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Sunday, January 11, 2015

FEBRUARY 5TH M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of February 5th, 1898:


TOWN CLOCK.


 And what a pride to exclaim "I have the correct time, listen to the town clock." Where to put it? At the court house. It is well and proper that time and justice should be together, as it takes time to get justice, and justice is never on proper time. Let us have our clock. May our city fathers realize this great need and give us poor folks time and a correct one. Watches. Yes, we have them but this is individual time. We were not born selfish and consequently we want a clock that shall be common property. What say ye?




Let Us Fall In Line.

We desire to direct the attention of the people of Lafayette to a fact over which there can not be any division of opinion: in just the same way we have found it possible to secure some substantial improvements by co-operative moves, in the recent past, we can add valuable acquisitions in the future. We have not unduly exerted ourselves along this line in times gone by and yet, within the comparatively short space of three years, we can point to no less than four very substantial enterprises that owe their existence in our midst to co-operative movements on the part of citizens. First came the Sugar Refinery at the eastern limits of the town; next followed by the Ice Factory; then, the Cotton Oil Mill and lastly the Water Works and Electric Light Plant. This is certainly a most gratifying showing and stands as indubitable proof of the great good to be accomplished by public spiritedness and co-operation.

If we have done well in the past may we not do even better in the future? The same forces we utilized before are still ours to command. They need only to be put in operation and kept in operation to bring grand results. Why not be up and doing then? Ours is a country of inexhaustible resources, a country of surprising possibilities - if the people who inhabit it will only develop the field. There will be a good opportunity afforded to the citizens of Lafayette to come together next Monday night to make common cause of the future progress and prosperity of Lafayette town and parish. We refer to the meeting of the Business Men's Association announced to take place at Falk's Opera House, the 7th. instant. The efforts of this organization in the past have been of particular value to the community, and are fully recognized.

Every citizen of Lafayette who has the interest of the community at heart, should not fail to attend this meeting and join in the movement, well remembering the Providence only helps those who help themselves.

We must get in line, forthwith, in order that we may not get left in the rapid march of progress that has seized upon the entire country.

Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1898.




A Need.

An editor who has the best interest of his town must now and then point out its resources, embellishments, enterprise and show also to the naked eye its weak spots. Since the beginning of the new year we have suggested some of the needs of our town. How our suggestions have been received, we know not. We have, so to speak, cleared our skirts, feeling that we have done the duty incumbent upon us as guardian of our town and that the responsibility or inaction will rest hereafter in higher circles. Not discouraged in the least, we shall continue to show how to improve our town and to give her the necessaries that civilization requires, and we are prompted to thus act because we wish to see this community keep its renowned name as the garden spot of Louisiana, and we would feel very backward if towns East and West of us would beat us in the race of progress. The "need" that we shall introduce to our readers is one of great use both for rich and poor, more so for the latter class thus making it more imperious upon us. All comforts and requisites that will brighten and enliven the lives of the poorer classes ought always to be primarily in mind of those who are placed above them in authority. Every citizen of whatever race he may be has a right, under the constitution, to be partaker of the quota levied by taxes and special levy. To satisfy people it is not always necessary to give them great things. The toiling classes are exhausting themselves daily by inquiring about this time. Lafayette is the first town, that we have visited in this XIX Century of progress and civilization, without a town clock. Do we need this extravagance, as some, will surely call it. Let us look at the benefits derived by a "people's clock". No more inquiries about time, and therefore no wear and tear of vest pockets pulling out watches to give necessary information. Dinner time would be revealed by the twelve strokes. This charming novelty would be a boom to the school boys. The termination of the pedagogue reign would be heralded by the clock. No more excuses for the tardiness of the cook at noon-day meals. Our electricity could be connected with our clock so as to give us time by night, thus saving a great number of matches. No more reasons to be behind time at the office or at church. It's hourly merriment would bring to our mind all of our engagements. In the still hours of the night, our nervous sleepless citizens longing for the return of day would have a friend in the town clock bringing to them from hour to hour the hope of a speedy relief. Our young men paying night calls would be reminded of saying "au revoir" before the ire of the father is raised. Our loafers could find ready employment watching the great hands moving on the dial. The only objection in sight could come from those who are despised to relegate Morpheus back to his kingdom.

