convention will be the department conferences, which are the ungraded school teachers, the primary, the grammar, the high, the kindergarten, the music and the drawing teachers.

 The main topic of the evening session was the change of date of the State Convention from December to some time in the spring of 1905, also that of requesting the Parish School Board to grant leave of absence for three days, with pay, for those teachers who attend the State Convention.

 Prof. Stephens says that 500 are expected to attend the Convention at Lafayette, as he knows that New Orleans would send a solid delegation of 400. A hotel of fifty rooms, to cost over $40,000, will be completed in time for the assembly. From the New Orleans Picayune and in the Lafayette Advertiser of 5/11/1904.       

    


For Benefit of Public Schools.

 The people of Lafayette will have the rare pleasure hearing the famous Southern story teller, Richard T. Wyche, next Saturday. Through the efforts of Miss Holmes, principal of the Lafayette Primary School, arrangements have been made by which Mr. Wyche will entertain the school children of the town and parish in the forenoon, and entertain the public at night. 

 Mr. Wyche will tell a number of the unwritten stories handed down by the old-time negro, along with many from Uncle Remus, such as "Tar Tar Baby," and "Brer Rabbit and the Mosquitoes." His stories are interesting and educative, and it is said of Mr. Wyche that there has never been a teller of stories in Athens that ever approached him in the art of engrossing the attention of his bearers and keeping them well entertained throughout a whole evening's entertainment.

 In the morning at 10 o'clock the children will be delightfully entertained, and all the school children of the public and the private schools in the town and in the parish will be admitted FREE of charge. Parents and others will be welcome, and an admission fee of 25 cents will be collected from these.

 At half past eight o'clock at night the entertainment is intended for the whole public, men, women and children, and everybody will be charged admission - children 15 cents and adults 25 cents.

 J. Y. Joyner, State Supt. of public instruction of North Carolina, says, "Mr. Richard T. Wyche has mastered the art of storytelling." It is true that Mr. Wyche has a special gift as a teller of tales, and his stories possess high literary meaning and value.

 The school children will sell tickets for the night entertainment, and  one-half of the door receipts will be donated to the Primary School to finish painting the building.

 The pleasure of the evening will be enhanced by vocal and instrumental music by Misses Robertson and Reid, of the Primary School, and others.

 Both entertainments will take place at Falk's opera-house, and an enjoyable time is promised to all who will attend. The date is Saturday, May 14, and the night program will be entirely different from the day program.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.






The Good Roads Convention.
 A Good Roads Convention was called to meet at the courthouse Saturday, April 23, at 9 o'clock. The convention was late in getting together. The attendance was small considering the very important object for which it was called. It was principally composed of town people. A number of the old and new Police Jurors were absent. M. Billeaud, president of the Police Jury called the convention to order and was elected chairman, which position he filled very judiciously and impartially. He opened the discussion by calling on each member of the Police Jury present to give number of miles, cost per mile, method of working and condition of the roads at the present time, which brought out a good deal of important and useful information. As the discussion progressed, I asked the chairman a number of questions in reference to our road tax, which he answered very promptly and satisfactory.  First question. - Is there any road tax collected in this parish except the per capita tax and vehicle tax? Answer - Emphatically no.  Second question. - Is there any portion of our parish taxes set aside yearly for road purposes?  Answer no.  Third question. - Has out Police Jury a legal right to appropriate a portion of the parish funds to any separate ward for road purposes?  Unfortunately for the last two years, I have been gradually growing a little deaf and can't hear distinctly all that is said.  But I understand the chairman to say that it had been done in some cases. I am well aware that the Police Jury has the right to make appropriations out of the parish funds to the whole parish for road purposes. After a good deal of discussion over past Police Jury matters, I asked the convention a number of questions in reference to our present system of road tax.  First question. - Does this convention think it right and just that if a man owns twenty-five or fifty thousand dollars worth of real estate in this parish and is an absentee or over fifty-five years of age that he should be exempt from paying any poll tax, per capita tax, vehicle tax or road tax?  Answer no.  Second question. - Does this convention claim that it is right and just that if a man owns a plantation worth 12 or 15 thousand dollars and rents it out to a poor man who does not own a nickel's worth of real estate in the parish, but has two boys, one over 18, the other twenty, his own age fifty, that he should be assessed for thirty-six days work on the road or pay thirty-six dollars or go to jail, when the owner of the land who lives in town and has all the benefits of the roads don't pay any road tax directly or indirectly. The above law was imposed in a number of cases last year.  Answer no.  Third question. - Does this convention hold that it is right and just that a man living in Alabama, who owns two thousand, five hundred acres of land in this parish near Scott, and has all the benefits of the roads should be exempt from paying any road tax, directly or indirectly?  Captain Buchanan answered and said the Police Jury has no authority to levy a road tax on real estate for road purposes. I think there must be some mistake about the interpretation of the road law. If the Captain is correct in his view, the law should be repealed as soon as possible, for it is certainly one of the most absurd and unjust laws that can be found in any civilized country. It is a disgrace to the parish, the State and the Legislature that passed it. I claim that every man that uses the roads and has the benefit of them should be paying his fair share towards building them and keeping them in repair. Dr. Mayer's resolution was a very good one had it been put in a little different shape. As it was, it only carried by a majority of one out of twenty-five votes. There were quite a number who voted against it who were highly in favor of letting out all the roads to be worked by contract. I think it is far the best and cheapest system that we can adopt. The first clause in his resolution was to have the parish divided into road districts. That is quite unnecessary. Our parish is now divided into eight wards and each ward is an organized road division within itself, and it should not be changed. I think each ward should control its own road work under the general rules laid down by the Police Jury.

 The Gazette is right. Every important organization should have a responsible head. The chief supervisor of the Board of Works for the parish is responsible to the Police Jury for all his acts, and the local supervisors being appointed by the Jury, they are responsible to them for all their acts as road supervisors. The Board of Works if well appointed, will relieve the Police Jury of nine tenths of their labors in the way of looking after contracts, roads and road overseers. I think the Police Jury has quite enough to do, considering the pay they get, to look after the parish affairs.
            (Signed)  J. NICKERSON.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.

                 

A PROGRESSIVE LEAGUE NEEDED NOW.  

Elsewhere in this paper is published a call for a meeting of all those interested in organizing a progressive league "to promote the commercial and industrial welfare of this community," the meeting to be held at the court house Thursday, May 12, at 8 p. m. It is hoped that a large number of our citizens will attend. The organization of such a body at the present time has become a necessity. Lafayette has been touched with the quickening spirit of progress, and needs a guiding hand to move forward steadily and rapidly. In other communities such a body, has accomplished much, and in our little city, ready to expand and ripe for development, it can achieve things which many of us wish for, yet despair of; for we have only a faint idea of the power of steady purpose and united action.

 Already we have an instructive lesson as to what a league might do. Scarcely two weeks ago, a number of citizens came together and resolved to make a move towards getting a railroad from here to Baton Rouge. They have succeeded as well as could reasonably be expected; for they have gained the support of Baton Rouge and Breaux Bridge, a company has been organized and a charter drawn up. The move has been started well. There needs now that on organized body push the project earnestly, zealously, hopefully, and without ceasing. This is the duty of a progressive league, and the sooner it is formed and takes up the work, the greater chance of ultimate success, and that there will be success is without question if we go at it resolved to succeed, regardless of discouragement, obstacles or difficulties.

 Faith will move mountains, perseverance will bore through them, wisdom will go around them. Let us have all three, and with one mind attack this railroad proposition with vim, vigor and determination, and we will find that the way will finally open for its satisfactory solution, and Lafayette be the richer by the acquisition of a competing railroad to all points of the compass. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.




 New Railroad Project. - A company with a capital stock of $200,000 has been organized in Opelousas to build a railroad from that place in a northeasterly direction to intersect the Texas and Pacific at some suitable point; also to extend the same railroad in a southwesterly direction to the Gulf.   Laf. Adv. 5/11/1904.





