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Monday, January 12, 2015

**MAY 15TH M C

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of May 15th, 1907:

PHENOMENAL RAINS.

Extraordinary Precipitation for 24 Hours - Wednesday of 9:57 Inches.
         
 Followed Thursday Morning by a Records-Breaking Fall of 3:35 Inches In Two Hours.   
          
 Large Section of Town Flooded, Caused by Inflow of Water From Parish. Effort to Be Made to Divert Water.
 Last Wednesday night and morning occurred the greatest fall of rain in the history of this section, as far as the records show, the precipitation, according to the report of Mr. J. J. Davidson, U. S. weather observer at this point, amounting for the twenty-four hours to 9.57 inches. The next largest rain reported was in 1905 and amounted to for twenty-four hours, to 5:50 inches. On Thursday a second heavy downpour took place, and within a space of making two hours 3.35 inches fell, making it, counting the period of duration, the heaviest rain ever known in this parish.

 As a result the town and parish were deluged and Vermilion bayou is said to have risen 13 feet in a few hours. Thursday the water was reported running three feet over Beausejour bridge and that Pin Hook bridge was in danger of being carried away, though fear on that score proved groundless. The bayou however, is said to have been higher than even the oldest inhabitants remember.

 The damage to the crops is great, how much can not be determined as yet. Many farmers will have to replant, but with favorable weather from now on, a good crop can still be made. The principal difficulty seems to be the scarcity of cotton seed.

 THE RAIN IN LAFAYETTE.

 Wednesday morning a very large number of the people of Lafayette awoke to find themselves located in a sea of water. A large section of that part of the town on the east side of the railroad was submerged, and on the west side from the Vordenbaumen Lumber Co.s yard to Mr. Joe Breaux' and down towards the Merchants' Grocer Co., was a wide lake 6 to 12 inches deep with the streets over 2 feet deep. Other parts of town had water in plenty, but it soon drained off, but in the two above sections it stayed all day. On the east side of the railroad in the streets the water was in some places three feet deep and from six inches to two feet deep all over it for a time. On East Lincoln avenue near the railroad the water covered the sidewalks and came within an inch or two of flooding the business houses.

 By Wednesday night the water had subsided to a large extent and by Thursday morning the ground was practically clear. But about 9 o'clock another tremendous rain fell and in two hours the people of the same parts of town flooded before finding themselves again submerged. And for another twelve hours had to wade to get in and out of their houses.

 THE RAIN GENERAL.

 The rain was general over the Southern and middle portions of the State and reports from other towns show that Lafayette was no exception as far as being flooded is concerned. In portions of Baton Rouge the water rose so high that it became waist deep in some of the houses, and in many other towns the streets and yards were flooded for hours. Considerable wind and heavy hail marked the progress of the storm across the parish around Mouton Switch bearing towards Breaux Bridge. The wind did but slight damage, but the hail, which was the size of a hen egg, ruined the crops in its path, which fortunately was not very wide, not over two miles, as far as we can learn.  In Lafayette the wind was rather light and aside from slamming a few blinds and breaking window glasses, did no damage. Thursday morning, however, lightning struck the residence of Mr. P. Krauss, doing some slight damage to the roof. No one was hurt.

TO PREVENT FLOODING IN THE FUTURE.

 The extent and persistence of the flood, the ground remaining covered in the areas previously mentioned something like twelve hours, emphasized the necessity of taking some measures to guard the town against a recurrence of such conditions in the future.

 Notwithstanding the unusual phenomenal rainfall of Wednesday and Thursday had it not been for the water coming from parish, the drainage of the town would have been sufficient. But the immense volume of water emptied from the parish, a distance of three to four miles, into the town, was entirely to great to be taken care of.

 The problem then is, how best to dispose of this parish water. Friday Mayor Mouton, several members of the Council and citizens made an investigation. It is believed that the water can be diverted by cleaning out the ditch from the Vallier place to Morgan's corner; the ditch through the Buchanan and Webb places; from Mentor Richard's to the coulee beyond the Cochrane place; and from near the base ball park to Judge G. Bienvenue's; also by carrying the ditch direct from the round house to the Guidry ditch, which should be enlarged. Lafayette Advertiser 5/15/1907. 

