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Monday, January 12, 2015

**AUGUST 24TH M C


 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 24th, 1904:


For Benefit of High School. 

 At an impromptu gathering of wee folks at the home of little Misses Alice and Eppie Moss last Monday, the happy idea was conceived by them of giving a jolly daylight entertainment to swell the fund now being raised by Prof. Avery for painting the High School Building.
 


 The children eagerly entered into the spirit of the affair which is entirely of their own doing, and all went to work immediately to master the different parts assigned on the program gotten up by themselves. They decided upon next Saturday afternoon as the time and the new Jefferson theatre not yet completed, they secured Oak Lawn, the spacious and inviting home-place of Dr. Moss, for the field of operations.

 An admission fee of ten cents will be charged to view the performance, and lemonade and cake will be sold to increase the receipts. The doors will be open at five o'clock and curtain will rise at 5:30 p. m.

 The following little men and women will carry out an interesting program of dialogues, recitations, songs and drills:

 Ida Roy, Clayton Pellerin, Raoul Mouton, Tommy Guilbeau, Martha Pellerin, Patrich Mouton, Eppie Moss, James Blake, Stella Roy, Lilla Mouton, Lillian Guilbeau, Alice Moss, Paola Mouton, Emily DeBlanc, Wilfred Moss and Eva Mouton.

 The actors and performers invite all their friends to be present, and all dolls with clean faces coming with their little mamas will be admitted free.

Laf. Advertiser 8/24/1904.  




 Urges Practical School Supervision.

  Superintendent of Education J. B. Aswell has sent the following letter and copy of laws to all members of school boards in the State:

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 Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.



NOTICE.

 Owing to my duties in connection with the post office I find that I have not the time to devote to my insurance business, and take this opportunity of letting my patrons and friends know that I have sold my agency to J. C. and L. D. Nickerson who will conduct the name of Nickerson Bros. Commissions of authority, as agents have been issued to them by the different companies I represented, and all policies written by me will be thoroughly protected.

 Knowing my successors to be reliable business men I take pleasure in recommending them to my patrons and the public general.
                      J. R. DOMENGEAUX.
     Havine assumed active and personal supervision of Mr. J. R. Domengeaux's insurance business we are prepared to serve his patrons and friends in the future as has been his pleasure to serve them in the past. Our companies are second to none, as has been evidenced in the several great conflagration sweeping this country. Our best endeavors towards supplying you with the best in the insurance market are offered. On an honest and legitimate basis we solicit a share of your patronage.
                      Yours very truly,                                                     NICKERSON BROS.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.






No New Trust Needed. -

 Information has been received that the Opelousas Compress people have filed a petition before the Railroad Commission asking that an order be issued prohibiting the railroads from hauling cotton to be compressed past a compress.

 A counter petition is being circulated for signatures here and is being promptly signed by all requested.

 It is hardly possible that the Commission will consider the Opelousas petition seriously, as it is so palpably a violation of personal rights. Should such an order be issued it would deny a man the right to send his cotton to be compressed wherever he desired, and force him to patronize the nearest compress regardless of the charges made by the compress or his inclination in the matter. In other words it would place the cotton raisers at the mercy of the compresses. There may be such a thing as benevolent trust, but the farmers of Louisiana do not care to subject themselves to a compress trust, nor have the right of compressing their cotton wherever they consider most advantageous taken away from them. The Advertiser does not for one moment believe that the Commission will entertain the Opelousas petition. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.




Arrested. - Friday Sheriff Lacoste arrested a white man named Dr. Golman, at Cade, accused of assault to murder and jumping his bond in Nacogdoches, Texas. Laf. Adv. 8/24/1904.                               




Charged With Horsestealing. - Wednesday information was given Sheriff Lacoste that a negro had attempted to sell a blue mare about 15 1/2 hands high at the home of Mr. B. F. Foreman. Mr. Foreman charged him with having stolen it. He finally admitted that he had and made off, leaving the mare. Deputy Alphonse Peck too up the case and by some shrewd work located the negro near Gueydan where he arrested him and lodged him in jail here. The negro is named John Wright and has confessed to stealing two other horses, one near Crowley and the other in this parish. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904. 

 

 Will Re-open First Monday in September. - Mt. Carmel Convent will open its 59th session the first Monday in September. The patronage of the public is solicited, and parents are cordially invited to call and investigate our superior advantages for the instruction of the young. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.



Works Well. - Last Thursday afternoon an Advertiser reporter happened in Adam's & Dauriac's shop just as they were operating their machine for adjusting rubber tires on buggy wheels. It was quite interesting. The machine works well and quickly and owners of rubber tired buggies need not worry over worn out tires, for Adams & Dauriac can fix them up in short order.


Death of Mrs. Elimire Marie Bacque. -

 Mrs. Bacque was a member of one of the largest families in this parish, and possessed a large number of friends who esteemed her for her many admirable traits of character. She was a devoted wife and mother whose heart was wrapped up in her home, a faithful member of the Catholic Church and a devout and conscientious christian.

The Advertiser joins with many friends in extending sincere sympathy to the bereaved father and children. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.



Notice. - Owing to my duties in connection with the post-office I find that I have not the time necessary to devote to my insurance business, and take this opportunity of letting my patrons and friends know that I have sold my agency to J. C. and L. D. Nickerson, who will conduct same under the name of Nickerson Bros. Commissions of authority, as agents have been issued to them by the different companies I represented, and all policies written by me will be thoroughly protected.

Knowing my successors to be reliable business men I take pleasure in recommending them to my patrons and the public in general.
J. R. DOMENGEAUX.

Having assumed active and personal supervision of Mr. J. R. Domengeaux's insurance business we are prepared to serve his patrons and friends in the future as has been his pleasure to serve them in the past. Our companies are second to none, as has been evidenced in the several great conflagrations sweeping this country. Our best endeavors towards supplying you with the best in the insurance market are offered. On an honest and legitimate basis we solicit a share of your patronage.

Yours very truly,
NICKERSON BROS.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.





Will Give All His Time.

 Postmaster J. R. Domengeaux has disposed of his business to Nickerson Bros. and will now devote his entire time to the duties of his office. Mr. Domengeaux has made a most excellent postmaster and now having his entire time free to give to his duties, will, we are sure improve upon his already fine record. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.  





Base Ball.
 Saturday the Lafayette team played the first of two games in Jeanerette. Lafayette didn't have all of the regular team and got "done up" to the tune of 7 to 1, favor of Jeanerette. But in the second game Sunday all the members were present, and the Jeanerette people saw one of the liveliest and best games of the season. It took twelve innings to decide and then stood only 4 to 3, favor of Lafayette, showing how tight the playing was.

 Pilette and St. Martin played a fine game on the local diamond Sunday. The score was 3 to 2, favor of St. Martin. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.  






Declared the Democratic Nominees.

 The Judicial Democratic Executive Committee met at the court house Tuesday Aug. 16 and, as no other candidates for district judge and district attorney had announced themselves within the time prescribed, declared Phillip S. Pugh of Crowley, the regular Democratic Nominee for district judge and Wm. Campbell, of Lafayette, for district attorney. The primary ordered for Sept. 10, being unnecessary, will not be held. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.



 By the Carload.

 The Falk Mercantile Co., are daily receiving their fall and winter stock. Several carloads have been received and there are more to come. Mr. Ike Bendel, the buyer for the firm, has just returned from New York and he states that he has been more than fortunate in securing some tremendous bargains, which the firm will later share with their customers by offering them bargains lower than bargain prices.

