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Monday, January 12, 2015

**APRIL 24TH M C

From the Lafayette Gazette of April 24th, 1897:



THE SUGAR REFINERY.


 Messrs. Gumbel & Co., the New Owners, are a Progressive and Reliable Firm.

 The refinery, which was built through the energy of Col. Gus A. Breaux, is being put in thorough condition for the next season. As the readers of The Gazette already know the plant is owned by S. Gumbel & Co., one of the best known and most reliable firms in the South. Messrs. Gumble & Co. purchased the property of the Lafayette Sugar Manufacturing Co. at public sale about a month ago and became the owners of the refinery, which, though not very large, was built according to the best ideas and the latest modern inventions in the sugar-making line.

 Messrs. Gumbel & Co., have engaged the services of Mr. A. B. Denbo who is superintending the work now being done at the refinery. Mr. Denbo enjoys the confidence and esteem of the people of the community and a better manager could not have been found.

 The capacity of the mill is 300 per day or 1,800 tons in a season of 60 days. The Gazette is assured that the new owners can be depended upon at all times to give the cane, growers the highest market prices for their cane, and as to the reliability of the new firm there need be no fear.

 Aside from the money paid for cane and for labor this refinery has been of great benefit to this parish. It has served as a stimulus to the cane industry which is growing surprisingly fast in this section. Lafayette is destined to become, at no distant date, one of the best sugar parishes in the State. The lands here are every bit as fertile as those of the Teche and river parishes and the cane they produce are not inferior to any. And when it is considered that we have equally good transportation facilities and that the disastrous floods from the Mississippi do not reach us, how can it be doubted that before many years our beautiful parish will be dotted with refineries, surrounded by waving fields of cane.

 Let us hop that this refinery will prove remunerative to its owners and that its success will serve as an incentive to those who may be inclined to take advantage of the unsurpassed resources which this parish offers to investors.
Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.




A Few Days More.
 The Democrats and those who are not Democrats, but intend to vote the Democratic municipal ticket, are reminded that they only have a few days in which to register. Unless they are registered under the new law they will not be allowed to vote.

 Let it be borne in mind that every vote will count at the election on May 4. One vote may mean a great deal to this town. It may give us good, intelligent and honest city government, and it is the duty of every citizen to get his name inscribed on the registration list so that he will be in a position to help bring about this happy result. While there seems to be no reason to doubt that the Democratic ticket will be elected, yet it would be the height of folly to take any chances.

 Let all those who have not registered do so at once. See that your friend and your friend's friend have done the same and all will be well.
 Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.



Ballain Again In Trouble.
Charged With Serious Offense.

 Gustave Ludovic Ballain, who has gained some undesirable notoriety upon different occasions, is again in trouble. He was arrested Thursday morning by Deputy Sheriff Mouton and placed in jail. The charge against Ballain is assault and battery and attempt to kill and murder a woman named Celestine Kadare and the affidavit that he tried to kill Virginia Allemand. It appears that Ballain had made the assault which resulted in his arrest, while at the notorious resort of Madame Baptiste in the suburbs of town.

 When Ballain was arrested he affected to cry and became very demonstrative.

 If the affidavit against Ballain is supported by evidence, he will very likely serve a term in the penitentiary.
Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.



The Crescent Hotel. - Capt. John Hahn, manager of the Crescent Hotel, informs us that some elaborate repairs are being made at this well-known house. The building is being painted inside and out, bath rooms with pipes for hot and cold water will be built, and a wash room back of the office will be very convenient to passengers. When the several improvements will have been completed the Crescent will be thoroughly up-to-date.
Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.






Demanade Rents Hotel.

 Mr. Paul Demanade has rented the Olivier Hotel and will take charge of that well-known house on the 1st of May. Under the new management it is safe to say that this hotel will lose none of the deserved popularity it has enjoyed under the superintendence of the Misses Olivier. Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897. 






Telephone Exchange. - Mr. R. F. Hoggsett, manager of the Teche & Vermilion Telephone Company, was in Lafayette this week attending to some business connected with the local exchange. The telephone service given by Mr. Hoggsett's exchange, has, we believe, been satisfactory. The exchange has undoubtedly been of great benefit to the people of the town and if it is extended the patronage that it deserves it will prove of far greater advantage in the future. It must be remembered that Mr. Hoggsett was the first to venture into the telephone business in Lafayette, and if for no other reason, he is entitled to our thanks. Miss Desbrest, the manager of the exchange, is ever prompt and accommodating and does everything in her power to give to the patrons of the line a first-class service. Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.