FIRST COMMUNION.
Two Thousand People Present to Witness the Impressive Ceremonies.

 A vast congregation assembled at St. John's Catholic Church Thursday to witness the celebration of first communion services, something near 2,000 people being present. The sacrament was administered to 250 children. Father Forge, the pastor, was assisted by Fathers Bollard, Durand, Doutre, Langlois, Peeters, Mailluchet, Veurlings, Girault de la Cargnais, Rognes, Roger and Crozier.

 At the renewal of baptism vows, Rev. Leon Mailluchet delivered the oration, and after the solemn consecration to the Blessed Virgin, the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament was given by Rev. Durand. Rev. Peeters, Girault and Veurlings received the children into the Society of the Scapular of Mt. Carmel. Father Forge was greatly pleased over the success of every part of the ceremonies. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904. 

    
    
 Surrey Park Changes Hands.
 Saturday Surrey Park was bought by Messrs. Pellerin Bros., Alphonse Peck, Chas. Cochrane and P. H. Mouton, who will manage it under the name of the Surrey Park Associciation, with A. Peck, president; P. H. Mouton, vice-president and general manager; C. A. Cochrane, secretary; Pellerin Bros., treasurer. The track will be governed by the rules of the American Trotting Association, and at all times good order will be maintained. The new management promise the public and especially all admirers of fast horses, a series of fine trotting, running and pacing races that will appeal to the lovers of the sport. The first races under the new management will take place Sunday, May 15, beginning at 2:30, and they give promise of being highly interesting. A special invitation is extended to the ladies, who will be admitted free, to be present. The next series will be run on Sunday, May 22.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.





Lafayette Plays New Iberia.
 The Lafayette team played New Iberia Sunday on their home grounds, and the game was strictly professional up to the eighth inning. The playing was fine, could not be improved upon. Only one run was made and that by Lafayette. But when the eighth inning set in, things took a different complexion, for Lafayette lost their grip somehow and began to drop errors which New Iberia picked up promptly and adroitly, piling up runs, so that when the game ended Lafayette walked off with one little run while New Iberia stepped high with seven. Lafayette didn't feel so bad, however. Everybody has "off" days, and next Sunday when Franklin comes up here to play, the "boys" calculate it will be their "on" day, and there will be some real lively doings. 
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.
    


A New Plumber in Town. - Mr. J. K. Bradshaw, late of the O. K. Plumbing and Electrical Co., of Crowley, arrived in Lafayette Thursday accompanied by his wife. It is Mr. Bradshaw's intention to locate here permanently, if business justifies. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.   


A Curiosity. - Mr. F. E. Darby brought to this office Saturday something in the way of a curiosity. It was a large spongy ball, nearly as large as a baseball, seemingly composed of fibrous vegetable matter decomposed to a mass of fine hairs, with a hard vegetable-like outer covering. It was taken from the stomach of a cow twenty-two years ago, and the cow when killed was remarkably fat and healthy. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.




ANOTHER EVIDENCE.

Of the Fertility of Lafayette Soil. Immense Strawberries and Dewberries.

 Lafayette soil is pretty well known for its great fertility and adaptability for all kinds of vegetation, and yet there are many who really do not realize the soil and climate's possibilities. To such, a look at the enormous strawberries and dewberries which Dr. T. B. Hopkins brought to this office Saturday, would be a convincing, object lesson. Both the strawberries and dewberries, of which the Doctor has quite a large number of vines, are sweet and delightfully flavored. The raising of these two here so successfully, shows what a vast field for profitable truck farming this parish offers; and with a competing rail road, particularly the one to Baton Rouge which would connect with three great rail roads running north, east and west, here could be made the ideal garden spot of this country. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.




Base Ball.
The Lafayette team played New Iberia Sunday on their home grounds, and the game was strictly professional up to the eighth inning. The playing was fine, could not be improved upon. Only one run was made and that by Lafayette. But when the eighth inning set in, things took a different complexion, for Lafayette lost their grip somehow and began to drop errors which New Iberia picked up promptly and adroitly, piling up runs, so that when the game ended Lafayette walked off with one little run while New Iberia stepped high with seven. Lafayette didn't feel so bad, however. Everybody has "off" days, and next Sunday when Franklin comes up here to play, the "boys" calculate it will be their "on" day, and there will be some real lively doings.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.





May Festival.

 On Friday afternoon, May thirteen, the ladies of the Episcopalian Guild will give a May festival on the grounds near the Episcopal church. At six o'clock there will be a baby show. Two prizes will be given to the finest baby and the prettiest baby from the ages of four months to two years.

 Later in the evening the children of the town will crown their May queen and give the beautiful May pole dance upon the green. Sontag's Military Band will furnish music. Refreshments will be served.

 The admission fee will be twenty-five cents, fifteen cents for children. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904.



 Women's Literary Club.
 Mrs. John Givens was the hostess of the Literary Club on Saturday afternoon, when a large number of members filled the parlors of her pretty home. "Grace King and the Books She Has Written", were the subjects under discussion.

 Mrs. Givens read an interesting letter from this charming authoress, whose historic talent has been so beneficial to the youth of the South.

 Mrs. John Kennedy read selections of the "Balcony Stories, and Miss Riss gave selections from, "New Orleans, The Place and People." The program was closed with the song, "Old Kentucky Home," sung by the Club quartet, whose members are, Mrs. Blake, Mrs. Givens, Mrs. Biossat and Miss Leftwich.

 Several communications were read, among the most important were those from Miss Gordon of the Era Club, of New Orleans, and Mr. Avery of our town.

 A movement is now on hand to find a more suitable name for the Club. As under its present name, its identity is almost lost, among the numerous "Literary Clubs" belonging to the State Federation.

 This meeting was in every way a most enjoyable one, and your correspondent cannot refrain from mentioning the beautiful souvenirs prepared for the occasion by Dr. Hopkins, the venerable father of Mrs. Givens, the hostess. They were appreciated by every member, the only regret was they were perishable.

 A cordial welcome was given the visitors, Mrs. Ralph B. Raney, of Crowley, and Mrs. J. C. Nickerson. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1904. 

  

Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 5/11/1904.

 Take the children to see the crowning of the May queen and the fascinating May Pole dance in Judge Parkerson's grove next Friday evening. They will all greatly enjoy the occasion.

 A good thing is a book from the Circulating Library at the Moss Pharmacy. You get a dollar's worth of pleasure for a ten cent investment.

 The many friends of Mrs. Joe E. Mouton, who underwent a serious operation at the Hotel Dieu in New Orleans Wednesday, will be glad to know that she is doing as well as could be expected.

 A number of friends of the Lafayette team went to New Iberia Sunday to see the game.

 Wm. Kelly, one of the Institute students, is confined to his room with fever.

 Mr. and Mrs. Baxter Clegg went to the city Sunday for a short visit.

 Mrs. C. K. Darling and her two boys, Clarence and George, of Houston, Texas, are here on a short visit with Mr. and Mrs. J. Nickerson.

 J. C. Nickerson, real estate agent, went to Jennings Monday on business, returning same day.

 Dr. E. L. Stephens left for Alexandria Friday to attend the meeting of the executive committee of the State Teachers Association. He returned Sunday.

 Mr. C. W. Breeding, who is connected with the Lafayette Compress & Storage Co., offers his services as electrician tot the public. He will do all kinds of electrical work.

 Friday Sheriff Broussard arrested at Baldwin a young negro named Zack Veazey charged with stealing a horse from Mr. Onezephore Comeux. The horse was found in the negro's possession. Laf. Adv. 5/11/1904.


  

  

  

  





  


  
 From the Lafayette Gazette of May 11th, 1901:



MAYOR CAFFERY BANS SNAKE-EATING WOMAN.


