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Monday, January 12, 2015

**AUGUST 3RD M C

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 3rd,  1904:



Saturday's Mass Meeting.
The Advertiser's Reply to Gazette:

 Major P. L. DeClouet has written to the Lafayette Gazette criticising the comments of  The Advertiser on the mass meeting held in the court-house July 23. This is what we said on the subject.

 There was a good attendance at the mass meeting held in the court house last Saturday, and the gathering was a representative one, though it was entirely factional, and for that reason the action of the meeting can not be said to fairly reflect the popular will. 

 It will hardly be denied that the factional spirit of politics in Lafayette parish is still alive, as much as this circumstance may be lamented by the less militant ones among our public men; and neither side can successfully lay claim to a monopoly of the good people, because both factions have a strong following. This fact cannot be eliminated from our deductions and conclusions in weighing the work of the mass meeting, a fact attested by the work itself. And The Advertiser would not feel called upon, as a non-partisan newspaper, to offer an explanation of this kind, but for the misleading claim that the action of the mass meeting stands for a "united Democracy" instead of a tactful move for factional political advantage.


 With this point made clear, The Advertiser willingly acknowledges the worth as a whole, of the selections made by the mass-meeting, as appears from the official proceedings published in another column. 

 Major DeClouet contends that the above editorial expression is replete with misleading statements and is plainly the expression of badly concealed political disappointment. Let us see what are the true facts of the case.

 The validity of the charge of political disappointment and spleen is precluded by the firmly established Independence of The Advertiser in the field of politics.


 Being free from political alliances or aspirations that might be expected to compromise our honest views and opinions on public question in the hope of reaping personal reward, we can well afford to maintain ourselves in the position we assumed from the beginning of an independent, non-partisan, Democratic journal, a position to which the editorial columns of The Advertiser bear convincing proof.


 As to the other charge that our editorial discussion of the mass meeting is "replete with misleading statements," we have the testimony of our esteemed local contemporary that "the actual attendance was composed in LARGE PROPORTIONS (capitals ours) of voters lately aligned with the faction led by Sheriff Lacoste and Clerk Voohries"; and we have the word of Maj DeClouet in public print, that "since the election we [the Lacoste-Voorhies faction] have been as conciliatory as possible, again offering on several occasions the olive branch in the way of giving representation to BOTH FACTIONS (capitals ours) in the appointments of delegates to State, judicial and congressional conventions, also in the list of persons to be recommended for appointment on the School Board. And in spite of all this, we have been given the thorns in return for the olive branch."

We submit to a fair minded public that the foregoing statements corroborate the essential points covered by the editorial complained of by Maj. DeClouet.

 In our remarks we did not undertake to deal with the whys and wherefores of the factional differences not yet healed in the Democratic ranks in Lafayette parish, but we made a simple statement of their existence, and pointed to the net results of the mass meeting itself, merely to show the public that the meeting recorded the will of a faction and was not the expression of a united Democracy.


 Our statements were not misleading then, and the public intelligence is too much quickened to submit to an unceremonious sweeping aside of them by any general denial on the part of Maj. DeClouet.


 Most certainly we do not claim infallibility for our views and opinions; but such as they are, we believe they usually carry a reasonable conviction of their purpose to serve the ends of justice and truth. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.




Letter to the Advertiser's Editor: - Will you kindly insert in your paper the following: The Lafayette Gazette of Saturday, July 30, has an article entitled "A Regrettable Occurrence," in which it seems to blame Thursday's disturbance at the ball grounds to the base ball boys. The fact of the matter is that said unpleasantness was caused by outsiders, and we trust that the public will exonerate us from all rowdyism:
Respectfully,     Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.
MAX C. HINA,
Pitcher-Lafayette Base Ball Team.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.




Fixing Jefferson Street. - The street committee began Thursday having dirt and pieces of broken brick placed in the middle of Jefferson street to fill up the center and low places. When this part of the work is completed, it is to be hoped that the committee will make an effort to grade the street, open the ditches on each side and get a proper fall so the ditches will drain thoroughly.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.




 Negro Women Fight. - Some excitement was created at the depot yesterday just before the New Orleans train came in by a fight between two negro women. One of the women was knocked unconscious and it was some little time before she was brought to. Marshal Veasey arrested the other one.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.




 Robbery - Monday night some one broke into C. J. Jordon & Co's, butcher shop and rifled the cash drawer. Fortunately no money had been left in it, and the robber secured only a few copper cents for his trouble.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904




Complimented With a Map.

 Thursday The Advertiser received a blue print map of the town of Lafayette with the compliments of Mr. Guy Tanner, the maker, and of Mr. J. C. Nickerson, the hustling, wide-awake real estate agent, who is agent for them. Many thanks. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.



MARRIED.
ST. CLAIR-GUIDRY. - Thursday evening at six o'clock Mr. Walter St. Clair, an employee of the Southern Pacific, and Miss Corrine Guidry, the charming daughter of Mrs. M. Billeaud, Sr., were united in marriage at St. John's Catholic church.

 At the appointed hour the bride, handsomely gowned in white China silk, covered with silk chiffon sheered, with medallions, entered the church on the arm of her brother-in-law, Mr. A. J. LeBlanc, and while a beautiful wedding march was played, proceeded to the sacristy, where the groom awaited them. Rev. Father Langlois, of Breaux Bridge, performed the ceremony, after which the happy couple were driven to the home of the bride's mother, and later took the train for a two-weeks visit to El Paso, Texas, after which they will return and occupy their neat little cottage, just completed on Jackson street.

Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904



 Races Sunday. -  The weather was fine Sunday and a good crowd was in attendance at the Surrey park races, which were very interesting. Splendid order prevailed and everything went off smoothly.
There were two races. The first, pacing, a pacing one-half mile heat, best 3 out of 5, for a purse of $500, was won by Dr. J. R. Melancon. The second, trotting or pacing, a one-half mile heat, best 3 out of 5, 3 minute class, winner to take purse made up the entry fees, was won by Venuse, belonging to S. J. Veazey.
Another series of races will be arranged to take place shortly, and will be up to the high standard so far maintained. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.



Anse La Butte. - An Advertiser man had a talk with Mr. Meyer, who is putting down a well, Meyer No. 1, in the Anse La Butte field and he states that they have struck cap rock, the first real cap rock so far encountered. The drillers have gone through 43 feet of it, and the farther the rock is penetrated, the more signs of oil. They are putting in a new standard rig at an expense of $1000 additional, and expect to bring in a fine well.

 Moresi Well No. 4 is being baled out and when finished gives promise of yielding by pumping 400 to 500 barrels daily.


 Moresi No. 3 is producing regularly 100 barrels a day, and they now have 3000 barrels stored on the field, which is for sale. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.



 Work Resumed. - Work has resumed on the First National Bank building last Thursday, and Monday a large force was put on the hotel building, and the construction will be pushed as rapidly as possible. Work on the opera house is delayed for the present awaiting bricks. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.

 Handsome Show Cases - Levy Bros. have just received two handsome counter show cases, and are expecting a $350 one in a few days. These cases add greatly to the appearance of the store and afford a splendid medium for the display of goods. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.


 Car Load of Stoves. - The Falk Mercantile Co. have just received a car load of Lilly Darling, Mascot and Charter Oak stoves, and are in a position to make it hot for their competitors. See them. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.



For District Attorney.

 The Sontag Military Band has decided to make a tour of Southwest Louisiana and has arranged to play to-morrow at Jennings, Sunday at Breaux Bridge, then following Wednesday at Crowley, and on Sunday at St. Martinville.

 The Sontag Band is a splendid musical organization and a treat is in store for the citizens of the towns mentioned.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.


For District Attorney.

 The announcement of the candidacy of Mr. Wm. Campbell for re-election to the office of district attorney appears in another column. Mr. Campbell has served the people of Lafayette and Acadia four years and during that time has filled the office acceptably. He has been a zealous, conscientious officer, and if elected, as beyond question he will be, he will continue to discharge the duties of his office faithfully and creditably. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.


 Lafayette-Breaux Bridge.

 Thursday a fine game of ball was played between Lafayette and Breaux Bridge at the Ball Park. Both teams were in fine shape and did some excellent work. The interest of the spectators was kept at a high pitch from start to finish. Lafayette made two runs in the first inning and one in the third. Breaux Bridge never made a tally.

 The game in detail was as follows:

----------------p. 4-------------------

 Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1904.




City Council Proceedings.
7/18/1904.