Various persons have tendered us their opinion for the cause of our recent flooded streets. We thought like everybody else that the quantity of water that has descended upon us was the only cause of our flood, but after investigation we found that we were mistaken. At the time, we had called the attention to our sewers but we ought to have said our ditches. These latter ones are the main cause why our streets were transformed into bayous. We took a survey of the drainage water ditches in some portions of our town and we find them in a deplorable condition, especially would we call the attention of our street committee to the ditch which is located on the upper side of Mr. Chas. Caffery's residence. This ditch is entirely out of date for this section where the quantity of rain is far above the average. It ought to be broader, deeper and some means could be devised to keep it from caving. If planks were not sufficient to protect its banks from caving in, bricks ought to be used. At the intersection of this ditch and the one running in front of Judge Parkerson's house is almost all level with the street; going by the judge's house we found this ditch filled up with obstructions of various kinds and to our mind a cleaning up is greatly needed. Crossing, Lincoln Avenue, this ditch is continued through a channel which is too narrow for the quantity of water it is expected to carry; this continuation is like the main part of the ditch filled with obstructions of various kinds, old cans, etc., etc.

We hope our street committee will look after this matter, without delay, and a general overhauling of these ditches and others prevent another flood in our streets.


Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1898.




Where Do You Live?


"Where do you live?" is a question often asked.

"I live in Lafayette," is all the reply a new comer can give.

This is rather vague but in the absence of more (unreadable word) information your enquirer must satisfy himself with the reply.
It seems to us that in a progressive town as Lafayette, anyone ought to be able to tell the street on which he lives. We are lacking something in this respect and we would respectfully call the attention of our city council to this lack of information, and we would suggest to them, to remedy this defect, to place at each street intersection a small board in a conspicuous place, bearing the name of the street; then the question at the head of this short complaint could be answered satisfactorily. Don't stop at the cost, gentlemen, this would be but a trifle, compared to the genuine satisfaction of knowing where one lives. And to further bring the great question before you, gentlemen of the council, we will add that not only new comers are in ignorance of the location of their quarters, but even older residents are sometimes puzzled to know the location of our streets. Now gentlemen give us this street directory and we think you will have well merited in supplying this needful innovation. And while we are on this subject we would call the attention of our Police Jury to the sign boards in the parish indicating the way to the various towns around us. It would greatly diminish the anxiety of the travelers by adding under the names of the localities the number of miles to each respective point. This would be quite a step in the march of progress and in muddy weather a fellow would have the satisfaction of knowing that relief would or would not come in a certain number of miles. Lafayette Advertiser 1/5/1898.



Our Late Flood.

Various persons have tendered us their opinion for the cause of our recent flooded streets.
We thought like everybody else that the quantity of water that has descended upon us was the only cause of our flood, but after investigation we found that we were mistaken. At the time, we had called the attention to our sewers but we ought to have said our ditches. These latter ones are the main cause why our streets were transformed into bayous. We took a survey of the drainage water ditches in some portions of our town and we find them in a deplorable condition, especially would we call the attention of our street committee to the ditch which is located on the upper side of Mr. Chas. Caffery's residence. This ditch is entirely out of date for this section where the quantity of rain is far above the average. It ought to be broader, deeper and some means could be devised to keep it from caving. If planks were not sufficient to protect its banks from caving in, bricks ought to be used. At the intersection of this ditch and the one running in front of Judge Parkerson's house is almost all level with the street; going by the judge's house we found this ditch filled up with obstructions of various kinds and to our mind a cleaning up is greatly needed. Crossing, Lincoln Avenue, this ditch is continued through a channel which is too narrow for the quantity of water it is expected to carry; this continuation is like the main part of the ditch filled with obstructions of various kinds, old cans, etc., etc. We hope our street committee will look after this matter, without delay, and a general overhauling of these ditches and others prevent another flood in our streets.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1898.