 The action of Mayor Caffery in putting stop to the disgusting exhibitions of the snake-eating woman is to be commended, and it is to be hoped that the mayors of the other towns will follow his example.

 The Gazette is informed that this woman, who eats live snakes for the delectation of the public, is a wretched, semi-paralyzed being and is in a State of Imbecility or idiocy. That this fake concern has been permitted to have public exhibitions in civilized communities under the very eyes of the authorities is almost incredible in this age which boasts of its culture and refinement and we may say of its high standard of Christian civilization.  It is only to be regretted that Mayor Caffery was not made acquainted with the disreputable character of the snake-show before the license was issued, but we are pleased to say that as soon as he was correctly informed he put on end to the disgraceful affair by revoking the license and returning the money that had been paid for it. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.



  
LOOKS LIKE BUSINESS.
Companies Making Preparations to Bore Derricks on the Grounds.

 Capt. Lucas of the Guffey Company  States that Operations Will Soon Be Started.


 The lull in the land deal has been followed by what appears a determination on the part of several companies to begin operations.

 Capt. Lucas has written to one of his agents here that the Guffey Company, with which he is connected, has decided to "start a well as soon as practicable" or near Anse la Butte. Capt. Lucas also writes to his representative to find out if the local lumber yards can furnish material necessary to build a derrick. Capt. Lucas announces that he and his associates are "desirous of demonstrating to the good people of Lafayette and Breaux Bridge that there is no intention" on their part "to withhold operations."

 It may be added in connection with the foregoing that the Guffey Company has recorded all its leases on lands in this parish.

 The Gazette is informed that the work of building the derricks has begun at Anse la Butte and on the Moresi tract.

 The derrick on Mr. Falk's place in this town will soon be completed.

 The Lafayette Oil and Mineral Company states in its prospectus that it will begin to drill as soon as the necessary arrangements can be made.

 Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.








THE INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE.
The Bonds Taken up by the Louisiana Banks.
Work to Start Immediately.

 President E. L. Stephens, acting for the Board of Trustees, has closed with the First National bank of Lafayette for $38,000 worth of bonds, to be paid out of the revenues of the two-mill tax levied for the Industrial Institute. The bonds bear 5 per cent interest and will mature in 1910, but are subject to call. They were bought at par. The First National bank took $31,500 and the Bank of Lafayette $6,500. The amount derived from the tax will exceed $38,000, but it was not deemed necessary to raise a larger sum at this time.

 The action of the Lafayette banks is to be commended. It has greatly facilitated matters and will enable the Board to thoroughly equip the Institute without any loss of time.

 Mr. A. E. Mouton, who is supervising the construction of the dormitory, has already started the work and will do every thing in his power to hasten the completion of the building.

 President Stephens is very busy attending to the fitting up of the Institute preparatory to the opening. He is also engaged in arranging the program of the celebration of June 15 which promises to be a most interesting affair. Next Saturday's Gazette will contain a full account of the arrangements which are being made.
Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.





Destroyed by Fire. - The home of Mr. Ralph W. Elliot, has about two miles from town, was completely destroyed by fire last Thursday. It is believed that the fire originated on the roof and that it was caused by a spark from the chimney. The loss is a very heavy one to Mr. Elliot as not only the house but all its contents were burned. Among the articles consumed by the flames were a number of relics that were highly prized by the Elliot family. The property destroyed was one of the most comfortable homes in this section.
Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.





CONCEALED WEAPONS.

Judge Debaillon has raised the carrying of pistols. At a recent term of court at Crowley, he fined three prisoners $75 each for carrying concealed weapons. If the State judiciary would only make this the uniform freight rate, for hip-pocket pistols, it would minimize the number of transportations. Baton Rouge Advocate.

 Judge Debaillon's example in imposing a heavy fine upon persons who carry concealed weapons is worthy of emulation. There is a splendid law levying a license on dealers in fire-arms that will no doubt have the effect of diminishing the number of people addicted to the very pernicious habit of making walking arsenals of themselves, and if the courts will only inflict severe penalties upon the "pistol toters" brought  before them, before them, there will be fewer homicides in this State.

 Judge Debaillon's long experience on the bench has convinced him of the necessity of employing the most stringent measure to rid society of a practice so fruitful of evil results.

 Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.



Municipal Election. The town election was held last Monday. As there was no opposition to the Democratic ticket a very light vote was polled. Seventy-six ballots were cast and two were spoilt.
 Laf. Gazette 5/11/1901.







GOOD ROADS.

The Movement Started by the New Orleans Convention Strongly Endorsed.


 With characteristic energy the Times-Democrat is exerting itself in behalf of good roads. It has interviewed prominent men in the various towns in the State and in that way it has secured the strongest endorsements of the movement so suspiciously begun by the New Orleans convention. We reproduce below the interviews of a number of Lafayette people:

 Dr. F. S. Mudd:  "The good roads convention recently convened in New Orleaans is one of the best and most to be commended of any meetings of recent date. Its object and scope are certainly fraught with great benefit and instruction to all Southern communities. The most emphatic evidence of advancement and civilization is the state of the roads of any section of the country through which travel and commerce traverse. A scientific basis is the surest and speediest way to attain these ends. This the good roads convention recommends and supplies."

C. O. Mouton, merchant: "I am much pleased to see the interest created recently in regard to the project for good roads. I do not know of a cause more worthy the attention of every public-spirited citizen."

 S. R. Parkerson, cashier of the First National bank of Lafayette: "Failure to have good roads has been the greatest obstacle to the advancement of this section. The promoters of the good roads movement should be given every encouragement. The prosperity of a town and country in a great measure depends upon well-kept highways. I am pleased to see the great interest shown by the press and the people in the recent good roads convention held in New Orleans. The present agitation of the question should be kept up until it is crystallized into a practical movement that is bound to result in more genuine benefits to the country than anything else."

 Prof. L. A. LeRosen, principal of the Lafayette High School: "To the town and country, good roads mean business and prosperity; to the farmer, economy in marketing his crop, besides easy and ready access to the town. Every movement toward better roads should be zealously seconded by all."

 Mr. Billeaud, Jr., President Police Jury and delegate to the New Orleans convention;  "While the Police Jury of Lafayette parish was well disposed toward the building of good roads and had improved road conditions generally, the convention has served to further stimulate the good roads cause. The convention has enlightened the people in the way of organization. With the enthusiasm and interest manifested, I predict for Lafayette parish good roads, with their beneficial results."

B. N. Coronna, manager of Lafayette Compress and Storage Company:  "I consider good roads to be almost an absolute essential to good business. This parish has awakened to the necessity of improving its highways, and liberal sums are being appropriated by the Police Jury towards building and maintaining parochial roads. Our people are rapidly realizing the benefits that the whole community derive from well-kept thoroughfares, and it is believed this spirit will be maintained, and even increased, as the resultant benefits become more and more apparent."

 I. A. Broussard, sheriff of Lafayette parish:  "The good that will result from the movement started by the good roads convention at New Orleans cannot be overestimated. No movement is more deserving of the earnest support of every person interested in the welfare of this section. In a country like this, where agriculture is the basis of the prosperity of the people, nothing is more needed than a practical, well-directed system of public roads."

 Felix Demenade, merchant:  "Within the last few years the public roads of this parish have been greatly improved. The substitution of the present methods for the old Corvee system has been fruitful of good results. There is yet much to be done, and I think all citizens of the town and country should join the movement so well begun at the New Orleans good roads convention. I believe the convention will do a great deal of good. It will awaken the people to the necessity of concerted action in this most important matter."
Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.





Kansas City Meat.

 A. J. LeBlanc & Co., the well-known meat dealers, request The Gazette to inform the people of Lafayette that they will always keep a fresh supply of Kansas City meat. Orders will be filled promptly and the meat will be delivered at home. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.

 The Breaux Bridge Oil and Mineral Co., Limited.