Pursuant to adjournment of July 4, the City Council met with Mayor Chas. D. Caffery presiding. Members present: A. E. Mouton, Felix Demanade, M. Rosenfield, Henry Fontenot, M. Rosenfield, Henry Fontenot, John O. Mouton, D. V. Gardebled, Geo. A. DeBlanc.

Moved by Geo. A. DeBlanc, seconded by D. V. Gardebled, that a bid for the C. & C. Dynamos and (unreadable word) engine be made according to specifications in hand of Water and Light committee amounting to the sum of six-thousand, three hundred and fifty-three dollars ($6,353) F. O. B. Lafayette, La., less discount for cash. Carried.


 Moved by Felix Demanade, seconded by Geo. A. DeBlanc, that the sum of seven hundred dollars, ($700.) be appropriated for the purpose of acquiring strip of ground from Mrs. G. C. Babcock, necessary to continue the widening of Jefferson street.


 Yeas-Geo. A. BeBlanc, D. V. Gardebled, Henry Fontenot, M. Rosenfield, Felix Demanade, John O. Mouton:

 Nays-A. E. Mouton.

Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.






Selected News Notes 8/3/1904.

Mr. Willie Peck and Miss Emma Peck, of Grand Coteau, returned home Tuesday after spending a week with their cousin, Miss Victoria Peck.


 A. J. Bonnet, the bicycle doctor, who has been visiting relatives in Lake Charles the past two weeks, is back again.


 The Advertiser received Thursday from Fernand Mouton a postal card with a lithograph on the back of it of the Vallee d' Albertville, France, where he was present July 11 at a Congress of New York Life people, 125 in number.

Sterling Mudd left yesteday for New Orleans, where he will enter the employ of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad.

Dr. Z. J. Francez, of Carencro, was in Lafayette Monday.

Maurice Francez, of Carencro, was in town Friday.

Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Hopkins and children went on the excursion to New Orleans Monday and will return to-day.


Mrs. E. R. Kennedy and Mrs. Crow Girard left last week for New York to visit Mrs. (Dr.) Oliphant.


Judge T. A. McFaddin moved into his handsome new home in the Mudd addition last week.

Miss Nella Alpha returned from Franklin Wednesday, after spending two weeks there visiting friends and relatives.
 Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Hopkins returned yesterday from a two weeks visit to the World's Fair. They spent two days on the way home in Greenville, Texas, where Misses Rena Hopkins and Quint Morgan were visiting their sisters. They returned yesterday with Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins.


Sidney Alpha and Albert Bourgeois were visitors to New Iberia Sunday.

B. N. Coronna and daughter, Miss Gertrude, and Miss Wilhel Schmulen spent Sunday in New Iberia. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1904.






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 From the Lafayette Gazette of August 3rd, 1901:

There is Hope Yet.

 That the spirit of progress is abroad in this land is evident from the recent attempt to hold a good roads convention here in this town. We may be a little slow, but in the face of such overwhelming proof of our progressiveness, who will deny that we are slowly but surely moving along the pathway of advancement? The question of good roads is, as all will admit, one of the greatest importance and one that never fails to receive the earnest attention of a live community. Now for the proof of our progressive spirit:

 Thirteen years ago a good roads meeting was held there. There were twelves persons present. At the meeting last Thursday sixteen progressive and patriotic gentlemen responded to the call, the increased attention showing a marked improvement in public sentiment on the question of roads.

Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.



THE INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE.

PRESIDENT STEPHEN ISSUES THE CIRCULAR OF ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE FIRST ANNUAL SESSION.

  AN ABLE CORPS OF ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE ANNUAL SESSION.

 Presidents Stephens has issued a (unreadable word), greatly arranged catalogue making the announcements for the first annual session of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute.

 The session will begin at 9 o'clock a. m., on Wednesday, September 18, 1901, and end on Wednesday May 28, 1902.

 Examinations for entrance will be held on Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 18 and 19.

 The second term of the first school-year will begin on Monday, January 27, 1902.

THE GIRLS' DORMITORY.

 The ladies' boarding club will be open on Tuesday evening, Sept. 17, 1901. The dormitory is a picture of which is printed on this page, is yet incomplete, but it will be ready for the opening. It will be a splendid home for the ladies who will attend the school. Thoroughly modern in all its departments, the boarders will be afforded the best accomodations obtainable. Mrs. Elizabeth F. Baker, the matron, who will have personal charge of the dormitory, is, in every respect, eminently, qualified for the important duties incumbent upon one who is to exercise parental supervision over a number of young ladies. It must be understood that the institute is for the girls as much as for the boys and no efforts will be spared to make the Ladies' Boarding Club a pleasant, healthful and attractive home. Board will cost about $12.45 per month. The charges for washing will be about $1.00


 ABOUT THE BOYS.

 The boys will have to board in town. The Gazette is informed that a number of families in Lafayette will be pleased to take students as boarders at very reasonable prices.

 REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION.

 Candidates for admission to the first year class must be fourteen years of age, or older, in good health, and prepared for a simple entrance examination in reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic to denominate numbers, elementary geography. A certificate from the principal of an officially approved high school, or from such other schools as have been accredited upon investigation, showing that the candidate had done satisfactory sixth grade, will be accepted for entrance in lieu of an examination. The entrance requirements have purposely been made thus easy in order to give the greatest opportunity to the greatest number.

 COURSE OF STUDY.

 The Industrial Institute offers to boys and girls a rounded course in the academic branches and the manual training pursuits of the secondary school school - a course that will provide not only for mental development and culture, but also for the education of the hand as being the most important servant of the brain. It is designed to provide educative material representative of the humanistic, the scientific and the economic aspects of knowledge, and to fit students both for the better and more intelligent pursuit of the industries of life, and also for the more advanced studies of the college and university.

 The curriculum, extending through four years of two terms each, will regularly consist of the following subject: Language, includes writing, spelling, stenography, English, literature, and French: History includes general history, American history, and civil government; mathematics includes arithmetic, bookkeeping, geometry, and algebra; Science includes geography, physiology, physics, and chemistry; Music included singing as part of the regular course, and the study of piano, violin, cornet and other orchestral instruments - extra; drawing in free hand, instrumental, mechanical, design, color-work, cast drawing, and composition: Gymnastics includes regular exercises in the gymnasium with apparatus, out door sports, and games; Manuel  Training for boys consists of bench-work; and Manual Training for girls includes sewing, draughting, making garments, costume-design, domestic science, cookery household sanitation, and care of the sick.

SPECIAL COURSES.

 The energies of the Institution will be given in greatest part to the work of the regular course of study, and all students are advised, so far as it may be practicable, to take this course, exactly as it is outlined. But an advanced and mature student desiring to elect his subjects of study and take a special course, may do so if he is prepared for the work he elects and if his program of studies is approved by the president.

 Special courses will not lead to the regular diploma. Upon the completion of such courses specifying the subjects studied.

 Students satisfactory completing the four-year course indicated in the foregoing will receive the regular diploma of the Institute authorizes by the State.

 Institute had been particularly fortunate in the selection of the faculty - consisting of Mr. V. L. Roy, of Marksville; Mr. Florent Sontag, of Lafayette; Mr. L. W. Mayer, of Opelousas; Mr. Ashby Woodson, of Virginia; Miss Gertrude Mayfield, of Ruston; Miss Beverly Randolph, of New Orleans; Miss Edith G. Dupre, of Opelousas; Mrs. Elizabeth F. Baker, of New Orleans.

 Mr. Roy, the teacher of science is a native of Avoyelles parish, and is a member of the very large and influential family of that name throughout the French section of the State. He gave early evidence of ability and faithfulness as a student, and when ready for college was elected to the scholarship of Avoyelles parish in the State University at Baton Rouge. While there he was several times distinguished for his work as a student, and was graduated in 1890, with the bachelor's degree in science, winning the highest honor of his class in that year. Soon after leaving the University Mr. Roy was elected as special lecturer in chemistry in connection with the work of the State Agricultural Department in Southern University, and at the same time pursued special advanced courses in physics and chemistry in Tulane University, and at the same time pursued special advanced courses in physics and chemistry in Tulane University, under the direction of Prof. Wilkinson and Prof. Brown Ayres. He later supplemented this training with a course in the University of Chicago. In 1897 he was called to build and organize a high school in Marksville - a work that he has carried forward to the present time with the greatest success Mr. Roy was married in 1897 to Miss Josephine Sanford, of New Orleans, and has three interesting children.

