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Monday, January 12, 2015

**APRIL 25TH M C

From the Lafayette Gazette of April 25th, 1903:


POST OFFICE ROBBERY.


 Marshal Peck Captures John White and Recovers Booty.


 Last Tuesday morning at two o'clock Mr. Ed Higginbotham who lives next door to the post office saw a light in that building and upon closer investigation discovered a burglar in the act of opening the small iron safe kept on the premises. Mr. Higginbotham immediately sent in an alarm to the central phone office and Sheriff Broussard, Marshal Peck, Deputy Campbell and a posse of citizens responded promptly but before their arrival the thief had secured some $30.00 in cash, stamps etc., and had fled. The officers gave hot chase but soon lost their man in the neighborhood of the rail depot. Every precaution was taken to intercept the fugitive on the outgoing trains here and at all points along the line. Two men were arrested at Crowley but were subsequently released as no evidence of guilt could be found.

 However about daylight Marshal Peck and Deputy Campbell responding to a call at Scott to examine two suspects held there, determined, on returning, to search the railroad track. In pursuance of this plan, Marhsal Peck followed the railway while Deputy Campbell returned by the public road. Marshal Peck soon met John White, a negro and ordered him to halt, which the darky refused to do. Under cover of a weapon however Marshal Peck succeeded in marching his prisoner to a nearby cabin, where the negro made a desperate attempt to escape by striking the officer over the head with a single-tree and inflicting a slight scalp wound. The plucky marshal closed in on his man and with timely assistance of two negroes succeeded in overpowering him and placing fetters upon his limbs. A search was rewarded by the recovery of all the stolen money, stamps and even an old pen knife taken from the office. White was brought to jail and Inspector Anderson of New Orleans lodged the proper charge against him before Justice Monnier. The culprit will be held here until his trial before the United States court at Opelousas.

 It was first believed that several persons were implicated and that some explosive had been used to open the safe but later developments proved that White was alone and that he had pried the vault open with an ax or some like instrument. The proof of the negro's  guilt is beyond question and White himself has made an acknowledgement of the entire transaction.

 A reward of $200, it is understood will be paid for the capture and conviction of White and doubtless this will be apportioned between Marshal Peck, the two negroes who assisted him and Mr. Ed Higginbotham whose prudence and promptness so nearly enabled the officers to bag their man in the very commission of his crime.

 This is the third and only successful attempt to open the safe, in question, two attempts being made under Postmaster Demanade's administration, the second resulting in breaking off the heavy outer door. White therefore had only to pry open the thin inner door and secure the money. Postmaster Domengeaux may be congratulated over the happy outcome of the affair as otherwise it would have been a rather discouraging feature of his induction into office. As to the officers concerned, nothing more praiseworthy could be said than that they have faithfully and efficiently performed duty. Such admirable work will soon inspire a wholesome respect for law and order.
Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.



Off to Baton Rouge.

 Sheriff Broussard, Deputies A. P. Labbe, Abraham Hirsch and Rousseau Dugas left for Baton Rouge yesterday having in charge four negroes convicted and sentenced to the penitentiary, at the recent term of court. The following comprise the list and sentences imposed: Daniel McCoy, criminal assault, life; Placide Washington, shooting to kill, three years; Willie Lodge, passing counterfeit money, three months. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.

   

To Falk's Opera-house. - Mr. Geo. W. Scott and his metropolitan attraction will appear at Falk's Opera-house, Sunday night, April 26, 1903, In Hal Reed's big scenic production of "Roanoke," a beautiful story of Old Virginia, in five acts. Mr. Scott has a much stronger company than when he appeared before and the production of "Roanoke," will be the best seen on our local stage this season. High class specialties are introduced. Don't fail to see Aunt Dinah. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.



PUBLIC OPINION.

To The Editor of The Lafayette Gazette:

Mr. Editor, I desire to express my thanks for past favors, and crave your further indulgence on the question of the waterworks, for the submission of a few facts and suggestions.

 When I called attention to this question through a communication which you kindly published some weeks ago, I believed fully in the truth of the condition as I described it.

 From the reply published in the following issue of the paper over the signatures of the chairman of the water-works committee, it was made to appear that full and complete accounts of these matters had been made and published.

 If they have appeared in print the fact has escaped my notice. Neither was I alone in this condition of ignorance.

 Why should they not refer to these and give out the desired information?

 From recent publications it has been made to appear that at the time my letter was published eleven thousand of the total thirty-six thousand dollars had been paid, although seven of the ten taxes had been paid.

 As to what the total amount of these seven payments have realized there seems to be some mystery.

 It is known that the total assessment of the town amounts to nearly a million dollars. The annual proceeds of the tax ought therefore to realize an amount of approximating five thousand dollars.

 The committee's report when published will give the true state of facts.

 I submit that the committees went out of their way when they undertook to charge me with making political capital out of a request for information that any tax payer has the legal right to demand.

 Although I was not a candidate, and I had no direct personal interest in the result, I will not undertake to deny that political capital should have been made of it, and probably would have been effective if they had not been rescued by republican votes.

 I consider it the citizen's duty to make political capital out of errors and omission of public officials.

 I hope that I shall never be found trying to make political capital out of the operation of slot machines and violations of the Sunday law.

 With much respect, and assurances of my personal consideration.

 I beg to remain yours very truly,
          CROW GIRARD.

 Mr. Editor: - There are three important issues that now absorb the minds and attention of the people of Lafayette and surrounding parishes. They are education, drainage and public roads. In order to succeed and prosper, the three systems must go hand in hand. Neglect one of these we cripple the others. It must be very plain to the mind of every thinking man who has the welfare and prosperity of our parish at heart to see that the time has come to carry out the system of education which we have so well commenced. We have laid the foundation for one of the best systems of education to be found in the State. Our Industrial Institute is the central foundation, and we would have now in operation a High School second to none in the State, had it not been for the unfortunate mistake made by some of our legal advisers. I think our prospects for getting a High School are good yet. Then with our Industrial Institute, the High School and the proposed primary school system carried out through the parish, we will have a perfect system of education in reach of every man in the parish. One of the greatest drawbacks to the settling up of the South, especially of this State, has been the want of a better system of education. There are thousands of settlers in Western and Northern States who have capital who would like to settle in the South where they can find a warmer climate, but the want of education has deterred them. Let us carry out our projected school system, drainage and good roads and in a few years we will see the population of the parish more than doubled and large increase in the quantity or our agriculture products. Then we will become exporters instead of importers.

 The parish of Lafayette has a very rich and fertile soil. It contains three hundred and sixty thousand acres lying idle for want of cultivation. There is no reason why the parish should not raise all the horses, mules, cattle, sheep and hogs required for its own use, and also the hay, cats and corn required to feed them.