WEDDING BELLS.
Clegg-Givens.

"Happy is the bride whom the sun shines on."

 One of the prettiest weddings ever witnessed in our little city occurred on Tuesday, at the Methodist church, the contracting parties being Miss Louise Torian Givens and Mr. Baxter Clegg. The sacred edifice was exquisitely decorated with ferns, moss, palms, and a profusion of cut flowers. A few moments before eleven o'clock, the appointed hour for the ceremony, four sweetly pretty little maidens, Misses Inez Biossat, Rena Hopkins, Quintella Morgan and Alice Moss, stepped gracefully from their seats near the chancel rail and held the satin streamers of the wedding bell. Promptly at eleven, Mendelson's March, rendered by Miss L. Mudd, pealed forth and the wedding party ushers, Messrs. Frere and Givens, leading; bride on the arm of her uncle, Mr. W. S. Torian, Sr. - marched up the centre aisle and stood on front of a beautiful arch; the groom, entering from the vestry with his best man, Dr. F. E. Girard, met the bride beneath the wedding bell. The impressive ceremony of the Episcopal church was performed by Rev. C. C. Kramer, of New Iberia. As this divine pronounced the benediction over the kneeling couple, the organist played the soft, sweet strains of "Angels' Serenade" and the little girls swayed the bell to and fro, the whole scene presenting a most effective finale to the ceremony.

 The fair beauty of the bride was furthermore enhanced by a most becoming costume of handsome, dark-blue cloths, stylishly made and trimmed with rich cream lace, dark-blue satin and ribbon. Her hat was a dream of loveliness. The maid of honor was charmingly pretty, gowned in lilac Lansdowne, tastily trimmed in lilac and white silk, lilac ribbon and chiffon, with hat and gloves to match; she carried a bouquet of white rose-buds, with satin streamers. The bride's bouquet was of fragrant violets (her favorite flower) veiled by delicate sprays of maiden-hair fern.

 Numerous and handsome presents were received, also many telegrams of congratulation, all testifying to the deserved popularity of the young couple, who left on the noon train for a short wedding tour.

 May the future be as bright and unclouded as was their wedding day, is the wish of The Gazette.  Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.




Hannegan - McFaddin.

 Another pretty wedding, similar in some respects to the one of the previous day, inasmuch as the same arch and bell were used, was solemnized at the Presbyterian church on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The bride, Miss Mary McFaddin, being one of Lafayette's most popular young ladies, and the groom, Mr. Ambroise Hannegan, a resident of Arkansas.

 Loving hands that transformed the church into a veritable fairyland; palms, ferns, moss, evergreens and spring flowers being exquisitely combined.

 At the first chord of Mendelson's wedding march, excellently executed by Mrs. J. J. Davidson, the users, Messrs. Hopkins and Morgan, parted the drapery and leading the march, were followed by six little flower girls, wearing wreaths of Confederate Jessamines. Then on the arm of her maid of honor, Miss Susie Hopkins, came the winsome bride, daintily dressed in white organdy exquisitely trimmed with lace and ribbon; a pretty hat of white clip straw and a bouquet completed this charming toilette. At the altar the bride was met by the groom who entered from the rear of the church. The tableaux formed in front of the altar was one ever to be remembered as a thing of beauty. The party marched out by the lively strains of Lohengrin's march. The maid of honor was a picture of maiden loveliness, her costume being white and green organdy, the same colors predominating in the trimming of her hat and the arrangement of the bouquet she carried. The little flower girls, Misses Quintella Morgan, Alice Moss, Rena Hopkins, Lillian Van der Cruyssen, Hilda Schmulen and Inez Biossat, were indeed little elves in their light and airy dresses and not sweeter or fairer were the flowers they carried. The ceremony was performed by Rev. H. Wallace. Numerous presents were received by Mr. and Mrs. Hannegan who left for their home in Hope Arkansas, on the 3:30 train.

 Many friends were at the depot to bid the bride good-bye, and if good-wishes and rice bring good luck, certainly this couple will fare well in the future. Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.



 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 24, 1897:

 THE MERCHANTS AND THE ROADS.

