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Monday, January 12, 2015

**AUGUST 2ND M C

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 2nd, 1905:

MASS MEETING
Held Thursday AT 5 p. m. to Consider Quarantine Measures.

 COMMITTEE OF FIFTEEN APPOINTED

To Assist Authorities and $610 Subscribed in Help Defray Expenses.

 Thursday a well-attended meeting of citizens was held at the court-house to consider quarantine measures in view of the yellow fever in New Orleans. The meeting was called by means of dodgers, and at 5 o'clock, the hour named, the court room was practically filled.

 Mayor Mouton called the assembly to order and stated that the object of the meeting. He urged that there was no necessity of becoming excited, but that prompt action should be taken, and that systematic methods should be adopted to make an effective quarantine. After explaining the measures taken by the Council to clean up the city, he suggested that the meeting organize.

 Mayor Mouton's name was offered as permanent chairman, but upon his explanation that his other duties would prevent his serving, District Attorney Campbell was unanimously made chairman. Mr. Campbell, upon taking the chair, said he wished to state his views. He understood that the meeting was called that the citizens might give their ideas to the Council and Board of Health in regard to quarantine measures. He himself, believed in a strict quarantine; if such were to be maintained, he would serve as chairman, otherwise he would resign.

 No one expressed anything to the contrary and so it was tacitly understood that a strict quarantine was to be inaugurated.

 Maj. P. L. DeClouet was made secretary.

 The chairman called upon Judge Julian Mouton to give his views and he rose and said that he believed an auxiliary committee should be appointed to assist appointees of the Council in giving the town a thorough cleaning. He also suggested that as funds would be needed that individuals be called upon to contribute and offered to head the list with $25.

 Jerome Mouton, member of the City Board of Health, here explained what had been done by the Board, but stated that the quarantine was not yet effective.

 Upon request of the chairman Judge Mouton gave 15 as the number for "committee to assist" which he had suggested.

 Before further action on the committee question, Maj. DeClouet, of the Board of Health, explained the need of the help of the citizens to carry out the rules and regulations of the Board and Council.

 Judge Mouton then put his suggestion in the form of a motion as follows:

 Resolved that a committee of fifteen be appointed by the chairman of said committee for the purpose of co-operating with the City Board of Health, the Town Council and sanitary officers in adopting such quarantine measures as may be deemed necessary, with authority to solicit subscriptions and volunteer service, to put into effect the quarantine measures which may be adopted with a view of cleaning up and disinfecting the town thoroughly, and be invested with the power to appear before the Town Council and City Board of Health to urge stricter measures of quarantine, if deemed advisable.

 The motion was unanimously carried without discussion, and the chairman then appointed the committee as follows: Judge Julian Mouton, Dr. J. D. Trahan, Judge C. Debaillon, Dr. N. P. Moss, J. E. Martin, T. M. Biossat, Judge O. C. Mouton, S. Kahn, E. G. Voorhies, Fernand Mouton, C. D. Caffery, A. J. LeBlanc, Felix H. Landry, Dr. R. D. Voorhies, Dr. O. L. Clark.

 Subscriptions were then called for and the following responded with amounts set opposite their names.

----------------p. 1-----------------------

 The Committee will call on others for subscriptions.

 It was decided that a meeting of the Committee of Fifteen, the Council and Board of Health be held at 8 p. m. in the court house, and then the meeting adjourned. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.


CONFERENCE
Yesterday Between City Board of Health and Health Officer Brumby of Houston.

 Dr. W. M. Brumby, health officer of Houston, was here yesterday to confer with the City Board of Health in regard to quarantine. One being informed of measure taken here he expressed full satisfaction with them. He suggested to simplify matters and reduce expenses that instead of each town acting independently they act jointly and appoint inspectors to run from Avondale to Echo and back and from Echo to Houston and back, inspectors to see that no one entered train unless properly supplied with health certificate. Brumby returned on the evening train, but it was understood that the Board of Health was to present the plan in detail to the City Council, and if approved measures would be taken to get the plan into working order if consent of State health officers could be secured. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1902.



 The Fever Situation.

 The latest official report from New Orleans is as follows:

 Deaths from fever ... 5
 New cases of fever ... 21
 New foci ... 5

 This making the totals to date:

 Deaths from fever thus far ... 62
 Cases of fever thus far ... 304
 Total number of foci ... 49

 Two of these forty-nine foci are really within what is termed the original infected district, the actual total of foci being forty-seven - all of which are being subjected to all possible sanitary preventive and precautionary measures. Nearly all of these cases are traceable to the infected district, and from none of the foci, save the original focus, have definitely proven secondary infections sprung.

 One case of fever was officially announced at Morgan City Monday evening. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.




JOINT MEETING.
City Council Board of Health and Auxiliary Committee of Fifteen Thursday Evening.

 At 8 p. m. Thursday evening a joint meeting of the City Council, Board of Health and Auxiliary Committee of Fifteen was held at the court-house to consider quarantine matters. President Wm. Campbell called the meeting to order. On motion of Judge O. C. Mouton, it was resolved that in the opinion of Auxiliary Committee the City Board of Lafayette should adopt the following resolutions:

 First. To secure the services of a good and competent man, or more, to remain at New Orleans to see that the rules established at that point are carried out in such a way as to insure protection as to persons and freight.

 Second. To establish detention camps in connection with the Police Jury at the intersection of all railroads at the parish line.

 Third. To secure inspectors of passenger trains to see that passengers hold proper certificates before entering the parish.

 On motion of Mr. Jerome Mouton it was resolved that the City Board of Health be requested to pass a resolution prohibiting the admission into the town of freight infected places, unless stamped as having U. S. Marine Hospital Service.

 It was resolved on motion of Judge Julian Mouton that the City Board of Health and Council require that no health certificate from other points shall be accepted unless the signature of the health officer giving it is attested by a notary public, clerk of court or magistrate with the seal of the officer thereto attached.

 On motion of Judge O. C. Mouton the Auxiliary Committee tendered its services to the City Council, Board of Health and health officers and the Secretary was instructed to deliver all money collected to the Treasurer of the town.

 The following present subscribed the sum opposite names:


----------------p. 4------------------

 The meeting then adjourned.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.


SPECIAL MEETING
Police Jury to Consider Quarantine Measures for the Parish.

                          July 26, 1905.
  A special meeting of the Police Jury was held to-day with all the members present. President Billeaud presiding.

 Mr. Billeaud stated that the object of the meeting was for the purpose of considering the advisability of quarantine against New Orleans on account of yellow fever being declared at that place. That he had had a conference with Mayor C. O. Mouton relative to the town and parish acting in conjunction, and that a committee from the town Board of Health would meet the parish Board of Health at 2 o'clock at the court house.

 Attorney C. H. Mouton read the law in regard to the organization of the parish Board of Health and asked until 1:30 p. m. to make final and complete report. Granted. Moved to adjourn until 1:30 o'clock.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

 In accordance with the report of Attorney C. H. Mouton, the following resolution was offered and adopted:

 Resolved, that in conformity with the provisions of Act No. 150 of 1902, it is hereby ordained that a Board of Health of three persons, first, of a licensed and registered Physician residing in this parish, be appointed chairman of said Board of Health and that two members of said board of health; said appointees to constitute the Board of Health of Lafayette parish.

 And it is further ordained, that said Board of Health as herein appointed and constituted shall meet and organize as soon as practicable according to law, and elect said physicians chairman and health officer of the said Board of Health for the parish of Lafayette. That the secretary of the Police Jury and the treasurer of the parish are ex-officio secretary and treasurer of said Board of Health of the parish of Lafayette.

 Mr. Begnaud nominated Dr. L. A. Prejean of Scott, as chairman and health officer of said Board of Health.

 Mr. Boudreaux nominated Dr. L. O. Clark. A rising vote being called, resulted as follows:

 In favor of Dr. Prejean: Begnaud, Connolly, Breaux, Landry.