 Instead of sending our money away to enrich Texas and other Western States, we would have it to help build up our parish. I do not believe there is a white man in the parish who is not able to pay two or three dollars a year towards having a first class school house, a good corps of teachers, and a free school in every ward.
                    J. NICKERSON.
 Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.



Anse la Butte. - Last Sunday Messrs. B. P. Dorlan, A. S. Lyons and Sheriff Thompson, of Mobile, Ala., were in Lafayette, and in company with Assessor A. M. Martin, visited the Anse La Butte oil fields. Mr. Dorlan and Messrs. Aspalla of Mobile and M. R. Williams of Baltimore are interested in the development of the field on Mr. Martin's place near town. Mrs. Edgar Martin, Messrs. J. A. Chargois, A. M. Martin, C. G. Bienvenue and C. D. Caffery and the Richard brothers also have an interest in the enterprise. The derrick has been erected and drilling will begin by Monday or Tuesday. The visitors were all impressed with the prospects of success. To Mr. Martin is due the credit for the early development of the property near town. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.






SPECIAL TAX FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

 Because we have a session of nine months last year, many taxpayers do not see the necessity of raising more funds for the public schools. This reasoning would be sound if conditions were the same this year as last year as last. But they are not. Last year there were 35 teachers employed in the parish; this year there are 50, and the chances are that next year will be at least 55. Fifty-five teachers is a very conservative estimate for next year's teaching corps, because the rapid increasing in the attendance at nearly every school in the parish. Last year there were 965 pupils in regular attendance, this year there are nearly 2,000. According  to the new numeration there are about 5,000 children of school age in the parish. Should the increase in the attendance continue, there would be at least 2,500 children in the public schools next year and the School Board would be required to employ not less than 60 teachers. But admitting that there will be only 55 teachers next year. The pay-roll will be $2,520 per month, and for 10 months it will be $25,200.

 All available school funds at are, State $8,000, parish $6,000, school land $2,000, polls $2,000, polls $2,000, corporation $2,000, making a total of $20,000. Yet the School Board will need $25,200 which gives a deficit of $5,200 which gives a deficit of $5,200 unless the people of the parish vote the 3-mill tax which will give us about $5,000 additional.

 This is without taking into consideration our school-houses, many of which have been too small for several years. It is clear then that every cent of money now available and every cent that will be raised by the tax is absolutely necessary if our schools are to continue on the road to progress.

 In his speech at Carencro Governor Heard pointed out that the fact that Lafayette parish is at present receiving more money from the State than it contributes to its schools. It is unnecessary to say that if the education of our children worth $8,000 to the State of Louisiana, we should readily understand, we should readily understand that it is worth many times as much to us who are the fathers and mothers of the same children. Even with the proposed tax the direct contribution of the parish to its schools will be only $12,000, a little less than one-half the amount spent for public schools.

The Gazette is pleased to see that the people of the parish are looking at this question in the proper light as is shown by the popularity of the special tax movement. It is to be hoped and we feel confident that the Police Jury and the Town Council of Lafayette will continue not only give the present support, but that each body will increase the present appropriations when the next budget is made out. The public school system of the parish is forging to the front and we can not afford to take a backward step. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.



 Clean-Up.

 Now that the summer season is fast approaching The Gazette would advise a general clean-up of the town. Let the Mayor and City Council enforce the sanitary regulations by issuing the necessary proclamation and appointing an inspector to compel compliance with the law. A stitch in time saves nine and this means, life, health and comfort to the people of our city. Let there be no half-hearted steps taken, but vigorous and efficient enforcement of sanitary regulations. There are closets, cesspools and back yards demanding something approximating that celebrated clean-up of the Augean Stables by Hercules. Again we say clean-up now. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.


Drugstore Sold.

 Wm. Clegg's drugstore for many years an established commercial house of Lafayette is now the property of L. Prudhomme & Co. Mr. Lucius Prudhomme, who for a long time, served as pharmacist for the Moss Pharmacy is a member of the firm and will be glad to serve his friends. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.



Society.

 A large gathering of the culture and refinement of Lafayette society assembled at the beautiful home of Mrs. T. M. Biossat on Friday, seventeenth, the occasion being the annual reception given by the Woman's Literary Club. The rooms were filled with quantities of spring blossoms and rare occasion being the annual reception given by the Woman's Literary Club. The rooms were filled with quantities of spring blossoms and rare roses; potted plants and feathery ferns filled every available space, while festoons of cedar and moss were draped in the spacious hall and staircase. The guest were welcomed at the threshold by the receiving party and ushered up the "winding stair" into the dressing rooms by two dainty sprites from fairyland, Misses Inez Biossat and Martha Pellerin; the masculine apartment being presided over in a gracious manner by Master Moore Biossat. Unlike the guests of the wary spider these "came down again" and were greeted in the drawing-room and parlor by each member of the Woman's Club, whose pleasant duty it was to be hostesses of this delightful affair. Their plan of entertainment was Progressive Euchre and Flinch, the table for these was artistically arranged, and decorated in the Club colors, violet and white, and inspired by the strains of sweet music which is a string band discoursed from the upper hallway the 'players engaged with zest in twelve interesting games at the end of which the following were victorious - Mrs. B. J. Pellerin first ladies' prize at euchre, a handsome black and white parasol; the second prize, a very pretty white silk and lace parasol was tied for by Mmes. Biossat, Stephens and Miss Robbins; in the cut it fell to Mrs. Stephens who with inimitable grace of manner presented it to Miss Robbins, one of the guests of the club.

 The first gentleman's prize a stylish tie was cut for by Messrs. P. B. Torian, B. Clegg, and F. E. Davis, the former in the end victor. Mr. A. B. Denbo, was awarded the second prize a set of handkerchiefs. At Flinch Mmes. V. Roy and O. B. Hopkins were the prize winners each being given a dainty fan - while Mr. Lillibridge became professor of the gentleman's trophy, a set of ties.

 At the close of the evening cooling and delicious refreshments were served in the elegant dining room, from a table bedecked with nature's beauties, by the daintily attired and graceful tea-girls Misses Rena Hopkins, Quintilla Morgan, Inez Biossat, Edith Trahan and Martha Pellerin. And gathered round this "festal board" "fair women and brave men" united in best wishes for the longevity of the popular club which was celebrating its sixth anniversary and of whose lavish hospitality they had just partaken. This closed an evening fraught with pleasure to each participant. Now tis but a "sweet memory of the past," but "you may break, you may shatter the vase, if you will, the scent of the roses will cling round it still." Those present were:  Mmes. O. B. Hopkins, T. M. Biossat, E. M. Cooper, S. H. Rushing, E. F. Baker, W. A. LeRosen, J. Parkerson, S. R. Parkerson, B. Clegg, T. N. Blake, G. Comstock, A. B. Denbo, B. J. Pellerin, J. A. Martin, L. Stephens, J. C. Nickerson, M. G. Putnam, R. Williams, V. Roy.

