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Monday, January 12, 2015

**JUNE 27TH M C

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of June 27th, 1903:


LAFAYETTE SETS THE EXAMPLE.
From the N. O. States.


Those who are looking for an example of progressive public spirit in the matter of public education need go no fur   ther than to the splendid little parish of Lafayette, in Southwestern Louisiana.



 It has not been so long ago that this parish, territorially one of the smallest in Louisiana, was looked upon by many as being backward and non-progressive. This conception of a parish that has furnished some of the brightest characters in Louisiana history was rudely shocked some four or five years since when Lafayette imposed a voluntary public tax upon her citizens, the proceeds of which she gave as a bonus to secure the location of the State Industrial Institute in her leading town. This set people to thinking about Lafayette, and the result of the location of the Southwestern Industrial Institute has been to stir up the public pride and to make the town and parish of Lafayette progress by leaps and bounds. But the people were not content with that. The splendid State school became at once to them an object lesson of the value of schools in the making of a people, and the success which they had experienced in raising a large bonus necessary to secure that school suggested to them the power that had lain dormant within them for so long. They realized then what it seems  so difficult to impress upon many that education is an investment of gilt-edged character, and that it pays bigger dividends than any other form of investment which the people, considered as a political society, can possibly make.


 Having a school equipped for the more advanced training located in their parish through the public-spirited efforts and maintained by the State, it then became apparent that the next thing to do was to provide proper facilities for fitting the boys and girls of Lafayette to enter this school. They did not sit down and carp and fret over small appropriations; they did not appoint committees of leading citizens to grovel at the feet of Northern millionaires and beg for assistance. What they did was eminently sensible, practical  and praiseworthy, creditable alike to their self respect and their public spirit. They petitioned their Police Jury to order an election for a three-mill tax to be imposed upon all the taxable property in the parish, and when the election took place they voted this tax by a substantial majority. They recognized the eternal fact that the stars in their course, together with all moral and material forces, help those who help themselves, and that if education be desirable it is worth what it costs.


 It is a recognition of that other equally important fact that with a free and proud people self-help is the very best sort of help, and, indeed, the only sort of help that does not carry with it a certain perceptible sense of diminution of self-respect and independence.


 Lafayette sets a brave and wholesome example in the balance of the State to the South, and the State registers the prediction here and now that the public spirit manifested by these acts is going to cause Lafayette, in the near future, to lead the procession of parishes, both in point of education and in material development. There is not a rightly constituted man or woman in Louisiana who is not proud of the record made by the sturdy little parish of Lafayette. It is public spirit such as theirs that makes a section appeal to intelligent men as a desirable place in which to cast their fortunes and to build homes for themselves. It is that which begets the home spirit, the pride and love of home, and invests a little spot of earth with that veneration and love which arms man to for and if need be, to die in defense of the place called home.


 The example set by Lafayette is wholesome and inspiring, and its wide-awake citizens and its intelligently conducted press, which is so largely responsible for the sentiment awakened, are entitled to the congratulations of the people of the whole South. 
Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.    


                

MASS MEETING HELD.

 A mass meeting was held at Adelma Martin's grove June 14 with P. L. DeClouet as chairman and Ed. G. Voorhies as secretary, At said mass meeting a committee composed of three men from each ward was appointed to select candidates for parish offices, subject to Democratic primaries. The committee met on June 19 at Girard's office and selected the following candidates:

 For sheriff, Louis Lacoste; Clerk of Court, Ed. G. Voorhies; Representatives, Paul DeClouet and J. Gilbert St. Julien; coroner, Dr. J. F. Mouton.

 A resolution was adopted that a Democratic mass meeting be held the first Sunday in August for ratification; place to be selected later. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.


A New Firm. - In another column appears the advertisement of Morgan & Debaillon, who have purchased the grocery business of F. Demenade. The firm is composed of Messrs. Archie Morgan and George Debaillon, two of Lafayette's rising and progressive young men. Both were born and raised here, and have always stood deservedly high, because their worth and sterling integrity. To both of them The Advertiser wishes an unbounded success.  Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.



 Base Ball. - Another of the series of games provided by the Lafayette Base Ball Association took place at the Ball Park, between the local nine and the Washington team. The game was a fair one, but owing to the many errors of the visitors, considerable interest was lost. The score stood 18 to 2 in favor of the home boys. There will be a game Sunday with the Opelousas team, and with the St. Martin team on July 5 and 6.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.




WEDDING BELLS.
McBride-Melancon.

 The following special to the Times-Democrat gives an account of the marriage of Prof. Andrew McBride, one of Lafayette's sterling and rising young men, to Miss Laura Melancon, of Breaux Bridge :


 Breaux Bridge, June 23 - A brilliant social event occurred this morning at 10 o'clock nuptial mass, when Prof. Andrew McBride of Rugby Academy, New Orleans, wedded Miss Laura Melancon, granddaughter of Cyp. Melancon, president of the Breaux Bridge bank, and only daughter of J. K. Melancon, the junior in the firm of Melancon & Son. The couple were joined in wedlock by Rev. J. L. Langlois, assisted by Rev. A. Blanc. The church and residence were beautifully decorated with potted plants and cut flowers. The assemblage at church kept the three ushers busy. The maid of honor and best man were, respectively, Miss Blanche Jaubert of New Orleans and J. S. Broussard, St. Martinville. The bridesmaids were : Misses Laura Jaubert, New Orleans ;  Cora Martin, Lafayette ;  Litta Domengeaux, Breaux Bridge ;  groomsmen, John Virgil Dugan, New Orleans ;  Jack Praeger and Jerome Mouton, Lafayette ;  ushers, G. D. Domengeaux, mayor ; John F. O'Donohoe and A. A. Ransonet. The young couple left on the 1 o'clock train for Biloxi, Miss., where they will spend the summer. From the N. O. Times-Democrat and in the Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.




Pellerin & DeClouet.

 The first material for the Pellerin & DeClouet store was placed on the ground last Monday. It will be a three-story, iron front, frame building and when completed will be one of the largest and handsomest buildings in town. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



 Daughters of the Confederacy.