     

   

      

   

  








 From the Lafayette Gazette of May 15th, 1897:


CONTEST OF THE ELECTION






 Filed by the Defeated Candidates - A Number of Charges Made.

 The lawyers representing the People's ticket have filed a contest. It is a long-winded tale of innumerable woes, which, put all together are analyzed, make but a very mild kick. It is re-hash of all that has been said with the dreadful Syrians left out. The petition is signed by Messrs. Gus. A. Breaux, Wm. Campbell and R. W. Elliot as attorneys. The petitioners are the defeated candidates and the following gentlemen:  Jno. Vigneaux, Phil Crouchet, C. A. Cochrane, Arthur Couret, J. A. Delhomme, Alphonse Peck, Jno. J. March, H. H. Hohorst, Alb. Delahoussaye, H. D. Delahoussaye.

 The first part of the petition is devoted to the subject of representation at the polls. The presence of deputy sheriffs at the entrance is a subject for unfavorable comment and the booths which were used to allow the voter to prepare his ticket are objected to. It is alleged that this was a scheme to vote illiterate men who were provided with tickets by outside parties.

 With their characteristic modesty they claim all the ballots thrown out. It is alleged in the petition that ballots were marked or defaced before being given to the voters and that one of the commissioners used a lead pencil to push the ballots down into the box and in this manner defaced or marked them.

 Others wild and delirious assertions are made in the petition.

Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.






THAT CONTEST.

The Gazette is informed that the People's ticket will contest the election. Defeat is bitter to the gentlemen and they can not make up their minds to accept it with becoming grace. They know very well that they were squarely beaten, but by setting up the cry of fraud they hope to lessen the bitterness of defeat and make some political capital in order to prevent a complete collapse of the combine.

The Gazette believes that the commissioners who conducted the last municipal election are honest men. We have never heard their honesty questioned and we have no reason to believe them capable of practicing fraud upon anybody. Three watchers from each party witnessed the count and every facility was afforded the opposition to see that they were not unfairly treated.

What does the People's ticket think of the men it selected as watchers? Does it accuse them of unfaithfulness ? Or does it simply infer that they did not have sense enough to what was going on ? The Gazette believes that the People's ticket is doing an injustice to its watchers, for all three are intelligent, clever young fellows.

We repeat that we are satisfied there is nothing in this contest, nor do we believe that those who are claiming that fraud was committed have any hope of success.

The Democratic victory was fairly and squarely won. If there was fraud it was done by the other side.

 Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.





Death of An Old Citizen.

 Mr. Pierre Gerac, Sr., died at his late home in this town at 5 o'clock Thursday morning. Mr. Gerac was born 61 years ago at Sauve-Terre, France, but at an early age came to America in company with his brother, Jean Gerac, who died in this town about two years ago. Mr Gerac was of an industrious nature and by dint of hard work and economy he had amassed considerable wealth. At one time he was one of the leading merchants of Lafayette, being a member of the mercantile firm of Gerac Bros.

The deceased possessed a large circle of friends who were pained to hear of his death. He leaves a wife and eight children to mourn the loss of a dutiful husband and father.

 His remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery Friday morning. A large number of people attended his funeral.
Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.



Railroad Accident. - A wreck occurred on the Alexnadria branch a short distance from Sunset last Sunday night at 9 o'clock. All the crew escaped unhurt with the exception of Mr. William Parrot, who sustained injuries of a serious nature. Two ribs were broken and he was considerably bruised. The many friends of Mr. Parrot hope that he will soon recover.  Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.






HOG ORDINANCE NOT LEGAL.

A Decision Rendered by Judge Debaillon Settles that Question.