 Misses L. Parkerson, M. Robertson, E. Hopkins, A. Hopkins, M. Littell, L. Marshal, L. Robbins, H. D. McLaurin, F. Holmes, R. DeBlanc, G. Mayfield, E. Montgomery, E. Horn, C. Johnson, E. Trahan, Q. Morgan, I. Biossat, M. Pellerin and R. Hopkins.

 Messrs. O. B. Hopkins, B. Clegg, G. Comstock, A. B. Denbo, B. J. Pellerin, J. C. Nickerson, W. Middlemas, W. Torian, P. B. Torian, S. R. Parkerson, W. A. LeRosen, T. M. Biossat, A. Woodson, W. Lillibridge, F. E. Davis, I. Davis, J. Givens, L. Judice, J. Mouton, A. Morgan and Prof. Smith, Drs. L. Stephens, J. A. Martin, A. R. Trahan,F. E. Girard.

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 The first of the sub-lenten social events was the Progressive Euchre given on April the fifteenth by Mrs. B. J. Pellerin the winsome hostess being assisted in receiving by Miss L. Parkerson and Mrs. G. Comstock. A color scheme of pink and white was carried out in parlor and dining-room adding a daintiness and finish to the attractive surroundings. After a spirited contest the first prize a handsome engraving was awarded Mrs. J. A. Martin, while the second a pretty game plate with hunting-scene design fell to the lot of Mrs. A. B. Denbo. The consolation, a unique work basket of Easter eggs was won by Mrs. LeRosen. The proverbial rabbit being given to Mrs. J. Arthur Roy as a booby. At the close of the afternoon delicious refreshments were served. The participants were: Mmes. T. M. Biossat, C. Caffery, B. Coronna, W. LeRosen, T. N. Blake, J. A. Roy, T. B. Hopkins, jr., A. B. Denbo, J. A. Martin, J. Parkerson, G. Comstock, J. Hultz, R. Williams, J. C. Nickerson, B. Clegg, L. Stephens, A. Bonnet, L. Mayer. Misses E. Montgomery, L. Parkerson, G. Mayfield, H. McLaurin, H. Marshal, L. Robbins.

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 The Sweet Sixteens, alias Rosebuds, Misses Anna Hopkins, Viola Young, Louisa Tolson, Mary Marion, Emmie and Lavinia Torian were entertained on Monday night by the first mentioned member of the club, who is dispensing the hospitality of her home during the absence of her parents. Several guests, including several gentlemen were present, the party of lads and lassies being chaperoned by Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Hopkins, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hopkins, Prof. and Mrs. LeRosen. The popular game of Flinch was indulged in and enjoyable evening was spent by the guests.

 ---------

 Mrs. B. Clegg entertained Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Martin, Dr. F. E. Girard and Mrs. Marshal of Indiana, at tea on Wednesday a game of six-handed euchre adding to the evening's pleasures.

 ---------

 Several evenings during the past fortnight the friends of Mrs. A. B. Denbo have gathered at her cozy cottage home to meet her attractive sister, Miss Marshal of Corydon, Indiana. Each time the charming hostesses and jovial host have proven equal to the occasion and a merry time was participating in by each one present. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.



     
 Close Stores.

 Many of our most prominent merchants and business men have signed an agreement to close establishments and offices at 7 o'clock p. m. beginning May 1. This has been the practice in Lafayette during the spring and summer months for several years and is most commendable. The Gazette most heartily endorses the plan and trusts that it may soon publish a longer list of firms than the following:

 Lafayette, La., April 23, 1903. - We the undersigned merchants do hereby agree to close our places of business on and after first day of May until 1st of September except Saturdays or railroad company pay day, at 7 o'clock p. m.

 P. Krauss, Mouton Bros., Gus. Schmulen, Prudhomme & McFadden, Geo. Doucet, Felix Demanade, Morgan Bros., J. F. Tanner, A. T. Caillouet, Gus. Lacoste, Alex Delahoussaye, L. F. Salles, Prejean & LeBlanc, Falk Mercantile Co. Ltd., L. Levy, Lacoste Hardware Store, W. V. Nicholson, Pellerin & DeClouet, J. O. Mouton, Moss & Co., Lafayette Clothing House, Levy Bros., N. Abramson, Richard Alexandre L. F. Rigues, L. F. Bellemin. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.



Anse la Butte.

 Last Sunday Messrs. B. P. Dorlan, A. S. Lyons and Sheriff Thompson, of Mobile, Ala., were in Lafayette, and in company with Assessor A. M. Martin, visited the Anse la Butte and Martin, visited the Anse la Butte and Martin oil fields. Mr. Dorlan and Messrs. Aspalla of Mobile and M. R. Williams of Baltimore are interested in the development of the field on Mr. Martin's place near town. Mrs. Edgar Martin, Messrs. J. A. Chargois, A. M. Martin, C. G. Bienvenu and C. D. Caffery and the Richard brothers also have an interest in the enterprise. The derrick has been erected and drilling will begin by Monday or Tuesday. The visitors were well impressed with the prospects of success. To Mr. Martin is due the credit for the early development of the property near town. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.


PUBLIC OPINION.
From Crow Girard.

 To the Editor of The Lafayette Gazette:

 Mr. Editor, I desire to express my thanks for past favors, and crave your further indulgence on the question of the waterworks, for the submission of a few facts and suggestions.

 Mr. Editor, when I called attention to this question through a communication which you kindly published some weeks ago, I believed fully in the truth of the condition as I described it.

 From the reply published in the following issue of the paper over the signatures of the chairman of the water-works committee, and the finance committee, it was made to appear that full and complete accounts of these matters had been made and published.

 If they have appeared in print the fact has escaped my notice. Neither was I alone in this condition of ignorance.

 Why should they not refer to these reports and give out the desired information?

 From recent publications it has been made to appear that at the time my letter was published eleven thousand of the total thirty-six thousand dollars had been paid, although seven of the ten taxes had been paid.

 As to what the total amount of these seven payments have realized there seems to be some mystery.

 It is known that the total assessment of the town amounts to nearly a million dollars. The annual proceeds of the tax ought therefore to realize an amount of approximating five thousand dollars.

 The committee's report when published will give the true state of facts.
 I submit that the committees went out of their way when they undertook to charge me with making political capital out of a request for information that any tax payer has the legal right to demand.

 Although I was not a candidate, and had no direct personal interest in the result, and had no direct personal interest in the result, I will not undertake to deny that political capital should have been made of it, and probably would have been effective if they had not been rescued by republican votes.

 I consider it the citizen's duty to make political capital out of errors and omission of public officials.

 I hope that I shall never be found trying to make political capital out of the operation of slot machines and violations of the Sunday law.

 With much respect, and assurances of my personal consideration.

 I beg to remain yours very truly,
                           CROW GIRARD.
Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.