 A number of ladies met at the court-house last Friday for the purpose of forming a chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy. Miss Aimee Mouton presided, and Miss Lelia DeBlanc acted as secretary. It was decided to defer organization until the first Wednesday in July, when another meeting will be held to which all daughters and granddaughters of confederate veterans are cordially invited to be present and join. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.



 Compliments in Order.

 In comparing the returns from last Thursday's election, we find that the vote in the third, fifth and seventh wards was almost unanimous for the tax. The Advertiser desires to compliment the people of the entire parish upon the result of the election, and especially those of the above three wards. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.



 THE FARMERS' INSTITUTE.

 A most interesting and helpful Farmers' Institute was held Wednesday at the court-house, Prof. Morgan, of the State University, conductor, assisted by a corps of capable instructors. The Institute which was fairly attended opened about 10 o'clock with R. C. Landry presiding. Mayor Caffery, in a brief but appropriate address bade members of the Institute welcome to our town and parish. He was followed by Dr. Fred J. Mayer, who most interestingly traced the idea of intensive from far back in the misty ages of the past and showed that the ancients with their teeming populations, were enabled to support a high degree of opulence and prosperity by a scientific knowledge of agriculture and zealous State aid and supervision. His address was both entertaining and instructive. Prof. Morgan then assumed charge of the Institute, and after a few preparatory remarks introduced Hon. J. A. Brewer, of Bienville parish, whose talk on Parish Fairs was very valuable. His remarks were eminently practical, and interspersed with a pleasing humor that furnished much entertainment to the audience R. E. Blouin closed the morning session with a splendid talk filled with information and of great benefit to the farmers.

 After partaking of a barbecue dinner, the audience assembled at 2 p. m. for the afternoon session. Prof. Morgan discussed the cane-borer, and gave some practical information in regard to the pest. He also described the habits and character of a number of different bugs and insects that are destructive to crops. The information imparted by him should be known to every farmer in the parish; for undoubtedly the researches made by Prof. Morgan and others are of a nature to be extremely valuable to all farmers, and it is to be regretted that every farmer in the parish was not present.

 Prof. S. M. Tracy discussed Fertilizers, and Mr. C. Chiquelin closed the session with a talk on Sugar Making.

 Among those present were a large number of the parish teachers, most of whom were ladies. They were in attendance by request of Supt. Alleman, who desires to introduce elementary agriculture in the schools, interest the children in nature study along the line of bugs and insects injurious to the crops raised here.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.



A Good Idea.

 Last Monday Supt. L. J. Alleman issued a circular letter to the teachers of the parish instructing them to close their schools and attend the Farmer's Institute, stating that hereafter some attention would be given the science of elementary agriculture. This is in line both with common sense and with true educational principles. Where agriculture forms the principal occupation upon which a country depends for its wealth, certainly proper instruction to the youth in all that pertains to that occupation, so that they many not only learn how to make it most profitable, but also to take pleasure and pride in it, seems the natural and sensible thing.

 And from an educational point of view, its value is great as teaching not alone the head but the hand. It cultivates the scientific habit of thought, which Prof. Caldwell in his address to the first graduates of the Institute, state as one of the first essentials of an education, and with it gives a love of nature and its wonderful secrets has a powerful ethical bearing. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.

POLICE JURY AND SCHOOL BOARD.

 As the Police Jury and the School Board are the two public bodies which have most to do with the immediate welfare of the people of the parish, it becomes a matter of the highest importance to select men of intelligence and progressiveness to compose these bodies; and the people should make themselves heard on this question.

 Good roads and good schools are the two things which enter most largely and most deeply into the everyday lives of all the people, and in the enjoyment of these two great benefactions the country should be made secure by placing the administration of these two important branches of the public service in worthy hands.

 At this time, when so much attention is being given to the selection of candidates for sheriff, clerk of the court, and other officers, The Advertiser wants to give prominence to the fact that the people of this parish have more at stake in the matter of choosing good police jurors and good school directors for the next four years, than with regard to the other officers of the parish. We do not mean that the people are not directly interested in having good men fill the offices of sheriff, clerk of court, and representatives up to the president of the United States, but we do insist that it is a matter of much greater concern to the people to see to it that the immediate affairs of the parish be administered in an intelligent and businesslike manner; and now is the best time to speak out on the subject, when the slates are being made up by the men seeking political preferement at the hands of the public.

 Let the people of each ward in the parish nominate in mass meeting one of their best citizens for police juror, and at the same time and in the same way recommend for appointment by the governor, another one of their best citizens for school director. The people have it in their power to secure a good Police Jury by first nominating and afterwards electing the men of their choice, and they have it in their power to select their own school directors by recommending good men for appointment, because their wishes when formally and publicly expressed will be respected by the public officers who interest themselves in these matters with the appointing power, the governor.

 It is now up to the people of the parish to say who shall, and who shall not, have charge of their roads and of their schools during the coming four years of government administration. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.





Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 6/27/1903.

Friday morning about 7 o'clock, a severe storm passed over Lafayette. It arose very suddenly, and drove across the sky at a high rate of speed. The effects were felt considerably near the ground, but, owing to the great attitude of the wind, no damage was done.



 O. H. Malinear, of the Sanborn Manufacturing Co., who has been making a new fire map of Lafayette, left Tuesday evening.

 Mrs. Wm. Campbell, Sr., and daughter, Miss Philomene, left Friday for Grand Coteau to attend the closing exercises of the Sacred Heart Convent.

 J. E. Primeaux left Monday for Morgan City where he has accepted a position with the railroad company.

 Supt. L. J. Alleman returned Tuesday from Centerville. Mrs. Alleman and baby will remain there a little longer visiting her parents.


 Mr. Sterling Parkerson, son of Mr. William Parkerson, of New Orleans, is visiting his grandparents, Judge and Mrs. J. G. Parkerson.

 Regular services will be held in the Episcopal church to-morrow evening at half-past five o'clock.