 Eight car loads of furniture have already been received, and others are on the way. The Falk Mercantile Co., propose to be headquarters for furniture, and if stock and prices will make them headquarters, they certainly will be. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1903.  


JUDGE MOUTON'S CANDIDACY.
Endorsed by Acadia and St. Landry Bars. - An Able Officer Who Deserves Re-Election.

 Elsewhere in this issue will be found the announcement of the candidacy of Judge Julian Mouton for Judge of the Court of Appeals for the first district of the first circuit. Judge Mouton has already served as a judge of the Court of Appeals for eight years and during his incumbency of the office won sincere praise from the bars of the parishes in which he held court. He requires no encomiums in his home parish, where his high character, sterling integrity and true worth are known, and we believe The Advertiser voices the wish of the people of Lafayette in expressing the hope that the people of the district will recognize the eminent fitness of Judge Mouton and again elect him to the position of the Court of Appeals which he filled for eight years with distinguished ability.

 At the close of his last term of court in the parishes of Iberia, and Acadia, and also Rapides, which last, however, is not included in the present district, the bars in each of the three parishes as an act of appreciation of Judge Mouton's services and to express their sincere esteem, met and passed most flattering resolutions expressive of their high regard for him personally and commending the able manner in which he had uniformly discharged the duties of his office. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.



   



Barbarous and Savage. The details of the burning of two negroes at Statesboro, Ga., Tuesday of last week, given in column lengths in the daily papers, are simply horrible, and how it is possible for men in a christian community to wreak such a savage and barbarous vengeance even upon the most depraved seems perfectly astounding. That punishment swift and sure should be meted out to criminals is understood, even to the taking of life if need be, but to torture a miserable wretch even though he richly merits it, is not consonant with civilization, and rightly is receiving strong condemnation throughout the country.

 Burning a human being is brutality of the worst kind, for which there is no excuse and no justification. In certain cases lynching may be condoned or even approved; but in no case can the awful crime of burning at the stake awaken any sentiment but horror, and is a sad commentary upon our enlightenment and civilization that such a deed worthy only of savage Indians, could occur in a community that lays claims to the name of christian. Original author unknown. In the Lafayette Advertiser of 8/24/1904.


  




City Council Proceedings.

           Lafayette, La., August, 22, 1904.
  Special meeting of the City Council was held this day with Mayor Chas. D. Caffery presiding; members present, A. E. Mouton, D. V. Gardebled, John O. Mouton, Geo. A. DeBlanc.  Absent: Felix Demanade, Henry Fontenot, M. Rosenfield.

 The object of said meeting was called for the purpose of devising means for the removal of the Fire House and City Hall away from the Court House square.

 Moved, seconded and adopted, that, Mayor be authorized to contract for the purpose of having said buildings moved to such places as may be practicable and which may cause the least expense to the City Council provided; that if sale be found for the City Hall at a reasonable price the Mayor is authorized to sell same. Carried.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
J. P. COLOMB, Assistant Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.
  


Police Jury Proceedings.
Lafayette, Thursday, August 11, 1904.

 The Police Jury met this day as a Board of Reviewers to pass upon the assessment list of the town of Lafayette, for the year 1904, with all members of the Jury present.

  On motion duly seconded it was ordered that the cement walk around the court-house square be made six feet wide and the walk in front of the court-house leading from the front steps to Lafayette street be made ten feet wide, and walks leading sideways from the front steps of said court-house to be six feet wide and the walk from the rear steps of the court-house to the jail to be six feet wide.

 On motion duly seconded it was ordered that the cement walk around the court-house square be laid inside of inner line of old pavement; any additional expense to be borne by City Council of Lafayette, incurred in changing location of the cement walks. Motion was was carried.

 Messrs. Billeaud, Begnaud, Boudreaux, Breaux, Mouton, Spell, and Connolly voting yea, and Mr. Landry voted nay.

 Mr. Landry explained his vote ad being based upon the objection in his mind that the square was not large enough to allow this strip to be taken from it; that his observation was that other communities were enlarging rather than decreasing their court-house squares.

 The Jury again sat as a Board of Reviewers to pass upon the assessment on vehicles, made by L. Billeaud in the town of Lafayette, and said assessment was accepted and turned over to sheriff for collection.

 On motion the Jury adjourned until the next regular meeting.

M. BILLEAUD, Jr., President.
D. A. COCHRANE, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.












 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/24/1904:

 Miss Mayme Duson spent Friday in Lafayette as the guest of Dr. T. B. Hopkins.

 Dr. R. B. Raney was in town Sunday, visiting at the home of Dr. J. D. Trahan, and was accompanied home Monday by his wife, who has been visiting her parents several days.

 Mr. W. W. Duson passed through Lafayette Friday on his return from New Orleans.

 Mrs. Crow Girard returned home Thursday after spending several weeks in New York, Niagara Falls, and other points North.

 Baxter Clegg made a flying trip to New Orleans Friday.

 Mr. and Mrs. Leo Judice were in town Saturday.

 O. B. Hopkins, manager of the Vordenbaumen Lumber Co., went to Patterson Saturday on business.

 Leonce Gladu left Sunday morning for Reserve, St. James, Parish, La., to accept a position with Sol Strauss, general merchandise.

 Clerk Ed. G. Voorhies has laid aside the cares of the office for a while and is taking a vacation.

 Deputy Clerk F. K. Hopkins, after taking a three weeks' vacation, entered upon his duties again Thursday.

 G. J. Abbadie, of Carencro, was in town Saturday and reports the presence of caterpillars in his cotton in large numbers.

 Professor Greig's Home Institute will re-open for eighth session Monday Septemeber 5.

 Mrs. C. H. Voorhies and daughter, Miss Irma, and little son George, have moved to Houston, where they will make their future home.

 A. J. LeBlanc and Rousseau Dugas left for Cheniere la Croix yesterday on a fishing trip.

 Hugh Wallis returned home Saturday, after spending several weeks in St. Louis and other points.

 N. Abramson went to Baton Rouge Monday.

 G. B. Evans,  general agent of the United Oil and Refining Co., Beaumont, Texas, spent several days in Lafayette vicinity last week looking after the interests of his company. 

 An exceptionally large pumpkin of the best variety was sent to this office Monday by Mr. H. A. Gianelloni who raised it. It is an exhibition in the office window.

 Deputy Alphonse Peck took a negro woman to the Insane Asylum at Jackson Monday.

 Mrs. Ed. Prudhomme and baby, after spending several weeks most pleasantly with relatives in Morgan City, returned home Monday.

 S. Kahn returned Monday from New York, where he purchased a large and elegant fall stock of clothing, shoes and gent's furnishing goods for the Lafayette Clothing House.

 Robert H. Broussard has accepted a position in the sheriff's office as assistant tax collector. 

 Misses Aimee Mouton and Rita Broussard, after a pleasant stay at Lake Arthur, have returned home. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1904.


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 From the Lafayette Gazette of August 24th, 1901:


PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS.
It is Proposed to Build a School House, a Market and an Extension of the Waterworks and Electric Lights.
 
The following petition is being presented to the tax-payers of this town for their signatures, and, we are pleased to say, only six or seven persons have, so far, refused to sign it:
To the Hon. Mayor and Members of the City Council of Lafayette, La. -- We, the undersigned property tax-payers of the corporation of Lafayette, Louisiana, being and constituting one third of the total number of property tax-payers of said town, entitled to vote under the provisions of the State constitution, respectfully show:

 That the following described public improvements are urgent public necessities in said town, to-wit:

 1. Grounds and buildings for a first-class modern high school (for white children), requiring not less than $20,000.

 2. The extension of the water mains of said town, for the extinghishment of fire, and other purposes, and also the extension of the electric light system for additional street lights, and for private lighting requiring not less than $10,000.