 In favor of Dr. Clark: Mouton Boudreaux, Spell.

 Dr. L. A. Prejean, was declared elected. So ordered.

 Moved and seconded that Messrs. J. Edmond Mouton and M. Billeaud, Jr., be appointed members of the parish Board of Health in accordance with forgoing resolution. Carried.

 Moved and seconded that the parish Board of Health act jointly with the Board of the town of Lafayette in regard to quarantine against New Orleans. Carried.

 There being no further business the meeting adjourned.
M. BILLEAUD, JR., President.
FELIX H. MOUTON, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.



CONFERENCE.

 Held Yesterday Between City Board of Health and Health Officer Brumby, of Houston.

 Dr. W. M. Brumby, health officer of Houston, was here yesterday to confer with the City Board of Health in regard to quarantine. On being informed of measures taken here he expressed full satisfaction with them. He suggested to simplify matters and reduce expenses that instead of each town acting independently they act jointly and appoint inspectors to run from Avondale to Echo and back, inspectors to see that no entered train unless properly supplied with health certificate. Dr. Brumby returned on the evening train, but it was understood that the Board of Health was to present the plan in detail to the City Council, and if approved measures would be taken to get the plan into working order if consent of State health officer could be secured. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.




Parish Board of Health.

           Lafayette, La., July 26, 1905.
  The parish Board of Health met this day for the purpose of organizing and to take up the matter of quarantine jointly with a committee from the town Board. Those present were Dr. L. A. Prejean, J. Edmond Mouton and M. Billeaud, Jr.

 On motion, Resolved, that Dr. L. A. Prejean be made chairman of the Board. So ordered.

 After due conference with the town authorities the Board adopted the following rules:

 Resolved, that the parish of Lafayette do hereby establish a quarantine against the cities of New Orleans and Bunkie, La., under the rules and regulations to the hereinafter enacted.

 Resolved, that the parish of Lafayette do hereby quarantine against non-infected localities which have not quarantined against New Orleans and Bunkie, La., and such localities as may hereafter be infected.

 The following rules were adopted:

 Passengers with or without baggage from points intended in resolutions shall not be admitted.

 Fruit and second-hand household goods to be excluded.

 On motion, Resolved, that the parish, establish detention camps to be located near the railroad on the parish line; one on the line near St. Martin parish, one near Acadia parish, and one near St. Landry parish.

 That it understood with the town Committee present that the expenses of said detention camps are to be borne as follows:  by the parish two thirds, by the town of Lafayette one third.

 That inspectors are to be kept on the passengers trains, and that persons not able to show proper certificates of health to be detained for five days according to law.

 That the parish is to pay one half the other expenses of the quarantine, in matters where the town and parish are jointly interested, and the town of Lafayette the other half.

 Moved and seconded that the secretary be instructed to secure three tents for the detention camps, that he write to Dr. Edmond Souchon, president State Board of Health, asking him to advise this Board  when he would deem it prudent for the parish to fumigate freight.

 The secretary was requested to call on Mr. C. C. Brown and ask that he spray oil in pools of water etc., in his pens near the J. J. Mouton railroad crossing. Mr. Boudreaux, police juror of third ward kindly promised to secure the necessary oil.

 Moved to adjourn.
FELIX MOUTON, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.


Parish Board of Health.

      Lafayette, La., July 26, 1905.
 The parish Board of Health met this day for the purpose of organizing and to take up the matter of quarantine jointly with a committee from the town Board. Those present were Dr. L. A. Prejean, J. Edmond Mouton and M. Billeaud, Jr.

 On motion, Resolved, that Dr. L. A. Prejean be made chairman of the Board. So ordered.

 After due conference with the town authorities the Board adopted the following rules:

 Resolved, that the parish of Lafayette do hereby establish a quarantine against the cities of New Orleans and Bunkie, La., under the rules and regulations to be hereinafter enacted.

 Resolved, that the parish of Lafayette do hereby quarantine against non-infected which have not quarantined against New Orleans and Bunkie, La., and such localities as may hereafter be infected.

 The following rules were adopted:

 Passengers with or without baggage from points intended in resolutions shall not be admitted.

 Fruit and second-hand house goods to be excluded.

 On motion, Resolved, that the parish establish three detention camps to be located near the railroad on the parish line; one on the line near St. Martin parish, one near Acadia parish, and one near St. Landry parish.

 That it is understood with town Committee present that the expenses of said detention camps are to be borne as follows:  By the parish two thirds, by the town of Lafayette one third.

 That inspectors are to be kept on the passenger trains, and that persons not able to show proper certificates of health to be detained for five days according to law.

 That the parish is to pay one half the other expenses of the quarantine, in matters where the town and parish are jointly interested, the town of Lafayette the other half.

 Moved and seconded that the secretary be instructed to secure three tents for the detention camps, that he write to Dr. Edmond Souchon, president State Board of Health, asking him to advise this Board when he would deem it prudent for the parish to fumigate freight.

 The secretary was requested to call on Mr. C. C. Brown and ask that he spray oil in pools of water, etc., in his pens near the J. J. Mouton railroad crossing. Mr. Boudreaux, police juror of the third ward, kindly promised to secure the necessary oil.
   Moved to adjourn.
FELIX MOUTON, Secretary.

********************

                          July 28, 1905.
  The parish Board of Health met this day with all members present.

 Mr. Mouton reported having established a detention camp near the railroad by Bayou Carencro.

 Dr. Prejean reported having established a detention camp west of Duson near the railroad.

 Mr. Billeaud reported having established a detention camp near the railroad by St. Martin parish.

 On motion resolved that the following rules be adopted:

 INSTRUCTIONS TO GUARDS AT DETENTION CAMPS.

 1. All freights trains entering the parish must stop at the respective detention camps. No one but the train crew must come in on the freight trains, and the crew must exhibit proper health certificates. Train crew must stop long enough for a thorough search of the train. Anyone besides crew, on freight trains must be detained at camps.

 2. Passenger trains are in charge of inspectors. If not already inspected they stop at detention camps for inspection by inspectors.

  3. All persons entering the parish must have certificates properly executed and the signature of the health officer must be certified by a notary, magistrate, or clerk of court.

 4. Lafayette, town and parish, are quarantined against New Orleans and all infected places and places not quarantined against these infected places.

 5. United States Marine Hospital Service certificates of detention are recognized.

 6. Persons from infected places cannot go through parish unless detained at the camp.

 7. No merchandise from New Orleans is admitted unless stamped as having been fumigated by the U. S. Marine Hospital Service.

 8. No merchandise from other infected places is admitted.

 9. That clause in rule 3 relative to attestation of health certificate goes into effect at noon, Sunday, 30th inst.

 Guards will receive further instructions as they are made.

 The secretary was instructed to have printed 1000 health certificates to read as follows:

 OFFICE BOARD OF HEALTH, PARISH OF LAFAYETTE, LA.

 To whom it may concern:

 ---------------p. 4-------------------

 Moved and seconded that a special officer be placed at Duson, Scott, Youngsville, and Broussard, and that these officers be instructed to require the exhibition of a proper health certificate from all strangers or persons, whom in the opinion of the officer, an account of previous residence, etc., is necessary.

Persons unable to give proper account of themselves to the officer are to be sent to the nearest detention camp for the usual five days detention.

 The Board them adjourned subject to call.
FELIX H. MOUTON, Ex-officio Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.



TOWN AND PARISH BOARDS
Meet Monday and Arrange About Detention Camps and Freight.

 Monday afternoon a joint session of the town and parish Boards of Health was held at the city hall specially to discuss equipment of the three detention camps established on the railroads of the parish line.