 Prejean & LeBlanc are offering their stock at a considerable reduction preparatory to moving into their large handsome new store.

 Mrs. B. J. Williams and little son Ben, of Greenville, Tex., came last Sunday, being called here on account of the serious illness of her mother, Mrs. Thos. B. Hopkins. She returned home Friday, her mother having improved greatly.

 Mr. L. E. Bernard brought to our office Tuesday two fine stalks of cotton 3 feet high filled with squares. He states that he has eight acres of the same kind and that many have blooms on them.

Dr. and Mrs. E. L. Stephens are at home again.

 J. C. Nickerson returned Monday from Chicago, where he went to attend the convention of railroad immigration agents.


 Joe Trahan, of Youngsville, brought to The Advertiser office Friday, a stalk of cotton 3 1/2 feet high, having 82 forms, balls, and blossoms on it. He has ten acres just like the sample.

 We are glad to state that Mrs. Thos. B. Hopkins is much better.

 Postmaster Domengeaux has added 50 lock boxes to his office, in order to meet increased demands.


 The ball Thursday night, given by the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, was a most enjoyable affair. A large crowd was in attendance, and the financial part was very satisfactory. Electric fans were loaned by Pellerin Bros. for the occasion, and contributed greatly to the comfort of those dancing, and were especially appreciated by the ladies. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1903.










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From the Lafayette Gazette June 27th, 1903:

PARISH POLITICS.
Two Tickets in the Field for Local Offices.

 During the past week the announcement of two parish tickets caused a somewhat premature opening of the local campaign. First it was stated that the following ticket had been formed and would submit its claims to popular support: For sheriff, I. A. Broussard; for clerk of court, Dr. G. W. Scranton; for representatives, Dr. J. P. Francez and Jerome Mouton; for coroner, Dr. G. A. Martin. As soon as this announcement was made, other forces began to gather and after a number of conferences it was given out that the following ticket would enter the field for political honors:

 For sheriff, Louis Lacoste; for clerk of court, Edward G. Voorhies; for representatives, Paul DeClouet and Gilbert St. Julien; for coroner, Dr. J. F. Mouton.

 A noticeable feature of the personnel of the two tickets shows the absence of ringism in the composition of either. In each case men who formerly opposed one another formed an alliance and will make the fight together. We believe that this is a healthful sign. It will rob the campaign of the bitterness which the old, familiar cry of "ring" always engenders. And it can not be said to be a fight of the "ins" against the "outs," for both these elements are about equally represented on the two tickets. On one ticket the candidate for sheriff and a candidate for representative formed parts of the opposing tickets at the last election. On the other ticket the candidate for clerk and a candidate for representative were opposing candidates for the same office at the election of 1900. All this merely shows that human nature has changed but little since the immortal bard of Avon said "that politics makes strange bed-fellows."

 On the question of rotation in office neither will have the advantage of the other, as the leaders of both sides have ignored the illustrious example of the sage of Mount Vernon.

 Both tickets playing even on the questions of "rings," "rotation in office," "ins vs. the outs," etc., the popularity of the candidates will likely cut a big figure in the outcome. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



New Buildings.

 The following buildings are in course of construction: Store for Pellerin & DeClouet, store for LeBlanc and Prejean; store and residence for M. Rosenfield, wholesale store for the Merchant's Grocer Company, residence for C. O. Mouton. A second story is being added to Mr. C. D. Caffery's residence. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



 Daughters of the Confederacy.

 The following ladies met at the court-house on the 21st to organize a camp of the Daughters of the Confederacy:  Mrs. V. Dupuis, Mrs. V. Guidroz, Mrs. Sidney Mouton, Misses Ida, Estelle and Aimee Mouton, Cora Desbrest, Corrine Guidry, Cecilia Guidry, Jennie Torian and Lilia DeBlanc. Miss Aimee Mouton was elected temporary president and Miss DeBlanc secretary. A meeting will be held on July 1 to organize permanently. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



Echoes of the School Tax.

 The Gazette is glad to publish the following interesting telegram and letter referring to the special school tax lately levied in Lafayette parish.

 ------------------p. 1-----------------

 Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



 The Trainmen's Ball.

 The trainmen's ball at Falk's hall Thursday evening was well attended and greatly enjoyed by a large number of people. The committee in charge procured three electric fans with the use of which the heat was dispelled and the temperature in the hall was rendered cool and pleasant. There was good music for the dancers and everything else conducive to the pleasure of the guests was secured. Mr. Bracken, on behalf of Lodge 317, under whose auspices the ball was given, made a few remarks, thanking the people of the town for their generous support. He also tendered the thanks of the trainmen to Pellerin Bros. for the use of the electric fans, to the Sontag band and Mr. Melchert and the municipal authorities for contributing to success of the ball. Mr. Bracken stated that the charm offered as a reward to the one selling the largest number of admission tickets had been won by Charles Harnish, who had sold 121 tickets. Mr. Bracken said that the thanks of the lodge were due to Locke Nevue who had sold only one ticket less than Mr. Harnish, his number having reached 120. A fine cake was given to Miss Robichaux who was decreed the best dancer by the judges. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.


BASEBALL
The Lafayette Juniors Defeat Washington.

 The Lafayette Juniors scored an easy victory over the Washington team last Sunday afternoon at the Baseball Park. It required only one inning to show that Lafayette had a cinch, and lead-pine one at that. The visiting team was so much weaker than the locals that the game soon ceased to be interesting. Despite the lack of any incentive to play good ball the home boys managed to prevent the interest from dying out altogether. No team can make a really good showing when playing against a lot of dead ones. The score of 18 to 2 was one-sided enough to be sure, but the visitors should not have been allowed to score at all.

 The features of the game were Meaux's pitching, Alpha's fielding and Suarez's batting. Meaux has all the qualities of a ball-player. With him as a twirler, Lafayette should lose but few games. The line-up was as follows:

 ----------------p. 1------------------

 The game to-morrow promises to be  very interesting. Lafayette will play Opelousas.