 The farmer suffers the burden of the disadvantage of bad roads, but the merchant necessarily comes in for no considerable loss. The more freely and conveniently country folk can ride into town, the more they are inclined to do so, and every visit to the town carries with it an expenditure of money for merchandise of some description. There is no telling just to what extent the sale of the merchant's ware is curtailed on account of bad roads deterring our farmers and others from coming to town excepting when compelled to do so. It is certain that a very considerable volume of business is lost to the merchants of Lafayette in consequence of ill-conditioned roads, so that the merchants are as largely interested in securing good highways throughout the parish as the farmers themselves. The subject of good public roads deeply concerns every merchant and tradesman in Lafayette and unless they recognize this fact to the utmost they lost sight of a very important factor in the success of their business enterprises.

 The Advertiser hopes to see this question of public roads rapidly brought to an intelligent and satisfactory solution. We stand for a special road-tax as light as possible, but sufficiently large to secure and maintain a thoroughly good system of highways. Let everyone who believes this method to be the best talk to his neighbor about it and help create a healthy public sentiment in favor of a special road fund, and then let us take a vote on the question, according to law. There is reason to believe that the people are ready for the question now and would gladly accept the first opportunity to put themselves on record in favor of a road tax. Lafayette Advertiser 4/24/1897.    
         














Social Hops. - Social hops are on the decline and ere long will cease altogether. This is due to the fact that protracted meetings with will soon commence at the different churches, then our young people will renounce their allegiance to his Satanic Majesty and seek religion. O. C. P. 
Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.


Back in Lafayette. - Alex Vanderdoes has returned to Lafayette and resumed his position at the telegraph office of the Southern Pacific Company. Ed Chase who had replaced Mr. Vanderdoes during his absence has gone back to Sunset, where he was formerly employed. Lafayette Gazette 4/23/1897.


 Valuable Lot. - The valuable lot next to Judge O. C. Mouton's office was sold by Mrs. Theodule Hebert, Jr., to Mr. Gus Lacoste for the sum of $1,500. This is one of the best lots in town for either a residence or a business house.
Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.


 At Oak Ave. Park. - The boys had a very interesting game of ball at the oak Avenue park last Sunday evening. It was played by the "Dixies" and a packed nine, resulting in a score of 6 to 2 in favor of the former. Some very creditable playing was done on both sides. Another practice game will take place to-morrow at 4 o'clock. An invitation is extended to everybody. 
Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.



NARROW MINDED PEOPLE.

 Some people, whose mental vision is very limited, are seemingly displeased because this paper has sold a portion of its space to a New Iberia firm, and their displeasure has reached such alarming proportions that they even threaten to withdraw the support which they may have afforded us in the past.

 For the information of those who have taken such an unreasonable view of this matter, The Gazette will state that its advertising space is for sale to anyone engaged in a legitimate business, and it matters not if the advertiser should live in Lafayette, New Iberia or anywhere else. This paper does business on the principle practiced by intelligent persons in other branches of trade.

 If there is a merchant in Lafayette who is so narrow-minded that he will refuse to sell goods to a man because he should happen to live outside the limits of this parish, we would like to get his picture so that it could be framed and preserved for exhibition at the next centennial exposition. And if the proprietor of this paper had refused to accept the advertisement of a New Iberia firm he would have placed himself in the same category.

 The Gazette will state that notwithstanding its ardent desire to please the esteemed gentlemen who would restrict the paper to such narrow limits, it will continue to sell its advertising space to all those who believe it is worth buying and paying for. It will do this regardless of the fact that it may incur the disfavor of those who have gotten into the habit of looking at everything through a gimlet hole.  Lafayette Gazette 4/23/1897.




Auction Sale of Church Pews.
To the Lafayette Gazette:

 LAFAYETTE, LA., April 22nd, 1897.

 Easter Sunday is an eventful occasion in Lafayette, hardly more so on account of the religious circumstance it commemorates that for the annual auction sale of pews in the Catholic church, that always takes place immediately after high mass on that day.

 The use of the pews for a term of one year is sold to the highest bidders, and, as the demand for the most desirable seats always exceeds the supply, the bidding is spirited, often finding expressions in outward manifestations of enmity that endures from one Easter day to another, at which time the opportunity offers itself to "get even." To intensify the interest on this occasion it is the custom to remove the seats from pews that remain unsold, to ensure that none may enjoy the use of these without being entitled to that privilege by having paid the rental fee. The entire affair naturally engenders much ill-feeling, which fact causes the more thoughtful members of the church to deplore the annual recurrence of an event that creates and fosters dissension, and the congregation longs for another means of allotting church seats in better accord with religious sentiment.
                  (Signed)  LAYMAN.
Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.