 Some years ago the Police Jury passed an ordinance which empowered farmers to kill hogs found depredating their crops. Acting in accordance with that ordinance, Antoine Hebert and B. Roche killed some hogs belonging to John Solari who brought the suit before Judge Brandt's court for damages. The suit was decided against the plaintiff who took an appeal to the district court, where the decision of the justice's court was reversed and the ordinance declared null and void. Hence, all those who kill hogs deprecating in their fields, can be made to pay their value.

Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.





An Enjoyable Affair.

 One of the first picnics of the season was given on last Saturday, at Chargois' Springs by the Ladies Club.

 Despite the threatening aspect of the weather ninety-seven persons were in attendance. Three large wagons and many private carriages furnishing means of transportation for the merry crowd. A more congenial assemblage or enjoyable affair has never been chronicled. At three o'clock an elegant dinner was served, the variety of meats, salads and sweets could not have been surpassed by a caterer of the Royal cuisine.

 The fortunate participants were the following:

 Mmes. J. Nickerson, C. D. Caffery, T. M. Biossat, A. B. Denbo, C. K. Darling, A. A. Morgan, F. S. Mudd, T. B. Hopkins, N. P. Moss, A. Cornay, Franklin Mouton, A. C. Young, J. E. Trahan, S. R. Parkerson, Delaney, C. M. Parkerson, L. J. Serrett, Jno. O. Mouton, F. Demanade, Jaufroid, Jno. Hahn, I. A. Broussard, Albert Doucet, B. Clegg, M. Mouton, J. J. Davidson; Misses Clye and Lizzie Mudd, Liza, Susie and Anna Hopkins, Bessie and Leila Cornay, Adele and Viola Young, Stella Trahan, Nita and May Scranton, Lea Gladu, Lizzie Parkerson, Lula Kelly, Frances Greig, Berthie McCord, Maud Boas, Dora Jaufroid, Mamie Duson, Pearl Harmonson, K. Andrus, Edith Trahan;  Messrs. Chas. D. Caffery, T. M. Biossat, A. B. Denbo, C. K. Darling, Jaufroid, A. A. Morgan, J. Nickerson, St., J. Nickerson, Jr., Dr. F. S. Mudd, C. M. Parkerson, P. B. Torian, Dr. Hy A. Irion, Dr. F. E. Girard, Baxter Clegg, J. Givens, Don Greig, Homer Mouton, G. Gladu, Dr. R. B. Raney, Mousseau, George Doucet, O. Mouton, Charles F. Trudeau, Pierre Gerac, Crow Girard, S. W. McFaddin, Sterling Mudd.

 A sequel to the day's pleasure was a very enjoyable evening spent at the home of Mrs. J. E. Trahan. Music, song and dance lent their charms to the enjoyment of those present. Delicious refreshments were served. Mrs. Trahan was assisted in receiving by the Misses Cornay and Young. Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.




A Public Market.

 A public market house is badly needed in Lafayette and it is to be hoped that the incoming Council will use every means in its power to have one built. It is useless to speak of the many advantages to be derived from a public market. We dare say that every resident of Lafayette would more than welcome the erection of a suitable building for market purposes. Under the present system the house-keeper is put to a great deal of trouble to procure the day's provisions. The revenues that would inevitably flow from a public market would in a short time pay for the building. Let the City Council think seriously of this matter. It is worth the attention of our councilmen who can not give their attention to a better cause.
Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.





Ball To-night.

The Gazette has received an invitation to be present at the ball to be given to-night at Falk's Opera House by the members of Morgan Lodge 317. The following are the committees.

Reception: J. B. Coffery, chairman; J. F. Bowen, W. A. Hebert, R. L. Cochrane, C. H. Snyder, I. N. Fields, A. J. Bru, W. A. Clark.

Floor Managers: J. B. Comes, chairman; J. F. Guidry, L. Bazun, C. J. Baudier, A. Comes.

Arrangement: H. Jagou, chairman; L. Bazun, J. B. Comes, J. F. Guidry.

Invitation: J. F. Guidry, chairman; F. H. Guidry, E. Pefferkorn.

Music will be played by the Breaux Bridge Band. Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.







LAGNIAPPE:

Bishop Sessums of New Orleans.