WEDDING BELLS. - A. D. Martin, of Lafayette, and Miss Adeline Petetin, of Grand Coteau, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony at the Catholic Church, at Grand Coteau, last Thursday morning at 9 o'clock, high mass being celebrated. The happy couple left on the evening train for Galveston, Texas, where they will enjoy the sea breeze.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1898.




An Impromptu Musicale.

On last Friday night, a week ago Miss Mary Adele Young entertained quite a large number of her friends at her mother's hospitable home, the Cottage Hotel. In response to informal invitations the crowd gathered about 8:30 o'clock, where dancing was participated in until mid night, with music furnished by the Shreveport String Band.

 Miss Young robed in heavy novelty worsted trimmed in black plush and velvet, looked like a living statue if beauty and queenliness. She, assisted by her mother, and Miss Bessie Cornay, in their usual grace and comeliness, saw that everyone had a splendid time.

 Nice refreshments were served at eleven o'clock. In everyone's memory there are always some ever-clear spots. So speaking for everyone present, I say, that occasion can be classed amongst those sweet pleasures of the past, that dwell in our memory forever. Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1898.




Select News Notes (Advertiser) 2/5/1898.

Mr. J. D. Carter is happy over the addition to his family, "a boy".

Archbishop Chappelle, of New Orleans, will pass through Lafayette on February the 8th. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

New Goods!!! Go to Schmulen's Racket Store for shoes, Hats and Shirts.


Don't forget our offer good till the 1st of March. One dollar for the "Advertiser."
 Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Boston Peerless Seed Potatoes and all kinds of fresh Garden Seeds at Mouton and Hopkins. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Dr. F. E. Girard, will soon have his new office near the court house where Mr. F. Simpson's house used to stand. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Creole Cough Cure is guaranteed to cure coughs and colds quickly. Pleasant to take, 35 cents a bottle at the Moss Pharmacy.

Hon. Henry Watterson, the ablest editor of the South, will lecture at Falk's Opera House to-night. General admission, 50 cents, no reserved seats.
 Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Mr. Hebert Billeaud is the happy possessor of a charming residence at Broussardville. It is one of the finest in our parish. Mr. Anderson, the builder of it, has certainly done well. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

If you are in need of embroideries and laces, come and see our line at Schmulen's Racket Store.

Our "job department" is overtaxed. Our presses are running daily till late in the night. Fine work and low prices will bring "jobs."
 Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898.

The ball given last Saturday night by the lodge of A. O. U. W., did not receive the patronage it ought to have had. The young men were conspicuous by their absence. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898.

Mr. L. Lacoste is busy transforming the great stable near Mrs. Hebert's in a great warehouse where agricultural machines, buggies, phaetons, harness etc. etc. will be found. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Mr. H. Hunoldstein, the general agent of the Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York, is with us this week, and has established a local agency in Lafayette, of which Mr. Ambroise Mouton is the agent. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Many persons from different parts of the States are corresponding daily with Ambroise Mouton, the Real Estate agent at this place, with a view of buying lands to plant in sugar cane. Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Notwithstanding the unfavorable weather the concert given by Miss Boas and her pupils was a success. Applause was freeely and often given especially to local talent and to all participants. It was a musical feast and too much credit can't be bestowed upon Miss Boas for her efforts.
 Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

"Send him a paper." This is daily asked at our office. It is a subscriber who begs us to send a copy to his neighbor, to his uncle, to his cousin. who watch the proper time to take possession of our "Advertiser" and then read it himself..........Gratis.
Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Mr. Don Caffery returned from New Orleans last Wednesday accompanied by a competent electrician who will place wires in stores and houses.
Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

A circular received from E. C. Roger, Arnaudville, La., informs us that having admitted his sons with him in business, the new firm is styed E. C. Roger & Sons.
Laf. Adv. 2/5/1898

Mr. Hebert has sold his Ice Factory to Messrs. Jno. L. Phillips, of Tyler, Tex., and Baxter Clegg, of our town. They will have a splendid plant and we hope that we will enjoy cheap ice during the summer. Mr. Baxter will be the main manager.
Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1898.