 Mr. Florent Sontag, who will teach music, is one of the most accomplish and most widely known musicians in the State. It is safe to say that a better selection could not have been made. Mr. Sontag was born in Breaux Bridge in 1871. He is the son of the late Prof. George Sontag, known and recognized by all lovers of music as an artist of great talent. Mr. Sontag is presently engaged at the Athletic Park in New Orleans. Writing of his work there Stede Bonnet said in The Harlequin: "Mr. Florent Sontag, the cornetist, was a conspicuous part of Band-master Paoletti's very tasteful and entertaining musical programmes on Sunday and Tuesday evenings last, rendering solos. Harlequin has predicted a brilliant cornetist, and these first essays before a New Orleans audience as a soloist seem to have convinced the judicious  of solid foundation for this prophesy. Mr. Sontag phrases with exquisite taste. His tone is as sweet as the caress of a motherly voice. There is none of the flashy display of the Levi method in this work, but there is music - music which would be as much in place and as beautiful in the solitude of deep woods or by the side of the sea, as before a great audience. The thought is suggested by a story I once heard related about Levi. This technical master of the instrument was once telling a musician of his greatness when the other asked him, "How do you think, sire, your horn would sound in the woods where the birds are their music?"

 "The thought of the connection between nature and music was possibly lost on Levi, but it comes back to one as he listens to Sontag. He will figure making their music?"

 "The thought of connection between nature and music was possibly lost on Levi, but it comes back to one as he listens to Sontag. He will figure among the great cornetists, or I mistake me much.

Mr. Mayer, who is to have charge of the work in shorthand and typewriting, is also a Louisianian, having been born and reared in Opelousas, the son of Prof. R. Mayer, to this work in the Industrial Institute from similar work, of which he has made a marked success, in the St. Landry High School. He is a graduate of the Pitman Phonographic Institute and cashier of the Boarding Club.

 Mr. Woodson is from Albemarie County, Virginia, a graduate from the Miller Manual Training School, of that county - the most richly endowed institution of the kind in this country, and, in all respects, one of the most thoroughfare and the best. Mr. Woodson comes with the highest commendations of Prof. Stonewall Tompkins, whose work in the organization of industrial education and manual training schools in the Southern States has made him a recognized and conspicuous leader in this department of instruction. Mr. Woodson has been for several years, since his graduation, Prof. Tompkins' assistant in the engineering work of the Miller School. During the present summer he has been doing actual labor in the machine shops of Stevens Institute in Jersey City, and is now in Jersey City, and is now doing similar work in the shops of Cornell University.

 Miss Gertrude Mayfield comes from a well known family in North Louisiana, and is a graduate of the Industrial Institute in Brooklyn. She was excellent in her work as a student in the department of domestic science and economy at Ruston, and, upon graduation there, went specially to Pratt Institute to make herself perfect in preparation to be a teacher in the branches of this department of study. In this she has admirably succeeded, and having taught two years successfully since her return from Brooklyn, she comes now to the work here with the richest possible experience.

 Miss Randolph, the teacher of the splendid training to be obtained from Miss Clara G. Baer, the director of the Newcomb gymnasium. She is now spending the summer at Monteagle, Tennessee, taking the special courses in her favorite subjects and preparing herself for the better for the year's work here.

 Miss Beverly Randolph is of a family well known in New Orleans. Her mother is the Librarian of Newcomb College, and her grandfather Mr. Parham, was for many years identified with the educational interest of the city as president of the Board of Education.

 Miss Edith Garland Dupre, of Opelousas, who is to have charge of the work in both English and French, is the daughter of Mr. Laurent Dupre, and is already well known over all this section of the State. Her education has been thorough and she has received the highest commendation from teachers upon her work in school and college. She was prepared for college at home in the St. Landry High School, and successfully entered Newcomb College in New Orleans, from which she was graduated with honors in 1900. Since her graduation she has been engaged in teaching in Fairmont School, Monteagle, Tennessee. Her scholarly attainments and her thorough knowledge of both languages make her peculiarly well fitted for the department she will direct in the Industrial Institute.

 The Institute is fortunate in having found it possible to obtain so excellent a person as Mrs. Elizabeth Fowles Baker of New Orleans, to have charge of the dormitory for girls, and, in fact, to take the place of a mother to the young ladies placed in her care. Mrs. Baker is in every sense of the word, and has proved herself a most successful housekeeper by the experience of having taken boarders at her home in New Orleans during a number of years. Mrs. Baker is of a prominent family connections in both this State and Mississippi. She is a sister of Miss Anna Fowles, one of the teachers in the Louisiana Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, and of the late Mrs. J. O. Fuqua, of Baton Rouge.  Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1901.



 For a Graded School.

 Our remarks last Saturday advocating the establishment of a graded school at this place, may have been construed as a reflection upon the Lafayette High School, but we wish to state that it was not our intention to detract from the merit of that institution. On the contrary, we recognize fully the good work that it is doing. We believe, however, that Lafayette needs an improved educational facilities to meet the new conditions. The present school buildings are totally inadequate and in as recent years the sessions have been altogether too short.

 A modern school building is badly needed. It should be put up in as central a point as possible. The town schools should be in one building and under the control of one principal. With a central or graded school to prepare the pupils to enter the Industrial Institute, Lafayette will be able to boast of educational advantages equal to those of any other town in the State. Lafayette has an excellent opportunity to become the educational center of Southwest Louisiana, and judging by its record we are justified in predicting that it will make the most of its opportunity. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.


 An Improvement.

 The post-office department announces a further step toward uniformity in the postal systems of the United States, Canada and Cuba. The change is that money orders may be issued at any money order office in the United States, drawn on any money on any office in Canada and Cuba, at domestic rates. Heretofore these orders could be sent only through foreign money order offices is drawn on an office in this country. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.

     

  


A WHITE STATE.
Statistics Give Louisiana a White Majority of 80,107 - Lafayette Make a Splendid Showing.

 Statistics recently given out by the census authorities show that Louisiana is a white State by an overwhelming majority. The white population exceeds the colored by 80,017. In 1890 there was a black majority of 1,797. This rapid Caucasian increase is very significant. Viewed from a political, industrial or social standpoint this is a victory of the greatest importance. Louisiana may well congratulate itself upon such fine results.

 Lafayette is among the parishes which have helped to give Lousiana a white majority. As will be seen by the following figures, since 1870 this parish has never failed to show marked gains for the white race. To-day there are nearly 4,000 more whites than negroes in this parish.

 The various censuses since 1860 show the following division of population by races:

-----------------p. 1-------------------

Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.


GOOD ROADS.
The Convention Fails to Materialize - President Billeaud Will Issue Another Call.

 Owing to the very small attendance it was decided to postpone the good roads convention to a future date, to be fixed by President Billeaud, of the Police Jury.

 Mr. C. C. Brown, who was to preside over the meeting, announced to the few persons present that a postponement had been decided upon. Mr. Brown expressed regret at the evident indifference of the people to a matter of such vital importance. He said that the people should be heard from on this question and that another opportunity would be afforded them to come together and express their views. President Billeaud would issue a call for another convention, which, he hoped, would be largely attended.

 It is certainly to be hoped that more people will respond to the next call.

 Numerically the town of Lafayette was very poorly represented at the meeting. There were four citizens of the town present. The business and professional men of the town should exert themselves in this movement. The town should join hands with the country. Both are greatly interested in good roads. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.




 The Greig Concert Company.

 Quite a large number of people enjoyed the entertainment given sat Falk's ball last Sunday by the Greig Concert and Minstrel Company of St. Martinville. It is needless to say that the music was of a high order of excellence, for it is well known that Prof. Greig's band is one of the finest musical organizations in the country. Prof. Greig is certainly to be congratulated upon the splendid execution of his band. It is not often that Lafayette has an opportunity to listen to such delightful music as was played by the Greig band during the parade last Sunday evening. The minstrel boys are also deserving of much praise. All did their parts well. We have heard only the most favorable comments upon their performance. They have all acquitted themselves in a most creditable manner. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.

 For a Town Market.

 Mayor Caffery, Councilmen A. E. Mouton, Geo. DeBlanc, Jno. O. Mouton, H. H. Hohorst and Secretary Louis Lacoste went to Crowley last Monday, and inspected the town market at that place and secured valuable information concerning its management. It is the intention of the Council to send a committee to New Iberia to look into the market at that place. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

 The following real estate transfers were recorded in the clerk's office during the past week:

  Sam Levy and others to Mrs. Wm. E. Walker, 21 arpents in the third ward, $1,300.
  Victor Breaux to Edmond Breaux, one lot in Lafayette, $600.
  Albert E. Broussard to Mrs. Edmond P. Broussard, one lot in Lafayette, $315.
  F. V. Mouton, 83 arpents in third ward, $4,000. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.




There is Hope Yet.