 A game of ball is also announced to take place to-morrow at the Surrey Park. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.


A Good Word for Lafayette.

 J. C. Nickerson has returned from his visit to Chicago where he had gone to attend the convention of the Southern Pacific Land and Immigration Agents, held on the 17th and 18th of this month. Mr. Nickerson says that Southwest Louisiana received a great deal of attention in the convention and that Lafayette was not overlooked. Geo. M. McKinney, president of the Southern Pacific and Illinois Central Land and Immigration Association made special mention of Lafayette in his address, referring to the Institute which he saw while visiting this town last spring. While in Chicago Mr. Nickerson distributed a great deal of literature advertising of Lafayette parish. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



 Band Concerts.

 On Friday, June 19, the Sontag Band gave the first open-air concert of the season at the grove. Owing to the absence of the manager, Dr. Girard, it was not possible to have the vitascope ready for an exhibition. Quite a large crowd was present and it is safe to say that the music was greatly enjoyed and up to its usual standard of excellence. The next concert will take place Friday. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



A GOOD MEETING
Of the Farmers' Institute Held at the Court-house.

 MOVEMENT TO HOLD FAIR.

 A Number of Interesting Addresses by Prof. Morgan and Others.

 A well attended and most interesting farmers' institute was held in the court-house last Wednesday. Prof. Morgan, of the State University, conducted the meeting which proved to be one of the best ever held here. Prof. Morgan was ably assisted by the following institute corps:  R. E. Blouin, sugar cane expert from the State Experiment Station; Geo. Chiquelin, expert sugar-maker from the State Experiment Station; Col. John A. Brewer, the father of parish fairs in Bienville; Prof. S. M. Tracy, botanist from the United States department of agriculture and former director of State experiment stations in Mississippi.

 Hon. Clemile Landry, one of the most successful planters of this parish, called the meeting to order as president of the Farmers' Club of Lafayette, and introduced Mayor Caffery, who delivered an able and eloquent address of welcome.

 Prof. Morgan asked Dr. Mayer to respond for the department of agriculture, which he did, elaborating some of the points made by Mr. Caffery and urging the establishment of an annual agricultural fair as the vest means of bringing together in generous rivalry the fruits of the earth, teaching the value of intensive methods, principally soil upbuilding and fertilization. He gave an historical resume of the genesis of agricultural science and proved that the ancient law-givers and theologians always favored agricultural development and that whenever this was neglected the country sank into the lowest depths of degradation and that it was the present duty of the farmers to see to it that their noble calling was not immolated on the altar of commercialism or imperialism, or prostituted to a spirit of militarism always antagonistic to civil liberty and agrarian rights and development.

 Dr. Mayer was followed by Col. Brewer, of Bienville, who spoke on parish fairs and showed how the Bienville fair grew from a $55 concern to a $2,500 premium list. Col. Brewer said that as a result of these fairs the finest mules, horses, cows and hogs could now be bought in Bienville for less than in the North and West.

 Capt. Morrow, of Iberia, made a good talk in French. He entertained the audience on the advantages of parish fairs.

 At noon the institute adjourned for dinner. The Police Jury having made ample provision for dinner, Mr. Hirsch, chairman of the committee, was fully prepared to meet the large crowd of farmers with plenty of good grub and cool drinks.

 At 1:30 the institute reassembled. Prof. Tracy made a most instructive talk on seed selection. This was particularly interesting to the farmers.

 Prof. Morgan then spoke on insects in their relation to crops. His lecture was a magnificent expose of the whole subject of biology. His remarks on the cane-borer were unusually interesting.

 Mr. Chiquelin spoke on sugar and syrup-making, delivering a most practical address.

 The following resolution was offered by Dr. Mayer and unanimously adopted:

 Be it resolved that it is the sense of the farmers of Lafayette than an annual parish fair be held at some central point in the parish, and that the following committee be appointed to organize the same: Martial Billeaud, Jr., R. C. Landry, Alcide Judice, C. O. Mouton, C. C. Brown, Aurelien Olivier, J. C. Buchanan, Dr. F. E. Girard, Sam Montgomery, Julian Mouton, G. R. Daniels, Rodolph Roy.

 A pleasant feature of the meeting was the presence of a number of public school teachers who came in response to a circular-letter sent out by Superintendent Alleman. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.


Race on July 4.

 Sidney Veazey's famous "Little Jim," and "Beauty," owned by Dr. Ben Guilbeaux, and one of the best horses in St. Landry, will pace five half-mile heats at the Surrey Park in Lafayette. The race will take place at 2 o'clock. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.


The Bank of Lafayette.

 We publish to-day the last statement of the Bank of Lafayette, which shows that institution to be in splendid condition. This bank was organized to supply a local demand for greater banking facilities. Conservative management and considerate treatment of the public soon won for it its share of business, as is shown by a semi-annual dividend of 4 per cent to be paid on July 1, and an addition of $2,000 to the surplus. The Gazette is pleased to note this added evidence of the success of the Bank of Lafayette, which is in every way worthy of the confidence of the people. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.

PROMOTION ANNOUNCED
T. J. Anderson New Southern Pacific Passenger Agent.

 [From the N. O. Times-Democrat.]

 S. F. B. Morse, general passenger traffic manager of the Louisiana and Texas lines of the Southern Pacific, who spent yesterday in the city, announced the appointment of Thomas J. Anderson as general passenger agent of the Southern Pacific lines east of El Paso.

 Mr. Anderson has been with the Southern Pacific about three years, and in that time has worked his way up from district passenger agent at Waco to general passenger agent. The appointment is effective July 1.

 Mr. Anderson was at one time in the passenger service of the Seaboard Air Line, leaving that system to go with the Southern Pacific. He is a man of recognized ability, and is said to be well qualified for his new position. He has been assistant general passenger agent for some time, and when Mr. Robbins left the Southern Pacific to accept the position of the general passenger agent of the Texas Central. Mr. Anderson was selected as his successor.