PUBLIC OPINION:
From J. Nickerson.

 Mr. Editor: - There are three important issues that now absorb the minds and attention of the people of Lafayette and surrounding parishes. They are education, drainage and public roads. In order to succeed and prosper, the three systems must go hand in hand. Neglect one of these, and just to that extent we cripple the others. It must be very plain to the mind of everything thinking man who has the welfare and prosperity of our parish at heart to see that the time has come to carry out the system of education which we have so well commenced. We have laid the foundation for one of the best systems of education to be found in the State. Our Industrial Institute is the central foundation, and we would have now in operation a High School second to none in the State, had it not been for the unfortunate mistake made by some of our legal advisers. I think our prospects for getting a High School are good yet. Then with the Industrial Institute, the High School and the proposed primary school system carried out through the parish, we will have a perfect system of education in reach of every man in the parish. One of the greatest drawbacks to the settling up of the South, especially of this State, has been the want of a better system of education. There are thousands of settlers in Western and Northern States who have capital who would like to settle in the South where they can find a warmer climate, but the want of education has deterred them. Let us carry out our projected school system, drainage and good roads and in a few years we will see the population of the parish more than doubled, the price of our farming lands more than doubled  and a large increase in the quantity of our agricultural products. Then we will become exporters of importers.

 The parish of Lafayette has a very rich and fertile soil. It contains three hundred and sixty thousand acres, and there are thousands of acres lying idle for want of cultivation. There is no reason why the parish should not raise all the horses, mules, cattle, sheep and hogs required for its own use, and also all the hay, oats and corn required to feed them.

 Instead of sending our money away to enrich Texas and other Western States, we would have it to help build up our parish. I do not believe there is a white man in the parish who is not able to pay two or three dollars a year towards having a first class school house, a good corps of teachers, and a free school in every ward.
                           J. NICKERSON.
Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.
                                 




 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 4/25/1903.

 Messrs. J. R. Domengeaux and Louis F. Guerre have formed a co-partnership for the transaction of business, their office to be in Domegeaux's old stand. A notice signed by them is printed in another column of this paper.

 Ben Schmulenski, spent two days in Alexandria this week on business.

 For bargains in second hand bicycles call on A. J. Bonnet. If you have a wheel you want sold leave it with him.

Wanted. - Planters, if you have a few loads or a few hundred barrels of corn left that you wish to dispose of call on our write to Magnolia Mills, Lafayette, La.

 In the morning of the Saturday on which Gov. Heard was to speak in Carencro, he was shown around the  Industrial Institute, and was well pleased with everything, and has promised to leave his Capitol to be present at the at the commencement exercises.

 Dr. Stephens left Sunday for Richmond, Virginia, to be present at the meeting of the National Educational Education Board. This meeting is going to be one of the greatest the country has ever had. All great educators will be there, and the South will particularly be well presented. 


 If you're thinking of buying a bicycle buy one with a reputation; the "Crawford" is a wheel which has a reputation. See A. J. Bonnet for prices and particulars. Phone 124-2.

 Wanted. - A young man to run a delivery wagon. Apply at this office.
Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.




 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 25th, 1903:

 Robbery of Post Office.

 Tuesday morning thieves broke into the Post Office and secured about $30 in money and a quantity of stamps. The robbery occurred about 2 o'clock a. m. and is supposed to have been done by three men. Mr. Ed Higginbotham, whose residence is next to the Post-office, was awakened and discovered the robbers. They, however, had worked so rapidly that they were enabled to escape with their booty. Dynamite was used to force the doors of the safe, and it was the noise of the exploration that called attention to their presence and cane near being the cause of their capture in the act. This is the fourth time this office has been burglarized. At three previous times professionals have made attempts on the safe, the last time the outer doors having been blown off, but leaving the inner doors intact. This time dynamite was used on the inner doors, wrecking them, and then a charge was placed in the cash compartment, that shattered the door. The work was quickly done, showing that the robbers knew what they were about.

 It was but a short while before Sheriff Broussard and the town officers were on the scene and started in hot pursuit of the thieves. Sheriff Broussard immediately after making an investigation advanced the theory was practically confirmed by an arrest made later by Marshal Peck,  who arrested a negro named John White between Lafayette and Scott, and recovered from the prisoner the $30 cash, the stamps, and a pocket knife stolen from the office, but resisted capture, and struck the Marshal several blows across the head, but was later forced to surrender. He confessed and implicated a white man, who however has not yet apprehended. Two men arrested in Crowley on suspicion, but were released. Sheriff Broussard and Messrs. Jack Preager and Henry Judice left on the morning train for Crowley, and following a pretty sure clue caught two men two miles this side of Estherwood, one of whom answered the description of one of robbers seen rifling the post-office. When arrested the men were walking rapidly towards Estherwood. They both claim to be from Lake Charles. United States Marshal T. Anderson came at once to Lafayette and began investigation.

 Later and fuller examination about convinced the officers that the negro was alone in the affair and in fact he now states that he had no accomplice. According Inspector Anderson swore out an affidavit before Justice Monnier charging John White with the burglary, and the other men arrested in connection with robbery were discharged. The reward of $200 will probably be divided between on Marshal Peck the two negroes who assisted him and Mr. Ed. Higginbotham who gave the alarm. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.


 A Slick Oil Man.
[From the N. O. States.]

 A. J. Erskine, who described himself as president and field superintendent of the Consolidated American Oil and Refining Company when he was placed in jail on Saturday night on the charge of obtaining money by false pretenses from F. F. Hansell & Bros. Limited, was yesterday transferred to the parish prison, having failed to furnish a bond of $250.

 This is rather an unusual position for the president and "whole works" of a company chartered with $250,000 capital and owning valuable oil property in three states, but it is not Erskine's first experience of this character. He was there before not a long time ago. His stay this is, of course, problematic.

 A quiet investigation of some of the claims made by the Consolidated American Oil and Refining company has been going on for several days, and the result has not been, to say the least, satisfactory. Just what will come of this investigation is now known at this time, but it is probable that there will be a judicial inquiry steps looking to this having already been taken.

 The company some months ago established itself in handsomely appointed offices at No. 121 Carondolet street. At that time the roster of officers was said to be; Z. E.Kline, of Ohio, president; W. B. Morris, of California, treasurer: A. H. Erskine, of Louisiana, field superintendent, and N. Engerhardt, a woman. Considerable literature  was sent out, but the returns on the alluring offers made must have been woefully small, for the company fell in arrears on its rent and the furniture and offices were turned over to a well-known gentleman, who is at present established there. This gentleman consented to allow the company to use a little back of gentleman consented to allow the company to use a little back office, with the understanding that it could redeem the furniture when the necessary money was on hand. The furniture was not redeemed, and the company was told to get out on the first of the present month.