 From the Lafayette Gazette of February, 5th, 1898:

Ice Factory. 

 The ice factory which has not been in use for some time will be in full operation the coming season. Mr. P. L. Philips, of Tyler, Texas, and Mr. Baxter Clegg will be manager of it. The Gazette is glad to see the signs of improvement all around us and that is certainly an encouraging one. Mr. Philips has already been connected with the ice plant, and he is known to be a man of business tact and ability. Mr. Clegg will take an active interest in the concern and will devote his time to see it succeed. As such an enterprise is badly needed in our town, there is no doubt but that it will prove a successful business venture.  
Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.


 Water and Lights.

There has been some trouble with the contractors who were to furnish the incandescent lamps to the town, but this has been settled. The wiring of houses will be commenced as soon as the material arrives, it having been shipped from New Orleans Friday. D. L. Caffery went to the city Monday and while there he secured a thoroughly competent electrician to do the work. The stand pipe is completed except the painting and connecting it with the water mains.

Mr. C. M. Pasquier, manager of the company in charge of the erection of the plant here is to remain in order to push the work to completion.

Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.




HON. HENRY WATTERSON.


To-night at Falk's Hall the great Kentuckian and Southerner, Hon. Henry Watterson will deliver a lecture on "Money and Morals." He is known to all of our readers as the distinguished Confederate veteran, American statesman and one of our country's foremost citizens.

As the manner of getting Col. Watterson to lecture here may not be understood by all, we believe, it best to explain it. It is simply this. About seventy-five of our citizens have guaranteed the payment of one hundred dollars for the lecture, that being the price exacted by him. Those who so guarantee that amount pay as the others to hear the lecture. The money taken at the door goes toward refunding the guaranteed amount pro rata.

This is a rare opportunity offered to our people and we hope that it will receive encouragement.
Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.





BUSINESS MEN'S ASSOCIATION.

 In another column of The Gazette appears an announcement of a meeting of the Business Men's Association at Falk's Hall, Monday, February 7.

 Lafayette possesses advanced methods of procuring water and light, and there could be no more fitting time than now to "boom" the town. The above named association has done incalculable good to our town already by concerted and united action and we hope that that their next move will meet with as much success as their former ones. We owe to them many of our recent improvements, and all our citizens should get together and help the association in its laudable efforts. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.


Mardi Gras Carnival.
New Orleans, La. Feb. 22, 1898.

 --The Carnival this year promises to exceed previous efforts in grandeur, and New Orleans will show to the world the insignificant effect her recent affliction has had upon the temper and resources of her people. The Southern Pacific will sell round trip tickets February 18, 19, 20, 21, from all points on its line to New Orleans at rate of one fare, limited for return to fifteen days from date of sale. Children will be carried at one-half the adult rate. Double daily train service with sleeper service in both directions. Local agents will furnish all information. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.


A Serious Difficulty.

 A difficulty occurred Tuesday evening on the Long plantation, in which Mr. C. C. Mabry, manager of that place, shot a negro by the name of Jean B. Daigle, and slightly wounded him. Mr. Mabry was assaulted by the negro with brick-bats and had to defend himself with his revolver. Daigle was armed at the time of the shooting. Affidavits were made before Judge Verro: by both parties.
Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.


Enjoyable Time.