 3. Ground and building for a first-class public market house, requiring not less than $20,000.

 And petitioners further show that there are no funds in the treasury of said town to acquire and construct said improvements, and that same can only be required by the levying, assessing and collecting of special taxes therefor and issuing bonds thereon.

 4. And petitioners further show that there are outstanding $30,000 of six per cent bonds issued under Act. No. 90 of the Acts of the Legislature of 1896, to obtain the present water and light system of this town, and that it is to the best interest of said town that said bonds should be called in and replaced by five per cent bonds with greater length of time for redemption.

 Wherefore, we respectfully petition your honorable body to order a special election in said town of Lafayette, Louisiana, under the constitution and laws of the State, for the purpose of ascertaining and determining whether or not it is the sense and desire of the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette, that special taxes based upon the assessed valuation of property of said town according to the official rolls, be assessed levied and collected, for twenty-five years, beginning with the year 1902, at the rates and for the purposes hereinafter set forth, upon which tax, and the public faith and credit of said town, negotiable bonds shall be issued by the City Council of said town, in such denominations as may be found convenient, bearing five per cent per annum interest, payable in twenty-five years (interest payable annually) with right to call in the same as said tax is collected. And the rates of said taxes and the purposes for which they are levied and intended, and said bonds issued, and now declared to be as follows:

    1. To procure grounds and buildings for a first-class modern public high school in said town, a special tax of 1 1/4 mills on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, upon which tax bonds shall be issued for the sum of twenty thousand dollars.

    2. For the extension of the water mains and light system as herein above set forth, a special tax of five eighths of one mill on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of ten thousand dollars.

    3. To procure the ground and building for a first-class public market house, a special tax of one and one-fourth mills on the dollar upon the valuation of property aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of twenty thousand dollars.

    4. To retire and replace the outstanding bonds issued under Act No. 90 of 1896, for the present water and light system, a special tax of one seven-eighth mills on the dollar of the assessed valuation aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of thirty thousand dollars.

 All of which taxes shall be levied and collected, and said bonds issued, for the time and in the manner herein above set forth and the title to said improvements shall be in said municipality, and subject to the control of said City Council, and said bond not be sold for less than par.

 And we further petition that said propositions be submitted to the qualified voters at said special election, in such manner that the voter may vote separately on each, "for" or "against," as he may desire.

 It is obviously unnecessary for us to expatiate upon the plan clearly set forth in the petition. It is understood that the levying of the proposed tax will not increase the present rate of taxation. The five-mill tax, which is being collected for the payment of the waterworks and electric light bonds, will be discontinued the day that the new tax is levied, because the plan is to call in the outstanding bonds. The fourth proposition on the petition refers to the matter of bonds. As explained in the petition it is a distinct proposition to be voted on separately. It is, however, the foundation of the plan and it must first be adopted before the other propositions can be made effective. In other words, if proposition No. 4 is defeated the whole plan falls to the ground.

 Proposition No. 1 provides for the expenditure of not less than $20,000 for the purchase of a suitable grounds and the building thereon of a modern school house for the use of the white children of the town. We do not think that any argument is necessary to convince an intelligent person of the necessity of a new school building. The present buildings are clearly inadequate.

 The second proposition provides of the extension of the waterworks and electric light plant. For this work not less than $10,000 is to be spent. It is well known that the plant, in its present condition, fails to meet the requirements of this community. The residents in several streets have not had an opportunity to enjoy the benefits derived from the plant equally with people living in other portions of the town. The proposed extension of the plant will make it possible for a much greater number of people to receive the benefits of both light and water.

 The third proposition provides for a public market which is to cost not less than $20,000. The Gazette does not believe in a public market. It fails to see the resultant benefits which will justify the expenditure of $20,000 for a market.

 The Gazette believes that propositions 1, 2 and 4 will meet with little, if any, serious opposition. The matter is so presented to the tax-payers that each proposition is considered separately.
 
 This question is of vital importance to the people of the town - to the tax-payers in particular. We hope that the solution that will be made of it will be in accord with the progress of the times.

 Lafayette cannot afford to retrograde. In recent years the town has moved along on the highway of progress at a very satisfactory gait. That the town needs a modern school building is conceded by all, and that an extension of the waterworks and electric light plant is a necessity, cannot be gainsaid. The only way to secure these improvements is to pay for them and the most equitable manner to raise the money is by taxation.
Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.





HOW IT WAS RAISED.
An Incident of the Industrial School Campaign Not Generally Known.

 It will be remembered that the contest for the Industrial Institute, which resulted so happily for Lafayette, was not without what the politicians call a "stiff fight." Every honorable means had to be employed to secure the coveted prize. Of course, it is well understood that no man or set of men did it all. It was victory achieved by the people of the whole parish, and, as Schley said about the battle of Santiago, there was glory enough for everybody, but there is one incident of that interesting contest is perhaps not generally known. For fear that it may have escaped the attention of some The Gazette will give that incident this somewhat tardy notice.

 A few hours before the propositions of the competing towns were submitted, the men who had Lafayette's interests in charge held a hurried consultation and decided that more cash was needed to win out. The two-mill tax had been voted, but it had not yet been collected and there was no money obtainable from that source. It was proposed to have the local banks advance ten thousand dollars to be paid out of the revenues of the tax. Of course it was necessary to secure the required security as a guaranty to the banks. It was then that the following gentlemen attached their signatures to four notes, each one being for $2,500. N. P. Moss, Julian Mouton, Wm. Clegg, O. C. Mouton, Charles O. Mouton, E. G. Voorhies, C. Debaillon, Wm. Campbell, C. C. Brown, Crow Girard, S. R. Parkerson, Chas. D. Caffery, I. A. Broussard, H. M. Durke, Alf. A. Delhomme, L. C. Delhomme, A. M. Martin.

 This very commendable act on the part of these gentlemen raised Lafayette's cash donation to $18,000. That was the "blow that nearly killed father" and all competitors gracefully conceded the victory to Lafayette.

Of course, it has not been necessary for the guarantors to pay one cent of the ten thousand dollars; nevertheless, they manifested a spirit of progress - we may say of patriotism - which is not often seen in this selfish old world. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.

   



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

 The following real estate transfers were recorded in the clerk's office during the past week:


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 Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.


 A New Store.

 The store which is being built for Mr. Abramson to fill the place with a thoroughly assorted stock of goods, and to give the public the benefit of the very best prices as well as the best quality of merchandise. Mr. Abramson has had much experience in mercantile business and he knows the needs of the public. Those intending to make any purchases will not lose anything by waiting until the opening of Mr. Abramson's store which will take place during the first days of September. The opening of this store indicates the growth of Lafayette and Mr. Abramson will no doubt prove a valuable acquisition to the commercial fraternity. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.


 A Shoe Store.

 Mr. Sig Kahn, of the Lafayette Clothing House, is very busy these days fitting up his shoe store in the Bacquet building. Mr. Kahn intends to run an exclusive shoe store, and will do a strictly up-to-date business in that line. Mr. Arthur Burvant, an experienced shoe man of New Orleans who will be in charge of the store, will be assisted by Mrs. S. Kahn and Miss Cora Desbrest. The store will be ready for business about Sept. 1. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.


 Music and Dancing.

 On last Wednesday evening a very enjoyable party was given at the home of Mr. A. A. Mouton. Sweet music was discoursed and dancing was engaged in until a late hour. Some very pretty singing was also heard. Delicious cake and liquor were served. At about midnight the party broke up, all having enjoyed themselves very much. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.