 The transaction on which the charge against Erskine is based is a small one. The company had printing done by F. F. Hansell & Bros., Limited, Erskine presented a check for $35. The bill was $11 and he received $24. The check was not honored by the Hibernia Bank & Trust Company, although Erskine claims to know President Castles very well and calls him "John."

 On Saturday night while in a cell Erskine said that if the arrest was published the company would not receive $8,000 which a well-known gentleman had promised to put into it. He said that he was president and general manager; that Morris had resigned.

 The company claims to own 360 acres of land near Lafayette, La. This claim has been investigated and it is stated that the company does not own a foot of land there. In fact, it is stated that no one owns as much as one hundred acres of land between Lafayette and Anse la Butte. Erskine did arrange to lease was never recorded. It has been, or will be, cancelled. In this connection Sheriff Broussard sent to a gentleman here a very strong letter.

 In one of circulars sent out by the company it is stated that Capt. Erskine bought 360 acres of virgin oil land near Lafayette and then sold it to the company and accepted the position of general superintendent. It was stated that he would have charge of the drilling and other improvements of the company in the different fields. Kline, it is stated, sold 1,520 acres of land in the Ohio oil belt to the company and Morris sold 120 acres of land in the California belt.

 Despite the fact that the company owns no land near Lafayette, it is stated that a warranty deed to one acre of land in the proven oil field will be given with each share of stock. It is said further that the land is worth $125 an acre, and that when the company makes certain improvements it will be worth $500 and upwards. The promises made by the company are glittering in all of their terms. Erskine, who, no doubt, a number of Lafayette people will remember well is the party who came here some time ago as an oil man unlimited capital to back him. Some of our citizens will probably remember him a real long time and the souvenirs he left behind. The Advertiser also made his acquaintance, but kept on the safe side. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.



Geo. W. Scott.

 To-morrow night April 26th at Falk's Opera House, Mr. Geo. W. Scott, Mr. Geo. W. Scott and his select company of artists in Hal Reid's big scenic production of Roanoke", a beautiful story of old Virginia in 5 acts. Mr. Scott is touring the South with this piece, and is receiving big praise from the press in all the large cities of the south he has played. This piece is Mr. Reid's latest success, and has run for 300 nights at the Garden Theatre in N. Y. High class vaudeville feature are introduced.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.


Races at Surrey Park.

 There will be some very interesting races at Surrey Park on Sunday, May 3, and all lovers of the 'sport of kings' will have the opportunity of seeing a horse race that will be the event of the season, the feature of the day will be a trotting match, half mile heat, 3 best in 5, for a purse of $200, between Lilly entered by Dr. B. Guilbeau of Sunset, and Bonita Moore, entered by Mr. Sidney Veazey of Lafayette. There also will be some lively races by two year old colts, which have been entered for the futurity race next June that will catch the crowd. Jack, the famous stallion belonging to Dr. B. Guilbeau of Sunset will also be on exhibition at the track during the races.

 The races will begin at 1:30 p. m. and everybody is invited to be present. An admission of 25 cents will be charged. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.


Shells Paving Streets.


 The City Council is having more shells placed on the streets which have already been shelled. This is a good move as the shells have already very materially improved the streets, and it is evident that a sufficient quantity will properly placed, make most excellent and permanent streets. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.




$25,000.00 Deal.


 One of the largest transfers of Real Estate that has ever been made in Lafayette Parish was brought to a close yesterday when Mr. C. C. Brown sold his beautiful plantation home near the town of Carencro La., to Mr. Jules Clement of Jennings La., who has lately been appointed Land and Immigration Agent by the Southern Pacific R. R.

 If you have any land for sale call on him and he will advertise them for you in the North, East and Western states free of cost. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.



Changes. Mr. Lucius Prudhomme for a number of years the efficient Pharmacist at Moss' Pharmacy will now have charge of the prescription department of the new firm, whilst his partner Mr. Rene Delhomme will manage the grocery department. These young men have bought in the Clegg business and will hereafter conduct their business at the old stand. The Advertiser wishes them success. Lafayette Advertiser wishes them success. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.




A New Firm.

 Messrs. J. R. Domengeaux and Louis F. Guerre are partners in the Fire and General Insurance business, Mr. Guerre having bought a half interest in Mr. Domengeux's business. Both are young men full of energy and the firm should prosper. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.  


Women's Literary Club.

 One of the pleasant social events of the season was the reception given by the Women's Literary Club Friday night of last week at the elegant home of Mrs. T. M. Biossat. The evening was most pleasantly passed with progressive euchre and flinch. In the euchre game Mrs. Pellerin was the lucky winner of the first prize, a fine silk parasol, Miss Robinson won the second, a lovely fancy parasol Mr. Pink Torian captured the first prize a beautiful tie, and Mr. Denbo received the second, a half dozen linen handkerchiefs.

 In the Flinch game Mrs. V. L. Roy was the successful contestant receiving as first prize a lovely silk fan. Mrs. O. B. Hopkins won the second, a very neat fan, Mr. Lillibridge carried off the gentleman's prize, a fine silk tie.

 At the close of the games delightful refreshments were served, the whole affair was a most enjoyable one. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.



Bids Wanted.

 Until April 30th, 1903, sealed bids for digging a canal on the school section in the second ward of this parish will be received by L. J. Alleman, Lafayette, La.

 The right to reject any and all bids is reserved. Specifications can be obtained from either member of the following committee: A. Judice, Scott; Alex. Broussard, Scott; Jasper Spell, Indian Bayou; L. J. Alleman, Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.


Moved to Freetown.

 The old building next to Schmulen's store, which was formerly a bakery shop, was moved Tuesday to a lot in Freetown where it will serve as a rent cabin. In its place Mr. Schmulen will erect a substantial frame building 30 x 40 feet, with glass front. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.




 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 4/25/1903.

 The Lafayette Clothing Store has a full line of spring suits, something nice and very wearable.

 Dr. P. M. Girard left last week for San Antonio and other points in Texas.

 Rev. Father Forge will treat the St. John's Choir and Orchestra with a "grand pic-nic to-morrow.

 Judge Debaillon and District Attorney Campbell returned from Crowley Tuesday, having decided to postpone court, as the farmers are so busy with their crops which are late, that they cannot well afford to lose any time just now.

 Mrs. B. Falk and Mr. Ike Bendel will leave for New York, Sunday, where they will make their future home. Mrs. Falk's grandson, Leon Schmulen, will accompany them, and enter school there.

 Rosenfield's mammoth new store is nearly completed. When finished it will be an ornament to the town.

 Dr. N. P. Moss made a business to trip to New Orleans, Tuesday.

 Deputy Albert Trahan arrested a young white man named Albert Landry Tuesday on a charge of passing a worthless check in Lake Charles several months ago. Sheriff Perkins came for the prisoner and took him to Lake Charles.