 That the spirit of progress is abroad in this land is evident from the recent attempt to hold a good roads convention in this town. We may be a little slow, but in the face of such overwhelming proof of our progressiveness, who will deny that we are slowly but surely moving along the pathway of advancement? The question of good roads is, as all will admit, one of the greatest importance and one that never fails to receive the earnest attention of a live community. Now the proof of our progressive spirit.

 Thirteen years ago a good roads meeting was held here. There were twelve persons present. At the meeting last Thursday sixteen progressive and patriotic gentlemen responded to the call, the increased attendance showing a marked improvement in public sentiment on the question of roads. Some pessimistic folks may think that an increase of four in thirteen years gives out scant promise for the successful culmination of the movement; but it must be remembered that no great reform has ever been accomplished in one day. Four more are not many, but they show that we are not retrograding. They show that the future has something in store for us - that there is a silver lining in the clouds. The veriest tyro in mathematics may figure it out, and it will clearly be seen that at that rate of increase - four every thirteen years - at the dawn of the 25th century it will be possible to hold a well-attended good roads convention in Lafayette. There is no cause for alarm. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.




 A Parish Fair.

 Dr. Fred J. Mayer writes us a communication disclosing a practical plan to organize a parish fair association. It is proposed to hold a meeting at the court house, in this town, at 3:30 p. m., on Aug. 17, for the purpose of effecting a permanent organization. The object of the association will be to hold annual parish fairs. It is understood that the first fair will be held at Scott, which all will agree, is a splendid selection.

 As suggested by Dr. Mayer, Lafayette is an ideal parish to hold an agricultural fair, and if properly supported a fair association  can accomplish a great deal.

 The Gazette hopes that Dr. Mayer will be accorded the necessary assistance in a movement which can result in so much good to the people of the parish.

 All interested in this undertaking are urged to subscribe to the fund which will be used in buying, premiums and paying other expenses. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.



 A Cotton Factory.

 Mayor Caffery has received the following letter from Mayor F. M. Welch, of Alexandria:

       ALEXANDRIA, LA., July 29, 1901.
  To the Honorable Mayor, Lafayette, La.

 Dear Sir. - If your people can secure $20.00 in cash and put up a building that will cost not to exceed $6,000. I can locate a cotton factory at once that will give employment to forty or fifty hands. I have a party who will take stock outside of the $20,000 to the extent of $10,000. We are getting a larger one here but I believe this factory would be of great benefit to your city.
                     Yours truly,
                           F. M. WELCH.

 The Gazette can not, with the information at hand, discuss the merits of the proposition of Mayor Welch, but it is no doubt worth looking into. The B. M. A. might take it up. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.


POLICE JURY.

 Holds Its Regular Monthly Meeting - A Synopsis of the Proceedings.

 The Police Jury met last Thursday with all the members present, at the usual hour, but adjourned until two o'clock p. m. to participate in the Good Roads Convention.

 Messrs. Blanchet, Whittington and Cade, appointed to confer with the authorities of Vermilion as to the location of a new steel bridge at or near Olidon Broussard's ferry, reported that pending a survey to be made by a United States civil engineer no agreement has been effected. The committee was continued.

 An ordinance prohibiting, under penalty of fine or imprisonment, the discharging of any skimmings, molasses, sweetened or acidulated waters from steam trains, vacuum pans and double effects into any streams of the parish or any ditches, canals or tributaries thereof, was adopted to take effect Oct. 1, 1901. Fine shall be not less than $50 nor more than $500 and imprisonment for thirty days or six months or both at the discretion of the court.

 An application from the Segura Sugar Company of Iberia for a right of way across the public roads right of way across into the parish near Blanchet's store, in the fourth ward, was read and duly granted.

 The Southern Pacific road was notified to repair the public crossings near Gerac's ginnery and opposite the Miss Boudreaux's, the steep grading rendering the places dangerous of passage.

 Mr. Alfred Hebert appeared and asked that the road leading to the Lafayette Refinery be graded before the heavy traffic incident to the harvesting season. The gentleman was informed that steps had already been taken to place the road in prime condition.

 Assessor Martin submitted a statement to the effect that the total parish assessment would have appoximately to $2,500,000, and the corporation of Lafayette, $750,000, making a grand total of $3,250,000.

 The Jury thereupon fixed the rate of taxation for the year 1901 at ten mills on the dollar distributed in accordance with the items of the budget.

 The treasurer's report showed a cash balance in the general fund of $101, and special road fund of $770.33.

 After approval of accounts the Jury adjourned. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.




   



    







 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 8/3/1901.

 Simeon Begnaud visited Crowley this week.

 C. E. Carey, the up-to-date painter and paper hangar has returned to Lafayette and is ready for business. Headquarters at L. Lacoste's hardware store.

 Mr. F. E. Darby, who is one of Lafayette's most progressive farmers, brought to The Gazette office an open boll of cotton. Despite the drought Mr. Darby has a very good crop.

 The post-office department has established a post-office at Pilette, in this parish, with Mr. J. O. Broussard as post-master.

 Misses Eugenie and Cecile Doucet leave to-day for Donaldsonville, where they will spend about a fortnight. They will be accompanied by their brother, Jacques, now a resident of Donaldsonville, but who has been in Lafayette several days. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1901.


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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 3rd, 1901.


NEW TELEPHONE EXCHANGE.

Everybody will be entitled to a phone.
No Rental to be paid.

The Company expects to place 500 boxes, and work will soon commence.

 The Louisiana and Texas Long Distance Telephone Co., have made arrangements to place an exchange in Lafayette. It is the intention of this company to conduct their exchange on an entirely new plan. They propose to place a phone in every house in town, and charge only when the phone is used. They will sell copper checks at two cents each, perhaps one cent, and when you wish to be connected with the central, you will drop a check in the phone. In this way you pay only when you use the phone, so that everybody, poor or rich, can have the benefit of telephone service at as small an expense as you wish; for you do not pay a cent unless you use it. The Company expects to put 500 telephones in Lafayette in 60 days from now.

Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1901.






Back From the East.

 Messrs. B. Falk and S. Kahn returned Wednesday from an extended trip through the East. The large and increasing business of these gentlemen demanded that they make a personal inspection of the best markets to secure the very best and latest lines for their several branches. In selecting the stock for the Lafayette Shoe Store they went direct to Boston, which is the "Hub of Universe" and the recognized center of the shoe industry. To fill in their other lines they visited New York, Philadelphia and Cincinnati. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1901.




RAIL-ROAD NOTES  8/3/1901.

 Last Saturday the habitués around the depot, had an opportunity of seeing the beast of burden, used by the Filipinos, a baggage car, attached to train No. 1, containing four fine specimens of the Carabao or water buffalo consigned to the U. S. government, in charge of a customs officer, passed through here. They attracted a good deal of curiosity.

 The rain of last Sunday morning no doubt prevented many people from going on the Excursion but Conductor Crawford brought four hundred and twenty nine into Abbeville nevertheless.


 Yard Master Triay, is an ardent advocate of Socialism. He is well read on the subject, and can expound the benefits of Socialism to all willing listeners, the Switchman believes that there is something in it.

 The Round House office and storeroom is being remodeled by the building repair gang, the roof has been cut down and made nearly flat, and will be covered with roofing paper instead of iron as before.


 The hot weather was too much for Allie Sprole this week, "he is taking a lay-off."


 Don Greig is recuperating at the Sea Shore.



 Auguste Maitre, fireman on the Alexandria Branch says, that he believes there is oil under his land in Anse La. Butte.

Frank Ledet, and a pig had a hot-race last Wednesday morning.



 Uncle Ben Donlon on Engine 528, says that the Co., ought to put on some kind of revolving fan on the engines.

Geo. Connif, Inspectors clerk, is the boss cigarette smoker.


 Gradny Cochran, has resigned his position in the car repairers force. John Lester succeeds him.

 Ed. Dunshie is conceded to be the handsomest passenger conductor on the Southern Pacific System.

Leonard Chico would make a good short stop in a rail road base ball nine.

The two switch engines in the yard are kept unusually busy at this season, and the main line crews are putting in full time.

Some of the men in the service do not take kindly to the personal record blank, which the Co., requires each man in the service to fill out.


 C. C. Mallard, superintendent of bridges and buildings was in town Wednesday on business connected with his department.

Conductor Pefferkorn's residence is nearing completion, and will soon be ready for occupancy.


 It is announced that G. W. Hariman of the Mexican Central, will succeed W. B. Mulvey, deceased, as superintendent of the L. W. Division. H. H. White, chief train dispatcher has been acting as superintendent since Mr. Mulvey's death.