 It was decided to provide each camp with five tents, floor them, furnish benches, cots, etc., and necessary toilet conveniences. The Broussard tent being without shade, flies for tents were to be supplied. Maj. DeClouet was authorized to procure all needed to equip the camps as above. Board for those detained at Carencro and Duson camps would be furnished by parties living near; at Broussard a cook was to be supplied and provisions sent there.

 It was decided to place four guards at each camp and instruction should be allowed outsiders with those in camp.

 The time of detention was changed from 5 to 10 days and no one is to be admitted unless he has certificate showing he has not been in an infected district within 10 days.

 The following resolution was passed in regard to admission of freight:

 That no freight be admitted in the parish from any infected point without stamp showing it to have been duly fumigated by the U. S. Marine Hospital Service or the town and parish Boards of Health at the parish line or some other convenient point. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.


CITY BOARD OF HEALTH
Decide on Town Detention Camp and Fever Hospital.

 Tuesday morning the City Board of Health met and decided it to be urgently necessary to establish a town detention camp to take care of those getting through the lines, especially hoboes. Also a fever hospital was decided upon. It will have two rooms, be screened, be provided with mosquito bars, and have screen vestibule with double doors. Good beds will be provided and all necessary conveniences, and a nurse hired.

 The following suggestions by the Auxiliary Committee of Fifteen were adopted.

 Resolved by the Auxiliary Committee that Dr. George C. Babcock, sanitary officer of this town or his assistants be and is hereby requested to proceed without delay to oil the cisterns in this town with not less than a tea-cup of coal or insurance oil to each cistern, and as soon as this is complied with to call on property holders to have their cisterns screened and in case of refusal or inability of property holders to comply wherewith, then the officer to attend to the necessary screening; that said officer or his assistant be urgently requested to call as soon as practicable on Carnes, Bass, Benckenstein for the oil that may be needed for the purpose of using in gutters, ditches, and other places where there may be pools or accumulations of rain or stagnant water, and in order to carry or these measures with promptness, the said officer be authorized to draw on funds subscribed by the people of this town the sum necessary to oil the cisterns to screen the cisterns where the property holders refuse or are unable to do the screening, and for the expenses needed to distribute the oil in the ditches, gutters, etc., as above suggested.
WILLIAM CAMPBELL, Chairman Auxiliary Committee.
FERNAND MOUTON, Secretary Auxiliary Committee.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.



 City Council & Board of Health Meet.

 A joint meeting of the Council and Board of Health was held last night and the Council enacted all the above suggestions of the Board of Health except in regard to the town detention camp. That was postponed for the present, as Sheriff Lacoste offered to attend to all hoboes and others that got past the inspectors and guards and see that they were placed in the detention camps or where there would be no menace to the public health. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.


 Council Meeting Friday.

 The Council held a meeting at 9:30 Friday morning to discuss quarantine matters. On recommendation of the Board of Health O. B. Hopkins was appointed a committee of one to act with a like committee from the Board of Health to confer with the Police Jury to see that prompt action be taken in the matter of quarantine regulations.

 An ordinance was passed that ropes be properly placed at the passenger depot to prevent anybody outside of railroad employees on duty or passengers taking trains, from congregating about the trains, on penalty of $5 fine or five days in jail or both at the discretion of the mayor. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.



 Council Meet Saturday.

 the Council met to discuss admission of freight as information had been received that the U. S. Marine Service had decided not to fumigate freight, the authorites considering it useless and unnecessary. After careful discussion of the matter, Mr. Hopkins moved that no freight be admitted unless properly fumigated. The motion was lost and the Council decided that freight should be admitted without fumigation. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.





 Council Meeting Sunday.

 A special meeting of the Council was held Sunday at 5 p. m. to consider the resignations of Messrs. Jerome Mouton and Geo. Doucet and Dr. A. Gladu. Messrs. Mouton and Doucet resigned because of a difference of opinion with the Council as to quarantine measures, and Dr. Gladu because he felt unable to continue under the responsibility of Chairman.

 The resignations were accepted and Mr. C. C. Brown, and Drs. F. R. Tolson and L. O. Clark selected and the Secretary and Mayor instructed to notify them. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.





Council Monday Morning.

 Monday the Council met at 9:30 and received report from Secretary Colomb that Mr. Brown could not serve on account of illness, and that Dr. Tolson would accept conditionally. Dr. Tolson was asked by telephone to come to the meeting which he did in about fifteen minutes. After explanations Dr. Tolson agreed to accept and was confirmed as chairman of the Board of Health. Dr. R. D. Voorhies and Dr. L. O. Clark were appointed other member. The Board now stands.

 Dr. F. R. Tolson, Chairman, Dr. Geo. Babcock, Sanitary Inspector, Maj. P. L. DeClouet, Dr. R. D. Voorhies.

 Mr. J. Edmond Mouton of the Parish Board of Health being present, Mayor Mouton suggested that a meeting of town Board of Health and the parish Board of Health be held at 4 p. m. that afternoon to see about the detention camps which Inspector Babcock had reported not properly equipped for use and that until they were he would refuse to put any one in them. It was agreed that the two Boards of Health would meet. The Council then adjourned. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.






 Hard at Work.

 As will be seen by the proceedings of the Council and the town and parish Boards of Health published in this issue, they are actively talking measures to guard against the invasion of yellow fever. It has taken several days to get the quarantine in shape, but it is in good working order now and improving.

 There are some measures incomplete yet, but the Boards are hard at work and everything will be done just as promptly and rapidly as possible, and we may rely on their doing all that can be done. Meantime we should all assist in taking precautionary measures by either screening or oiling our cisterns, putting on all stagnant or standing water about our premises and cleaning up thoroughly. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.



 Canonization Postponed.

 The canonization of Rev. Father Forge, which was fixed for to-day, has been postponed. The following letter from Archbishop Chapelle to Father Forge is explanatory:

 VERY REVEREND FATHER: - On account of the panic produced by the outbreak of yellow fever, and the difficulties of traveling this fact entails, it seems to me better to postpone the ceremony of your investiture to a more favorable time, for I desire earnestly to have it celebrated with all due solemnity possible. You will, therefore, without delay, inform your guests of this.

 I feel exceedingly sorry for this unhappy circumstance, but I hope, postponed as it is, the celebration will only gain in grandeur.
                 Yours truly,
                       P. L. CHAPELLE,
                               Archbishop.
July 26, 1905.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.


 Train Service.

 Owing to quarantine the Southern Pacific has discontinued all passenger trains except No. 9 going west, due at 5:01 p. m. and No. 10 going east, due at 1:15 p. m. Both trains have been made locals and therefore will arrive later than the hours mentioned. The north bound branch train No. 127 will wait for No. 9. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.


Changes in Southern Pacific Office.

 On August 1, Assistant Superintendent C. C. Mallard severed his connection with the Southern Pacific and was succeeded by G. C. Scarlett who since July 1 has been chief dispatcher. Mr. Scarlett is from North Carolina and was connected with Seaboard Air Line and Southern before coming here. W. F. Gouldsboro who has been night chief dispatcher succeeds as day chief and H. Gouldsboro's place as night chief.

 During Mr. Mallard's residence here he has made a host of friends who will regret to see him leave Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905. 

    


New Homes.

 Mr. J. Gilbert St. Julien has let out the contract to Emes & Alexander for a handsome one story cottage to be built on his lot on St. John ave, just beyond Elmhurst addition. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.



Residence Nearly Completed.

 Mr. Tom. Hopkins' two-story residence corner Congress and Douglas streets is about completed and ready for occupancy. It is a fine addition to that part of town. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.




 Shot Her Husband.

 A young negro woman was arrested and jailed this week for taking five shots at her spouse through the window of a house in Free Town, where he was paying too much attention to another woman. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.