 With the promotion of Mr. Anderson, Joseph Hellen, who has been chief clerk to Col. Morse for several years, succeeds to the position of a assistant general passenger agent. Mr. Hellen was chief clerk to R. J. Parks for several years before accepting the same position with Col. Morse. From the N. O. Times-Democrat and in the Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.


LAFAYETTE'S RECORD

In Past Few Years the Subject of an Editorial from the N. O.  Daily States.

 Little Parish Sets a Brave and Wholesome Example to the State.

 [From the N. O. Daily States, June 24.]

 Those who are looking for an example of progressive public spirit in the matter of public education need go no further than to the splendid little parish of Lafayette, in Southwestern Louisiana. It has not been so long ago that this parish, territorially one of the smallest in Louisiana, was looked upon as being backward and non-progressive. This conception of a parish that has furnished some of the brightest characters in Louisiana history was rudely shocked some four or five years since when Lafayette imposed a voluntary public tax upon her citizens, the proceeds of which she gave as a bonus to secure the location of the State Industrial Institution in her leading town.

 This set people to thinking about Lafayette, and the result of the location of the Southwestern Industrial Institute there has been to stir up the public pride and to make the town and parish of Lafayette progress by leaps and bounds. But the people were not content with that. The splendid State school became at once to them an object lesson of the value of schools in the making of a people, and the success which they had experienced in raising the large bonus necessary to secure that school suggested them to them the power that had lain dormant within them for so long. They realized then what it seems to be so difficult to impress upon many that education is an investment of a gilt-edged character, and that it pays bigger dividends than any other form of investment which the people, considered as a political society, can possibly make.

 Having a school equipped for the more advanced training located in their parish through their public-spirited efforts and maintained by the State, it then became apparent that the next thing to do was to provide proper facilities for fitting the boys and girls of Lafayette to enter this school. They did not sit down and carp and fret over small appropriations; they did not appoint committees of leading citizens to grovel at the feet of Northern Millionaires and beg for assistance. What they did was eminently sensible, practical and praiseworthy, creditable alike to their self-respect and to their public spirit. They petitioned their police jury to order an election for a three-mill tax to be imposed upon all the taxable property in the parish, and when the election took place they voted this tax by a substantial majority. They recognized the eternal fact that the stars in their courses, together will all moral and material forces, help those who help themselves, and that if education be desirable it is worth what it costs. It is a recognition of that other equally important fact that with a free and proud people self-help is the very best sort of help, and, indeed, the only sort of help that does not carry with it a certain perceptible sense of diminution of self-respect and independence.

 Lafayette sets a brave and wholesome example to the balance of the State and to the South, and the States registers the prediction here and now that the public spirit manifested by these acts is going to cause Lafayette, in the near future to lead the procession of parishes, both in point of education and in material development. There is not a rightly constituted man or woman in Louisiana who is not proud of the record made by the sturdy little parish of Lafayette. It is public spirit such as theirs that makes a section appeal to intelligent men as a desirable place in which to cast their fortunes and to build homes for themselves. It is that which begets the home spirit, the pride and love of home, and invests a little spot of earth with that veneration and love which arms man to fight for, and if need be, to die in defense of the place called home.

 The example set by Lafayette is wholesome and inspiring, and its wide-awake citizens and its intelligently-conducted press, which is so largely responsible for the sentiment awakened, are entitled to the congratulations of the people of the whole South. From the N. O. Daily States and in the Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



 Demanade Retires.

 In another column of this paper Mr. F. Demanade announces his retirement from the retail grocery and crockery business. Mr. Demanade states that he has sold his store to Messrs. Archie Morgan and George Debaillon, young men of industry and integrity, under whose management the store will doubtless receive the same full measure of public patronage which it has always enjoyed. The Gazette is pleased to state that this change does not carry with it the permanent retirement of Mr. Demanade from the commercial affairs of this town. We understand that he will engage in another enterprise, thus continuing to be actively connected with the business life of the community. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



At Surrey Park.

 The management of the Surrey Park Association expects large crowds Saturday and Sunday. On each day several good races will be run and fast horses have been entered for every race advertised to take place. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.


 Garbage Collection.

 Lafayette needs a garbage cart without which the town will never be kept in a cleanly condition. With a cart to haul debris out of town it would be possible to compel people to keep their premises clean, and the streets would not be used as a dumping ground for every old thing. The Gazette believes that a garbage cart properly worked and the drainage of certain streets would greatly improve sanitary conditions in this community. In several places drainage is impossible on account of oyster shells, which should be used to repair the streets but not to stop the flow of water, which, when permitted to remain in a stagnant state in pools, can not but be unhealthy. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



Bakery for Rent.

 After July 10, 1903, the bakery now occupied by Castel Bros. Will be for rent. This is a good location; being an old established stand. Apply to Dr. H. D. Guidry, Lafayette, La. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.



Mrs. C. Jeanmard.

 The advertisement of Mrs. C. Jeanmard appears in this issue of The Gazette. Mrs. Jeanmard has one of the finest millinery and dressmaking establishments in this section of the State. She employs a number of skilled milliners and is fully equipped to fill orders for work of the highest grade. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.


    



 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 6/27/1903.

 Messrs. Andrew Prudhomme and Julian F. Tanner, both merchants of this place, left on Thursday's fast-mail for Leesburg, where they will remain a few weeks.

 Judge Blackman was in Lafayette Monday.

 Mr. Geo. Doucet, the druggist, left Thursday evening for New Iberia, being called to the bedside of his brother-in-law, Mr. Joseph Boutte.

 The Lafayette Mattress Factory's new building is almost ready to be occupied.

 Rev. Father Bollard, of Charenton, was in Lafayette during the week.

 Mr. R. O. Wood, the oil expert from Jennings, spent Sunday evening in Lafayette among his many friends.

 Regular services will be held in the Episcopal church to-morrow evening at half past five o'clock.

 Mr. Rhul Peck is having a home built in Mouton's addition. Lafayette Gazette 6/27/1903.









  

  

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From the Lafayette Advertiser of June 27th, 1896:

 THE ADVERTISER'S PHONE.