 As may be seen in its advertisement in another column this company has been very fortunate in securing some of the most desirable oil lands in the Anse la Butte section. At the beginning the Breaux Bridge Oil and Mineral Company went to work and obtained leases, which, in the event that oil is found, will make its stock very valuable. The officers and directors of the company are among the most successful business men of St. Martin parish. The president is Albert Domengeaux, a member of the State Legislature and a prominent merchant of Breaux Bridge. T. J. Labbe is secretary and treasurer. Mrs. Labbe represents this district in the State known throughout the State. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.


 The Lafayette Oil and Mineral Company.

 Elsewhere in this paper will be found the advertisement of the Lafayette Oil and Mineral Company of which Leo Judice is the president and A. B. Denbo the secretary. The advertisement contains the prospectus of the company which is composed of well-known business and professional men of this parish. The company controls tracts of valuable land in this parish, one of which is situated a short distance from Anse la Butte. In view of the finding of oil in Calcasieu the company's leases in that parish will no doubt greatly enhance the value of its stock. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.



Destroyed by Fire.

 The home of Mr. Ralph W. Elliot, about two miles from town, was completely destroyed by fire last Thursday. It is believed that the fire originated on the roof and that it was caused by a spark from the chimney. The loss is a very heavy one to Mr. Elliot as not only the house but all its contents were burned. Among the articles consumed by the flames were a number of relics that were highly prized by the Elliot family. The property destroyed was one of the most comfortable homes in this section. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.



CONCEALED WEAPONS.

 Judge Debaillon has raised the carrying rate of pistols. At a recent term of court at Crowley, he fined three prisoners $75 each for carrying concealed weapons. If the State judiciary would only make this uniform freight rate, for hip-pocket pistols, it would minimize the number of transportations. - Baton Rouge Advocate.

 Judge Debaillon's example in imposing a heavy fine upon persons who carry concealed weapons is worthy of emulation. There is a splendid law levying a license on dealers in fire-arms that will no doubt have the effect of diminishing the number of people addicted to this very pernicious habit of making arsenals of themselves, and if the courts will only inflict severe penalties upon the "pistol toters" brought before them, there will be fewer homicides in the State.

 Judge Debaillon's long experience on the bench has convinved him of the necessity of employing the most stringent measures to rid society of a practice so fruitful of evil results.
Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.







CAPT. LUCAS' DISCLAIMER.

 The Gazette has received the following letter from Capt. A. F. Lucas:


                          J. F. GUFFEY COMPANY,
                                   FUEL OIL.
              BEAUMONT, TEX., MAY 6, 1901.

 Editor of the Lafayette Gazette, Lafayette, La.

 MY DEAR SIR - I  notice that you have reproduced an article, purporting to be from the New Orleans Picayune, in which you quote an interview I had with its reporter, stating that I said there was nothing in it at Anse la Butte, and that I have stated that we have no disposition to start operations there, and that we only wanted to get control and that oil would hold where it is, as we had plenty of it. Also the drastic remarks in regard to the Guffey and Galey Company, and the disposition of the people who are tied up with our leases. Allow me to reply to that, that the statement made by the Picayune, if it was such a settlement, was an absolute falsehood, and only made to garble the condition of things and irritate the owners of those properties. We think also that your drastic remarks were uncalled for, and in explanation to the foregoing would say that we propose to bore and operate at Anse la Butte as soon as possible, and only the difficulty in obtaining of machinery and men capable of doing the right kind of work has delayed our operations. We have the interests of the people associated with un in lease-holds at heart, as well as ourselves. In fact, their interests are identical with ours. I will thank you, as will our Company thank you to kindly correct the disparaging remark that I personally have never made, and oblige,
                    Yours respectfully,
                          A. F. LUCAS,
                               by G. C. S.

 The interview which furnished the basis of our editorial appeared in the New Orleans Picayune of April 29. The words ascribed to Capt. Lucas were printed between quotation marks, and knowing the Picayune to be a reputable journal and in the absence of any denial from Capt. Lucas, we accepted the interview as truthful and commented upon the remarkable utterances which it contained. We had no reason to question the authenticity of the statement and under the circumstances our remarks were justifiable and not a bit too "drastic."

 If Capt. Lucas was incorrectly reported, we regret that we did not know it before the publication of our editorial, because we do not wish to do any injustice to Capt. Lucas or anyone else. In order to have prevented the dissemination of erroneous impressions concerning the Guffey Company the incorrect interview should have been rectified as soon as it was published. We gladly give space to the foregoing letter particularly because Capt. Lucas couples his disclaimer with a promise "to bore and operate at Anse la Butte as soon as possible." This will be good news to the people. Although several companies have been taking up leases throughout this section and thousands of acres are controlled by them, not an inch of actual boring has yet been done and it is not surprising if the reported interview of Capt. Lucas has caused unfavorable comment. The farmers who signed the leases acted in good faith. They readily offered their lands and were pleased to accept a reasonable compensation in the event of the discovery of oil, but it is safe to say that not a single lease would have been secured if any doubt existed as to the sincerity of the lessees.

 Capt. Lucas directed the first investigations at Anse la Butte and the stated through the columns of the Times-Democrat that his work there was a success and that it was discontinued on account of a lack of financial support. The Guffey Company, with which he is connected, as some of the most desirable lands in that section, and it is to be hoped that he will soon be in a position to give some tangible evidence of the fact that he means business. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.


GOOD ROADS.

 The Movement Started by the New Orleans Convention Strongly Endorsed.

 With characteristic energy the Times-Democrat is exerting itself in behalf of good roads. It has interviewed prominent men in the various towns in the State and in that way it has secured the strongest endorsements of the movement so auspiciously begun by the New Orleans convention. We reproduce below the interviews of a number of Lafayette people:

Dr. F. S. Mudd:  "The good roads convention recently convened in New Orleans is one of the best and most to be commended of any meetings of recent date. Its object and scope are certainly fraught with great benefit and instruction to all Southern communities. The most emphatic evidence of advancement and civilization is the state of the roads of any section of the country through which travel and commerce traverse. A scientific basis is the surest and speediest way to attain these ends. This the good roads convention recommends and supplies."

 C. O. Mouton, merchant:  "I am much pleased to see the interest created recently in regard to the project for good roads. I do not know of a cause more worthy the attention of every public-spirited citizen."

 S. R. Parkerson, cashier of the First National Bank of Lafayette:  "Failure to have good roads has been the greatest obstacle to advancement of this section. The promoters of the good roads movement should be given every encouragement. The prosperity of town and country in a great measure depends upon well-kept highways. I am pleased to see the great interest shown by the press and the people in the recent good roads convention held in New Orleans. The present agitation of the question should be kept until it is crystallized into a practical movement that is bound to result in more genuine benefits to the country than anything else."

 Prof. W. A. LeRosen, principal of the Lafayette High School:  "To the country town good roads mean business and prosperity; to the farmer, economy in marketing his crop, besides easy and ready access to the town. Every movement toward better roads should be zealously seconded by all."

 M. Billeaud, Jr., President Police Jury and delegate to the New Orleans convention:  "While the Police Jury of Lafayette parish was well disposed toward the building of good roads and had improved road conditions generally, the convention has served to further stimulate the good roads cause. The convention has enlightened the people in the way of organization. With the enthusiasm and interest manifested, I predict for Lafayette parish good roads, with their beneficial results."

 B. N. Coronna, manager of Lafayette Compress and Storage Company:  "I consider good roads to be almost an absolute essential to good business. This parish has awakened to the necessity of improving its highways, and liberal sums are being appropriated by the Police Jury toward building and maintaining parochial roads. Our people are rapidly realizing the benefits that the whole community derive from well-kept thoroughfares, and it is believed this spirit will be maintained, and even increased, as the result benefits become more and more apparent."