 Miss Anna Hopkins entertained the S. S. Tuesday night with a delightful Flinch party.

 The family of the late Mr. B. Falk have erected a handsome monument to his memory in the Jewish cemetery. It is 28 feet high, beautifully carved, and with the figure of an angel crowning the shaft. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1903.



 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 25th, 1896:


VICTORY.

 The great wave of defeat so long predicted by our adversaries, arrived on Tuesday, but it was not the signal snow-under that our prophets were expecting. The victory was rather with us than with our self-confident enemy.

 The chain of political bondage that had obtained to such proportions, its boss forgers thought no onslaught could rupture, has stood the onslaught with an unbroken front, that never wavered for once during the entire campaign; and not withstanding the famous primaries of December 14th, we have issued from the arena with the major part of spoils.

 Our campaign has been conducted on a fair and honorable scale, based on the principles of truth and honest government, and has consequently been, as all just campaign should be, an economical one. We did not resort to special trains and flag and brass band parades, and other such ridiculous means of influencing public sentiment; but relied upon the integrity and intelligence of the people to choose for themselves without bias, or other consideration, which of the candidates they dreamed most worthy acquisitions, knowing that at last been cast in twain and the larger piece has fallen to the share of the "Googoos". The power of the "Ring" is broken, and it will no longer be in the dominion of the former captains to dictate how our affair should be governed. It is true we lost our sheriff, but by such small majority that the opponent quaked in his boots up to the last hour. While it is true we lost the sheriff and district attorney, we came off fairly from the field having captured the offices of Judge, Senator, Representative, and four members of the Police Jury, not omitting some of the Justices of the Peace.

 The "Googoos", are considered to-day the strongest faction in the parish, an opinion to which, after Tuesday's disclosure, they are eminently entitled to assert. Notwithstanding the untiring and relentless war of the regulars upon  their ranks, the "Googoos" have stoutly obtained them through no trickery or dishonest measures, but soley by the honest expression of the best people.

 The entire force and shrewdness of the on the office of Sheriff; with the desperation that the dying man catches at the straw, they turned all their energize upon the point, and the won - but it is fortunate for the people that the winning was not confined to one side only, for in the division of the offices that has ensued it is reasonable to suppose that the interests of the people will be cared for in a more satisfactory way in many respects, than in the past. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1896.



 Results of the Election.

----------------p. 4------------------------


----------------


 A Horrible Murder.

 One of the most high-handed robberies and brutal murders that ever occurred in this parish was perpetrated at Scott on Thursday night. The victim being a well known and highly respected merchant of that place, Mr. Martin Begnaud.

 Mr. Begnaud is a single man about 45 years of age, and lived alone in the rear part of his store. On Thursday morning when the servant went as usual about seven o'clock to attend to his rooms, she was surprised to find him lying on the bed in a pool of blood, his body had been literally perforated with stab wounds, 52 having been counted. The safe door was open, and all its valuables missing. It is supposed that robbers secured about $7,000 in money.

 The Sheriff and Coroner repaired thither immediately from Lafayette, as soon as notified and every effort is being persuaded to bring the perpetrators to justice. Numbers of people from Lafayette and surrounding points visited the scene of the outrageous crime on Thursday and public indignation runs high. No clue to the terrible crime has been discovered. Mr. Begnaud was a prosperous and law-abiding citizen and his horrible murder has caused a great shock to the entire community.

 Later particulars of the Scott murder, prove it be one of the most atrocious crimes ever perpetrated in the history of this country. The fiend or fiends, who committed the deed, first gagged the unfortunate victim, by tying a large bandanna handkerchief over his mouth and around his head, then bound his hands behind his back, and after securing his feet and legs with strong ropes, he was then completely wound up, head and all, in a sheet of white domestic and thrown upon the bed; then comes what is almost too horrible to relate; the black-hearted villains then began their work of torture, be dealing him short stabs with some triangular shaped dagger, 52 in all, forming a complete necklace of wounds beginning on the side of the neck and passing down over the chest and up to the neck again on the opposite side, thus forming a complete chain; then the final stab was given over the region of the heart piercing this organ through and through, and was sent with such violent force that it left the print of the daggers hilt upon the mouth of the wound. His throat was even cut after all this mutilation. Never in the modern history of this country, and we doubt in the history of another country, has so fearful a crime been known, exhibiting such dastardly pleasure in human ravagment and torture. So terrible is the shock of horror, produced upon the minds of a quiet community like this where crimes are few, that the human heart shudders and recoils from contemplation of the bloody details.

 The sheriff is doing all in his power to bring the guilty to punishment; blood hounds have been carried to the scene of crime, but owing to the immense throngs of people who crowded around the dead man's home before the arrival of the hounds, no trail has yet been struck that points to any conclusions. It is rumored that the officers have a clue, not no arrest have yet been made. It is hoped that energy will never relax, until these damnable fiends are brought to expiate their crime, upon the gallows.

 Later: It was discovered Friday evening at a late hours that one of the drawers in the safe what was rifled, was overlooked by the robbers, and that this drawer contained $2,600 belonging to Mr. Simeon Begnaud brother of the deceased. Mr. Simeon Begnaud held the key of this drawer.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1896.






 Martin Begnaud's Funeral.

 The funeral of Martin Begnaud, the unfortunate victim of Wednesday night's bloody event at Scott, took place from the Catholic church at this place yesterday morning. Public sentiment had been roused to such an extent that the church could scarcely contain the crowd with thronged to witness the ceremony. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1896.



Priest Threatened by Regulators.

 Rev. Father Malluchet, of Port Barry, the priest whose life had been threatened by the regulators, was in town during the week, the guest of Father Forge. Father Malluchet called at our office while here, and showed us the letter received from the regulators, notifying him that if he did not have the body of Stelly removed from its burial place within 24 hours, that he, father Malluchet) would be treated to 150 lashes. Stelly is the negro who was killed at Port Barry a short time ago by the regulators and his body had been buried in the Catholic cemetery there.

 It seems that Stelly's family had purchased a plot of ground in the cemetary, within close distance of white people graves, and this caused the action of the regulators. The body was removed. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1896.


 Not a Republican.

 The statement made by "Acadiennes" in a communication published in the Advertiser last week, in reference to me, is entirely erroneous and without foundation in fact. The writer was evidently misinformed and impressed upon by an intriguing politician, who intended the fabrication to have some political effect. I never was a Republican club. I have been a Democrat all my life and for fifty years have voted the Democratic ticket.
                        (Signed) A. J. MOSS.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1896.


School Board Proceedings.
Vermilionville, April 20th, 1874.

 School board met this day. Present: A. Monnier, President; B. A. Salles, Secretary and Treasurer J. M. Caffery, M. G. Broussard and F. Martin.

 The following communication from Hon. Geo. B. Loud was read and ordered to be printed:
       
            Vermilionville, Parish of Lafayette, April 4th, 1874.