Presented Gold-Handled Umbrella. - Monday night Morgan Lodge 317, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen presented Asst. Supt. C. C. Mallard with a handsome umbrella as a token of their esteem, upon the eve of his retiring from the Southern Pacific. The presentation was made by Mr. F. C. Triay in a brief but most appropriate manner. Mr. Mallard was deeply touched by this most kind expression of friendship and regard upon the part of the Lodge. After the presentation the Lodge favored Mr. Mallard and Rev. F. E. Rogers with stereoopticon views of the Brotherhood chart.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905.










 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/2/1905.

 Dr. Lessley, of Carencro, was a visitor here Monday.

  Conductor J. S. Baldwin left Thursday with his family for Dallas, Texas, to leave them there until the fever situation becomes better. He will return.

 Mr. J. Nickerson and family and Mr. F. E. Davis and family returned from High Island Sunday.

 Jos. A. Chargois, appointed by the Council to go to Avondale and New Orleans to see how the quarantine regulations were being carried out, left Saturday.

 There will be several interesting racing events and a fine game of ball at the Carencro race track next Sunday. Admission 25 cents, ladies free. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1905. 





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 From the Lafayette Gazette of August 2nd, 1902:


AN ELECTRIC RAILWAY. 

To Connect Lafayette with Breaux Bridge, St. Martinville, New Iberia, Youngsville and Abbeville. 


 Mr. John McIlhenny, of Avery's Island, was in Lafayette Wednesday and Thursday, in the interest of a movement to build an electric railway through this section. Mr. McIlhenny's plan it to run a line from New Iberia to St. Martinville, continuing along the Teche as far as Breaux Bridge, and from the latter town to Lafayette, and then back to New Iberia by way of Youngsville and Abbeville.


  Mr. McIlhenny will appear before the Council Monday for the purpose of securing a right of way through certain streets in this town. He will ask to be allowed to run the road along Lincoln avenue, Pierce and Jefferson streets to the corner of Lamar avenue; from this point to Industrial avenue, passing in front of the Institute, and running to the intersection of Lafayette street which will give a direct route to the Cotton Oil Mill and Compress. After going over a short strip of land outside the town limits, the road will reach Mudd avenue, passing through Sterling avenue, Simcoe street, Pine street until the starting point in Lincoln avenue is reached. As may be seen from the route indicated the intention is to belt the town as much as possible. Mr. McIlhenny has already obtained the right of way from the Councils of New Iberia and St. Martinville and it is not probable that he will have any trouble in securing favorable action from the municipal authorities of the other towns through which the projected road will pass.

 In order to facilitate the construction of roads of this character, the last Legislature passed a law empowering Police Juries to grant rights of way through the public roads. This law, in the passage of which Mr. McIlhenny was instrumental as representative from Iberia parish, safeguards the rights of abutting owners and protects the interests which the public have in the granting of franchises. When this law will have been promulgated, Mr. McIlhenny will apply to the various Police Juries for the right of way through the country districts. This is an enterprise of great importance to this section, and it is to be hoped that there will be no impediment in its way. Not only are the people of the town to be largely benefited by the construction of this electric railway, but the country people are also vastly interested in its success.
Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902. 




AT THE OIL FIELD

The oil gusher at Anse la Butte has not yet come to gladden the hearts of the people, but the voice of prophecy cheers us with the assurance that before the waning of another moon Lafayette will have an oil field in fact as well as in name. 


 The indications at the Moresi well continue to be most encouraging and if no accident occurs it is possible that the precious fluid will be shooting out of the earth as it is want to do at Beaumont and Jennings. Our people who are so anxious to see a gusher should exercise some patience. It is a hard and difficult job to go a thousand feet into the bowels of the earth, and it requires an unusual degree of skill and perseverance. At the Heywood well, which is a short distance from the old LaDanois well, the work is being pushed rapidly. Capt. Harper, and experienced oil man, is supervising the work. The men are working with a vim and as they have a thoroughly equipped plant, no time will be lost. Capt. Harper expresses himself as being hopeful and considers the chances very good. His opinion coincides with that of every oil man who visited the field lately. At no time has the future seemed so bright for Anse Labutte.

Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.





Heywood's Prediction.

 Dewey Heywood passed through New Orleans Thursday on his way to St. Louis. he was interviewed by a States reporter to whom he said that he "was sure a good gusher would be brought in at Anse la Butte." Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.


Not Much Oil Land Left.
 Several persons representing oil companies were in this section lately trying to lease land, but we do not think they have been very successful as all the landowners, with few exceptions, signed contracts during the oil excitement about a year ago. Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.


THE INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE
To Begin Its Second Session on Wednesday, Sept. 17.

 Elsewhere in this paper appears the advertisement of the Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute.

 This excellent institution begins its second session Wednesday, Sept. 17. As may be seen in the brief statement printed in the advertisement, the Industrial Institute offers exceptional advantages to the youth of both sexes who desire to acquire a practical education. Judging from the success of the first session and the large number of letters received from prospective students it is safe to say that the second session will begin next month with it a greatly increased attendance. New equipment in the workshop and additions to the faculty will enable the Institute to offer increased facilities in the manual training department as well as in the academic course.

 The Legislature having appropriated an adequate sum for that purpose, the girl's dormitory will be completed and it will be possible to furnish board and lodging at the school to a much larger number of young ladies.

 Steps will soon be taken to build the president's home, or which the Legislature appropriated $4,000 at its last session. Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.


 Special School Tax.

 Enough people having signed the petition being circulated in the first ward, it will be presented to the Police Jury at its next meeting and that body will call an election to obtain the sense of the tax-payers of the ward relative to the proposition to levy a special tax of 1 1/2 mills on the dollar for school purposes. Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.



SUPT. ALLEMAN
Presents An Interesting Report to the School Board - Changes Recommended.

 Supt. Alleman submitted the following report to the School Board at its meeting held on July 17:

 To the President and Members of the Board of School Directors:

 It is with some degree of satisfaction that I submit my first annual report on the conditions and needs of the public school system of the parish. This Board has reason to congratulate itself on the fact that it has been one of the first Boards in the State to break away from the old spoils system of selecting teachers. In Lafayette parish the teachers are appointed on their merits, and the whole administration of the important public matters entrusted to this Board has been systematic and economic. The record of this year will bear out this statement.

 I wish to thank the members individually for the support which has, almost without exception, been given to those measures calculated to elevate the standard of our public school system. The past year has been marked by a remarkable absence of petty wrangling over matters of minor importance which so often mars the proceedings of public bodies and make intelligent systematic work impossible. But notwithstanding the fact that we have done well, we should not close our eyes to the fact that we have only begun, and that there are matters of paramount importance which need our immediate attention. The most important of these is, 

OUR REVENUES.

 Our revenues are not sufficient to elevate our system of schools up to the standard of efficiency so much desired. We have been compelled to employ a large number of teachers holding third grade certificates at thirty dollars per month. A teacher should know vastly more than he is required to teach, and it is a self-evident proposition that if we wish to improve our schools, the first thing for us to do is to require our teachers to improve themselves. Our school system can not possibly rise above the average teacher.

 We must depend upon our Police Jury for a larger appropriation and now that we have demonstrated to the public that we will put its money to the best use, we have a just claim on the public funds, and, I venture to say, the people and their representatives on the Police Jury are prepared to vote the much needed increase. This parish has a fairly good system of public roads and there is no reason why she should not have an equally good system of public schools. Good roads and good schools go hand in hand, and they are good index to the general intelligence of the community supporting them. Exactly the same conditions which have brought about good roads will bring about good schools. These conditions are ample funds and an intelligent expenditure under the scrutiny of a healthy, active public sentiment. The only thing we lack is the funds without which we can not hope to move forward.