 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 4/24/1897.

 The new building built by Mr. B. F. Anderson for Mr. Maurice Mouton is a very neat structure and presents a fine appearance.

 Mr. H. H. Hargrove, staff correspondent of the Picayune, was in Lafayette a few hours Wednesday afternoon. The Gazette acknowledges a pleasant visit from Mr. Hargrove.

 A number of painters, under the supervision of Foreman Morgan, are at work on the Crescent Hotel.

 Alex Vanerdoes has returned to Lafayette and resumed his position at the telegraph office of the Southern Pacific Company. Ed Chase who had replaced Vanderdoes during his absence has gone back to Sunset, where he was formerly employed.

 The Gazette thinks that if the School Board is able to make a small appropriation to paint the iron roof at the High School building it should do so at once. A little paint would prevent the rust from eating up the roof.

 As soon as the jail repairs are finished the Police Jury should see about painting the court-house. It is sorely in need of a fresh coat.

 The valuable lot next Judge O. C. Mouton's office was sold by Mrs. Theodule Hebert, Jr., to Mr. Gus Lacoste for the sum of $1,500. This is one of the best lots in town for either residence or a business house.
Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.



 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 24th, 1897.


THE MERCHANTS AND THE ROADS.

 The farmer suffers the burden of the disadvantage of bad roads, but the merchant necessarily comes in for no inconsiderable loss. The more freely and conveniently country folk can ride into town, the more they are inclined to do so, and every visit to the town carries with it an expenditure of money for merchandise of some description. There is no telling just to what extent the sale of the merchant's ware is curtailed on account of bad roads deterring farmers and others from coming to town excepting when compelled to do so. It is certain that a very considerable volume of business is lost to the merchants of Lafayette in consequence of ill-conditioned roads, so that they the merchants are as largely interested in securing good highways throughout the parish as the farmers, themselves. The subject of good public roads deeply concerns every merchant and tradesman in Lafayette and unless they recognize this fact to the utmost they lose sight of a very important factor in the success of their business enterprises.

 The Advertiser hopes to see this question of public roads rapidly brought to an intelligent and satisfactory solution. We stand for a special road-tax as light as possible, but sufficient large to secure and maintain a thoroughly good system of highways. Let everyone who believes this method to be the best talk to his neighbor about it and help create a healthy sentiment in favor of a special road fund, and then let us take a vote on the question, according to law. There is reason to believe that the people are ready for the question now and would gladly accept the first opportunity to put themselves on record in favor of a road tax.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/24/1897.



Save Railroad Fare,

 It should be self evident to every reasonable person informed of the number, the variety and the character of the business houses in Lafayette, and the keen competition carried on between these same mercantile establishments, that prices for commodities of life here are kept down to the lowest notch to the particular advantage of consumers.

 Our local tradesmen control cash of equal purchasing power with the cash manipulated by tradesmen in other towns and they possess ability of an order not inferior to that of their colleagues in other localities, then why should any consumer doubt the capability of the local merchant to supply his needs on as small a margin of profit as a merchant doing business fifteen or twenty miles away. And the local merchant is compelled to do it as matter of self preservation.

 Then why pay the railroad fare to a neighboring town under the delusion that you can save money by the operation?

 The species of impression that we refer to herein as a "delusion" is capable of accomplishing a way to build up other towns at the expense of one's own. Even if it were true that a resident of Lafayette could buy a given thing from a merchant in another locality at a lower price than at home, we contend that, even then, by sending his money away from his own town he loses in a direct way more than the slight saving i price. It is a poor business policy to take money out of circulation in the town where your own prosperity and well being is gauged in a direct ratio with the volume of that circulation. It is one of the most certain ways of holding back a town, and what could be worse for the residents and property holders of a town than its backwardness.

 This thing of "sending off" for what we need that can be gotten right at home at equally low prices, is a two-edged knife, and a most dangerous one. It is a knife that is likely to cut more against your interests than in your favor, as you must understand when you reason the matter out to its legitimate sequel. The average person does not always view a subject from its two sides and this is a great error. The Advertiser it is sub-serving the true interests of the home people by dwelling particularly on this important subject and feels confident much substantial good will result from an awakening of this line of thought among residents of Lafayette.
Lafayette Advertiser of April 24th, 1897.