Bob Chargois is practicing these days in the yard, with the switching crews, Bob wants to be a railroad man.


Henry Fontenot says that nothing can cheer his stomach like a good slice of pie about 4 p. m.


 Gus Joret, is great on water melons, he likes them on ice.

Another excursion to-morrow from Lake Charles to Opelousas.

Not much doing in R. R. circles this week - SWITCHMAN.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1901.




Visited Anse la Butte.

 Judge Blackman of the Circuit Court was in town Tuesday. While here he visited the Anse la Butte well of the Danois' Co., of which he is a heavy stockholder. He stated to an Advertiser reporter that the new well had reached a depth of 200 feet and that a good flow of oil had been struck. He added that the formation on the hill was entirely different from that of the first place. He expressed himself as more hopeful than ever before of getting a gusher, since they had struck oil in such a quantity. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1901.



Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/3/1901.


The first open cotton boll of the season was brought to the Advertiser office by Mr. F. E. Darby.


 Mr. B. Falk, who has just returned from New York, states that he has contracted with a number of first-class attractions for the coming season, and that he will have special officers at each performance to see that everything is quiet and orderly.

Gus Schmulen says that he has in stock just what the ladies need to trim their dresses - fine laces.


 Mr. John Torian is enjoying a most delightful stay with his brother, Mr. Tom Torian, near Donaldsonville.

The Southern Pacific is giving excursions to all points on its line. What's the matter with an excursion to Lafayette.


We received from Mr. Cijus Bernard a nice sugar cane having nine red joints. This is the finest cane we have seen this season. Mr. Bernard has 6 acres of this cane.

Mr. Emmannuel Pellerin and baby returned this week from Lake Arthur where they spent three weeks.

C. E. Casey, the painter, is hard at work but this doesn't prevent him from taking your orders; he can easily increase his force and do the job whenever you desire it.


A number of ladies met at the home of Mrs. T. M. Biossat on Monday, and organized a Sunshine society with Mrs. Biossat as president; Mrs. C. D. Caffery, vice-president; Miss Lizzie Parkerson, secretary; and Mrs. B. J. Pellerin, treasurer.

Miss Maud Herring, a charming young lady of Bolton, Miss., is visiting Miss Anna Hopkins.


Misses Bettie and V. Cocke of Franklin are guests of Miss Maxim Beraud.


The attention of the street committee is respectfully called to the condition of the plank walks in various parts of the town.


Mr. Frank Breaux has resigned his position with the Hogsett Telephone Co., and has accepted employment at the compress.


W. V. Nicholson has just received a carload of the famous White Elephant Surreys, Buggies and Carts.


Messrs. B. Falk and S. Khan returned Wednesday from an extended trip through the East. The large and increasing business of these gentlemen demanded that they make a personal inspection of the best markets to secure the very best and latest lines for their several branches. In selecting the stock for the Lafayette Shoe Store they went direct to Boston, which is the "Hub of Universe" and the recognized center of the shoe industry. To fill in their other lines they visited New York, Philadelphia and Cincinnati. 

From the Lafayette Advertiser of 8/3/1901.

 


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 From the Lafayette Gazette of August 3rd, 1895:

A NEW CAR FENDER.
H. L. Falk's Contrivances to Save Life and Limb.

 "A new car fender has been invented by Mr. Hilbert L. Falk, of this city, (New Orleans) which he claims to be better than any now on the market. He brought a model to The Times-Democrat office yesterday. It is to project about three feet in front of the car, and can be detached and used on either end. The main feature of the invention is that it can be deployed to a level of the rails by means of a spring, which is worked by the motorman in exactly the same way as the gong is. The fender is made of rubber, and ordinarily is six inches above the rails, but by means of two powerful springs it is made to shoot outward and slide along the rails in front of the car. Underneath the rubber is placed a set of steel brushes below the fender. When anything is struck by the car the rubber will act as a shovel and throw it on the fender. Mr. Falk is making one of these fenders out of brass, and he intends to make a present of it to the Traction company. The patent has been applied for. Mr. Falk is the inventor of the electric dynamo which requires no steam for its operation, a description of which was published some time ago in The Times-Democrat.

The Advertiser adds: Mr. Falk is backed by Dr. N. P. Moss, one of the wealthiest men of Lafayette parish. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1895.




MOUTON - BARRY.
Special to the N. O. Times-Democrat.

"Grand Coteau, July 30. -- Mr. Fred Mouton, of Lafayette, La., and Miss Marie Barry, of this place, were united in matrimony at the Sacred Heart Church this morning at 9 o'clock, Rev. Father C. M. Widman officiating. Many relatives, friends and acquaintances were in attendance. The groom is a grandson of the late ex-Gov. Alexander Mouton, and is a successful contractor and builder. The bride is a daughter of the late Sylvester Barry, who was a prominent merchant of this place (Grand Coteau) for many years. The happy couple left on the 12:16 train for their home in Lafayette."

 Mr. and Mrs. Mouton arrived in Lafayette on the afternoon train on the day of the marriage and they have taken possession of their home in the addition.

Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1895. 




 Had Chandler Been There.

 A young negro, hailing from Galveston, got his foot between two cars at Scott last Monday and sustained rather painful injuries. He was brought to this town and the railroad officials at headquarters were informed of the accident, but at first refused to furnish the negro with transportation to a point where he could get relief, but when it was ascertained that no help would be given by the parish and town authorities the company had him sent to New Orleans. It may be well to state that some white men to whose attention the condition of the negro was called, collected a small sum of money and purchased some medicine which Dr. Martin kindly consented to administer to the injured negro who was considerably relieved. It is a pity that the editor of the Inter-Ocean or Bill Chandler was not at the depot to see Southern men dispense charity to a negro and a Southern doctor give his services free of charge to relieve a friendless and penniless darkey. Probably these vaunted friends of Sambo would not have done as much for him as those whom they sometimes choose to call "Southern brutes."  Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1895. 
 









In Favor of McDaniel.

 Judge McFaddin had decided in favor of Eli McDaniel in his suit against Alphonse Peck for a race fee of $100. The trial took place Wednesday and the Judge too the case under advisement and rendered his decision Thursday afternoon. The case will be carried to the district court. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1895.



Base Ball.

 A game of base ball was prayed last Sunday between the clubs of Royville and Mauriceville boys, by a score of 7 to 3. We understand that the invulnerable Pilette boys to tackle the victors at an early date. If they do, The Gazette will bet a new Stetson hat that they will win. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1895.


The Refinery.

 Jno. T. Keller, of New Orleans, who is superintending the construction of the refinery, is a gentleman of wide experience in this line. His manner of supervising the work shows that he is a workman of skill and ability and that he knows exactly what to do and does it speedily and well. The company was indeed lucky in securing his services as such a man was needed to conclude the work in time for the coming crop. Mr. Klein, of New Orleans, foreman of the bricklaying department, is also a competent workman and is a "hustler". We were pleased to see that a number of Lafayette people were given employment by the contractor. Mr. Ralph Elliot has been assisting in the construction of the refinery in various ways. Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1895.


Prohibition for Lafayette.


 PINHOOK, LA., July 31, 1895. - Mr. Editor - I heard that at its last session the Police Jury adopted a resolution which says that should one-fifth of the voters of this parish sign a petition asking for an election on prohibition, that said petition would be entertained.

 Doesn't it strike your editorial mind, Mr. Editor, that some people are getting just a trifle too good in this parish? Doesn't it look as if a handful of super-virtuous folks are just a little previous? For heaven's sake what might be the matter with them that they want to make of old Lafayette such a goody-goody place that we'll have but one step to make to reach the "beautiful shore." We don't know for a a fact, but it seems to us that we are not quite ready for prohibition. If our friends with watery inclinations will turn turn their attention toward other things they may accomplish some good, but in all frankness, they are simply wasting their angelic sweetness on the desert air when they come forward with the proposition to make this a dry parish. Prohibition in this parish would stand as much show as Grover Cleveland in a Populist conventions, or Bog Ingersoll at a Baptist camp meeting.

 There is not the least necessity for prohibition in Lafayette. For instance in the town of Lafayette there is perhaps less liquor drunk than in any other town in Louisiana. We have had too many elections in the past few years and the voters should not be annoyed unnecessarily.

 If they want to make people temperate let them do so by moral persuasion, but not by prohibitory laws, which are not adapted to the soil of this parish. They will never grow here. They can not take root, our people are too liberal minded to saddle such a ridiculous law upon themselves.
                         (Signed)  LIBERTY.
Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1895.



Police Jury Proceedings.