Hello! Please inform the public for me, that I keep constantly on hand a fine stock of poultry, and would be pleased to serve them. 14 is my telephone number.


 Hello Mr. Editor! Remind your subscribers that invitations to the grand ball at Falk's Hall on July 4th. will be sent out in a few days. Don't forget to say that there will be a prize awarded to the best lady and gentleman dancer.

 Hello, Advertiser!

 ----- Hello! Any news to tell us?

 Yes. There's a new disease in town since the 18th. instant, and quite a number of people are already known to be attacked with the ailment. The affection is peculiar in being confined to the brain and may be communicated, from husband to wife. Its most prominent symptom is a feeling of great fullness of the head as though the brain was very much swollen and this is attended with extreme perturbation of the mind. This disease is regarded as a formidable one but not necessarily fatal. Fortunately a remedy has been discovered for this affection, that acts like a true specific.

 -----What is the remedy?

 Cotton Seed Oil. Good bye.

 -----We catch on. Ring us up when you have some more news to tell and - say, send us a large size dose of the medication for a certain friend of ours.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1896.



Higginbotham Robbed. - Thieves entered the room of Mr. Ed. Higginbotham, on last Friday night, and stole his gold watch and chain. Although Mr. Higginbotham was sleeping in the room he was not aroused from his slumber, by the miscreants, and knew nothing of the robbery till next morning when he arose. Foot prints were plainly visible on the gallery roof which is situated on the second floor. The burglary was immediately reported to the sheriff, who will use every effort to seek out the guilty party.  Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1896.


Cabbage Destroyed.
 Mr. John Hill who works on Dr. Mudd's farm had several hundred head of cabbage destroyed last Sunday night, by some low minded sneak thieves, what they could not carry off with them, they had taken a cane knife and slashed to pieces, and left them scattered over the ground. He has very strong suspicions who the parties are.

 Here is another case for our Sheriff to work out. What inconceivable depravity in the nature of a man not content with giving away to, and gratifying ad libitum, one of the lowest and most reprehensible sins in the decalougue, he sets forth wantonly destroying that which he cannot carry away -- Shame !  We hope and trust that the author of the above crime will soon be lodged behind prison bars, and that Col. James may not have to wait long ere he gets these cabbage gentry added to his force. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1896.



  
First Communion.

 The beautiful ceremony of First communion, took place at our catholic church last Wednesday. Upwards of 170 children received the holy sacrament. The church was crowded with the relatives and friends of the host of young candidates, to eager witness them receive the solemn and sacred rites, which were administered by the Rev. Fathers D hommee of Washington, Chabrier of Youngsville, Beaulieu of Natchitoches, Forge and Maltrait of Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1896.

   

Our Sugar Refinery.

 Now, that it has been an accomplished fact, it seems fit and proper to announce to the public generally, that the Lafayette Sugar Refinery has been thoroughly overhauled and put in perfect working order, to manufacture the crop of the coming season. As soon as the cane has sufficiently ripened, the Factory will be opened and ready to grind all the cane that may be contracted for. The alterations have been made by Mr. C. H. Bernard, one of the most competent engineers in the State, and when in his judgment the machinery is pronounced in perfect working order, the fact may be relied upon. The services of the same engineer and a thoroughly competent staff of employees have been secured, each one thoroughly fitted for the special department in which he is employed. The whole establishment has undergone a complete examination and has been pronounced second to none in the State, of its size and capacity. All has been accomplished, one might well say, through the indefatigable efforts of one man, Col. Gus. A. Breaux, who has had to contend, not only with what would seem insurmountable pecuniary difficulties, but, also, with the opposition of those, who, had they been as friends to the community and public spirited citizens, would have generously aided him in the enterprise.

 Prosperity for this Factory means enrichment and prosperity for all; for if the planter can dispense profitably of the fruit of his hard earned toil, he is thus enabled to pay his debts to his merchant, who thus derives his share of profit, to say nothing of the thousands of dollars which are paid out to the various employee of the Factory, four-fifths of which goes to enrich the merchants and saloon keepers of Lafayette. We can safely say this Factory will pay out during the next grinding $60,000, which as before stated will be mostly spent in Lafayette.

 Surely, he must be a very short sighted citizen who does not perceive that any and all such establishments benefit directly and indirectly every member of the town and community where they are built, and yet, wonderful to relate, we are credibly informed, that one who poses a highly public spirited citizen, not only intends to dispose of his own crop to a factory outside of our parish, but is employed agents to go about to secure the crops of others in the neighborhood, to ship likewise. It must not be supposed for a moment that the aforesaid public spirited citizen is making all these prodigious efforts simply from a wish to benefit his fellow-man, or prevent him from expending unnecessary money, or, that he can thereby obtain a higher price for his cane. Though we understand that he claims all this. We shall endeavor to give our readers "a good understanding" on the subject. We are informed that a large Company is trying to make use of the services of those who have no interest in the general welfare, so long as their own private interests are sub-served. They have secured the services of such persons by offering, if a stipulated number of cane are secured, to erect derricks, to load the cars, these persons thus employed to receive fifteen cents a ton for loading; their own cane loaded free of cost. Thus are the unselfish motives of our magnanimous fellow-citizens reveled. In other words, they propose that all those whose cane they secure, shall not only pay fifteen cents a ton, but that they shall also pay fifty cts a ton freight to the railroad, to say nothing of the loss sustained by transportation. If cane is not weighed at the derrick, the loss will be fully two per cent by shipping, and (unreadable words) assurance have the shippers for (unreadable words) cars?

 On the other hand, the planter has only to haul his cane directly to the Lafayette Refinery built for his special advantage, there to have it immediately weighed, under his own eyes, and finally disposed of, to his advantage as below:-

 If shipped away, Eighty cents for each cent prime yellow clarified sugar sells for, say it sells for four cents, it would cost ...

$3.20 per ton
   Less freight ... .50
   Loading ... .15       .65

     2:55 Net per ton.