 Some of the preachers of New Orleans are up in arms because Bishop Sessums, who compares with the whole set intellectually as a mountain does with a molehill, has recently expressed in a sermon profound in wisdom, ideas and views in line with modern thought. Mr. Sessums is responsible to his church alone for his religious actions, deeds and words, and just what a lot of cantankerous Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists and Lutheran preachers have to do with his service to the church, is far from clear. Their recent protest is an exhibition of arrant ignorance, despicable intolerance and contemptible inter-meddling propensities. The church, Christianity and the worship of God is elevating to humanity, without which the earth would be a veritable hades. But frequently the action of some of the self-styled ministers of God would disgrace, if credited to, the inmates of a State prison.

From the Iberville South, Democrat and in the Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.


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From the Lafayette Gazette of May 15th, 1897:


CONTEST OF THE ELECTION






 Filed by the Defeated Candidates - A Number of Charges Made.

 The lawyers representing the People's ticket have filed a contest. It is a long-winded tale of innumerable woes, which, put all together are analyzed, make buit a very mild kick. It is re-hash of all that has been said with the dreadful Syrians left out. The petition is signed by Messrs. Gus. A. Breaux, Wm. Campbell and R. W. Elliot as attorneys. The petitioners are the defeated candidates and the following gentlemen:  Jno. Vigneaux, Phil Crouchet, C. A. Cochrane, Arthur Couret, J. A. Delhomme, Alphonse Peck, Jno. J. March, H. H. Hohorst, Alb. Delahoussaye, H. D. Delahoussaye.

 The first part of the petition is devoted to the subject of representation at the polls. The presence of deputy sheriffs at the entrance is a subject for unfavorable comment and the booths which were used to allow the voter to prepare his ticket are objected to. It is alleged that this was a scheme to vote illiterate men who were provided with tickets by outside parties.

 With their characteristic modesty they claim all the ballots thrown out. It is alleged in the petition that ballots were marked or defaced before being given to the voters and that one of the commissioners used a lead pencil to push the ballots down into the box and in this manner defaced or marked them.

 Others wild and delirious assertions are made in the petition.

Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.






THAT CONTEST.

The Gazette is informed that the People's ticket will contest the election. Defeat is bitter to the gentlemen and they can not make up their minds to accept it with becoming grace. They know very well that they were squarely beaten, but by setting up the cry of fraud they hope to lessen the bitterness of defeat and make some political capital in order to prevent a complete collapse of the combine.

The Gazette believes that the commissioners who conducted the last municipal election are honest men. We have never heard their honesty questioned and we have no reason to believe them capable of practicing fraud upon anybody. Three watchers from each party witnessed the count and every facility was afforded the opposition to see that they were not unfairly treated.

What does the People's ticket think of the men it selected as watchers? Does it accuse them of unfaithfulness ? Or does it simply infer that they did not have sense enough to what was going on ? The Gazette believes that the People's ticket is doing an injustice to its watchers, for all three are intelligent, clever young fellows.

We repeat that we are satisfied there is nothing in this contest, nor do we believe that those who are claiming that fraud was committed have any hope of success.

The Democratic victory was fairly and squarely won. If there was fraud it was done by the other side.

 Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.





Death of An Old Citizen.

 Mr. Pierre Gerac, Sr., died at his late home in this town at 5 o'clock Thursday morning. Mr. Gerac was born 61 years ago at Sauve-Terre, France, but at an early age came to America in company with his brother, Jean Gerac, who died in this town about two years ago. Mr Gerac was of an industrious nature and by dint of hard work and economy he had amassed considerable wealth. At one time he was one of the leading merchants of Lafayette, being a member of the mercantile firm of Gerac Bros.

The deceased possessed a large circle of friends who were pained to hear of his death. He leaves a wife and eight children to mourn the loss of a dutiful husband and father.

 His remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery Friday morning. A large number of people attended his funeral.
Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.