 At the Convent.

 A nice little feast took place Monday at Mount Carmel Convent.

 That day was the anniversary of the Rev. Mother Incarnation. It was a surprise to the dear mother when during the morning the young boys and the afternoon the young girls assembled at the Convent Hall and there rendered a full programme suitable to the occasion. Many parents were offered to the Rev. Mother by the children and the Sister; among them was a beautiful picture of the Sacred Heart. The day was spent joyfully and cakes and refreshments were served. In the near future a pic-nic will be given by the pupils of the Convent. Lafayette Advertiser 4/24/1897.





Bicycles at Moss.

 According to all indications the year 1897 will be the banner year for bicycling. Manufacturers are turning out wheels night and day without any prospect of getting ahead in their orders. Lafayette will do her part of the riding on the mystic wheel and Moss Bros. & Co. have made the necessary arrangements to promptly meet the local demands for "bikes." Interested persons are invited to call and examine the 1897 "Crescent" at $50 and $75. Other wheels at lower prices. Wheels sold for cash and on the installment plan. A complete line of bicycle accessories, also. Call, or write for an 1897 catalogue. Lafayette Advertiser 4/23/1897.





HAPPY UNIONS.
Clegg-Givens.

 Tuesday, April 20th, Mr. Baxter Clegg and Miss Louise Givens were married at the Methodist Church at 11 o'clock by Rev. C. C. Kramer, of the Episcopal Church of New Iberia.

 Miss Clye Mudd acted as bridesmaid and Dr. F. E. Girard as groomsman. The church for that occasion was splendidly decorated by friends of the young couple. After the ceremony a reception was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Clegg where refreshments were in abundance. The young couple left on the East bound train on a bridal tour. Lafayette Advertiser 4/24/1897.



Hanegan - McFaddin.

 On last Wednesday the marriage ceremony of the popular young Miss Mary McFaddin, to Mr. A. T. Henegan, was celebrated at the Presbyterian church. The day was just such as lends enchantment and loveliness to the sacred ceremony. At the appointed time (2 p. m.) an immense crowd had gathered at the church to await the arrival of the contracting parties.

 The church was elaborately decorated with wreaths and garlands of flowers, and over the place where stood the happy couple, a large and handsome snow-white bell had been hung. In order to make more impressive the already beautiful ceremony of the Presbyterian church, all the windows were closed and the only light which fell upon the young (unreadable words). The bride arrived at the church accompanied by her father and her brother who walked to the maintenance with her.

 Here she was met by six little girls who accompanied her to the altar where she met the groom and where the solemn words which made them man and wife were pronounced.

 Mr. and Mrs. Hanegan left on the 4 o'clock train for their future home in Arkansas. They carry with them the good wishes of many friends.

 The Advertiser joins in, and recognizes the fact that Arkansas' gain is Louisiana's loss. Lafayette Advertiser 4/24/1897.







     







      







 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 4/24/1897.

 Mesdames B. Falk and G. Schmulen leave to-morrow for a short stay at Hot Springs.

 Miss Gussie Wolf of Washington is visiting the family of Leon Plonsky.

 The district convention of the Teacher's Institute of Lousiana will be held in Lafayette on May 28th. Addresses will be delivered by prominent Educators to different divisions of the assembly both in Falk's Opera House and at the High School building. The public schools will be closed during the entire day. Lafayette Advertiser 4 /24/1897.

 The lecture which was to have been delivered to-morrow by Thos. A. Badeau for The Catholic Knights of America in Falk's Opera House has been postponed until May 2nd.

 R. F. Hogsett, manager of the Teche Telephone company was in Lafayette looking after the interests of his company, and making arrangements to extend the service and put in night service in the near future.

 E. W. Philips of New Iberia was in Lafayette Thursday. Mr. Philips is a contractor of fine ability and is always engaged in monumental structures. Although as he says, he has plenty of work, there is room for more.

 Mr. D. Gordon Hall late of Galveston, has accepted a position in the Jewelry store of T. M. Biossat. Mr. Hall comes among us highly recommended as a skillful watchmaker and a gentleman. We gladly welcome him to our town and hope he will be satisfied in his new field of work, as we feel that he will prove quite an acquisition to our community.