 To the Hon. President and Members Board of School Directors, Parish of Lafayette.

GENTLEMEN: - You are hereby respectfully notified that I have this day granted Certificate of Qualification, as teachers, to the following named person, and to the grades set opposite their names, respectively, viz:

-----------------p. 2--------------------

 Owing to the failure to appear for examination, of several teachers who are at present in the employ of your Hon. Board, you are authorized to continue the contract with such teachers, provided their competition of services rendered, shall be contingent upon their passing the required examination before me, during my next visit to this Parish, which will be within two months from this date, and the Treasurer of your Hon. Board will pay no money to these teachers until they shall have received from me a certificate of their qualification as teachers.

 All certificates issued by me prior to this date, are hereby revoked.

 I would call the attention of your Hon. Board to the practice of maintaining public schools, where the average attendance of pupils is less than twenty, this does not auger an economical administration of school funds.

 The condition of your treasury, and the limited amount of funds received annually for the support of your public schools will not justify any imprudent or extravagant outlaw. In this connection, I would refer you to the circular of the Hon. State Supt. herewith submitted.

 I would also call your attention the 1st and 2nd sections of Act. No. 82 of 1873 in reference to "Special Parish School Tax" and I trust your Hon. Board will take proper action in this important.
                           Very respectfully,
                               GEO. B. LOUD,
        Supt. Public Education Third Division.
  B. A. Salles, Treasurer, having reported to the Board a full settlement with L. E. Salles, former Treasurer, which settlement having been approved by Hon. Geo. B. Loud, Div. Supt.

 On motion it was resolved, that the bond of L. E. Salles, late treasurer, been and same is hereby cancelled.

 On motion it was resolved, that the following named teachers be appointed and authorized to open schools without delay, viz: Mrs. S. T. Rand and G. J. Young, for male school in Vermilionville; Alex. Meaux, for Broussard settlement; Mrs C. P. Robertson at Ford Hoffpauir; teachers must call upon the President and sign contract as soon as possible.

 On motion it was resolved, that B. A. Salles be and he is hereby authorized to contract with W. B. Bailey for printing proceedings of the Board.

 There being no further business the Board adjourned.
A. MONNIER, President.
B. A. SALLES, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.

  


 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 4/25/1896.

 Local items are very scarce this week.

 The 'lection is over, so now let's settle down to business.

 Repairing of saddles a specialty at the C. J. Sanders saddle shop.

 A cotton seed oil mill is a possibility for Lafayette, in the near future.

 The erection of a standard system of water works  and electric lights will next engage the attention of Lafayette.

 Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Roulins of Lake Charles moved to Lafayette Tuesday. Mr. Roulins will assist Mr. C. J. Sanders in his saddle shop.

 The popular Restaurateur Mr. John Bunt, who holds forth adjoining Mr. Jno. O. Mouton's grocery, will be prepared to furnish residences with a delicious quality of ice cream to-morrow. Give him a trial.

 Mr. E. G. Voorhies, who has been elected clerk of court of this parish, received more votes than any other candidate on his ticket, which is doubtless due to the moderation and fairness with which this gentleman conducted his campaign.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1896.


From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 25th, 1874:


 Let Us Do Something.

 In accordance with the desire of several prominent citizens of this parish, it is suggested that a meeting of the people be had at the Court House to-morrow, (Sunday) at 11 o'clock A. M., for the purpose of organizing, to afford some relief and assistance to the destitute and suffering in the overflowed districts of the State.

 The distressing calamity that now afflicts a large portion of the State, spreading ruin and desolation among thousands of families, calls loudly and eloquently for the exercise of feelings of humanity, and let it not be said that the people of the parish of Lafayette are not touched by it and will not respond to the extent of their ability.

 We are aware of the depressed condition of our people, but those who cannot assist in contributions, may be able to offer shelter, land, teams and tools, and thereby do a charitable act and at the same time, secure to the parish desirable and valuable immigrants.

 Every man in the parish is invited to come, and if he can do nothing else, let him aid us by his counsels. Much may dose by concert of action and a little public spirit. Let us consult together and devise some kind of relief to those unfortunate families who are now helpless and in a starving condition.

 In God's name, let us do something and at once. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.



 Weather and Crop.

 We have lately experienced the most copious and excessive rains that has been our lot for many years. Our streams and drains are more full and flooded than they were in the year 1856. Before this, the prospects for a good crop were most flattering, but the damage they have sustained are serious and much of them will have to be replanted. At this present writing, we are again being subjected to another tenacious spell of rain. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.



New Drugstore.

 Mr. J. A. La Neuville, Druggist and Apothecary, has opened a Drugstore in this place, in Hebert's Hall, and will from Monday next be fully prepared to fill all prescriptions that will be sent to him. Mr. La Neuville is from what we have heard, a first class druggist. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.




Election.

 An election for Mayor and seven Councilmen for the town of Vermilionville, will be held at the Court House on Monday the 4th of May next.

 The following ticket has been handed to us for publication:

 For Mayor - A. Monnier.

 For Councilmen - R. L. McBride, L. P. Revillon, H. Landry, F. C. Latiolais, W. B. Lindsay, C. O. Olivier, Wm. Brandt.

 For Constable - Treville Bernard.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.



  

District Court.

 This court was opened on last Monday, and the Grand Jury duly impaneled with Onesiphore Broussard as foreman. After receiving the charge and instructions from the Hon. E. Mouton, judge presiding, the jury retired and entered upon the discharge of their duties. The petit jury being discharged until next Monday.

 Motions to quash were maintained in the cases of the State vs. Antoine Foote, not, Stephens, Freeman Brown, Dennis, on account of informality of a former grand jury.

 The following nolle prosequies were entered by J. A. Chargois, Esq. District Attorney:  State vs. Sazzazin Baker and Alexandre Dugas.

 On Wednesday the grand jury returned not true bill vs. Romare, Jack and Turner; and a true bill_____ vs._____, (2), Faustin Vincent, Alexandre Dugas, Adrien Breaux, Martin and Sarrazin Baker. Having completed their labors, the grand jury was then discharged for the term.

 In the case of the State vs. F. Vincent, bail was granted in the sum of $2,500, and in that of Sarrazin Baker in $1,500.

 In the case of the State vs. Martin, indicted fore rape, the court appointed to defend him, Col. W. C. Crow and L. P. Revillon, Esq., and after arraignment and pleading not guilty, the trial was fixed of next Monday.

 Upon suggestion by petition to the court, of the condition of the crops and the distress generally prevailing and impending all the suits on the civil docket were continued.

 It is understood that no criminal cases will be tried, except of such parties as may be in custody.

 On Thursday the court adjourned to next Monday. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.



ACCIDENT.