 I. A. Broussard, sheriff of Lafayette parish:  "The good that will result from the movement started by the good roads convention at New Orleans cannot be overestimated. No movement is more deserving of the earnest support of every person interested in the welfare of this section. In a country like this, where agriculture is the basis of the prosperity of the people, nothing is more needed than a practical, well-directed system of public roads."

 Felix Demanade, merchant:  "Within the last few years the public roads of this parish have been greatly improved. The substitution of the present methods for the old Corvee system as been fruitful of good results. There is yet much to be done, and I think all citizens of the town and country should join the movement so well begun at the New Orleans good roads convention. I believe the convention will do a great deal of good. It will awaken the people to the necessity of  concerted action in this most important matter." Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.




Police Jury Proceedings.

Lafayette, La., May 2, 1901. - The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present:  M. Billeaud, Jr., F. G. Mouton, J. C. Buchanan, J. A. Labbe, J. O. Blanchet, Alonzo Lacey, Saul Broussard, Alex. M. Broussard and Jno. Whittington.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 Messrs. Billeaud and Mouton, delegates to the Good Roads Convention, gave a most interesting and enthusiastic report of the work accomplished by that assemblage.

 The addresses by practical and scientific road builders as well as the actual demonstrations in the art of constructing roadways, showed, beyond question, the superiority of the system advocated over the ordinary methods pursued in the country parishes. With improved machinery the cost of building roads could be materially reduced and at the same time better highways maintained.

 The following report was ordered spread upon the minutes and the delegates were tendered thanks for their diligence:

 Gentlemen of the Jury: - Upon receiving appointment from the governor we question ourselves as to what information we could gather as to the buildings of dirt roads. We felt that the system of building roads could hardly be improved upon so far as circumstances in this parish would permit, and we considered that we knew all about road making. However, we soon realized our error. As to the actual display of road work, several different types of graders and other implements were exhibited in practical operation and the secretary will distribute pamphlets illustrative and descriptive of them.

 In the first place these people never attempt to make a road before getting up specifications for same. Their main roads are 24 feet wide from ditch to ditch, with the laterals ranging from 16 to 20 feet wide according to the service required of them. The pitch is generally from 1/2 to 3/4 inch to the foot according to circumstances.

 In order to get this embankment they start the roadbed with a belt conveyor grader which carts the dirt from the extreme sides of the road, the belt conveyor distributing the dirt in the center of the road. The ordinary grader levels the entire surface, providing the road with adequate drainage. The next thing in order is the roller, a massive cylinder that packs the roadway into a firm bed.

 Much information given in the way of bridge work; brick culverts to replace small bridges; all affording  greater economy. But gentlemen, the above descriptions would be in vain and all attempts at improvement futile unless provisions were made not only to execute these plans, but uniformity of method insisted upon throughout. This is of paramount importance and to attain this end the convention organized a permanent State Association properly officered and equipped. Each Police Jury in the State shall appoint one vice-president whose duty it shall be to confer with the different Police Jurors of the wards in his parish receive from the latter, information as to work being done and give in turn, certain lines of action suggested by the State organization as will best subserve the local requirements. Will here state that it is the hope of this organization to secure appropriations from both State and National governments. We, therefore recommend the appointment of a competent man as vice-president of the State organization to represent Lafayette parish. With this system inaugurated we hope to see at no distant day our thoroughfares comparing favorably with those of other States and answering the most sanguine expectations and demands of the inhabitants.
                              Respectfully,
                                  M. BILLEAUD, JR., E. G. Mouton.
Lafayette, La., May 2, 1901.

 By motion the appointment by President Billeaud of Mr. C. C. Brown, of Carencro, as vice-president to represent Lafayette parish in the State Good Roads Association, was ratified and approved.

 Mr. Blanchet reported notarial act acquiring roadway from Nelson Higginbotham, Joseph Vallot, Achille Melancon and Andre Melancon.

 Mr. Blanchard also reported securing donations to public road in 4th ward, but President Olivier of the School Board had refused to sign for that part of the road across the school section on ground that legislative enactment was necessary for his proper authorization in the premises. The donations were accepted, ordered filed and recorded.

 Mr. Blanchet reported progress in the matter of selecting site for a new bridge at Olidon Broussard's and was continued and directed to confer with the authorities of Vermilion. The secretary was instructed to write the Police Jury of Vermilion and ascertain what steps, if any, had been taken to secure fixing a site of the bridge by United States engineers.

 The committee on clerk's office was continued.

 Messrs. Whittington and Broussard reported Severin Duhon bridge repaired and in good condition. Approved and accepted.

 Mr. Alex. M. Broussard reported favorably on the proposition of committee from Rayne to build a road across the southwestern portion of the parish and recommend an appropriation of $50 to aid said committee. Ordered to lie over.

 Mr. Mouton, on behalf of the committee appointed to repair jail, reported progress and the committee was continued.

 Messrs. L. Judice, B. N. Coronna and O. P. Guilbeaux here appeared and asked for an appropriation to aid in putting the Breaux Bridge road in prime condition. Gentlemen were ready to advance the money without interest to the parish. By motion of Mr. Mouton the sum of $200 was appropriated for said purpose provided citizens interested contributed a like amount. Messrs. Buchanan and Mouton were appointed a committee to let contract with President Billeaud ex-officio chairman.

 By motion of Mr. Mouton, the following was adopted:

 Be it resolved, That Mr. _______ Cunningham be and is hereby notified to remove the levee on the north side of his property on the road leading to Breaux Bridge within five days from notice, otherwise said levee will be removed at his expense by the road overseer.

 Mr. Whittington reported some difficulty as to opening the road between J. P. Gulley's and Severin Duhon's and the secretary was requested to examine the original act tracing said road.

 Mr. Blanchet reported purchasing two mules for 4th ward at a cost of $325.

 Felix Begnaud, having been appointed justice of the peace to succeed Charles Breaux of the 8th ward, was allowed same salary as his predecessor under contract.

 Each member of the Jury was requested to produce at the next meeting a full list of all persons subject to license tax in his respective ward.

 The sum of $25 was appropriated for use by committee on jail repairs.

 The treasurer submitted the following reports:

 To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of parish funds since my last report:

---------------------p. 2------------------

 Respectfully submitted,
                  J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.
  Lafayette, La., May 2, 1901.

 To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of special road funds since my last report:

 ----------------------p. 2--------------------

 Respectfully submitted,
         J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.
 Lafayette, La., May 2, 1901.

 The following accounts were rejected:

 ---------------------p. 2--------------------------

 The following accounts were approved:


----------------------p. 2---------------------

 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
M. BILLEAUD, JR., President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.





 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 5/11/1901.

 The town election was held last Monday. As there was no opposition to the Democratic ticket a very light vote was polled. Seventy-six ballots were cast and two were spoilt.

 Mr. P. L. DeClouet's residence in Mudd's addition will soon be completed. It will be one of the finest homes in this section. The work was done under the supervision of A. E. Mouton.

 Mrs. Wm. Campbell is having a very neat and commodious home built in Johnston street.

 Vic Levy's new residence is nearly completed. It is one of the handsomest dwellings in town. It was built under the direction of A. E. Mouton. A. Aschaffenburg & Co. did the plumbing and H. A. Eastin the painting.

 Dr. J. D. Trahan has returned home after attending a meeting of State Board of Medical Examiners held in New Orleans recently. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1901.




















     






  







---------------------------------
lagniappe:
THE NEW MAN.
Incident of the day When Women Shall Carry the Latchkeys.

  "Er-Midred," he said a trifle nervously, as his better half laid down the morning paper, and lighting a cigarette, prepared for her departure to the city.  "Mildred, dear, do you think you could spare me a little money to-day?"

 His wife glanced at him impatiently. "What, again, George?"  she said: "Why, I only gave you your housekeeping allowance on - let me see - Thursday, wasn't it? Really, some of you men seem to think we women are made of money."

 "You forget, my dear," he remarked, "there are girl's wages, and the water rate, and the children both want new boots."