 The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry, H. M. Durke, Alfred Hebert, Alf. A. Delhomme, J. G. St. Julien and C. C. Brown.  Absent: Jos. W. Broussard.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 By motion of Mr. St. Julien, the secretary was authorized to correspond with the Police Jury of Vermilion and request cooperation of  in payment of cost in construction of a bridge-keeper's house at Olidon Broussard's ferry. Mr. Durke reported the cost of said building as $93 in full.

 Mr. Hebert reported having fulfilled his instruction as to building certain bridges in connection with the town authorities. Approved.

 Mr. Benj. Avant, appointed to represent this parish in the State Agricultural Society convened in the town of Natchitoches, reported concerning the said convention and its results. By request the address of Mr. Avant was read before the society was read for the benefit of the jury.

 Mr. Avant suggested that the jury invite the society to hold its next meeting in Lafayette and by motion it was resolved that a cordial invitation is hereby extended the society to convene its next session in Lafayette. Mr. Alfred Hebert was authorized to correspond with the executive committee of the society and urge the acceptance of the above invitation. By motion a vote of thanks was tendered Mr. Avant for his diligence.

 Bids for the construction of a bridge over the coulee near Dr. Mouton's place were opened and the contract awarded to Messrs. Webb and Arceneaux.

 By motion 50 percent was deducted from the license of Numa Schayot on the same terms and conditions as entered into with Messrs. Jno. Mouton, Alfred Hebert and others.

 A petition asking for a change in the public road near the proposed sugar refinery in course of construction on Mr. Chas. A. Mouton's place was read and by motion Mr. R. C. Landry was appointed to accept, the donation of road by Chas. A. Mouton, and represent the parish in any exchange or donation deemed necessary to make the changes submitted.

 The following was adopted:

 Wheras the sheriff and the parish treasurer do not agree as to the manner of deducting costs due on fines collected by him, of which the sheriff has heretofore made a statement to this body and whereas the School Board has appointed a committee for the purpose of adjusting the difference; Be it resolved that a committee of three be appointed by this body to meet the committee of the School Board and the Sheriff to effect an adjustment in the premises - Messrs. Alf. Hebert, T. A. McFadden and A. M. Martin were appointed on said committee.

 The following was also adopted:
 Whereas Act 76 of 1884 provides that the Police Juries, of the several parishes and the municipal authorities of the several towns and cities and the city of New Orleans, shall have exclusive right to make rules and regulations for the sale of prohibition of intoxicating liquors. Therefore be it resolved by the Police Jury that we will entertain petitions under this law asking for an election on the question when such petition when such petition shall be signed by one fifth of the legal voters, of the parish if Lafayette.

 Mr. Geo. A. Webster, representing the Pauly Jail Building Company, submitted a proposition to place a new steel cell in the parish jail and make other needed repairs in consideration of $2,100.

 By motion the matter was laid over.

 The following indigents were allowed $12.50 each; Adolphe Laband, Franciase Labarriere, Joseph Bonhomme and wife, Mrs. Sarazin Mathieu, Mrs. Emerenthe Bonin.

 Mr. Filiasse Boudreaux was appointed road overseer for the 4th ward instead of F. O. Broussard.

 The treasurer submitted his monthly report as follows:

        LAFAYETTE, LA., JULY 29, 1895.
 To the President and Members of the Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette.

 GENTLEMEN - The following is a statement of receipts and disbursement of parish funds since last report:

----------------------p. 2-------------------

 Respectfully submitted,
      July 29, 1895.        WM. CLEGG, Treasurer.

 The following accounts were approved:


 ------------------p. 2--------------------

 There being no further business the police jury adjourned.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary,
Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1895.






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 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 8/3/1895.

 A man named Baker is in the Crowley jail charged with having married his niece.

 Conductor Lusted returned home Tuesday from Houston.

 Romain Francez was among the people of Lafayette Wednesday.

 Dr. Irion's Dental Parlors, over post office, are always open from 8:30 a. m. to 1:30 p. m. and 3 to 5 p. m.

 We learned that Z. Cook, of Crowley, and A. M. Martin will open a saloon in the latter's building which is new being enlarged for that purpose.

 The Picnic to be given by the Pelican Band promises to be a very enjoyable affair. If you want to have a good time to join them.

 Sidney Veazey seems to have some attraction in Acadia. He has just returned from another visit to that parish. We're on to you Sid!

From New Iberia - Mrs. Maurice Mouton and her accomplished young friend Miss Leah Gladu, of Lafayette, were visitors to New Iberia the past week the guests of Mrs. Mouton's relatives, Mrs. W. B. Smith and family. - Iberia Enterprise.
Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1895.



   





  
































From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 3rd, 1901.


 NEW TELEPHONE EXCHANGE.

Everybody will be entitled to a phone.
No Rental to be paid.

The Company expects to place 500 boxes, and work will soon commence.

 The Louisiana and Texas Long Distance Telephone Co., have made arrangements to place an exchange in Lafayette. It is the intention of this company to conduct their exchange on an entirely new plan. They propose to place a phone in every house in town, and charge only when the phone is used. They will sell copper checks at two cents each, perhaps one cent, and when you wish to be connected with the central, you will drop a check in the phone. In this way you pay only when you use the phone, so that everybody, poor or rich, can have the benefit of telephone service at as small an expense as you wish; for you do not pay a cent unless you use it. The Company expects to put 500 telephones in Lafayette in 60 days from now.

Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1901.





RAIL-ROAD NOTES  8/3/1901.

 Last Saturday the habitués around the depot, had an opportunity of seeing the beast of burden, used by the Filipinos, a baggage car, attached to train No. 1, containing four fine specimens of the Carabao or water buffalo consigned to the U. S. government, in charge of a customs officer, passed through here. They attracted a good deal of curiosity.

 The rain of last Sunday morning no doubt prevented many people from going on the Excursion but Conductor Crawford brought four hundred and twenty nine into Abbeville nevertheless.


 Yard Master Triay, is an ardent advocate of Socialism. He is well read on the subject, and can expound the benefits of Socialism to all willing listeners, the Switchman believes that there is something in it.

 The Round House office and storeroom is being remodeled by the building repair gang, the roof has been cut down and made nearly flat, and will be covered with roofing paper instead of iron as before.


 The hot weather was too much for Allie Sprole this week, "he is taking a lay-off."


 Don Greig is recuperating at the Sea Shore.



 Auguste Maitre, fireman on the Alexandria Branch says, that he believes there is oil under his land in Anse La. Butte.

Frank Ledet, and a pig had a hot-race last Wednesday morning.



 Uncle Ben Donlon on Engine 528, says that the Co., ought to put on some kind of revolving fan on the engines.

Geo. Connif, Inspectors clerk, is the boss cigarette smoker.


 Gradny Cochran, has resigned his position in the car repairers force. John Lester succeeds him.

 Ed. Dunshie is conceded to be the handsomest passenger conductor on the Southern Pacific System.

Leonard Chico would make a good short stop in a rail road base ball nine.

The two switch engines in the yard are kept unusually busy at this season, and the main line crews are putting in full time.

Some of the men in the service do not take kindly to the personal record blank, which the Co., requires each man in the service to fill out.


 C. C. Mallard, superintendent of bridges and buildings was in town Wednesday on business connected with his department.

Conductor Pefferkorn's residence is nearing completion, and will soon be ready for occupancy.


 It is announced that G. W. Hariman of the Mexican Central, will succeed W. B. Mulvey, deceased, as superintendent of the L. W. Division. H. H. White, chief train dispatcher has been acting as superintendent since Mr. Mulvey's death.

Bob Chargois is practicing these days in the yard, with the switching crews, Bob wants to be a railroad man.


Henry Fontenot says that nothing can cheer his stomach like a good slice of pie about 4 p. m.


 Gus Joret, is great on water melons, he likes them on ice.

Another excursion to-morrow from Lake Charles to Opelousas.

Not much doing in R. R. circles this week - SWITCHMAN.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1901.



Visited Anse la Butte.

 Judge Blackman of the Circuit Court was in town Tuesday. While here he visited the Anse la Butte well of the Danois' Co., of which he is a heavy stockholder. He stated to an Advertiser reporter that the new well had reached a depth of 200 feet and that a good flow of oil had been struck. He added that the formation on the hill was entirely different from that of the first place. He expressed himself as more hopeful than ever before of getting a gusher, since they had struck oil in such a quantity. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1901. 




Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/3/1901.


The first open cotton boll of the season was brought to the Advertiser office by Mr. F. E. Darby.


 Mr. B. Falk, who has just returned from New York, states that he has contracted with a number of first-class attractions for the coming season, and that he will have special officers at each performance to see that everything is quiet and orderly.