 As has been already suggested,

 OUR SALARIES

 are too low. The average salary to white teachers in this parish is $36, and it should be about $42.50. This increase of salary would require an additional $2,460 per year, but it would give us a high standard of teachers and it would elevate our system of schools to a level with the most progressive communities. Under the present arrangement our third grade teachers are paid $30; second grade teachers, $45. This is not an equitable adjustment of salaries for the reason that the teacher is not paid in proportion to his attainments. It takes a very limited amount to obtain a third grade certificate. The second grade certificate is much more difficult to obtain, and no one can pass a first grade examination unless he has received a college education or its equivalent. Yet the inducement offered in this parish to holders of first grade certificate is only five dollars more than is offered the second grade. I recommend, therefore, that a readjustment of the scale of salary be made, giving third grade lady teachers $30, gentlemen $35; second grade, ladies $35, gentlemen, $40; after five years of satisfactory service, an increase of five dollars to the salary of each sex on the recommendation of the superintendent. Teachers of the first grade should not be paid less than $50; and to enable us to get young men of experience as principals of our graded schools we should offer $60 for those positions.

 This scale beside offering an inducement to our home teachers for self-improvement, would enable us to get the best teachers when it becomes necessary to employ the teachers from elsewhere.

 In recognition of long and faithful service on the part of the principals of the Dominique school, the Broussard school, the Mouton Switch school and the Alex Martin, Jr., school, and on account of special work done by these teachers during the past session, I recommend an increase of five dollars per month to their salaries for the coming year.

 HOLIDAYS AND SUMMER SCHOOLS.

 At present we defray the expenses of our teachers at summer schools, costing us from $400 to $800 per year, and we allow pay for the holidays (Christmas) costing the parish an additional $400, to which if we add the time lost on account of sickness, church holidays, legal holidays and bad weather, about $400, we have the sum of from $1,200 to $1,600 annually given away for which the parish gets no return.

 It would be infinitely better to use this money to increase the salaries, abolish the allowance made for attendance at summer schools, and require the teachers to teach twenty full days to each scholastic month, and make no allowance of pay for any cause whatsoever. This system would be more business-like and would enable us to use the money for which we now get no returns as a stimulus to our teachers to elevate their moral and intellectual standard.

 SESSION OF TEN MONTHS.

 It should be our aim to give at least a session of ten months next session. With the proper support from the Police Jury we can have it. In country schools the attendance is always more or less irregular and unsatisfactory, especially where the teacher is of inferior quality.

 The attendance during the past year was exceedingly poor throughout the parish and especially in the country schools. While we have had a session of nine months only 71 per cent of the children were in regular attendance in the parish, and in some individual schools the average attendance fell to 50 per cent. Our session, therefore has accomplished only six months of work throughout the parish, and only four months of work have been done in the schools whose average attendance was 50 per cent. The cost per child per month has been excessive in several schools. We have over four thousand white children of school age, and for this reason the required average monthly attendance should be raised from twelve to twenty. Of the four thousand children of school-age only seven hundred forty-two are in monthly attendance. The children are here, and they should be made to attend school regularly, and it is the duty of this Board to see to it that they do. When poor attendance is clearly the fault of the teacher he should be removed for cause at once. Some of our schools are over-crowded and others have barely the required attendance. The following statistics speak for themselves:

 ------------------p. 2-------------------

 The average attendance of 80 per cent and above was reached by only three schools in the parish, the Alex Martin Jr., the Lafayette, and the Scott school which heads the list with an average attendance of 88 per cent for the entire year. What can be done at Scott, should be possible at Lafayette, at Broussard and everywhere throughout the parish.

 OUR SCHOOL HOUSES.

 Many of our school houses are a disgrace to the parish, and it would be well for the Board to adopt a systematic plan to have them enlarged and repaired.

 It is advisable to open the town schools on the first of September. The country schools are best attended in the spring and summer months.

 CENTRAL WARD SCHOOLS.

 In order to place higher education within the reach of every child in the parish, central ward schools should be established in every ward in the parish - or at least in every ward which will support one. These schools should do work of the grammar school from the fifth to the eighth grades inclusive. The most convenient location for these schools would be Carencro, Scott, Duson, Broussard, Pilette, Royville and Ridge. The schools should be put into operation next session.
             Respectfully submitted,
                                L. J. ALLEMAN,
                         Parish Supt. of Schools.
Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.



   



 Cumberland Telephone  Moving.

 The Cumberland Telephone office is being moved to the Lacoste Building where large and commodious  quarters will be had. The new office, which will be splendidly equipped, will be open on or about the 15th of August. Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.





P. J. Huck Arrested on Train.

 Last Monday Sheriff Perkins, of Lake Charles, arrested P. J. Huck, a white man, on a charge of stealing a society badge from a drummer. The theft is alleged to have taken place on the eastbound passenger train within the limits of this parish. Sheriff Perkins lodged the man in the New Iberia fail, and wired Sheriff Broussard to have him transferred to the Lafayette jail. Sheriff Broussard went to New Iberia the following day and returned with Huck, who is now in the parish jail here. Huck protests his innocence. Some well-known people of New Orleans have communicated with Sheriff Broussard to intercede for Huck who is said to have borne a good reputation. No affidavit has yet been made against Huck. Sheriff Broussard is awaiting instructions from Sheriff Perkins to know what action to take.

 Huck has the appearance of of being a hard-working man, and would not be taken for a pick-pocket. Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.




Bought in Nickerson Addition.

 Mr. John Bagnal has bought about an acre of land from J. Nickerson, Sr., fro $1,000. The land faces Lincoln avenue and forms a part of the Nickerson addition, which promises to become a most desirable portion of the town. It is the intention of Mr. Bagnal to build a home. Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.



 A Serious Charge.

 Walter Hebert, alias Walter Keys, a negro, was arrested by Sheriff Broussard Saturday morning on a charge of entering the home of B. H. Wilkins and making an assault with intent to rape on the person of Mr. Wikins' daughter. Keys served a term in the penitentiary and was under bail for larceny at the time of the alleged assault. He resisted arrest and had to be tied to be taken to jail. Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.




 Presbyterian Services.

 Last Thursday evening Rev. Wm. Thornton of Carrollton, Miss., began a series of meetings in the Presbyterian church. Revs. J. Y. Allison of Lake Charles, and D. F. Wilkinson of Crowley, were also present to assist. The meetings will be continued every night for a time, opening at eight o'clock. A good congregation gathered last Thursday evening and listened to an earnest and thoughtful sermon by Rev. Thorburn. All are invited. Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.








Selected News Notes (Gazette)  8/2/1902.


 Several persons representing oil companies were in this section lately trying to lease land, but we do not think they have been very successful as all the land owners, with few exceptions, signed contracts during the oil excitement about a year ago.


 Miss Jennie Bradley, of New Orleans, is a guest at the home of Mrs, C. P. Alpha.


 Dr. H. P. Beeler leaves to-day for Kentucky where he will spend one month among relatives.

 Mr. and Mrs. Felix Demanade, and their son, Harold, returned Thursday, after spending two at Pass Christian.


 Now is the time to secure the best space in The Gazette. If you have anything to sell tell your story through the columns of this paper.


 A vaudeville entertainment, consisting of popular French songs, comic scenes and a comedy will take place at Falk's hall, Sunday, July 27. Prices 50, 35, and 15 cents.


 Vic Levy leaves for New York to-day for New York to buy his fall and winter stock.

 The Cumberland Telephone Co. office is being moved to the Lacoste building where large and commodious quarters will be had. The new office, which will be splendidly equipped, will be open on or about the 15th of August.


 Mr. John Bagnal has bought about an acre of land from Mr. J. Nickerson, Sr., for $1,000. The land faces Lincoln aveneue and forms a part of the Nickerson addition, which promises to become a most desirable portion of the town. It is the intention of Mr. Bagnal to build a home.


 Horsemen should read the advertisement of the Surrey Park Association. The association is making a splendid offer to the owners of good horses.


 L. F. Salles left Wednesday for a business trip to New York. He will spend a week in Virginia.
Lafayette Gazette 8/2/1902.







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From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 2nd, 1902:



THE LOUISIANA OIL FIELD.
President Clemenger's Observation.
Vast Pools of Petroleum.
 