 "Didn't I give you money for that?" she asked.

 "No, dear, that was the flannel for little Milly's warm petticoats I'm making."

 Besides, dear, I - don't angry, will you? - I saw such a cheap pair of trousers at the winter's clearance sale yesterday that I couldn't resist buying them, and you know I've hardly a rag to my back."

 Always your cry, George," she said angrily. "Really, your extravagance in dress is something sinful; it is a pity you haven't got to go out and earn the money; you'd know its value then. Here take this, and goodness sake do try and pay some of your household bills with it and not frivol the money away on a lot of trash."

 "There's a dear, good, darling wife," he cried joyfully; "let me help my Mildred on with her coat," he added, following her into the hall. "What time will you be home?"

 "Can't say, I'm sure," she answered. "I've got a lot to attend to at the office to-day, and I shall drop into the club for an hour for so after. So you needn't wait dinner."

 "O, that'll be nice!" he responded.  "I've got my woman coming to wash to-day and the girls and I are going to put up clean curtains and things. Give me a kiss, dearest! there-there's your bus going now."

 And as the breadwinner dashed out after the passing vehicle George blew her a parting kiss and went upstairs to bathe the children.

From the Chicago Tribune and in the Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1895.



contact vermilionville@yahoo.com


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From the Lafayette Advertiser of May 11th, 1901:

Bad Fire At Magnolia Plantation. 

It is with the feelings of the deepest regret that we chronicle the destruction by fire of the Elliot home at Magnolia Plantation this parish last Thursday noon. The fire originated from the explosion of a gasoline stove and so very rapid was the progress of the flames, that none of the household effects could be saved. Mrs. Cartwright one of the ladies of the house is still suffering from the terrible burns she sustained last winter was removed from the house with much difficulty. Not only do we regret the personal loss to the Elliot family, but the old home was a land mark in our parish. Its dimension, the general plan of the house and particularly its spacious gallery recalled another epoch. One had but to view the old place and at once visions of old southern hospitality and ease dawned across the imagination. It is to be hoped that the cruel flames did not destroy the majestic magnolias that towered above the house for now that the old building is gone, they in their proud grandeur would be a fitting reminder of the days that are gone, and of the brave southerners who have passed away. The place originally belonged to Valerien Martin, father of Mrs. Wm. Campbell, Sr. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.





Municipal Election.

 At the Municipal Election held here, on the 6th day of May, the following officers were elected without opposition: Chas. D. Caffery, Mayor; F. Demanade, F. E. Girard, H. H. Hohorst, A. E. Mouton, John O. Mouton, Ben Falk and Geo. DeBlanc, Councilmen. All of these gentlemen are so well and favourably known, that any comment on our part would be futile, suffice it to say, that in their hands the welfare of Lafayette is assured, and that each of these gentlemen elected is according to our point of view "the right man in the right place." Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.




Shot In the Foot. - While on an outing on Vermilion Bay, Prof. R. H. Broussard of Pilette accidentally shot himself in the foot. The muzzle of the gun rested on the foot and the discharge lacerated the member considerably. Dr. Tolson, who attended, the injured man, found the wound painful but not dangerous. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.


Leaving the Southern Pacific Main Line.
 It is with much regret that we note the departure from Lafayette, of Mr. John Mitchell, for a number of years the trusted Southern Pacific's master mechanic at this place. The company has seen fit to reinstate the venerable gentleman by placing him in charge of the branch road to Abbeville. Our sister town of Vermilion can justly feel proud of acquiring such an excellent resident, and though Lafayette can hardly express its regret in words, yet it is a source of pleasure to know that our good old friend is not so far away after all. Good luck to you Mr. Mitchell. The Advertiser and your hosts of Lafayette friends wish you much joy and prosperity in your new location. 
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.





Seventy Young Doctors.

 The State Board of Medical Examiners held its examinations in the Tulane Medical College, at New Orleans. Dr. H. S. Cocram President; Dr. A. F. Barrow, vice-president; Dr. J. D. Trahan, Dr. F. M. Thornhill and Dr. F. A. Larue, all in their places. There were ninety applicants for admission to the medical profession and of these seventy were successful and are now entitled to write M. D. after their name. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.









DIED, on May 6th, Willard Kahn, only son of Sigmund Kahn and Rose Bendel, aged nine months. Though little Willards journey on earth was such a short one, he will be sadly missed in the loving home where he was so tenderly cared for. To the grief stricken parents who mourn his loss, the Advertiser extends sincerest condolences. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.




S.L.I. Inaugural.
President L. E. Stephens, has chosen the fifteenth of June as the inauguration day of the State Industrial Institute. All will be in readiness for that date as the furniture is on its way to Lafayette now and in our next number we shall give full details of the inaugural ceremonies. Work on the dormitory building has begun and will be pushed with activity.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.






Anse la Butte.

 The following letter explains itself:
    Mr. H. A. Van der Cruyssen,
            Lafayette, La.
   Dear Sir:
     Please ascertain, in the local lumber yard there if we can obtain the following bill of stuff:

 ----------------------p. 1---------------

 We have decided to start a well as soon as possible at Anse la Butte or adjacent territory, as we are desirous of demonstrating to the good people of Lafayette and Breaux Bridge that there is no intention on our side to withhold operations, but to proceed on the lines of development. Kindly let this be known and notify us if this bill can be obtained in Lafayette, and if not we will have to order it from here, and oblige.
                Yours Respectfully,
       J. M. GUFFEY COMPANY,
                           By A. F. Lucas.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.


Oil Land Deals.

 Important deals in real estate are daily recorded, and the prospects for striking oil in this parish are equal if not better than those of any section of Louisiana. The lands around Anse la Butte are always increasing in value, and during the week Sheriff Broussard purchased fifteen arpents of swamp in that vicinity, from Captain Buchanan, for the sum of $15,000. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.



 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 5/11/1901.

 Dr. J. D. Trahan returned from a ten days stay in New Orleans, and has resumed practice.

 The Fanny Hill Co., will not perform Sunday as had been announced but will be on time Monday night.

 Rev. Father Baulard went to Breaux Bridge to assist in the First Communion ceremonies, last Thursday.

 Capt. Cade has sold his beautiful seashore resort at High Island, Texas, for a greasy million of dollars. - Abbeville Republican Idea.

 The Lafayette Sugar Refinery Co. Ltd., is now ready to contract for cane. In addition to market prices, it is paying a bonus of 25 cts., per ton for cane delivered by wagons. Advances are made on cane. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1901.


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 From the Lafayette Gazette of May 11th, 1895:



THE ELECTION.

 The election to choose a mayor and seven councilmen for the town of Lafayette was held last Monday. As there was practically no opposition to the regular Democratic ticket it had a real walk-over. The faction defeated at the mass meeting held at the court-house centered all its opposition against Judge A. J. Moss and Judge O. C. Mouton and on election day a desperate effort was made to secure the political scalps of these two gentlemen. A ticket was formed out of the regular ticket with the exception of Judge Moss whose name was replaced by that of Mr. Wm. Clegg and Dr. Tolson's name was printed in the place of Judge Mouton's. In justice to Mr. Clegg and Dr. Tolson we will state that their names were used without any authorization from them. They supported the regular ticket and were ignorant of the fact that they were candidates. It may not be amiss to state also, that several persons who were known to be opposed to the ticket before and at the nominating convention, cast their ballots openly for the whole ticket, but those were evidently in the minority, as is clearly shown by the vote received by Mr. Clegg and Dr. Tolson. The fight was made against Judge Moss and Judge Mouton, but the opposition was not strong enough to defeat them. They went in by a large majority. The following is the vote:

 --------------------p. 3------------------

Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1895.




 IT IS WRONG.