 If hauled to refinery, he would receive. Seventy-five cents for every cent or fraction prime yellow clarified sugar sells for; sugar at four cents, would equal $3.00. A clear saving to planter of forty-five cents per ton.

 Payments for cane to be made punctually, every Tuesday; said payments guaranteed in writing, by one of the largest and wealthiest firms in the South. We refer all who wish to find out if payments will be promptly met, to Mr. Wm. Clegg.

 Another false rumor which has been circulated to help injure this Factory and benefit the pocket of others, is, that a bonus of fifty-cents is to be deducted again this year.

 We cannot preserve a submissive silence to any such rumors, which are founded only upon base motive. We can only flatly and decidedly contradict them.

 The Lafayette Factory will pay 75 cts per ton for each cent or fraction prime yellow clarified sugar sells for; make no reduction, thereby saving the cane grower 45 cents per ton to haul there instead of shipping away. We simply mention above, as invidious attacks have been made against the Factory in our midst, and we do not want them to go unanswered.
     X. Y. Z.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1896.



Police Jury Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La. June 20th, 1896.

 The Police Jury elect duly qualified met this day for the purpose of organization. There were present the following members.

 R. C. Landry, C. C. Brown, Benj. Avant, Alonzo Lacy, Martial Billeaud, Jr., Jno. E. Primeaux, Alfred Hebert and Jno. Whittington, Jr. Absent: None.

 The Secretary called the meeting to order and the above named Police Jurors duly commissioned and qualified answered to their names.

 By motion Mr. R. C. Landry was unanimously elected president of the body.

 The Jury then proceeded by ballot to elect its officers as follows: For Secretary - R. C. Greig received five votes and D. A. Cochrane three votes.

 For Constable: L. Hirsch received five votes and A. Peck three votes.

 Applications from Messrs. S. R. Parkerson and D. V. Gardebled for the treasurership were received and read. Mr. Wm. Clegg was also placed in nomination. The vote for treasurer stood as follows:  First ballot: Clegg, four votes; Parkerson, two votes; Bank, two votes.  Second ballot:  Clegg, four votes; Parkerson, four votes.  The president declared there was no election for treasurer.

 The public printing was awarded to the Lafayette Gazette and the Lafayette Advertiser under joint bid for $275.00 per annum.

 By motion the regular meeting of the Police Jury was fixed for the first Monday of each month.

 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1896.


School Board Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., June 20, 1896.

 Pursuant to call the Board of School Directors of the Parish of Lafayette met this day in special session with the following members present: J. O. Broussard, President; P. A. Chiasson, Jasper Spell, D. Bernard, A. C. Guilbeau and J. S. Whittington.  Absent: J. E. Trahan and Dr. W. W. Lessley.

 The reading of the minutes of the previous meeting were dispensed with.

 On motion of Mr. Chiasson, seconded by Mr. Guilbeau the Directors of the several wards were permitted to keep their schools open during the summer.

 The (unreadable word) of Mr. H. C. Wallis, one of the committee of examiners, was received and accepted.

 On motion of Mr. Guilbeau, seconded by Mr. Chiasson, the Secretary was instructed to pay Mr. G. Greig thirty dollars for the time he replaced Miss L. Oliver, teacher of the Comeaux school during her late illness.

 The Finance Committee reported that they had examined the books of the Treasurer and found the same correct with a balance in his hands of $861.60 and that there is $200, donated by the ladies of Lafayette to be turned over to the Treasurer which will make $1,061.60 on hand.

 The following accounts were approved:

 R. C. Greig, Sundries for school ... $6.00
 J. S. Whittington ... $3.50
 Wm. Graser ... $3.00

 The Board then adjourned to meet Thursday July 2nd, 1896.
J. O. BROUSSARD, President.
H. E. TOLL, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1896.



 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 6/27/1896.

 Mr. Strauss, of the Dun Mercantile Agency, was a visitor in Lafayette this week.

 Call for a crushed fruit sherbet at the Moss Pharmacy and you'll think that life is worth living after all.

 Circuit Judge Julian Mouton has lately fitted up the small building next to the Delahoussaye grocery, for an office.

 A very enjoyable little soiree was tendered by the Misses Revillon at their residence, to a few friends, last Wednesday evening.

 Mr. W. A. Thomas of Scott has sent us a magnificent specimen of tomato which he raised, weighing seventeen and one-fourth ounces.

 The luscious water melon has commenced to arrive by the wagon load and, apparently, is receiving a cordial welcome. We have seen some fine specimens of both the water melon and not the cantaloupe or french melon.

 The High School closed on Friday of last week. The efficient principle, Prof. C. James, leaves in a few days for his home in Gibson, Tenn., where he goes to spend his vacation.

 W. A. Chachere is now ready to contract for painting buildings and signs, he also takes orders for wall paper, as he is the agent for the Alfred Peat Wall Paper Co. Give him a trial and you will be satisfied. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1896.




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From the Lafayette Advertiser of June 27th, 1874:


White People vs. The White League.


 The white people of the parish of Lafayette appear indifferent and do not respond in an appreciative manner to the efforts of the organizers of a White League. Many of the prominent men, whose names were attached to the call for a meeting to-morrow, have withdrawn from the same. In New Orleans, the Democrats, Liberals and Reformers are organizing an Independent party, upon whose (unreadable word) the Hives and other clubs may attend which very probably, will become general in its operations. A local party cannot exist, except for local purposes. The White League enjoys a feeble and precarious existence in a few parishes only. The evils they wish to correct are not local but of a general character. It follows then that a party whose operations and influence are extended and general, should attempt the remedy. This should be done in a comprehensive and conciliatory manner and not in a way to excite discord and trouble.

 We are not aware of any local reforms to effect this parish that requires the formation of a white or any other League. If the movement is made in view of local objects, they have not yet made known. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1874.





Gerac's Gin.

 Mr. Jean Gerac, the accomodating merchant on the corner of St. John and Vermilion streets has just received a large stock of goods of all kinds. Planters and the public generally are invited to give him a call and examine his stock. Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1874.