 His Old Kentucky Home.

 Dr. F. S. Mudd leaves to-day for his "old Kentucky home."  He will attend the conclave of Knight Templars at Lousiville after which he will visit with relatives at Springfield and Fairfield. Fifteen years have elapsed since Dr. the Mudd's last visit to the Blue Grass State, and that is a long time for a Kentuckian to be away from home. The doctor has been with us so long that he loves Louisiana almost as much as he does Kentucky, and we are sure that his fondness for the country and its people is as much reciprocated in his new as it is in in his old home. Our best wishes for a bon voyage, Doctor. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.


 No Reason to be Dissatisfied.

 Nothing has happened of late to change the oil situation. The Martin and Moresi Companies are still industriously engaged in boring. The Moresi Company's well has reached a depth exceeding 1,000 feet. The Martin Company, having abandoned the first well, is boring on the crest of the hill at Anse la Butte. We are informed that salt was found at a depth of 400 feet. Accompanied by Mr. F. C. Z. Caracristi, a geologist representing the Manufacturer's Record of Baltimore, Messrs. Martin, Burke, Lewis and Blackman visited Anse la Butte last Thursday. When asked to state the result of his investigations Mr. Caracristi replied:

 "I can not say how much about my investigations in this district at present except that the people holding properties will not be dissatisfied with my conclusions when they are published. The Manufacturer's Record of Baltimore will give my full report which will be reviewed by the press. There is no reason why anyone operating in this field should be discouraged." Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.


VERY TIMELY AND PERTINENT.

 Our Carencro correspondent, who is staunch friend of public education, is the author of the following pertinent remarks:

 "Those who feel a deep concern in the concert education of the children of the parish feel that proper steps are now being taken toward the accomplishment of their wishes. The Industrial School is a great institution, but the people of Lafayette parish feel and know that they can never hope to share in its benefits, unless the ward schools that must be the feeder for the Institute, and must be properly conducted to prove adequate."

 In a few lines the Carencro gentleman has stated the case very clearly. At no time in its history has Lafayette parish been in a position thoroughly feel the necessity of good primary or ward schools. The people have, at a considerable sacrifice, secured the Industrial Institute. It is now all important that the Institute be placed within the reach of as many children as practicable.

 In its last issue The Gazette believes that it clearly showed that more money is needed to raise the standard of public education in this parish. Only a few comparisons were necessary to show the cause of our inactivity along educational lines. There should be a first-class graded school in every ward of this parish. Carencro is large enough to have a graded school second to none in this State. The can be said of Royville, Scott and Broussard.

 It is incomprehensible that a people so prone to give with a lavish hand toward every laudable object should have failed to adequately support their schools. It is obviously not on account of a parsimonious nature and surely not because of a lack of appreciation of the importance of education. It seems to be that the people have failed to realize the necessity of united action. Every rational being believes in public schools and is willing to contribute his share toward their support. But in order that the contribution of each citizen should bear fruit the efforts of the people must be exerted collectively. Here is where the services of the public-spirited men and women of every community are needed to make effective the plans of the superintendent, supported by a progressive board. The Gazette hopes that the Carencro correspondent has sounded the keynote of the battle which should be waged for better schools and for the ultimate eradication of illiteracy from the borders of Lafayette parish. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.


TWO WHITE PARTIES.

 The Merridian (Miss.) Star says:

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 Commenting upon these remarks of the Star the Biloxi Herald says:

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 The negroes being eliminated from politics, The Gazette would welcome two white parties in this State. We believe that in politics, as in religion, opposition is healthful. Opposition promotes independence. It is conducive to a free and fair discussion of public questions. It is to politics what competition is to trade. Opposition prevents the monopoly of business in trade.

 But while we would be pleased to see the organization of two strong white political parties, we can not understand how a renascence of Republicanism would produce the desired result. No considerable number of people of Louisiana will ever go over to the Republican party because of a desire to create an opposition to the Democracy. Republicanism in the South can not be trusted with power. A Republican organization may at first sincerely claim to be a white party, but it is only a question of a short time when it will endorse negro suffrage. Its acceptance of Sambo in full political fellowship may be delayed a while but it is an inevitable result. We have yet to see the first Republican platform, National or State, which does not contain a denunciation of the South because it has rid itself of Negro rule. Every Republican State convention held this year has joined in a crusade of gratuitous abuse of the South because it has employed legal means to protect itself against negro majorities.

 It is the shallowest nonsense to talk about organizing a white Republican party in the South to oppose the Democracy. Those who would give new life to Southern Republicanism because of the alleged necessity of opposition to the Democracy are prescribing a remedy which is immeasurably worse than the malady. They are nursing back to life an old serpent with new skin perhaps, but with the same poisonous fangs. They tell us that the negro has ceased to be a political factor, but they fail to tell us how long he will remain in his present innocuous state if the Republican party should have the power to restore to him his "constitutional rights.

 Those who are willing to lend their efforts toward the organization of another white party will do well to do a little thinking. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.



SCHOOL SUPERVISION AND LAFAYETTE PARISH.

 The action of the School Board in engaging the services of a trained superintendent for Lafayette parish is the subject of an interesting article published in a recent issue of the Louisiana School Review. The Gazette has always advocated professional supervision of schools, being satisfied that no really efficient system could exist without a competent superintendent. The management of schools should be divorced as much as possible from political influences and from is perhaps worse, a baneful nepotism. Between the two, it is difficult to say which has caused more injury to the educational interests of this State.

 The first step in the organization of a school system for a parish should be the selection of a trained, energetic superintendent, and in looking for the right man a board should not be hampered by parochial lines. That narrow provincialism which would shut out talent and worth from another parish or State should find no place in an American community. So foolish a policy will enlist the support only of those who are naturally partial to Chinese methods.

 The Gazette publishes with pleasure the editorial of the Louisiana School Review. It will show that the enlightened course pursued by the local board is supported by the best educational thought in the State. The Review says:

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 Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.


Lynching Averted.

 Conductor Vosberg, who runs between this point and Houston, had quite an experience with a desperate negro. A special from Liberty to the Houston Post of Thursday has this to say of the affair: "An incident which came near ending in a lynching occurred last night on Southern Pacific train No. 5, Conductor Vosberg in charge. A negro refused to give his ticket or pay his fare. Vosberg insisted and the result was that he narrowly escaped serious if not fatal injury by a razor in the hands of the negro. The timely action of a deputy United States marshal saved Conductor Vosberg and the lynching a the negro, as a number of the passengers were in favor of lynching, which would have been accomplished by putting a rope about his neck and dragging, the negro as the train pursued its way. The cool-headedness of Conductor Vosberg prevented this and the train riot was quelled. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.



 Crowley's Diet.

 "Just what Crowley lives on" is a problem the Franklin Vindicator-News has been unable to solve. Judging from the growth of the kid one would think it has been fed on Mullen's food. 'The Iberian.'

 "Mullen is a good name all right, but the food which stimulates this progressive burg is a combination of grit, greenback and gall interspersed with a mixture of push and progress. - 'Crowley Signal.' "

 The intelligent exchange editor of The Signal has erroneously credited the foregoing squib to the Iberian, but the question of authorship makes no great difference. The Gazette had an opportunity to see Crowley in its infancy and it was then a very puny weakling, but the marvelous growth of the infant is conclusive proof that its nutrition has been of the best. Grit, greenback and gall is a powerful combination and it is almost sure to win, but we believe that the main factor in the development of Crowley has been a judicious use of printer's ink. Crowley might have gotten along without its proverbial gall or its unlimited supply of grit, but we hardly think that it would have forged to the front as it has without the Signal and Scott to fire the engine of municipal progress. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.