 The Gazette believes that it will be unfair to compel the people in the additions to pay back licenses and taxes. The members of the Police Jury are all intelligent and fair-minded men, and we have no doubt that when the matter is properly laid before them, they will act with the same fairness which has always characterized their actions in the past. It would be inflicting a heavy burden on the people living and doing business in the additions if they are forced to pay the parish taxes and licenses for the years 1893, 1894 and 1895. Like people in all sections of the country they have suffered very much from the general business depression, and this is a most critical period for them as well as for others. To hold one's head above water to-day, is as much as the most prosperous can do, and few are there who can do more. The merchants and liquor dealers in the additions should not be compelled to pay the back taxes and licenses, and should not be made to suffer for somebody else's mistake for which they can not be held responsible. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1895.




Bloomers.

 While the Gazette does not wish to take issue with or against the women who wear bloomers, the following verse from the Bible is given simply for information:

 "The women shall not wear that which pertaineth to a man - for all that do so are an abomination unto the Lord, thy God."

 A bright contemporary remarks that this does not apply to bloomers, for no sane man has ever been known to wear bloomers. Some time ago a lady-writer in the Arena claimed that breeches were originally worn by women who have a perfect right to wear them when they see fit. Between the silver issue and the bloomer question it is hard to say which is the hardest to solve. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1895.


 Runaways.

 Robt. Bailey borrowed Sigismond Bernard's horse and buggy and drove to the depot but he had to come back afoot. The horse ran away and Bob was compelled to jump out of the buggy, which he did just in time escape unhurt. The buggy was pretty badly damaged before the horse was stopped.


Henry Hohorst's horse made things look rather lively around the depot the other day. He took fright and started to run like a scared wolf. The buggy which he was pulling collided against another buggy and a gig, resulting in considerable damage to the three vehicles. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1895.



 For the Pen.


 Sheriff Broussard and Messrs. H. Billaud and Abram Hirsh left Tuesday for Baton Rouge to take the prisoners to the penitentiary:

 Ben Young, burglary and larceny, 7 years; Andrew Gary, shooting with intent to murder, 10 years; Joe Domingue, larceny, 8 months; Joe Green, larceny, 2 years; Frank Green, larceny, 1 year; Bob Rogers, burglary and larceny, 3 years. All the parties are colored with the exception of Domingue. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1895.


NEATLY NABBED.

 Last Saturday a negro called at the home of Victor Couvillon near Carencro, and offered to sell a horse for $12,000. Mr. Couvillon, suspecting that the horse had been stolen, hastened to Carencro and told Judge O. P. Guilbeau of his suspicions. Judge Guilbeau, accompanied by Mr. Couvillon, went in pursuit of the negro and soon had him under arrest. Sheriff Broussard was telegraphed for and he promptly proceeded to Carencro and brought the negro to town and jailed him. Monday morning Onezime Dronet came to town and stated to Sheriff Broussard that a horse and saddle had been stolen from him Saturday last, and to his surprise the sheriff produced the horse which Mr. Dronet recognized as the one stolen. It appears that the negro, whose name is Joseph Phillips, is a notorious rascal, to whom a term can not fail to prove beneficial to his health is not to his morals. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1895.


 Save Our Boys !

 [To the Lafayette Gazette.]

 Inasmuch as the necessity for the enacting of a law becomes apparent there must be a pre-existing evil, crying loudly for legal remedy. Legislation to limit, if not to restrain altogether, the baneful influence of houses of ill-repute is necessary. Minors should be protected by law and we pray that, at the meeting of the next Legislature, the member from this parish will take the initiative in seeing that a law is enacted, prohibiting the inmates of houses of prostitution from receiving boys, say under 18 years, in their establishments under a heavy penalty.
                     (Signed) FATHER.
Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1895.



A Foolish Demonstration.

 Thursday morning a "stuffed man" was found hanging to the telephone wire on Lincoln avenue. On one side were written the following words:  "King John, died May 6th, at 7 o'clock," and on the other side appeared the following:  "Plant sweet flowers on my political grave. Czar." No words should be too strong to condemn this demonstration, and The Gazette regrets that those responsible for it have so far forgotten themselves as to indulge in such a ridiculous thing. It is right and natural that men should rejoice over a political victory, but let the rejoicing be done in daylight and above board. This effigy-hanging done in secrecy will never meet with favor as it can be productive of good to no one.

 Nobody is happier than The Gazette over the result of the last municipal election and it will not try to conceal its joy, but as a newspaper it would be recreant to its duty if it did not express its disapproval of such proceedings. Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1895.




 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 5/11/1895.

 Judge Felix Voorhies was in Lafayette several days this week at the bed-side of his sick brother, Mr. Alfred Voorhies.

 Mr. and Mrs. Charles Martin, of Welsh, were stopping at Dr. G. A. Martin's home last Sunday.

 The Gazette learned Monday that the venerable Mrs. Nathan Hoffpauir was hopelessly ill at her home near Queue Tortue.

 Miss Marie Moise, daughter of Judge Moise of New Orleans, is visiting her friend, Miss Lea Gladu.

 Felix Voorhies, who had been engaged repairing the machinery of the Carencro sugar mill, spent Sunday and Monday with his family in Lafayette. He returned to Carencro Tuesday.

 Leo Alpha fell out of a mulberry tree last Tuesday evening, and broke his left arm. Dr. J. D. Trahan attended the little fellow and bandaged his arm.

 Mr. Rogan, formerly connected with the T. & P. Railway, has been appointed roadmaster of the M. L. & T. Division, vice P. J. Watson, resigned.

 A dog showing symptoms of hyrdophobia was killed last Monday morning by Robert Bailey and Alphonse Peck. Both these gentlemen being crack shots the poor canine was "done up" in a very short time.

 The many friends of Messrs. Numa Domengeaux and O. Duvernet are pleased to see that these popular gentlemen have recovered sufficiently to resume their work. Mr. F. Duvernet has not yet given up his crutches.


An affidavit was made before Justice McFadden charging one Pierre Royer with breaking into the house of Henry Ditrigde and making an attack upon the latter with a dangerous weapon with intent to kill.

 Thomas B. Hopkins, Jr., arrived home Thursday morning from Galveston where he recently graduated as a druggist in the Medical department of the Texas University. We understand Mr. Hopkins will move to Opelousas where he has secured a position.
Lafayette Gazette 5/11/1895.













 

























                      







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From the Lafayette Advertiser of May 11th, 1895:


 Wants His Pistol Back.

 Oliver Trahan, who was arrested here about three months ago for carrying concealed weapons and gave bond for his appearance at the district court, failed to appear and Tuesday wrote to Sheriff Broussard to send him his pistol to Eunice. His chances for being re-arrested are a great deal better than those of getting his revolver.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1895.



Horse Stolen.


 Saturday Sheriff Broussard received a telephone message from Judge Guilbeau, of Carencro, informing him that a negro was at that place, offering to sell him a good horse for $12. The sheriff asked them to hold the negro and at once went to Carencro. When arrested a revolver was found on the negro and he was held on a charge of carrying concealed weapons and brought to Lafayette and lodged in jail. On Monday Mr. Onezine Drouet came to Lafayette looking for a horse which had been stolen from his place about six miles out of town. He identified the horse which the negro had as being his property, and the State will doubtless have another negro convict for a number of years.
Laf. Adv. 5/11/1895.





We Need A Market-House.
 There should be a market house in Lafayette. It would not only be a great convenience to gardeners, but would encourage this industry. The town people would not have to depend on hucksters for their country produce, fruit, etc., if we had a market, but could go and select what they wish. As it is now is the gardener and farmer does not know what to do with his produce unless he peddles it and the town people never know what they will be able to get until the morning, with its string of peddlers. A building for this purpose would not cost much and could doubtless be rented to a good advantage. 
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1895.







LAFAYETTE PARISH SHERIFF HUNG IN EFFIGY.

In the following letter to the Editor of the Advertiser, Sheriff Vigneaux Calls it a  "Cowardly Act."