Gus Schmulen says that he has in stock just what the ladies need to trim their dresses - fine laces.


 Mr. John Torian is enjoying a most delightful stay with his brother, Mr. Tom Torian, near Donaldsonville.

The Southern Pacific is giving excursions to all points on its line. What's the matter with an excursion to Lafayette.


We received from Mr. Cijus Bernard a nice sugar cane having nine red joints. This is the finest cane we have seen this season. Mr. Bernard has 6 acres of this cane.

Mr. Emmannuel Pellerin and baby returned this week from Lake Arthur where they spent three weeks.

C. E. Casey, the painter, is hard at work but this doesn't prevent him from taking your orders; he can easily increase his force and do the job whenever you desire it.


A number of ladies met at the home of Mrs. T. M. Biossat on Monday, and organized a Sunshine society with Mrs. Biossat as president; Mrs. C. D. Caffery, vice-president; Miss Lizzie Parkerson, secretary; and Mrs. B. J. Pellerin, treasurer.

Miss Maud Herring, a charming young lady of Bolton, Miss., is visiting Miss Anna Hopkins.


Misses Bettie and V. Cocke of Franklin are guests of Miss Maxim Beraud.


The attention of the street committee is respectfully called to the condition of the plank walks in various parts of the town.


Mr. Frank Breaux has resigned his position with the Hogsett Telephone Co., and has accepted employment at the compress.


W. V. Nicholson has just received a carload of the famous White Elephant Surreys, Buggies and Carts.


Messrs. B. Falk and S. Khan returned Wednesday from an extended trip through the East. The large and increasing business of these gentlemen demanded that they make a personal inspection of the best markets to secure the very best and latest lines for their several branches. In selecting the stock for the Lafayette Shoe Store they went direct to Boston, which is the "Hub of Universe" and the recognized center of the shoe industry. To fill in their other lines they visited New York, Philadelphia and Cincinnati. 

From the Lafayette Advertiser of 8/3/1901.

 

















 From the Lafayette Advertiser of  August 3rd, 1889:




THE CARENCRO LYNCHING.

 Last Tuesday morning news reached here that the State militia were in Carencro, and had under arrest some twenty or more of the mob who had broken into the jail at this place on the 11th of July, taken therefrom the negro Felix Keys, confined for wife murder, taken him back to Carencro and there lynched him. The news was a complete surprise, as the people had no intimation that such summary action was about to be taken. At about 11 o'clock the special train arrived from Carencro, having on board about ninety State troops, composed of the following commands: - Captain S. J. Cranary; Delta Rifles, West Baton Rouge - Captain A. R. Robertson; Iberville Guards, Capt. Thos. Guerrier; all under command of Assistant Adjutant General, T. A. Faries; Sheriff Broussard and his deputy, T. H. Theriot; and all of the persons named in the following order (with the exception of Saul Broussard, Sosthene Arceneau and Fernand Breaux):

 Following is the judicial order giving Sheriff Broussard authority to convey the prisoners to New Orleans:
The State of Louisiana vs. Ernest Bernest et als - Twenty-fifth Judicial District Court, parish of Lafayette.

  To the Sheriff of the Parish of Lafayette, State of Louisiana:


  Whereas, it has been established to the satisfaction of me, the undersigned, judge of the District Court, that the jail of the parish of Lafayette is unsafe and unfit for the security of prisoners, therefore you are hereby commissioned in the name of the State of Louisiana to carry Ernest Bernard (planter and merchant), Mautut Bernard, Gabriel Duban (farmer), A. C. Guilbeau (Mayor of St. Pierre), Rosemond Broussard (farmer), Adolph Guilbeau (public school teacher), Bebe Potier, Ursin Prejean (physician), Sinnett Breaux (farmer), Gaston Blot (saloon keeper), Anatole Breaux (city marshal of St. Pierre), Ernest Crouchet (saloon keeper), Hypolite Hebert (farmer), Joseph Staymen (butcher), --------- Broussard (blacksmith), Ferran Broussard (farmer), Adolph Prejean (farmer), Gateau Castille (farmer), who you have in custody, to the nearest jail of any adjoining parish, which may be in a safe condition to secure said prisoners, or to the City of New Orleans, parish of Orleans, if security requires, for safe keeping. The said prisoners there to remain until said first mentioned jail be repaired, or until trial, or until they may be discharged by the course of law, and herein fail not.


 Given at chambers this 30th day of July 1889. W. W. EDWARDS.

Judge of the Twenty-fifth Judicial District Court.

 The prisoners and guard took dinner at Crescent and News Hotel, and after a stop here of forty minutes proceeded on to New Orleans, where they arrived that afternoon and the prisoners were contained in the Orleans Parish Jail.


 The arrest was well planned, was executed secretly and was a complete surprise. The troops came down the T. P. road Monday night to Cheneyville, where they were met by an empty special train from this place, which had left this place Monday afternoon. Returning, they arrived at Carencro Tuesday morning at 6 o'clock. Monday night Sheriff Broussard started out with deputies J. C. Buchanan, C. H. Bradley, T. H. Theriot and Albert Delhomme, assisted by a posse of citizens, and when he met the militia at Carencro early next morning had effected the arrest of five or six of the parties above named. These were placed in charge of the militia, and the sheriff and posse proceeded to make arrests of other parties and turn them over to the militia. All this was accomplished rapidly, quietly, and without any resistance worth considering. Several parties, we learn, surrendered voluntarily upon understanding the condition of affairs. The prisoners were entirely ignorant of their destination until their arrival in Lafayette, and many people in Carencro and vicinity did not know of the arrests until after the special train had left. The parish officers and the militia acted with promptness and efficiency, and with complete order; and it is a matter of congratulation that the affair was accomplished with much less excitement and trouble than might have been anticipated.


 We learn from the city papers that the prisoners are in comfortable quarters, and are the recipients of such attentions as can be permitted. On the morning of the 31st, Mr. J. Numa Augustin and Mr. B. C. Elliot, interviewed the prisoners, and were retained by them to look after their interests. Up to the time of going to press, we have no intimation as to the course counsel for the prisoners intend to pursue. The Supreme Court is not in session, and a writ of habeas corpus cannot be tried. As the charge is murder, bail is questionable.


 There is some excitement among the friends of the arrested parties, but as yet no overt act has been committed, and as a whole parish is comparatively quiet, awaiting developments. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1889.



 Nuptials Announced. -  We are the the recipient of a card announcing that at St. John's Catholic Church, Lafayette, on Wednesday, August 7th. Mr. Antoine Close will wed Miss Alice Lafond, both of this place.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1889.
 

 Thursday morning Mr. B. Falk brought to our office several bolls of open cotton from his farm near town. He has thirty arpents of cotton now opening and will commence picking in a very few days. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1889.

 

Ready for Excursions on the Vermilion.  - Capt. Chas. H. Lusted has just received an engine and machinery for a tug boat, which will soon fit up in Bayou Vermilion, to be used, principally in towing his wood yard. The Captain, to meet along felt want, will neatly arrange his tug so that it can be used as an excursion boat. At any time desired a most enjoyable trip can be had up the bayou five miles to Lake Carlos. This is a worthy effort on the part of Capt. Lusted to add to the pleasures of our community. Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1889.


Garden Party. -
Thursday evening, July 25th, a most enjoyable garden party was given by the young folks of Lafayette, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. E. Olivier, complimentary to Miss Blanche Gentil, of Convent, La. Among those present were Misses Stella and Haydee Trahan, Alix and Louise Judice, Martha Mouton, Laurence Delahoussaye, Zerelda Bailey, and Maydell Irvin; and Messrs. Alfred and Sydney Mouton, Raoul Trahan, Baxter Clegg, Gus. Breaux, Felix Girard, F. Cornay, John Comeau and John Lebesque. The evening was spent delightfully, and the young people express themselves as highly gratified by the many kind statements received from their generous hosts.

From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 3, 1889:






A Frozen Watermelon.

 Mrs. W. W. Wall is a lady gifted with the highest appreciation and most generous disposition - Col. Wall was at one time an editor, but has fallen from grace into a comfortable living earned by his own resources. Last Sunday, (which, by the way, was our birthday - we are still young,) while we were nursing the shade and whistling for a breeze, we were made to suddenly break the tune by the apparition of a large frozen watermelon, a present from Mrs. Wall. It just fit; and we assure our estimable friend that the recollection of her kindness will last much longer than the watermelon did.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1889.



 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/3/1889.

 Tuesday evening our town was visited by a severe wind and rain storm, which did some damage to the crops in this vicinity. The destructive storm of 1888 occurred on the night of August 19th.