 Died at the Age of 113.

 Possibly the oldest man in Louisiana, or perhaps in the United States, died at his home, near Breaux Bridge, last Monday. Napoleon Pierre Guchereau, who was born in France in 1788, breathed his last after witnessing the birth and death of two centuries. Mr. Guchereau was not only remarkable for his longevity but also in the enjoyment of all his faculties. A few days ago he chatted cheerily with a gentleman from this town. When asked if he had seen Napoleon I, he replied with sparkling eyes that he had seen the greatest Corsican when he crossed the Pyrenees at the head of his army. Speaking of the death of Mr. Guchereaux the Breaux Bridge correspondent of the Times-Democrat says:

 "Breaux Bridge mourns to-day the death of the oldest citizen of the parish, probably of the South, "Napoleon" Pierre Guchereau, who was born in France in the year 1788. He moved to New York when about sixty-five years of age, and after a short residence there moved to Breaux Bridge, where he married and resided, an upright honorable man, until his death, passing away peacefully and painlessly at 10 o'clock last night at the home of his only son, August Guchereau. The old gentlemen a few weeks ago was in robust health,  cheerful, jovial and chatty. He never wore spectacles or used any artificial assistance to peruse the daily papers, of which he was very fond. His hair was white, very thick and long, and there was no sign of baldness. He was a remarkably well-preserved man at the age of 113 years. A large concourse of friends followed the remains from the Catholic Church to the cemetery. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Father Maisonneuve, who paid a glowing tribute to the life of the venerated old gentlemen." Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.




 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 8/24/1901.

 Dr. T. B. Hopkins is building quite a handsome dwelling in Buchanan.

 Mr. Jildes, the telephone man, was in Lafayette this week.

 Willie Levy has returned from New York.

 Misses Bessie and Leila Cornay, who spent a month at Galbraith Springs, Tenn., have returned home.

 Judge Debaillon and Messrs. Jean Vigneaux and F. Lombard have returned from Pascagoula. They say the storm was not as bad as reported in the papers.

 Judge Blackman and Messrs. Walter J. Burke, Thos. H. Lewis and Robert Martin were at the Rigues House. They were here to look after their oil interests.

 Prof. L. V. Roy, of Marksville, who will teach science in the Industrial Institute, was in Lafayette this week.

 Ammick Courtney returned to Lafayette Thursday, to resume his work in the Lafayette Clothing House, after spending a week in Carencro.

 Miss Ruby Scranton has returned to her home at Royville after spending some time with relatives in Houston.

 Mr. and Mrs. Crow Girard left Saturday for a month's stay at Asheville, N. C.


 Nicholson has just received a carload of White Elephant buggies, surreys, road-carts, and etc.

 Morgan Lodge No. 317, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, has a membership of 41 and new applications are received at every meeting. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.










       

























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From the Lafayette Gazette of August 24th, 1895:

 LAFAYETTE IN THE LEAD.

 In the way of hotel accomodation Lafayette is ahead of any country town in Louisiana. At least this is the unanimous opinion of the drummers and they ought to know. While all attest the merits of the Crescent Hotel particularly under the present management, the Rigues House continues to enjoy that reputation for which it is deservedly famed far and wide. Especially among the commercial travelers may be heard praises of this popular hotel, which has done a considerable amount of good to our town, for what will more favorably impress a stranger with a town with a good hotel. A new-comer will very likely form an opinion of a country from the treatment he receives at its hotels and this being undoubtedly a fact one can readily understand to what extent Lafayette owes its present prosperity to its well-conducted hotels. A well-known New Orleans of The Gazette that he doubted very much the ability of any restaurant in the Crescent city to give a better meal than the Rigues House. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1895.




 Good Roads.
[From the Mansfield Democrat-Journal.]

  Some of our rural contemporaries urge the importance of good roads in their sections. These editors had as well sing psalms to a dead mule as to endeavor to secure good roads by the means employed. So long as the roads are not absolutely impassable your true Louisianian dosen't care. He can make the trip, and he dosen't care a red whether other people can or not. - Mansfield Democrat-Journal.

 The Gazette came to the above conclusion some time ago. As long as people don't take up this question of good roads there will be nothing done. No amount of newspaper talk will accomplish anything. It's all right if an editor cannot think of anything else to write about, then he may talk of the roads, but he must believe that his opinion in the matter will have more weight than a feather in a Kansas cyclone. In other words if he does not want to "talk through his hat" he must let the road question severely alone. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1895.


 A Serious Charge.

 A few days ago Namuel Pascal appeared before Justice McFaddin and made an affidavit against Clarence Avant, Jno. Nugent, Sidney Foreman and Voorhies Foreman charging them with robbery and assault with intent to commit murder. Sheriff Broussard and Deputy Mouton went to Duson last Saturday and arrested two of the parties and brought them here Sunday morning. The other two were arrested Monday. Their bail was fixed at $500 each they were released from custody Tuesday. Messrs. Jno. Vigneaux, F. Otto, Jno. Nugent and Gerard Foreman signed as bondsmen. Pascal's story is to the effect that on the 3rd of August he and young negro went to Queue Tortue to sell some fruits at a picnic which was given by the people of that section and that the above named parties took his fruits away from him, assaulted his colored companion and threatened ton shoot them; hence the affidavit. Mr. Nugent claims that he had nothing to with the occurrence except as a pacifier. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1895.





Died.
 [From the Breaux Bridge Valley.]

 The death of Mr. J. A. Domengeaux of this place occurred Friday morning, Aug. 12, at 12:40, at the age of 46 years, 8 months and 5 days. Mr. Domengeaux had been suffering from a throat disease for nearly twenty-one months, but the fatal disease illness lasted five weeks, after he took abed. Deceased was an old resident of this place, being a member of one of its first families. His death is mourned by a number of friends and relatives. His son, Mr. J. R. Domengeaux, of Royville, reached his bedside in time to see him before the final summons came. The funeral procession followed the remains to their last resting place. The Valley extends its sympathies to the bereaved family. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1895.


 A Stingy Drummer.

 The St. Martinville Messenger is lifting the hides off some drummers who are in the habit of visiting St. Martinville and are so stingy that they stay a whole day in town without patronizing the hotels and livery stables. The Messengers says that one particular simonious knight of the grip got his dinner the other day in a grocery store and ate five cents worth of crackers and ate the same amount in cheese. Editor Bienvenu is not a humorist and in this case his language would convey the impression that he is very serious. He advises the merchants not to patronize that class of drummers. Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1895.

    

   

NOTICE OF ELECTION.
Lafayette, La., Aug. 13, 1895.