  


LAGNIAPPE:
A Weak Plank in the Patron's Platform


 Among the many good works being accomplished by our friends, the Patrons, there is none that promises to be more lasting and practical benefit, than the one of domestic retrenchment and reform. It is not by what is made, but by what is saved, that individuals, as well as communities and nations become prosperous and wealthy. Poor Richard's averment that 
    
 "A penny saved is two pence clear, 
   A grot a day is a pound a year,"

 was a homely elaboration of a truism that stands as self-evident to-day as it did when the great economical philosopher made a fortune by adhering to its principles. Saving by the spigot and spending by the bung hole has been, unfortunately the rule instead of the exception with the industrial classes of the South. The Order of Patron's proposes to reverse this rule, and thus prove itself as it claims to be the sole star of promises which is to guide us out of the present unblazed wilderness or improvidence and misrule. The following remarks and resolutions, presented to the Pleasant Grove Grange, (Ala.,) by Mrs. M. A. Hightower, tell us one of the ways by which this much desired result is to be accomplished :

 "Worthy Master !  The female members of this Grange have not been indifferent spectators to what has been proposed and done at our several meetings. While we have not taken a leading part in its proceedings, we have with pleasure encouraged the various propositiuons and suggestions proposed toward improvements in agriculture and economy.

 "We do not acknowledge being inferior to man intellectually, but consider that each has a duty to perform to secure success in our domestic and farming operations. While it is the part of man to devise and form plans in regard to his farming interests, we consider it the duty of woman to aid in the execution. We do not claim this as the only part which duty commands her to do. There are honest household duties to which she should attend - everything therein to be kept in order - a yard to be arranged and ornamented with shrubbery in such a manner as to make home attractive and a place of pleasure - all of which can be done by woman. She too can be the means of saving a vast amount of money which is continually being wasted in the purpose of superfluous and sinful ornaments in dress. Owing to the distressed condition of our country, I think it a duty that we to ourselves, our children and to God to abandon and discountenance all such foolish expenditure. These reflections have induced me to propose the following resolutions, hoping they may meet with a hearty approval from every sister of this Grange :

 "Resolved, 1. - That in view of the stringency of the times we will exercise the strictest economy in our domestic affairs. That we will abandon the use of all ornamental dressing, and confine our purchases for the future to such articles as are neat and durable.

 "Resolved. 2. - That we will impress upon our sons that farming is not only profitable when properly pursued, but that it is an honorable occupation in the sight of all well thinking people.

 "resolved, 3d. - That we will impart to our daughters a domestic education. That is essential for a lady not only only to know how to perform household duty, but to do the same. That is not derogatory to her character to assist in the field labor if necessary in gaining a subsistence.

 "Resolved, 4th. - That while we are teaching our children domestic and agricultural knowledge, we will not, by any means, neglect their mental or literary culture, which we deem necessary for their success in this life, and a preparation for life to come."


From the publication Our Home Journal and Rural Southland and in the Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1874.






 From the Lafayette Advertiser of June 27th, 1906:

 ANOTHER CONFESSION.

 Howard Tells Newspaper Men of His Crime - Appears Resigned to His Fate. Wants No Appeal Taken.

 Wednesday Dave Howard, the negro under sentence of death for the murder of J. L. Breaux, the Syrian, made another confession, this time to the local newspaper men, who, although through the courtesy of Jailor Saul Broussard, were allowed to talk with him. Howard's confession varied in some minor particulars from statements heretofore made by him, but not materially. He seems resigned to his fate and has given up hope. Although his attorneys, Messrs. Elliot and St. Cyr expressed their willingness to take an appeal for him, if he desired them to do so, he said he did not wish it. He made the confession to the newspaper men voluntarily and freely and gave one the impression that his crime preyed on his mind and that it was a relief for him to talk about it. He is continued in one of the steel cages on the second floor and is all alone with no company whatever but his thoughts, which are evidently uncomfortable from the readiness with which he talks to visitors. His latest confession told in his own words and made into a consecutive narrative, was as follows: "I was born in Ascension parish about two miles from Donaldsonville, on May 16, 1878 and have a mother living there now. I have never been in any serious trouble before, only for fighting, playing cards and such. Worked at Opelousas at railroad grading under Mr. Shacklefoot, the contractor. Beat up a colored girl at Opelousas who broke a promise to me, but did not assault her. Used my fist. Then left and walked to Sunset, where I got on a freight and rode to Lafayette, arriving here when sun was about two hours high. Ate supper with extra gang on new railroad work, near brickyard, where I stayed until Lake Charles excursion came in. Then I walked about town on that side of railroad to locate houses. Saw door ajar and went in and got a coat. Then went further and saw a window open. Got in and looked around, then went back to the first house and got ax. Had taken off my shoes. I went back in the house through the window and began searching armoire which was open. A bottle turned over and the man awoke. I stepped back into the hall. The man raised up and looked around, then lay down. A went  back to the armoire and pulled a drawer open. The man waked again, raised up and was taking bar from over his head. I didn't see any chance of getting out without the man seeing me, and thinking he might have a gun in the bed, I struck him with the axe, He fell out of the bed and pulled the bar down with him. The woman waked and asked what was the matter. He made no answer back. I stayed in the house about five minutes after hitting the man, stooping down at the foot of the bed to hide from here. She got up and was getting out of bed when I put my hand on her face and shoved her back and ran out through the hall and through the window. I put my shoes on under the window and went about an acre from the house and stood there about five minutes while she was calling her neighbors, I didn't see anyone coming around and I made for the railroad. Then went straight on to Scott, which place I reached about seven o' clock. Walked around railroad tracks about half hour before I was arrested."

 At the conclusion of his confession he asked the following to be taken:

 "I am satisfied with what Mr. Elliot and Mr. St. Cyr did for me. They did all they could to save my life, but there was no way on earth for them to do it. They wanted to make an appeal, but I told them I didn't think there was any hope in the case for me, and I thank them for what they did for me." Lafayette Advertiser 6/27/1906.                       




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