 One of the most thoroughly enjoyable social events in the history of our town was the informal dance given on Friday, January 28, at the Cottage Hotel. The warmth of a most genial hospitality was evinced by the charming hostesses, Mesdames A. Young and T. N. Blake, Misses Young and Littell. The dance music was furnished by a quartette of traveling musicians whose efforts, to judge from the faces of the merry dancers, were much appreciated. This delightful entertainment will linger long in the memory of the many participants, among whom were the following:

 Mesdames T. N. Blake, B. Clegg, F. E. Girard, A. Denbo, N. P. Moss, R. Delaney, A. Bonnet, S. R. Parkerson and E. Trahan. Misses L. Gladu, E. and S. Hopkins, P. Harmanson, P. Gueriniere, B. Cornay, L. and C. Mudd, Haydee Trahan and Molly Wartell. Messrs. B. Clegg, F. E. Girard, A. Denbo, A. R. Trahan, F. S. Mudd, R. E. Cunningham, Chas. F. Trudeau, Ralph Squires, O. B. Hopkins, J. C. Nickerson, A. Morgan, F. O. Cornay, Kinney Zell and P. L. Caillouet. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.


Ladies Five O'clock Tea Club.

 The last meeting of the Five O'clock Tea Club was held at at the home of Miss Bessie Cornay, who proved a most gracious hostess. After the business program was dispensed with there followed a unique game, in which that almost proverbial "woman" weapon, the innocent looking hat-pin, figured conspicuously. The first prize was awarded Mrs. N. P. Moss, the booby fell to the lot of Mrs. F. J. Mouton. Vocal and instrumental music by Misses L. Hopkins and B. Cornay was enjoyed, as were also the delicious refreshments served later in the afternoon. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.




Successful Ball.

 The ball given by the local lodge of the A. O. U. W. last Saturday was a success. Although the number of those who attended was not large, the affair was a thoroughly enjoyable one in every particular. The lodge is to be congratulated on the successful and pleasant outcome of its undertaking. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.


Boston peerless seed potatoes, and all kinds of fresh garden seeds at Mouton & Hopkins. Laf. Gaz. 2/5/1898.



Falk's Opera-house Notes:

 Don't fail to hear Henry Watterson to-night.

 Every body should attend the lecture to-night. It will be an intellectual treat.

 Henry Watterson in "Money and Morals" to-night at Falk's Opera House. Tickets for sale at the Advertiser, Gazette and post-offices.

 Henry Watterson will lecture to-night at Falk's Opera House. The subject will be "Money and Morals." Admission is fifty cents. No reserved seats.

 Henry Watterson was the mouthpiece of the United States government at the opening of the World's Exposition at Chicago in 1893. His masterly oration at that time electrified the whole country. He in the South's greatest editor. Don't miss hearing him to-night. Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.



Cock Fights. - More than one hundred "sports" witnessed the cock mains at Wm. Hane's saloon last Sunday. The fights were between the Lafayette birds owned by Mr. Eli McDaniel and those from Opelousas belonging to Mr. DeValgas. The local birds won four fights out of seven. 
Lafayette Gazette 2/5/1898.  




Honorable R. C. Landry.
The States (New Orleans) makes the following complimentary notice of Lafayette's representative to the convention:

 "One of the venerable and patriarchal-looking members of the convention will be Hon. R. C. Landry, of Lafayette. He has always taken an active interest in the public affairs of his parish and is ever on the alert to advance and promote the interests of his people. He was born in St. Martin parish, February 22, 1824, but has resided in Lafayette ever since he was a year old. His parents originally came from Canada. During the Civil War he served for three years as a member of the Eighteenth Louisiana Regiment, under Captain A. P. Bailey, doing valiant and gallant duty in Louisiana and Arkansas. He is now one of the prominent planters in his section of the State. He has been a member of the police jury of his parish for five terms. He was first appointed immediately after the war; twice by Governor Nicholls, and once by Governor Foster and his intense popularity was proven when the office was made elective by his people electing him again to the office which he had so long filled with such eminent satisfaction to them and their interests. During the past six years he has been the president of the police jury.