The work of painting the Church steeple commenced Monday.


 Miss Irene Banks, of Clinton, Miss., is visiting Lafayette and is the guest of Dr. T. B. Hopkins and family.



Miss Anita Hohorst, who has been visiting friends and relatives in Galveston for several weeks, returned home this week.

 We have received a neat card announcing the engagement of Miss Gussie Plonsky, of Lafayette, to Mr. Leon Weinberg.


 There will be a meeting of the Ladies Aid Society at the residence of Mr. W. W. Wall, on Monday evening, August 5th.

 L. Levy and son, Samuel, left this week for New York city for the purpose of purchasing stock of fall and winter goods.

 We learn that the Knights of Honor of this place are making a steady increase in membership. The Lodge has four applications before it, to be acted on at the next meeting, August 13th.

 Thursday morning Mr. B. Falk brought to our office several bolls of open cotton from his farm near town. He has thirty arpents of cotton now opening and will commence picking in a very few days
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1889.


 











 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 3rd, 1878:

QUARANTINE.

 The existence of yellow fever of a magnificent type in New Orleans, has prompted our authorities to establish a quarantine. The infections and calamitous nature of that disease, justifies the adoption of all reasonable measures to exclude it from our midst. It has been frequently and satisfactorily proven that the disease is imported and transportable. There is no doubt that a perfect quarantine would effectually exclude the disease and that an imperfect one would at least, delay its introduction. The inconveniences of a quarantine are nothing compared with human suffering and loss of life. From the time that disease takes root in a place, the germs of it lurk in the atmosphere until dispelled by cold weather. Therefore, if a quarantine succeeds only in delaying the commencement of the malady, it will have accomplished great good. The active assistance and co-operation of all the citizens of our town, in the proper enforcement of the quarantine, will be very material to its effectiveness.

 The prompt enforcement of proper sanitation measures at this time, is a matter of great importance. Privies, stables and back yards, should be cleaned and disinfected and general drainage and cleanliness strictly observed. With a clean town and pure atmosphere, no disease whatever could commit any serious ravages. These are matters in which every individual is directly and personally interested and to which we earnestly invoke attention.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1902.



PROCLAMATION.
Mayor's Office.
Vermilionville, La., July 30, 1878.

 WHEREAS, yellow fever of a virulent type prevails in New Orleans, and the City Council of Vermilionville having recommended that a quarantine be established;
      Now, therefore, it is hereby proclaimed that New Orleans is an infected place and the annexed quarantine ordinance will, from the 31st of July, A. D., 1878, be strictly enforced.

 The importance of making timely and all possible efforts to prevent the introduction of that dangerous and ravaging disease, justifies the hope, and it is earnestly requested, that all our citizens will aid and co-operate in the proper enforcement of sanitary and quarantine regulations.
J. O. MOUTON, Mayor of Vermilionville.

ORDINANCE.

    ------------------P. 2---------------------

Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1878.






Meeting of the Parish Executive Committee.

 Pursuant to call the Parish Executive Committee of the Parish of Lafayette, met this 29th day of July 1878, at the Court House.

 Present: Messrs. John Clegg, C. Debaillion, Jean Bernard, Victor Martin, J. O. Leblanc, J. O. Broussard, J. G. St. Julien and Nathan Foreman. Absent: Dr. N. D. Young.

 The Committee was called to order and on motion, John Clegg, Esq., was appointed President pro tem and Jean Bernard, Esq., Secretary pro tem.

 The committee then proceeded to a permanent organization, and on motion of Mr. Victor Martin, John Clegg, Esq., was elected President and M. H. Bailey, Secretary.

 The committee being thus organized proceeded to business, and on motion of Mr. St. Julien, it was
    Resolved, That a Parish Convention be held at the Court House of the Parish, at 11 o'clock A. M., on the 19th day August 1878, for the purpose of appointing a member to the State Central Committee. To select six delegates to represent this Parish in the 11th Senatorial District Convention. To nominate a candidate for the House of Representatives.

 That the Democratic Conservative voters of the Parish, be invited to assemble in their respective Wards and on the 17th day of August 1878, and elect delegates as follows:

------------------p. 2-----------------

 That certified copies of the proceedings of the meeting duly signed, be forwarded without delay to the Secretary of the Central Committee.

 The President of the Central Committee is requested and directed to call the Convention or order and have the roll of the delegates called.

 Mr. Debaillon offered the following preamble and resolutions which were adopted:

 Whereas, there is no recognized authority in the Eleventh Senatorial District to call a Convention of the purpose of nominating a candidate for the Senate,

  Therefore be it resolved, That we invite the Democratic authorities of the Parishes of Iberia and St. Martin, comprising together with the Parish of Lafayette the 11th Senatorial District, to send delegates to meet in Convention those of our Parish, at Royville, on the first Monday of September 1878, at 12 o'clock to nominate a candidate for Senator from this District.

 That each Parish be entitled in such Convention to the same number of delegates as it is entitled to in a State Convention.

 That the Secretary be authorized to forward a copy of three resolutions to the Presidents of the Parish Executive Committees of Iberia and St. Martin Parishes.

 On motion, the Committee adjourned to meet on the 10th day of August next.
JOHN CLEGG, President.
H. M. BAILEY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1878.




 City of Vermilionville.

 Regular Session, June 3d, 1878. - The Council met this day, the Hon. J. O. Mouton, presiding and all the councilmen present.

 The minutes of the meeting were read, corrected and adopted:

 The committee appointed at the last meeting to fix the rates on licenses to be levied, presented the following report:

 "To the Honorable Mayor and Councilmen of Town of Vermilionville, La.:

 Your undersigned committee appointed by your Honorable Body to fix the rates of licenses to be imposed and collected upon all trades, professions and occupations carried on within the limits of the corporation of Vermilionville, beg leave to report as follows and recommend that there shall be levied and collected, the following amounts as a license or tax:

------------------p. 4---------------

 Respectfully submitted,
             JEAN VIGNEAUX, ED. MCBRIDE, ED. EUG. MOUTON."

 On motion of Mr. Landry duly seconded by Mr. Hebert, it was resolved, that the above report be adopted as a whole.

 The yeas and nays being called on said resolution stood as follows:  Yeas - Landry, Hebert, Lindsay, Ed. McBride, Vigneaux, R. L. McBride.  Nay - Alpha.

 On motion of Mr. Lindsay duly seconded by Mr. Lindsay it was unanimously resolved, that the report of the committee on licenses, be and is hereby made the law in regard to licenses to be imposed and collected.

 The Treasurer presented his reports, and on motion of Mr. Lindsay duly seconded by Ed. McBride, it was resolved, that said reports be and are hereby adopted.

   The yeas and nays were called for on said resolution:  Yeas - Lindsay, Ed. McBride, Landry, R. L. McBride, Hebert.  Nay - Alpha.

 Mr. Alpha stated that he objected to the Treasurer's report of the assets and liabilities for the reason that he thought the same was incomplete.

 The following account was presented and on motion duly approved.

 W. H. Williams, comm. of election ... $2.10.
               On motion, the Council adjourned.
JOHN O. MOUTON, Mayor.
H. M. BAILEY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/3/1878
  





LAGNIAPPE:
WORKING THE BICYCLERS.

A Muddy Passage Serves as a Trap to Catch the Wheelmen. "There's a justice of the peace in a country town not far from here," said a bicycler, to a reporter, "who has a scheme that will make him a millionaire if he sticks to it for a year or two.

 "You see the town has an ordinance forbidding bicycle riding on the sidewalks. A good many wheelmen go that way, so what does this justice do but scoop out a hole and make a great big puddle across the street right in front of his office. Of course, when the wheelman comes along, rather than ride through the mud, he turns up on the sidewalk. That's what the justice is waiting for. He has a constable on the watch, and the two rush out and nab the cycler.

 "I was caught in the snare last week. Though I protested I only intended to keep on the walk till I had passed the mud, to was of no avail. I was fined five dollars, and had to pay it. I got a chance to look at the book when he was recording my fine, and there was record of some twenty wheelmen who had been served the same way that day, and it was still early in the afternoon.

 "It made me mad, and I began abusing the old fellow for having such a mud puddle in the street.

 " 'Why don't you fill it up? I asked, "if you want wheelmen to keep in the road?'

 "He grinned in a most exasperating manner, and answered without so much as a blush:

 " 'Suppose we're going to destroy such a source of revenue as that mud puddle is? I guess not. John,' turning to the constable, 'you better take the hose and soften it up a little bit, ready for the next sucker.' "

From the Buffalo Express and in the Lafayette Gazette 8/3/1895.




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