 Alexis Voorhies, representing A. Baldwin of New Orleans, was in town during the week. We notice that his presence here is frequent which means that Alexis has a splendid field in our town. Lafayette Advertiser 4/24/1897.




  

  







    




   

       



















  









 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 24th, 1908:

WHY NOT PAVE THE BUSINESS STREET.
 The principal street being the one most used and the hardest used, and also the most conspicuous should be the best street and the most sightly.  Therefore, both to meet the service, not to mention the improvement in looks, the principal street should be paved in every town that can afford it.

 Lafayette is becoming quite a town. It now boasts of about 7,000 inhabitants and its business street already has a number of substantial brick stores. From which it appears that it has reached the class of towns which can afford to pave its principal street.


 The maintenance of the principal street in a condition suitable to the size and importance of a town requires a certain amount of money, in our case it has required a considerable amount in shells, work and cleaning. The time has now come, we believe, when it is a question whether it is a matter of either wisdom or economy to continue the present method of looking after the principal business street, and the resulting unsatisfactory condition of the street, or to begin paving it.


 A certain sum has to be expended on the street every year, and by adding this amount, it should be possible to pave one or two block every year. These paved blocks would be permanent and in a few years the complete paving of the street would be accomplished, we think, without an undue strain upon the finances of the town. Anyway, the question of paving the street should be taken up and discussed with the view of finding the easiest and least burdensome method of doing it. Lafayette is certainly big enough and important enough to have a paved business street. Lafayette Advertiser 4/24/1908.      





lagniappe:
A MERCIFUL JUDGE.

Scene in the Opelousas Court - The Power of Simple Eloquence.

 In  the course of a conversation an old member of the bar related to a representative of The Gazette a short story that is both interesting and pathetic. The occurrence referred to will doubtless be remembered by the older members of the Opelousas bar. The lawyer, who preferred not giving his name, related it to us as follows:

 "Some time after the war I was called to Opelousas on legal business. It was a few years after the emancipation of the slaves and the criminal dockets of the Louisiana courts consisted principally of accusations of petty thefts committed by the newly made colored citizens. I was seated with the members of the local bar, when the late George W. Hudspeth ordered the sheriff to open court. After the usual preliminaries, an old negro, who had grown white in the service of his master, appeared at the bar of justice and stood leaning against a chair. He was about to be sentenced for the larceny of a hog. Judge Hudspeth asked the old darky if he had anything to say before being sentenced. Thereupon, the aged prisoner approached the bench, and in a manner that carried conviction, and in a tone of voice which had the ring of truth in every word uttered, addressed the court substantially as follows:

  " 'Massa George, you knowed Jack when he was a slave. You know I was a good nigger. You know I neber stole what belonged to my master and other white folks. Because in those days, Massa George, we had plenty to eat; but when those Yankees had done made us free, I had to work to get something to eat for myself and children. I went to Mr. B-------- and I agreed to work in his field and he would give me meat and provisions for my children to eat. I worked well and hard for Mr. B--------, and I asked him for meat. I told him my children was all hungry and I had nothing to give 'em. He didn't give me anything. So on that night, my children was crying for something to eat and I was standing near the door of my cabin, when, as bad luck would have it, a fat pig came running by. I picked up an ax that was lying near the steps and I said, 'Pig, you b'long to Mr. B-------- and Mr. B-------- has promised to feed me and my children and he won't do it.'  Then I strick the pig on the head and I gave the meat to my children who was nearly starving. This is truf Massa George.'

 "Judge Hespeth, who was confident that the old nigger had told the truth, was visibly affected. As there were many hog thieves at the time, the judge had made up his mind to give him a severe dose, but he was so much moved by the simple story of the old negro, that he ordered the sheriff to take the prisoner to jail and to bring him into court the next morning.

 "When the prisoner returned to court for sentence, the good and humane judge said:  "jack, you have been convicted of hog stealing. The law must have its course. My duty is to sentence you for the crime of larceny. I, therefore, sentence you to a confinement in the parish jail for the term of ........ one hour !  But Jack don't work again for Mr. B--------.'

 "When the judge spoke the negro shook like a leaf, and when he heard the last part of the sentence, he almost dropped to his kness and cried out, "Thank you, Massa George.' "   Lafayette Gazette 4/24/1897.

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