 To be qualified electors residing within the corporate limits of the town of Lafayette, and to all whom it may concert:

 Notice is hereby given that an election under the general election laws of this State will be held at the court-house of the parish, in the town of Lafayette on Tuesday Sept. 2nd, 1895, to be voted at, only by those qualified to vote under the general election laws of the State, and who reside in the territorial limits of the town of Lafayette as established at present by Act No. 111 of 1869. The following proposition to be voted on at said election, to-wit:  Whether they concur in, consent and accede to the annexation to the territorial corporate limits of the town of Lafayette, to be subject to the jurisdiction, control and authority of the municipal authorities of said town as fully and to all intents and purposes of said town as fully and to all intents and purposes as if the same had been originally included therein by act approved March 11th, 1836, incorporating said town, certain lots or lands contiguous and adjacent to the corporate limits of said town as follows, to-wit: Starting at the bridge on the coulee west of said town, between the properties of Henry Hohorst and Dame Anita Hohorst, wife of Doctor Franklin J. Mouton, and running from thence along said coulee, North 86 1/2 West, a small ash, 33 feet; North 67 East, a small ash, 36 feet; thence N. 1/2 E., 300 feet in Hohorst's pasture; thence N. 27 1/2 E., 300 feet; thence N. 12 1/2 East, 170 feet, in cemetery 200 feet; thence N. 15 E., 389 feet; thence N. 18 1/2 E., 110 feet; going from cemetery to Mrs. Judice's place, 470 feet; thence N. 7 1/2 W. 800 feet; thence N. 20 E. 300 feet to south east corner of Arthur Greig's property; thence N. 1/2 E., 623 feet to the big ditch, 1,600 feet to public road leading to Scott, 2,553 feet to the Louisiana Western railroad, 2,653 feet to the north side of said railroad; thence E. 1,024 thence South 77 E. 660 feet to the Morgan railroad (L. W. Division) 1,760 feet to the public road leading to Breaux Bridge, 1,81o feet into Dr. F. S. Mudd's field, 3,820 feet to the south west corner of this garden, 3,900 S. about 75 feet beyond Dr. Mudd's residence, 4,300 in Dr. Mudd's back lot. Thence south 43 1/2 E. from Dr. Mudd's to public road leading to Breaux Bridge, 940 feet to Mentor Richard's lot, 1,050 feet into Crow Girard's property, 1,790 feet to stake.

 Thence south 55 degrees west, 70 feet between Nicholson and Cochran, 840 feet to Dowdell, 864 feet to stake. Thence S. 27 W., 890 feet to Chargois, 950 feet to red oak (2 feet in diameter); thence 46 W., 1,050 feet to N. E. corner of Roundhouse yard 1,520 feet to main line Morgan R. Ry. 1,820 to Mouton addition; thence S. 29 W. 1,414 feet to oak lane, 2,650 feet to public road leading to Pinhook; Thence N. 49 W. following the public road 1,900 feet to a coulee in front of the residence of M. E. Girard's. Thence S. 54 W. to S. E. corner of Mr. Girard's yard. Thence S. 76 W. in Mr. Girard's pasture, 1,000 feet in Dr. F. Mouton's field. Thence N. 85 W., 462 feet an oak (2 feet in diameter) south of Dr. Mouton's barn, 500 feet to a coulee. Thence following the coulee to the bridge starting Point N. 1/2 E. 586 feet.

 Every property owner voting at said election is hereby requested to write or cause to be written his name on the back of his ballot, so that the result may be readily ascertained, whether a majority in value, as well as in number, of the qualified electors voting at said election, have voted in favor of annexing and including the lots or land aforesaid the result may be readily ascertained, whether a majority in value, as well as in number, of the qualified electors voting at said election, have voted in favor annexing and including the lots or land aforesaid to the territorial corporate limits of said town.

 The electors shall vote by ballot and the ballots used at said election shall be of white paper upon which shall be written these word: - "For the proposed annexation." The votes shall be counted for or against the proposed annexation as cast; but in every case when the name of the voter shall appear on his ballot, the commissioners shall keep a record of how he voted opposite his name on the list of names, so as to ascertain to the result as to value.

 The poll shall be opened from the hour of six in the forenoon until seven in the afternoon; it shall be duty of said commissioners to keep a list of the persons voting as much at such polling place, which list shall be numbered from one end to the other, and shall be signed and sworn to as correct by the commissioners after the poll is closed and the votes are counted; that before entering on their duties the commissioners shall be sworn according to law, and if no other authorized to administer oaths be present to administer the oath to the commissioners, it may be administered by any voter, or if no voter be present, by the commissioners to each other; the commissioners shall proceed to count the votes without moving the box from the room or place where the votes were received, and in presence of any voter or voters who may desire to be present; two tally sheets shall be kept of the count, which shall be marked with tallies in lines from the beginning to the end of the page, and the total amount of the tallies shall be written in figures immediately after the end of the tallies, and in letters, so as to prevent any altercation thereof; and after the count is completed, the ballots counted shall be put back in the ballot box, which shall be immediately sealed, with the ballots therein. As soon as the votes are counted and the ballot box sealed, as above stated, the commissioners shall make two compiled statements of the votes cast, how many for and how many against the proposed annexation, also the number of ballots contained in the box, the number of ballots rejected if any, and the reasons therefore. The compiled statements shall be sworn to by the commissioners, the oath to the administered as before provided, and the compiled statements, list of the persons voting and tally sheets, shall be delivered to the Mayor of said town within forty-eight hours after the closing of the poll at said election, together with the ballot box and the votes therein contained.

 R. C. Greig, J. Ewd. Martin and Ernest Constantin, have been appointed commissioners of said election, and in case one or more of said commissioners fail to act, then commissioners to be appointed in accordance with the general election laws of the State.

 Given under by hand officially at Lafayette, La., this 13th day of August Domini, eighteen hundred and ninety-five.
                   Mayor of the town of Lafayette.
Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1895.








 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 8/24/1895.


 Help the brass band by going to the ball to-night.

 Henry Gerac and Louis Lacoste went to Carencro Thursday on business.

 Mrs. I. A. Broussard has returned from New Orleans where she spent several days.

 Andy McBride has gone to Houston in search of employment. Andy is one of our best boys and we wish him success.

 For the accomodation of families the committee in charge of the ball to-night will serve gumbo at half past eight o'clock.

 If Ike Broussard stands as solid on other sections of the parish as he does in Royville, it's easy to guess that he'll have no opposition. 

 The Gazette states that with no little pleasure that the dilapidated old building on the lot recently bought by Mouton & Salles have been demolished. These horrid shanties will now be a thing of the past.


 Miss Louise Bendel left Monday with Sam and Armand Levy for New York. Miss Bendel will remain some time in that city on visit to her brother, Henry Bendel.

 The ladies of the W.C. T. U. intend giving a concert during the first days of September. We are informed that Miss Grant, a young lady of high vocal talent, has volunteered her services for the occasion. An interesting program is being prepared by the ladies in charge.

 Dr. Iron's Dental Parlors, over post office, are always open from 3:30 a. m. to 1:30 p. m. and 3 to 5 p. m.

 Armand and Sam Levy left Monday for New York where they will purchase large stocks of goods for their store at Orange, Lake Charles and Lafayette. These gentlemen are experienced buyers and the fact that they buy goods in such large quantities necessarily enables them to get very low figures.
Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1895.

  




















 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 24th, 1889:

 A Democratic Parish.

 Lafayette is a Democratic parish, and at the coming Congressional election should roll up a handsome majority for Price. However, nothing must be neglected that would assure unity and harmony of action. Work is a strong factor of success in an election, when properly directed; and we want to see our Parish Central Committee and all the sub-committees hard at it. The Third District of Louisiana must not be represented by a Republican. We have our own interests to look after, and cannot afford to send a Representative to Congress to cater to the insatiable appetites of the monied monopolists of the North. It is not too evident for argument that it is the policy of the Republican party to sacrifice Southern agricultural interests for the benefit of Northern manufacturing interests? Why shouldn't it? Their life and their interests are there, and they would be political fools if they didn't do it; and we will be still bigger political fools if we help them to do it. Democrats of Lafayette, do your duty; in the present crisis it coincides with self interest.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1889.  
   




PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS.
It is Proposed to Build a School House, a Market and an Extension of the Waterworks and Electric Lights.
 