President F. J. Clemenger, of the Great Southern Refining Company, of Beaumont, Tex., has been making a thorough investigation of the oil fields of Lafayette and St. Martin parishes, with a view of investing. To-day Mr. Clemenger visited the Anse la Butte field, some five miles east of Lafayette, finding the drilling progressing very satisfactorily at the two wells now under way. Having had long and successful experience in the oil field of Pennsylvania and neighboring states, Mr. Clemenger declares the prospects for abundant oil fields in Louisiana and the southern states to be exceedingly bright. Speaking not from a theoretical standpoint, but from practical knowledge of the business, he maintains that vast pools of oil exist along a line running northeast and southwest, and that these reservoirs have in reality been the source of supply for the now exhausted regions of the east.

 The large quantity of gas escaping at the Anse, combined with the topographical and geological formation, indicate the presence of oil beyond doubt. The conglomerate character of the sand taken from the Moresis well is indicative of fine results, although nothing could be asserted positively. Mr. Clemenger will probably close a deal for thirty acres very near the Anse well, and may make still further investments.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1902.

 




Result Of Drink?

 Longshoreman Huck Is In Trouble At Lafayette.
 

Charged With Stealing Diamond Stud from a Drummer-Bore an Excellent Reputation.
  
 Sheriff Broussard lodged in the parish jail P. J. Huck, of New Orleans, on charge of stealing a stud from a drummer, aboard the early morning train bound east. Sheriff Perkins, who was a passenger, arrested Huck at New Iberia. The gem was found on his person, but he claims drunkenness as an excuse for his possession. Sheriff Broussard received a telegram from Mrs. Huck of 422 St. Andrew street, New Orleans, asking particulars, and complied with her request. While being arrested Huck threw his coat out of the car window and so far the officers have not recovered it. Huck resided with his mother at the address given in the telegram. His mother is greatly worried over his arrest and believes that his trouble is due to the fact that he was drinking. Huck is a longshoreman and schewman. He has worked the levee for years and has never been in trouble involving his honesty. All those who know him speak highly of him.   Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1902.

 




Races at Surrey Park.

 The following races will take place at the Surrey Park, Sunday, August 10th.

 First race, one quarter of a mile between May D. and Bay Ida. Purse $100.00.

 Second race, three quarter of a mile, between May S. and Ball. Purse $50.00.

 Third race one half mile, between Caesar and Dolphine. Purse $50.00. Other races will be matched during the day.

 Refreshments at very low prices.

 Admission for ladies, 25 cents and for gentlemen 50 cents. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1902.




Lafayette Oil Field.

 In an interview with Mr. R. Moresi, this gentleman does not hesitate to advance that in his opinion the Lafayette oil field will probably be the largest in the United States. The indications are for good quantities of oil, and it will not take very long to prove this to the world. Mr. Moresi is very confident and almost guarantees good results before the coming week is over. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1902



Town Alive With Strangers. -  The wires were hardly hot with the news that oil had been found in the Lafayette Anse la Butte oil fields that strangers began to flock to town. In conversation with many the prevailing impression is that the precious fluid is "there" and but a few more days when the spouter will be here to stay. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1902.




 
Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/2/1902.

Mr. Vic Levy has returned from Hot Springs, Ark., after one month's vacation with Mrs. Levy's relatives.

 Mr. Louis Lacoste is building a residence for rent on his lot on Madison street.

 Mr. T. M. Biossat has moved his family from the Bank of Lafayette in his new residence on Congress street.

 Messrs. Victor Levy and Ike Bendel left to-day for New York City where they will purchase Fall and Winter stocks for their different stores.

 Mr. and Mrs. Felix Demanade and son Harold have returned from Biloxi.
Mr. Felix Salles of Mouton & Salles left Wednesday for New York where he goes to make his Fall purchases for his large establishment.


 Mr. Felix Salles of Mouton & Salles left Wednesday for New York where he goes to make his Fall purchases for his large establishment.

 Don't miss the races at the Surrey Park, Sunday Aug., 10.

 A little inspection around some of the fruit stands will convince everybody that they are the filthiest and unhealthiest places in town.

 Miss Jeanne Broussard of St. Martinville was visiting relatives in our town.

 Mr. Sam Leblanc of the Blue Store will spend a few weeks in Donaldsonville.

 Mrs. Gus Schmulen will leave Sunday for New York, to buy a large stock of Fall and Winter goods for the Racket Store.

 The Cumberland Telephone Co. is moving its headquarters in the Lacoste building.


 The merchants of New Orleans are amusing themselves by making excursion all over the state between that city and country towns. It may be a good idea of running excursions in order of stimulating business, but the Advertiser is firm in believing that the merchants of New Orleans could do much better by giving Louisiana more factories. 

 Dr. J. A. Derbanne was struck by lightning near Cheneyville and instantly killed. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1902.


















 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 2nd, 1890:


Improvements All Around Us.

 Walk around town and notice all the improvements that are going on, the painting, whitewashing, etc., and you will find that Lafayette is not at all behind her sister towns in Southwest Louisiana in progress and material advancement; besides, it adds to the health and attractiveness of the place.


 Last Saturday our old (young) friend, Dr. George W. Scranton, from Royville, brought us in a splendid watermelon of the long and striped "rattlesnake" variety. It did not bite us; we bit it, and bit it bad.

 Our Crops. -
Crop reports from all sections of the parish continue to come in as “being the best prospects for many years.” We are not particularly poor and needy in this parish, but we hail with pleasure all prospects of benefit to our people. If we could only get a few sugar factories in the parish, or get a few more farmers to cultivate ramie. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1890.
 

 New Round-House. - The Southern Pacific Co. has just completed the survey for a new Round-house here. The structure is to be brick and iron, and will be of proportions to accommodate twenty locomotives. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1890.






His Eyes Said it All.

 One of our livery stable drivers told us the other day that as he was driving a well known and highly esteemed drummers through the parish, the drummer glanced around the at the beautiful prospect; and while he didn't say anything, his eyes looked as white and bright as two peeled, washed turnips. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1890.  






How About an Artesian Well.


 What about an artesian well in Lafayette? Now is just the time to start the matter and there is no better time to (unreadable word) for water than in hot weather. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1890.



A Serenade.

 Last Wednesday night we were honored by a serenade from some of our young ladies and gentlemen. It, of course, was a compliment; but aside from the compliment we appreciated the excellent singing and music. We know who the young ladies and gentlemen are who composed the party, and we admit that it was beautifully done. Such courtesies strengthen the social intercourse of a community, and we bow in gratitude.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1902. 








MASS MEETING.

      Lafayette, La., July 31, 1890.
  Pursuant to call the Anti-Lottery meeting was called to order by Mr. Alexandre Delhomme, Chairman, at the Court House to-day at 12: o'clock. Julian Mouton and R. C. Greig, as secretaries.

 The chairman then stated the object of the meeting was to select delegates to the Anti-Lottery convention to be held at Baton Rouge, La., on the 7th day of August, 1890.

 On motion of Dr. F. J. Mayer, it was resolved, that the chair appoint a committee of five on resolutions. Carried.

 The chair then appointed Dr. Mayer, chairman; Benjamin Avant, J. Massie Martin, C. C. Couvillon and Valery Guilbeau.

 A short recess was taken; the committee retired, the meeting called to order and following resolutions were read by Dr. Mayer.

 Whereas, We see, as was always self-evident, that the Louisiana Lottery company seeks, with unceasing, corrupt and evil designs to ingratiate himself with every factional movement of the Democratic party, for the purpose of creating division among us and endangering white supremacy and to perpetuate itself as a monopoly.