It reads as follows:


 Thursday morning the better class of citizens of this town were shocked at the scandal caused by a band of cowards and malicious and prejudiced idiots, who by taking advantage of the obscure veil of the night, showed their vengeance by hanging me in effigy. The greatest reason these cowards have for disliking me is the fact that I make mockery of their cowardice. Their cowardly act was supposed to humiliate me and glorify themselves over an election in which there was no opposition. My duties as city marshal have not been favorable to these cowardly curs  and therefore they show their vengeance in their usual coward way.

 On my usual round about town as marshal I came upon this attractive spot at about 6 o'clock and at once proceeded to remove the obstruction by cutting down the puppet (mannequin) and clearing the public ways. This obstruction was placed here during the early hours of the morning, the low-down curs expecting the quiet hours of the night to shield their identity. It did not take long to find a clue which led to the discovery of the dark actors. A small scrap of paper in a pocket of the puppet gave sufficient evidence to begin the investigation, which, step by step led to the detection.

 The following are the names of those engaged in this cowardly act: Henry Church, Augustus Albarados, Wilfred Riu, (Dids) E. Mouton, (Charlo) Alcide Mouton, Bud Triay and John Vandergriff. Three of these pall bearers were the only ones that could be found. To these I publicly gave my opinion and to all others connected in this affair I want to say that they are capable of stealing, robbing, murder, or anything else that can be accomplished in the in the dark and secretly. They are a set of miserable, cowardly curs and to those whom I had the pleasure of telling this, took it like the curs which they are.

 I await anxiously to be politically buried, but object to be carried to rest by such a set of cowards.
                                      J. VIGNEAUX.
Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1895.



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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of May 11th, 1889:


 Election Attempted.

 In connection with the election attempted to be held here last Monday for municipal officers of this town, we desire to give a plain statement of facts. During the week preceding the election the town was rife with rumors as to what would be done by the regulators on the day of the election; all, however, culminating in this, that the negro voters of our town would not be allowed to vote. These rumors were not generally created in town, we are satisfied, up to Sunday evening, the 5th inst. all then, 'tis it is to say,'  they were given foundation in act. On that evening, between six and seven o'clock, a body of men armed with Winchester rifles rode into town, and were said to be from St. Martin parish. The arrival of these caused no little commotion among the law-abiding citizens of the town, but barring horsemen riding the streets through the night there was no disturbance of the peace of the town. Monday, however, opened another chapter of  the history of our town. At the break of day a body of an estimated at between fifty and sixty men were assembled in front of the court house where the poll was to be held, and whom, excepting probably three or four, were non-residents of the town; and many, especially those who seemed to be head or in command, were strangers to the people of the town and non-residents of the parish. These men only carried side arms. At six o'clock promptly the poll was opened in the court house, the place designated (unreadable word) and which for information we will say stands in the middle of a square enclosed by a fence with entrances to the square, one in front and two on either side. At the opening of the polls there were present Sheriff Isaac Broussard, an executive officer; Clerk A. M. Martin as Supervisor, and two commissioners, Wm. Campbell and and Paul Demanade the third, L. Marchan, a colored man failed to appear, Joseph H. Moss was sworn in his stead. A few citizens were also present. In the meantime men with side arms stationed themselves at the entrances to the yard. These men, with the exception of two or three were utter strangers to the town. Sometimes after the opening of the poll. And after fifteen or twenty white men voted, a party of six or eight negroes, well known residents and some of the property owners in the town started to come in by one of the side entrances to the yard, when the man in the lead stopped by one of the St. Martinville men. Marshal Vigneaux, standing nearby told them to go on in and vote. They entered the yard and on into the court house. On going up to vote inside the court house, and right at the ballot box, they were stopped by Pierre Olivier, resident of this town, with revolver in hand, who told them they could not vote. Sheriff Broussard approached him and persuaded him to desist, and led him away some steps; and this party of negroes voted. About the time party of negroes just mentioned reached the court house door, or while they were voting, a signal or whistle was sounded by some one, and the men at the yard entrances left their posts, moved to a building near the court house and in a few minutes re-appeared bearing Winchester rifles, and took their stations as before. Then it was the mayor of the town, with several citizens standing around him called upon the sheriff to disperse the mob (who asked time to see his legal [unreadable word]), and things were brought to a still. Returning in a few minutes the sheriff went to a party of negroes on the outside of the square and asked if any of them wished to vote, and two or three of them replying in the affirmative were invited under the escort of the sheriff to enter the yard, when they were told by several men there with their rifles ready for use not come any further. The negroes drew back, and the sheriff then entered the court house and on consultation directed the commissioners to close the polls, which order was then and there carried into effect. The commissioners thereupon drew up and forwarded to the Governor a statement of the affair, concluding as follows:

 "Therefore we, said the officers, at the request of the sheriff, closed the polls and refused further to proceed with the said election under the demonstrations of armed violence, and we have therefore, after making affidavits for the arrest of the offenders, made this statement in duplicate and signed and sworn to the same."

 Subsequently several parties were arrested, and soon bailed, attended, however, by no little excitement and confusion. After the release of the prisoners it was thought all trouble was over. On Monday night, however, armed men gave no little uneasiness to the citizens of the town by riding through the streets. On Tuesday morning the excitement was intense, owing to the presence of 300 or more men armed with shot guns and rifles being assembled on the North of town within the corporate limits. The following report of their proceedings, sent to the Picayune, is short and we believe is in the main correct:

 "Marshall Vigneaux states that he received yesterday from friends three warnings that his life was in danger, and that he was obliged to take refuge in his room, prepared to defend himself. If such a measure was contemplated, it arose from the rumors that Mr. Vigneaux had purchased a lot of arms and placed them in the hands of negroes in expectation of a conflict. This rumor was generally circulated and given credence to by many.



 "A delegation of regulators, some six in number, called upon Mr. Vigneaux in regard to the matter, whereupon he offered to allow a search for the same provided they would the party or parties who originated the rumor. He did show (unreadable) personal arms and requested that inquiry should be made of the merchants whether he had purchased arms.

 "A proposition was made to submit the election to a white primary next Monday, but nothing definite has yet been reached, although the opinion prevails that such an agreement was consummated, and Mr. Vigneaux expresses willingness to settle affairs"

 Tuesday Oscar J. Rhodes, a negro justice of the peace, was waited upon and his resignation demanded. He promptly resigned. Michael Foote, a negro constable, who had fled, returned and resigned. Since the occurrences above chronicled we have seen no armed demonstrators nor heard of any disturbances of the peace. We believe the excitement has subsided. We are truly glad that we have no bloodshed to record.

 Attorney General Rogers arrived here on the early Wednesday train. He was met by Sheriff Broussard. During the day he held a consultation with officers and leading citizens. He returned without announcing any formal decision. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1889.   




Two Bids Received.

 Mr. C. C. Brown, member of the Police Jury of the 6th ward, informed us that he had received two bids for the construction of the bridge across bayou Vermilion east of the town of Carencro, as follows:  From E. H. Vordenbaumen, for $350.00; from Alcide Broussard for $795. The contract was awarded to Mr. Broussard. The dimensions of the bridge are, length 220 feet by a width of 14 feet. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1889.



 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 5/11/1889.

 We need rain. The dust has been suffocating for days.

 The corn in this parish is well advanced and growing finely; much better than the cotton.

 The pastures are now in a most flourishing condition, and the stock all look well.

 The cool, damp weather existing during the week has not been altogether favorable to the crops, and we hear of the young cotton suffering in some localities.

 There has been a little stir in the social circles of Lafayette of late. What has become of the gaiety of our young folks? Can't we rustle up a ball, or some other amusement?!

 We saw several loads of flour leaving for the country during the week. Does this indicate a scarcity of corn? We were under the impression plenty had been raised in the parish, and such must be the case. Here is an item for some of our country correspondents to inquire into. Lafayette Advertiser 5/11/1899.




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