 Master Edward Martin, oldest son of Mr. F. Martin, of this place, met with a severe accident at Grand Coteau College, last Sunday evening whilst, playing with his young companions on the College play grounds, he fell and broke his leg between the ankle and the knee. At last accounts he was doing well as could be expected. Master Edward has been most unfortunate, having some time ago had one of his arms broken and on another occasion has his elbow dislocated. We hope that he will soon recover from his last accident and resume his studies. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.



   

CITY COUNCIL OF VERMILIONVILLE.

 Special Session - April 17th, 1874.

 Present: A. Monnier, Mayor; Councilmen Landry, Latiolais, Revillon, McBride, Brandt and Olivier. Absent: J. O. Girouard.

 The Mayor called the Council to order, and,
  On motion, the reading of the minutes were dispensed with.

 Jos. H. Wise, Esq., presented himself before the Council and entered complaint that his assessment for the year 1873, was excessive, and prayed that the Hon. Council would take some action for his relief,
and,
   On motion it was resolved, that the complaint of Jos. H. Wise, and all persons having similar complaints to make be and the same is hereby postponed until the next meeting.

 On motion the Council adjourned to Saturday the 2d. day of May next.
A. MONNIER, Mayor.
H. M. BAILEY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.




School Board Proceedings.
Vermilionville, March 17th, 1874.

 At a special meeting held this day, were present: A. Monnier, President; A. Melchoir, F. Martin and B. A. Salles.  Absent: J. J. Caffery, M. G. Broussard and L. E. Salles.

 On motion of B. A. Salles was appointed Secretary pro tem.

 A communication from L. E. Salles, Secretary and Treasurer of the Board, tendering his resignation was read, and
    On motion accepted.

 The Board then proceeded to the election of a Secretary and Treasurer, when
   On motion, B. A. Salles was unanimously elected as Secretary and Treasurer, and required to give legal bond to the President of the Board without delay.

 On motion, it was resolved, that B. A. Salles, after furnishing his required bond as Treasurer, be and he is hereby authorized to settle with the former Treasurer, be and he is hereby authorized to settle with the former Treasurer of this Bond.

 There being no further business the Board adjourned.
A. MONNIER, President.
B. A. SALLES, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1874.






  









  

  

    





  



  





            






        

         



     



  



















   

   









   




  



     

         

       




   




  

    

  


   







           






















 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 25th, 1913:

THE CO-OPERATIVE WAY
The Way to Build Up Said Sec. Trezevant to Forum, Organize Chamber of Commerce.
 Secretary M. B. Trezevant, of the New Orleans Progressive Union, who addressed the Forum Sunday on the importance and value of commercial organization to a city, spoke briefly but interestingly. He praised the Lafayette Forum, which is the only one in the state outside of New Orleans, and declared that its influence was helpful and valuable to the community. Their are many things the civic bodies can not do, he said, which require the cooperation of the citizens and added that the aid of the women should be enlisted. The men should attend to the larger affairs but in matters such as sanitation, play grounds, etc., women could be of the greatest assistance. He mentioned Lafayette's prospective trolley systems and compared its opportunities to those of Indianapolis, which city trolleys have built up. He spoke of Mr. Holden the corn expert who declared Louisiana should quit raising tin cans, and declared that the greatest asset a country can have is to consume its own products. Industrial activity is in the air and is coming this way. We should organize to take advantage of it and he urged the formation of a chamber of commerce with a capable secretary. So much can be done in a cooperative way and he advised to cooperate with the agricultural and rural population. Good roads and trolleys are vital to cooperation. He again advised that the women be included in their cooperative organization, for without the women seriously working they would fall far short. Civic duties can be handled more effectively by women while the men should do the larger and constructive work. He emphasized the need of a chamber of commerce to forward the advancement of a town and the absolute need of a paid secretary. His talk was instructive all the way through and appreciated as was also his offer to come and assist in organizing a chamber of commerce should the citizens wish him to do so. Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1913.



 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 25th, 1906:

AN ATTRACTIVE CITY.
Capt. Hosack, of Texas, Has a Number of Nice Things to Say About Lafayette.

 Capt. J. A. H. Hosack, of Texas, who will have charge of the auction sale of lots in the Comington addition, in an interview Saturday gave his impression of Lafayette as follows:

 "I am proud of my visit here and find quite a great deal to engage my attention, perhaps one of the smallest parishes in the State, and yet one of the best agriculturally speaking.

 "The city of Lafayette is a gem of no ordinary character; is fast growing in importance and will soon be one of the most important points on the Texas and New Orleans Rail Road, and thought this is my first visit to this beautiful and attractive city, I am much pleased with it, and it would not take very much to make me fall in love with Lafayette and her good people. This is a new country to me and fine field for the investment of Capital.

 I meet friends here, a few old friends, and make new acquaintances at the Gordon where I am so hospitably kept, and here I met a Texas friend, Mr. C. A. Jackson, who now lives near here and was one of the happiest men I have seen in a long time, as he was just home from Texas, where he as captured a lovely and beautiful angel of Texas for his wife, and you can rest assured he had a right to be happy. I hope my visit here will be of benefit to this place for I am here in interest of an auction town lot sale of which I have made 150 in Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Indian Territory, and I have a fine field for development here in Comington, the new addition to the city of Lafayette, a lovely location and an inviting field for investment, for in the near future the money will be put into that property will double and no such opportunity will offer again soon.

 "I hope the public will honor me with their attendance on Saturday the 28th of April, 1906, and especially solicit the presence of the ladies to said sale which I will duly appreciate."
Lafayette Advertiser 4/25/1906. 

           


lagniappe:
Sub-Lenten Social Events.

 The first of the sub-lenten social events was the Progressive Euchre given on April the fifteenth by Mrs. B. J. Pellerin the winsome hostess being assisted in receiving by Miss L. Parkerson and Mrs. G. Comstock. A color scheme of pink and white was carried out in parlor and dining room adding a daintiness and finish to the attractive surroundings. After a spirit contest the first prize a handsome engraving was awarded Mrs. J. A. Martin, while the second a pretty game plate with hunting-scene design fell to the lot of Mrs. A. B. Denbo. The consolation, a unique work basket of Easter eggs was won by Mrs. LeRosen. The proverbial rabbit being given to Mrs. J. Arthur Roy as a booby. At the close of the afternoon delicious refreshments were served. The participants were: Mmes. T. M. Biossat, C. Caffery, B. Coronna, W. LeRose, T. N. Blake, J. A, Roy, T. B. Hopkins, jr., A. B. Denbo, J. A. Martin, J. Parkerson, G. Comstock, J. Hultz, R. Williams, J. C. Nickerson, B. Clegg, L. Stephens, A. Bonnet, L. Mayer, Misses E. Montgomery, L. Parkeron, G. Mayfied, H. McLaurin, H. Marshal, L. Robbins. Lafayette Gazette 4/25/1903.


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