The following petition is being presented to the tax-payers of this town for their signatures, and, we are pleased to say, only six or seven persons have, so far, refused to sign it:

 To the Hon. Mayor and Members of the City Council of Lafayette, La. -
  
 We, the undersigned property tax-payers of the corporation of Lafayette, Louisiana, being and constituting one third of the total number of property tax-payers of said town, entitled to vote under the provisions of the State constitution, respectfully show:

 That the following described public improvements are urgent public necessities in said town, to-wit:

 1. Grounds and buildings for a first-class modern high school (for white children), requiring not less than $20,000.

 2. The extension of the water mains of said town, for the extinghishment of fire, and other purposes, and also the extension of the electric light system for additional street lights, and for private lighting requiring not less than $10,000.

 3. Ground and building for a first-class public market house, requiring not less than $20,000.
And petitioners further show that there are no funds in the treasury of said town to acquire and construct said improvements, and that same can only be required by the levying, assessing and collecting of special taxes therefor and issuing bonds thereon.

 4. And petitioners further show that there are outstanding $30,000 of six per cent bonds issued under Act. No. 90 of the Acts of the Legislature of 1896, to obtain the present water and light system of this town, and that it is to the best interest of said town that said bonds should be called in and replaced by five per cent bonds with greater length of time for redemption.

 Wherefore, we respectfully petition your honorable body to order a special election in said town of Lafayette, Louisiana, under the constitution and laws of the State, for the purpose of ascertaining and determining whether or not it is the sense and desire of the property tax-payers of said town of Lafayette, that special taxes based upon the assessed valuation of property of said town according to the official rolls, be assessed levied and collected, for twenty-five years, beginning with the year 1902, at the rates and for the purposes hereinafter set forth, upon which tax, and the public faith and credit of said town, negotiable bonds shall be issued by the City Council of said town, in such denominations as may be found convenient, bearing five per cent per annum interest, payable in twenty-five years (interest payable annually) with right to call in the same as said tax is collected. And the rates of said taxes and the purposes for which they are levied and intended, and said bonds issued, and now declared to be as follows:

 1. To procure grounds and buildings for a first-class modern public high school in said town, a special tax of 1 1/4 mills on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, upon which tax bonds shall be issued for the sum of twenty thousand dollars.

 2. For the extension of the water mains and light system as herein above set forth, a special tax of five eighths of one mill on the dollar upon the assessed valuation of property aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of ten thousand dollars.

 3. To procure the ground and building for a first-class public market house, a special tax of one and one-fourth mills on the dollar upon the valuation of property aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of twenty thousand dollars.

 4. To retire and replace the outstanding bonds issued under Act No. 90 of 1896, for the present water and light system, a special tax of one seven-eighth mills on the dollar of the assessed valuation aforesaid, shall be levied and collected, and upon which bonds shall be issued for the sum of thirty thousand dollars.

 All of which taxes shall be levied and collected, and said bonds issued, for the time and in the manner herein above set forth and the title to said improvements shall be in said municipality, and subject to the control of said City Council, and said bond not be sold for less than par.

 And we further petition that said propositions be submitted to the qualified voters at said special election, in such manner that the voter may vote separately on each, "for" or "against," as he may desire.
It is obviously unnecessary for us to expatiate upon the plan clearly set forth in the petition. It is understood that the levying of the proposed tax will not increase the present rate of taxation. The five-mill tax, which is being collected for the payment of the waterworks and electric light bonds, will be discontinued the day that the new tax is levied, because the plan is to call in the outstanding bonds. The fourth proposition on the petition refers to the matter of bonds. As explained in the petition it is a distinct proposition to be voted on separately. It is, however, the foundation of the plan and it must first be adopted before the other propositions can be made effective. In other words, if proposition No. 4 is defeated the whole plan falls to the ground.
Proposition No. 1 provides for the expenditure of not less than $20,000 for the purchase of a suitable grounds and the building thereon of a modern school house for the use of the white children of the town. We do not think that any argument is necessary to convince an intelligent person of the necessity of a new school building. The present buildings are clearly inadequate.

 The second proposition provides of the extension of the waterworks and electric light plant. For this work not less than $10,000 is to be spent. It is well known that the plant, in its present condition, fails to meet the requirements of this community. The residents in several streets have not had an opportunity to enjoy the benefits derived from the plant equally with people living in other portions of the town. The proposed extension of the plant will make it possible for a much greater number of people to receive the benefits of both light and water.

 The third proposition provides for a public market which is to cost not less than $20,000. The Gazette does not believe in a public market. It fails to see the resultant benefits which will justify the expenditure of $20,000 for a market.

 The Gazette believes that propositions 1, 2 and 4 will meet with little, if any, serious opposition. The matter is so presented to the tax-payers that each proposition is considered separately.

 This question is of vital importance to the people of the town - to the tax-payers in particular. We hope that the solution that will be made of it will be in accord with the progress of the times.

 Lafayette cannot afford to retrograde. In recent years the town has moved along on the highway of progress at a very satisfactory gait. 

 That the town needs a modern school building is conceded by all, and that an extension of the waterworks and electric light plant is a necessity, cannot be gainsaid. The only way to secure these improvements is to pay for them and the most equitable manner to raise the money is by taxation.
Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901.




Resigned from L. B. A.

 Mr. Wm. Clegg, President, and Mr. Ad. von Klackstein, Vice President, having resigned from the Board of Directors of the Lafayette Building Association, the Board met at its meeting held August 20th elected Messrs. N. P. Moss and W. M. Kelly as Directors to fill the vacancies, and Messrs. E. H. Vordenbaumen as President and C. O. Mouton as Vice-President. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1889.


BASE BALL.
ABBEVILLE, LA., Aug. 19, 1889.

 W. E. Bowen, Capt. Lafayette B. B. C.:

 DEAR SIR: In replying to yours of the 15th inst., I will first say that the Abbeville Club beg leave to express their thanks for the prompt and affable attention shown them. With exceedingly few exceptions, the communications we have received from other base ball clubs have been so full of vain boasts and extravagant conditions that we were unwilling in our situation to consider them. We will play your club on the following terms, to-wit: We will play on your grounds on Sunday, August 25th, the Atlantics in the forenoon and the Crescents in the afternoon; or, vice-versa; or, if you have written to me as Captain of a combination of the two clubs, we will play your club in the morning or in the afternoon, or two games - one morning and one afternoon game. We do not ask for any bets nor require a purse, though if a small purse could be raised, and we won the same, our expenses would be lighter. All that we insist upon is that Lafayette should come to Abbeville and play on the first or second Sunday following our game. Try and make a game for us in Abbeville, for it is no further from L. to A. than from A. to L. Following is out team, who are all Abbeville boys:

 Nathaniel Beer, Claude O. Brookshier, Odilon Broussard, Olivier Broussard, Will P. Edwards, Leonard Terray, Ernest P. Lyons, Will P. Miller, W. W. Minor, Charles Caldwell and Theodore Laporte.

 We play ball for the sport and glory it affords. We are not in practice, but we do not care for professionals; so if you have any you can play them on us without hurting our feelings, as we have an idea that we will be beaten anyhow - though maybe not. 

 Fraterally, W. P. EDWARDS, 1st Captain A. R. S. B. B. C.

 Captain Bowen informs us that he has made favorable answer to the above communication, and that the games will be played here Sunday. His club has no professional features, excepting that a majority of them are professionals economists of their physical energies - they "were built that way." We trust that this is but the beginning of a series of enjoyable games that will afford mutual pleasure to the lovers of this commendable sport in the two towns. The Abbeville boys are manly and generous adversaries, and the citizens of Lafayette must respond by giving them a cordial and hospitable reception. Noblesse oblige.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1889.




Old Vet in Town.