 Whereas, we perceive of late that John A. Morris and the other stockholders of that company are endeavoring to disgrace and drag down some of our leading men to their own level, because the Nicholls' campaign committee accepted pecuniary assistance voluntarily tendered them, by John. A. Morris, he claiming to be a State rights Democrat, coupled with a pledge that no application would be made for an extension of the charter of the Louisiana company and said which was received for the legitimate purpose of political campaign and that they thus seek to demoralize the suffragans of the Democracy, by impressing them with the idea that hereafter they should have no faith in their political leaders.

 Therefore be it resolved, That we condemn the Louisiana Lottery company as having for its mission, the object of destroying the virtue of the people, upon which we have to rely for the maintenance of self-government, and that we earnestly call on the white Democracy of this parish, to join us, in this great contest, between the honor and virtue of our State and the vice and corruption of the Lottery company, which is suffered to prevail, may eventually disrupt the Democratic party of the State and lower it to level of the Republican party, which is apparently one of the objects of John A. Morris, Pinchback, Allain and others, the henchmen of the national Republican politicians.

 On motion the above resolutions were unanimously adopted.

 On motion, it was resolved, That the chairman appoint twenty-two delegates to the convention to be held at Baton Rouge on the 7th of August., Two from each ward, and six from the parish at large, the delegates in attendance at Baton Rouge to vote and act for the parish. Carried.

 The chairman then appointed the following gentlemen:

-------------------p. 5--------------------

 The meeting then adjourned.
     ALEX DELHOMME, Chairman.
JULIAN MOUTON, R. C. GREIG, Chairman.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1890.






 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/2/1890.

 Considering the fine growing weather we have been having for hay during the past month, we ought to harvest a splendid crop, and hay comes in right good sometimes.

 Ever since the Rev. E. Forge has received and put in operation an electric motor fan, the weather has been delightfully cool.

 The Southern Pacific Company has just completed a survey for a new Round-house here. The structure is to be of brick and iron, and will be of proportions to accommodate twenty locomotives.

 We do not believe that our little town ever presented a lovelier appearance of natural attractions than just now. Stroll around and look at our profusion of (unreadable word) and flowers.

 We have had a great many visitors this week, and they all report cheerfully. We believe Lafayette parish this year will take a new grip on prosperity.


 Remember the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen's excursion to Opelousas to-morrow. Lafayette should turn out and help the boys all they can.  They have never gone back on Lafayette.

 Irish potatoes have taken a tumble in the markets of our country as to price. But as to our individual market, they are not bringing them in very fast.


 That courthouse yard has not yet been fixed up and mowed exactly as it ought to be; but Isaac has been very busy of late. Wake up! our friend, and fix that yard just like it ought to be, and we will give you credit for it.

 We will venture this assertion that, for a town situated as Lafayette is, its peace and order, and its general good behavior is better than nine-tenths of the towns of this State. 

 Mr. J. E. Martin has torn down the old building formerly used as a "baker's shop," adjoining our office on the south, and will use the lumber to erect a building upon one of his places in the country.

 Galveston, Texas, is reaching out for business. This week Mr. D. B. Le Gros, representing Clarke & Courts, manufacturing stationary, was in town trying to interest our merchants in his line.

 Last Saturday our old [young] friend, Dr. George W. Scranton, from Royville, brought us in a splendid watermelon, of the long and striped "rattlesnake" variety.  It did not bite us; we bit it, and bit it bad.

 Crop reports from all sections of the parish continue to come in as "being the best prospects for many years." We are not particularly poor and needy in this parish, but we hail with pleasure all prospects of benefit to our people.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1890.









From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 2nd, 1879:


OUR RAILROAD. 

 All the steel rails, so far brought up from Calacasieu Pass, are laid. The steam tug and barges are so constantly employed in lightering, off Calcasieu Pass, New York schooners with cargoes of rails, etc., that they seldom find time to bring iron from the Pass to Lake Charles. Cross ties are being delivered near the depot, to be carried by construction cars along the road bed. The grading of the entire road bed will be completed by the first of October. The piling in the Sabine and Calcasieu rivers is finished, and the piling in the Sabine bottom, which is heavy work, will be completed in about seventy days, three top drivers being at work there. The grillage is finished on the pivot pier of the drawbridge across the Calcasieu river and also the false work for the fixed spans. The trestle work is going up in the northern edge of Lake Charles. From the Lake Charles Echo.

 The Orange (Texas) Tribune says : A large force of men are still working on the Texas and New Orleans road, raising the track, etc., and the line is in a better condition now than it has ever been before.

 Work on the Western is progressing steadily. Between the river and Lake Charles a very large number of men are employed. The bridge for the Sabine is expected to arrive within the next ten or fifteen days.

 The railroad track has been completed to within two miles of New Iberia up to to-day (Thursday, July 24), and unless rains interfere in a week or ten days the locomotive will reach town. The latter part of last week Mr. McDowell’s pioneer party of about twenty men finished leveling and widening the track to make switch room through New Iberia, and are working on westward through New Iberia, and are working on westward cleaning up the track. During the week, also, Mr. Clement Young has had several teams at work hauling heavy timbers for the railroad company to build a bridge over Coulee Lasalle, ten miles west of New Iberia. On the Western Louisiana division work progresses even more rapidly. The convicts, about 100 in number, have finished grading to a point about ten miles west of Vermilionville, and are working on west to meet the gang coming eastward from Lake Charles. We understand that most of the grading has already been done between Lake Charles and Texas. From the Sugar Bowl. 
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/ 1879.





Quick Time. - On their way home from the Convention last week Messrs. M. E. Girard, G. A. Breaux and E. M. Millard came within two miles of New Iberia, - a coach having been furnished for their use. They left New Orleans at 8 o'clock a. m. and arrived here at 9 p. m. the same day.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1879.






Closing Exercises at Mt. Carmel.

 The closing exercises of Mount Carmel Convent School were had on Monday last. The audience gathered on this occasion was as brilliant as the Parish affords. Everything went off smoothly and pleasantly and to the satisfaction of all. The patrons of the school appeared delighted with the progress of those they had confided to the care of the Sisters in charge, and that is the best and highest commendation the school can receive. Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1879.





Yellow Fever in New Orleans.

 We learn from the New Orleans papers that the yellow fever exists in that city. There are however only a few cases reported as yet, and considering the fact that those living in the house with the infected have been removed to a remote part of the city, and are properly guarded, and the further fact that the sanitary laws of the city have of late been strictly enforced, it is not probable that the fever will assume an epidemic character. Be that as it may, it is but right and proper that we should prepare for such a condition of things. We urge upon our citizens the importance of assisting the Constable in a strict enforcement of the sanitary ordinances of the town. It may become necessary later to organize a system of quarantine, but it is highly necessary that the proper steps should be taken now to preserve the health of the town.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1879.  

  




School Board  Proceedings.

       Vermilionville, July 21st, 1879.
  Pursuant to adjournment the Board met this day. Present: Dr. T. B. Hopkins, president; H. M. Bailey, secretary pro tem.; Dr. M. L. Lyons, Dr. F. S. Mudd, Sidney Greig, Ones, Broussard, J. O. Broussard and R. F. Grier.  Absent: Alex. Delhomme.

 The Board being called to order, the minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as recorded.

 The Board proceeded after due consideration, to make the following assignment of teachers, to-wit:


-----------------p. 1---------------

 It was moved and seconded, that the resolution passed at the last session of  this Board, prohibiting the opening of any schools without the approval of this Board, be and is reconsidered.

 It was further moved and seconded, that said resolution be and is hereby stricken from the records.

 It was further moved and seconded, that all  certificates issued to teachers, by former examining committees of this Board, be and are hereby extended for one year longer from this date.

 It was moved and seconded, that the contract with W. B. Bailey, for publishing proceedings of the Board, be and is renewed for twelve months longer.

 It was moved and seconded, that the action of the Secretary in issuing warrants for school house rent in the first ward, be and is approved by this Board.