 It goes without saying that Mr. Landry, who has always been a Democrat, is a most ardent white supremacist and he was chosen Democratic nominee to the Constitutional Convention without opposition.

 Mr. Landry was married twice. His first wife was Miss Irene Bernard and his second, Miss Felicia Doucet. He is the father of eleven children, three boys and eight girls."

From the New Orleans States and in the Laf. Gazette 2/5/1898.






From the Lafayette Advertiser of February 5th, 1909:

THE Y. M. C. A.

 Meeting to be Held at Masonic Temple Next Sunday to Discuss Organization.

 Some years ago an effort was made by a few prominent citizens of this town to organize a Young Men's Christian Association. In seeking to perfect this organization they felt that something was needed to be done to counteract the influences that were leading so many young men astray. Unforeseen conditions arose which made the organization at that time impracticable and since then no definite steps have taken in that direction. It is also worthy of note that since then even worse conditions have arisen in our town which is still greater argument for the organization of the Young Men's Christian Association. Sunday afternoon at a meeting held in the Masonic Temple by a few young men the matter discussed fully and they concluded to hold a special meeting at the same place next Sunday afternoon and invite citizens of the town to meet with them.

 It hardly seems necessary to discuss the need of such an organization in our city. Unfortunately this matter has been neglected too long. A business man remarked to the writer of this article recently, "Our young men need better prepared for places of responsibility and the demoralizing influences that surround them are not conducive to that end." When Sunday comes young men are seen loafing on the streets or going to places of amusement that do them no good. Something ought to be provided for them. In many states the railroad companies recognize this fact and assist materially in the Y. M. C. A. work. In many cities the large department stores provide places of amusement for their employees and seek to keep them away from harmful influences. In the country towns there is but little of that sort of work done. It is the purpose of this organization to meet such conditions.

 Can the Y. M. C. A. successfully meet such conditions? We think that it can. First of all, it is interdenominational in spirit and in its organization. It is not affiliated with any religious denomination. Hence, it is absolutely independent. Of course, it is Christian in spirit and seeks to develop in the lives of its members the genuine Christian character. It includes in its membership Catholics, Protestants, Jew and Gentiles. It not only seeks to minister to the spiritual life, but to do a still large work. It furnishes young men amusement. Perhaps the gymnasium is one of its most interesting features. It gives special attention to that part of its work. It furnishes a reading room and a library. It seeks to appeal to every side of manhood, and above all to the social relation. Coming together frequently, and under the most favorable conditions, young men have opportunities they could not otherwise enjoy. It provides lectures, musical concerts, and other forms of amusement and entertainment. It looks after strange young men and especially those who are in need. It has free bath rooms, lounging rooms and other means of assisting the poor.

 This is the nature of the work the Y. M. C. A. seeks to do. At the meeting in the Masonic Temple next Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock the subject will be more carefully discussed. Everybody is invited to come. The sympathy and co-operation of our business men is needed and we trust that this appeal will not be in vain. Lafayette Advertiser 2/5/1909.

        


















lagniappe:
How to Walk.

When a girl walks she should be trained to hold her shoulders well back and to keep her arms close to her body. The chest will then be thrown out, not form an inward curve, and the head must be held up fearlessly. Some women go through life with the head a little forward reminding one of nothing so much as an inquisitive tortoise out on a voyage of discovery.

The foot should be placed on the ground on the ball first, not on the heel or quite flat. The latter way robs one of all grace, and to put the heel first is too ungainly for words. It is just as ugly to mince along on the toes; it looks as though the ground was overheated and not to be trodden on. Even when climbing a hill or mounting the rather dingy staircase of town-built houses and flats, the head should be held up and not drooped as though you were searching for a lost nickel.
(Original source unknown.) Printed in the Lafayette Advertiser on February 6, 1897.

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