 Last Wednesday our heart was gladdened by a visit from John T. Block, of New Orleans, an old comrade of the Louisiana Guards Artillery, who we had not seen since twenty-four years ago, at which time we were unavoidably separated in Virginia during a little misunderstanding between the Confederate and the Federal troops in "the late unpleasantness." He is on a visit with his family to his brother-in-law, Mr. D. A. Dimitry, at Carencro, and we were delighted to find him enjoying such good health and spirits. The emotions engendered by a meeting with an old comrade, bound by such ties and associations, cannot be transcribed on paper. We are not two times a grand-father, and he - well, we will give him a chance. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1889.



   Love is a nightmare with one foot,
        Two children with one bun,
     Two corns upon a single foot,
        That hurt like sixty-one;
     Now if your corns you will be free,
        And no longer pain endure,
     Go to Moss Pharmacy and get,
        C. C. C. "Certain Corn Cure."
Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1889.



 Organized a Lodge.

 The Brotherhood of Railroad Brakemen of Lafayette have recently organized a lodge at this place - Morgan Lodge No. 317. They have tickets out for a grand fancy dress and calico ball, on Sept. 27th, at Falk's Hall, Lafayette. They wish to raise a fund to establish their lodge on a sound financial basis. Buy a ticket and give the boys a lift. We will tell you more about it next week. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1899.


IN MEMORIAM.

 DIED, In the town of Lafayette, at the residence of his parents, on Wednesday, August 21st, 1889, at 11 0'clock P. M., JOSEPH H. MOSS, eldest son of Judge A. J. Moss and Octavie Cornay, aged 29 years and 11 months.

 He was esteemed and appreciated for rare qualities of mind and heart. He was always kind, charitable, frank, just, truthful, honorable. His repentance for human weakness was full and complete, and God has blessed his soul with eternal life in Heaven. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1899.



     
Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/24/1889.

 The weather this week has again been showery and unfavorable for the cotton crop, but in spite of all our drawbacks Lafayette parish will make a respectable showing this year.

 Mr. W. F. Johnson is doing neat work painting the altars in St. John's Church. The decorations are principally white and gold, and add much to the appearance of the interior of the edifice.

 A young lady wishes to obtain a situation as teacher in a family. Apply at this office.

 Mrs. Jules Rousseau and daughter, Miss Julia, of New Orleans, are visiting relatives in Lafayette, and are the guests of Judge C. Debaillon.

 Miss Emily Cornay returned home last Sunday after an extended visit to relatives in Patterson and Franklin, La.

 Captain Patrick Drewry, of the Southern Pacific Railroad, is the champion fish eater of Lafayette. Don't mention it to him, though, unless you are beyond the reach of his nervous cane.

 The ice cream festival given by the young ladies of the "Ivy Circle," Thursday night, notwithstanding the adverse weather, was a gratifying success. Their receipts were nearly fifty dollars.

 The regular session of 1899-90 of Mt. Carmel Convent, of Lafayette, will begin on Monday, Sept. 2nd. This school has our highest endorsement, as we know it always does full justice to its pupils and patrons.

 Mr. J. A. Veazey has removed his grocery store and coffee house to the building on Lincoln avenue recently occupied on Lincoln avenue recently occupied by McCrossie & Adams as a drug store. "Jakey" Pefferkorn is conded to be the "boss," and makes the "Old Man" and "Lule" walk a chalk line. McCrossie & Adams have removed to the drug store adjoining Vigneaux's branch stable.

 Mr. Geo. B. Petty, the photo-artist, has returned to Lafayette at last, and, as he says, is now "a permanent fixture of Lafayette." He is arranging a suite of elegant rooms over the Moss pharmacy, and wants you to come see him. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1899.




 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 24th, 1909:

NEW BAPTIST CHURCH.
Rapidly Nearing Completion - Handsome Building Faced With Brick - Will Seat About 350.

 The Baptist church being erected on the corner of Oak and Lee avenues is rapidly nearing completion and when finished nearing completion and when finished will be a very handsome building. It is a frame faced with brick, something new in construction in this city, and it has the advantage of both frame and brick construction. From the outside it appears to be a brick structure. It has a large auditorium for church services and a commodious Sunday school room in the rear, with separate class rooms and lobby. The church will seat about 250 and by means of folding partitions the church proper and Sunday school room can be thrown into one, providing seating capacity for an additional hundred. The building is quite handsome architecturally and is a fine addition to the town. Lafayette Advertiser 8/24/1909.  








  











  

    



   

    




   

















LAGNIAPPE:
[From the Washington Post.]

 “Bad Nigger with a Gun.”

 The more or less Hon. T. Thomas Fortune, negro leader according to his own account, ought to be gratified by his perusal of the following dispatch to the New York World:

 “Boston, Aug. 13. – Alfred Wheeler, a young colored man, of nowhere in particular, pleaded guilty to-day to assaulting several members of the Sagadahoc, one of the Kennebee line of steamers, on the high seas last night, shortly after the steamer had left Popham Beach for Boston.
  “Before Commissioner Fisk, in the United States Court, he was ordered to recognize in $500 for the United States grand jury.

“Wheeler was brought into court heavily manacled. He was in the irons on the boat all last night, where he ran amuck shortly after the boat’s departure for Boston.“For half an hour the negro held the crew and the one hundred passengers at bay by threatening to shoot if they attempted to molest him, and with a revolver in one hand and a chair in the other he held undisputed sway on the vessel. He was subdued after a vigorous resistance.
        
“That a desperate struggle resulted before Wheeler was conquered was evident in court to-day. His face and head were badly bruised. Wheeler in his behalf admitted assaulting the officers and threatening others when they endeavored to punish him. He admitted he had been drinking, but denied that the officers refused to serve him, that he became indignant, but acted in self defense.”

 Only a few days ago this negro prophet, Fortune, delivered himself of an exalted and altruistic utterance on behalf of his race, in the course of which he said that he was tired of hearing about good niggers – that what he wanted was to see “bad niggers with guns in their hands.” Of course, Mr. Fortune did not propose, in his own person, to play the part he so ardently urged upon others.

Fortune has scores of imitators here, and elsewhere north of the Potomac, who delight in giving homicidal advice through the newspapers or from the rostrum, but who never dream, of going South themselves to lead their down-trodden people to victory and vengeance. Cleaning cuspidors around in the departments or running errands for petty government officials is far more to their fancy than the field of battle, but they can throw the firebrand from a safe distance, all the same, and the fate of the fools who take their active does not concern them in the least.

 We rather think, however, that Mr. Alfred Wheeler is one of the Hon. Fortune’s latest disciples. At least, he has done what the prophet advocated. He is to be congratulated upon his choice of an arena in which to illustrate the Fortune gospel. He had drawn his gun and threatened the lives of a hundred people on a Southern steamboat, he would now be the subject of a coroner’s solicitude. The Southern idea is to dispose of the intending criminal before he harms any one, rather than let him kill two or three innocent persons and exploit the majesty of the law after the funerals. Mr. Alfred Wheeler, therefore, has our feliciations on his fine instinct in the matter of latitude. He has not been quite as discreet as Mr. Fortune and other negro orators of that class, for he has dared to practice what they only preach, but he imitates their wisdom in keeping on the safe side of the line.

 As we have already said, Mr. Fortune has every reason to be proud of this fruit of the pious exhortation. To be sure, Mr. Alfred Wheeler is in jail; but the prophet continues to dwell in security and comfort, retaining unimpaired his faculties and energies for the prosecution of the noble work to which he has devoted them.

From the Washington Post; then the New York World; and finally the Lafayette Gazette 8/24/1901. 



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