 On motion the Board adjourned to Saturday the 4th day of October, 1879.
T. B. HOPKINS, President.
H. M. BAILEY, Secretary pro tem.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1879.




POLICE JURY PROCEEDINGS.


         July 5th, 1879.
  Pursuant to adjournment, the Police Jury met at the Court House this day.

 Members present: Martial Billeaud, president; Aurelien Primeaux, L. G. Breaux, Jos. L. Prejean and Sebastian Hernandez.

 The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

 On motion resolved, that the appointment of road overseer for the Fifth Ward, made on the 2nd of June, 1879, be amended as to read:

 R. C. Landry is appointed road overseer of the 5th ward for that portion of the road extending from Pin Hook bridge to Broussardville, and Martial Billaud is appointed paid overseer for that portion of the road extending east of Broussardville to Bayou Tortue and thence to the southern limits of the parish.

 On motion, resolved, that hereafter all field fences in the 4th and 5th wards, shall be of four picux, and on outside ditch of not than 18 inches wide and 18 inches deep.

 The committee appointed on the 2nd of June, 1879, to devise means to pay the indebtedness of the parish incurred in the building of the different bridges, made by the following report:

 -------------------p. 4--------------------

 The above report having been read, it was on motion, rejected.

 On motion, the following accounts were approved and certificates ordered to issue:

-----------------p. 4----------------

 There being no further business, on motion, the Police Jury adjourned to the first Saturday of October, 1879.
MARTIAL BILLAUD, President.
J. N. JUDICE, Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1879.


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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 2nd, 1873:

CITY COUNCIL OF VERMILIONVILLE.
Regular Session, July 7th, 1873.

 Present: Aug. Monnier, Mayor; and Councilmen L. P. Revillon, F. C. Latiolais, H. Landry, Jos. O. Girouard, C. O. Olivier and R. L. McBride.  Absent: W. Brandt.

 The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

 On motion it was resolved, That the petition of Auatole Garnier asking for a half license as retail liquor dealer, be and the same is hereby rejected.

 Resolved, that the constable be and is hereby instructed to rigidly enforce the law in regard to all persons retailing liquor, without first having procured a license of the Collector.

 The following accounts were approved:

 Trevile Bernard, Constable ... $28.35.
 L. Creighton, for work on m. house ... $12.00.
 Cotton Boll, pub. Election notice ... $6.00.

 On motion the Council adjourned to next regular meeting.
A. MONNIER, Mayor.
H. M. BAILEY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1873.




Police Jury Proceedings.

        Vermilionville, Lafayette Parish, June 14, 1873.

 The members appointed and commissioned, to-wit:  G. Dubau, 1st ward; S. J. Montgomery, 2d ward; Jean Bernard, 3d ward; R. Leblanc, 4th ward; R. C. Landry, 5th ward; met at the Court House; all present and having qualified (except Mr. Bernard) proceeded to organize by electing Mr. Dubau President; and the following officers were elected, and their respective salaries per annum fixed, for the unexpired year ending December 31st next, as follows; A. J. Moss, Clerk, $150; M. E. Girard, Treasurer, $150; Edgar Mouton, Constable, $100.

 The annual report of the treasurer was received and referred to a committee composed of Messrs. Montgomery, Landry and M. F. Rigues, and the same committee was instructed to prepare an estimate of the debt and expenses of the parish for the current year. The committee presented the following report, which was unanimously adopted:

 To the Police Jury of the Parish of Lafayette:

 The Committee appointed by your Hon. body to prepare an estimate of the debt and expenses of the Parish for the current year, respectfully submit the following report, to-wit:

 --------------------p. 1------------------

 The report of the Treasurer was examined and verified and found correct; the recapitulation of which is as follows:

 ------------------p. 1-------------------

 On motion, a warrant was authorized to be issued in favor of the Treasurer for the amount due him.

 The following resolutions were adopted without objection:

 Whereas, an agreement having been entered into with the Cotton - Boll and Advertiser for publishing the proceedings of the Police Jury, therefore
     Be it resolved, That one hundred dollars is hereby allowed to each of the above papers in full to January 1st next ;  the Cotton-Boll to publish in English and the Advertiser in French.

 Resolved, That hereafter, the tax collector shall receive parish warrants in payment of all parish taxes.

 Resolved, that the licenses on professions, occupations, &c., are hereby fixed at the same rates as for the past year ;  provided that no license shall be and is hereby constituted the road overseer in his ward and that the sum of three hundred dollars be appropriated to each ward for the purpose of keeping the roads and bridges in good order.

 Resolved, that no member of the Police Jury shall receive any pay whatever for his services on road overseer.

 Resolved, that the sum of fifty dollars be and is hereby allowed to Mrs. P. Steidman for the (unreadable word) and (unreadable word) of an old and indigent colored man named Noel Guidry.

 Resolved, that all the accounts approved and warrants issued and other acts done since the organization of the Police Jury, on the 3d of February last, except those relating to the levying and collections of tax of 1872, be and they are hereby approved.

 On motion the Police Jury adjourned to Monday, the 18th of August next.
G. DUBAU, President.
A. J. MOSS, Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1873.

     


Lagniappe:
Strict Vegetarianism.

  A man wandering down Calhoun street last night, and approaching Trey's grocery store , asked of the proprietor :

 "You got some greens, don't it?"

 "Greens? Yes, sir;"

 "You got rooting bakers?"

 "Rutabagas? Yes sir, how many will you have?"

 "Got  red some little blates, mit green tops?"

 "Red plates with green tops? Well, no, sir; I suppose you will find them at the china store, up town."

 "Don't got no little red plates ? guess it was better of you got some; guess you was a liar. Vich you call dose?"

 "Those? Why those are radishes."

 "Red dishes - dat's what I said.  Say, maybe I get some letter for you to-morrow. You got it?"

 "Letters? There are no letters here for you; you must inquire at the post office."

 "(Unreadable word) mit de Bost offic for letters? Dose was a fine skeems. I vas up town and vent auf a bake shop and vant some bums, und the man said : 'Get out you olt bum, or I'll fire you troo de door.' "

 "You should have said 'buns." He -----"

 "Bums" Dats vot I said - bums; and then I comes and vont some red dishes, and you dell me to go auf a china store; I vont some letters to eat and you say go mid de Bost office. I egspect off I vant some beats you tole me to go to de station house. I tell you vot I do - you can go to de tyfel. Of you vas a nice man, I vant some injins and cowcumpers, and blendy dings, but I guess I go to de drug store and buy a brick and neddels rat pizen.


 From the Fort Wayne (Ind.) Sentinel and in the Lafayette Advertiser 8/2/1879.   

 
 





 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 2nd, 1913:

SANITARIUM NOTES.

 Mr. Sidney Guillot, of Marshal, Texas, brother of Miss Alive Guillot, the head nurse, was a visitor at the Sanitarium this week.

 Drs. Gardiner and Guilbeau, of Sunset, came in Sunday with little Burnie Peck, who was dangerously ill, and operated on at once by Dr. L. O. Clark, assisted by Drs. Saucier, Gardiner and Guilbeau.

 Mrs. (Dr.) G. A. Martin was operated on yesterday by Dr. L. O. Clark, assisted by Drs. Saucier, M. Mouton and L. A. Prejean. She is doing very well.

 Mrs. E. Guidry, of Scott, is in the Sanitarium and will be operated on Wednesday morning.

 Mrs. Pedergos, on her way back home from a visit to Galveston, was taken from the train to the Sanitarium at 3:30 a. m. Monday, suffering from acute indigestion. She was able to leave that afternoon for her home in Mississippi.

 Miss Ruth Mouton is now in the rolling chair. Mrs. Jos. Guidrop is rapidly recovering and all the other patients are doing well.

 The Sanitarium is filled to its utmost capacity, an indication of the necessity of such an institution in this city and the appreciation the people have for the great good being done by it.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/2/1913.

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