Railroad Accident. - A wreck occurred on the Alexnadria branch a short distance from Sunset last Sunday night at 9 o'clock. All the crew escaped unhurt with the exception of Mr. William Parrot, who sustained injuries of a serious nature. Two ribs were broken and he was considerably bruised. The many friends of Mr. Parrot hope that he will soon recover. 
 Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.






HOG ORDINANCE NOT LEGAL.

A Decision Rendered by Judge Debaillon Settles that Question.

 Some years ago the Police Jury passed an ordinance which empowered farmers to kill hogs found depredating their crops. Acting in accordance with that ordinance, Antoine Hebert and B. Roche killed some hogs belonging to John Solari who brought the suit before Judge Brandt's court for damages. The suit was decided against the plaintiff who took an appeal to the district court, where the decision of the justice's court was reversed and the ordinance declared null and void. Hence, all those who kill hogs deprecating in their fields, can be made to pay their value.

Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.





An Enjoyable Affair.
 One of the first picnics of the season was given on last Saturday, at Chargois' Springs by the Ladies Club.

 Despite the threatening aspect of the weather ninety-seven persons were in attendance. Three large wagons and many private carriages furnishing means of transportation for the merry crowd. A more congenial assemblage or enjoyable affair has never been chronicled. At three o'clock an elegant dinner was served, the variety of meats, salads and sweets could not have been surpassed by a caterer of the Royal cuisine.

 The fortunate participants were the following:

 Mmes. J. Nickerson, C. D. Caffery, T. M. Biossat, A. B. Denbo, C. K. Darling, A. A. Morgan, F. S. Mudd, T. B. Hopkins, N. P. Moss, A. Cornay, Franklin Mouton, A. C. Young, J. E. Trahan, S. R. Parkerson, Delaney, C. M. Parkerson, L. J. Serrett, Jno. O. Mouton, F. Demanade, Jaufroid, Jno. Hahn, I. A. Broussard, Albert Doucet, B. Clegg, M. Mouton, J. J. Davidson; Misses Clye and Lizzie Mudd, Liza, Susie and Anna Hopkins, Bessie and Leila Cornay, Adele and Viola Young, Stella Trahan, Nita and May Scranton, Lea Gladu, Lizzie Parkerson, Lula Kelly, Frances Greig, Berthie McCord, Maud Boas, Dora Jaufroid, Mamie Duson, Pearl Harmonson, K. Andrus, Edith Trahan;  Messrs. Chas. D. Caffery, T. M. Biossat, A. B. Denbo, C. K. Darling, Jaufroid, A. A. Morgan, J. Nickerson, St., J. Nickerson, Jr., Dr. F. S. Mudd, C. M. Parkerson, P. B. Torian, Dr. Hy A. Irion, Dr. F. E. Girard, Baxter Clegg, J. Givens, Don Greig, Homer Mouton, G. Gladu, Dr. R. B. Raney, Mousseau, George Doucet, O. Mouton, Charles F. Trudeau, Pierre Gerac, Crow Girard, S. W. McFaddin, Sterling Mudd.

 A sequel to the day's pleasure was a very enjoyable evening spent at the home of Mrs. J. E. Trahan. Music, song and dance lent their charms to the enjoyment of those present. Delicious refreshments were served. Mrs. Trahan was assisted in receiving by the Misses Cornay and Young. Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.


A Pleasant Meeting.

 The Ladies' Five O'clock Tea Club is indebted to Mrs. N. P. Moss for a very merry afternoon on last Thursday. The usual business part of the programme having been finished, Mrs. W. Mouton's splendid rendition of "Maud Muller Up-to-Date" was enjoyed. The musical selections of Mrs. Darling and Miss Mudd added much to the pleasure of the meeting. After partaking of delightful refreshments a novel feature of entertainment was introduced by the charming hostess. At this game, in which the "Comical Catcher" was very amusing, Mrs. Biossat and Mrs. Caffery proved themselves well versed in the art of pitching and tied for the prize, a vase of exquisite design. In the final contest Mrs. Biossat was the fortunate winner. Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.




A Public Market.

 A public market house is badly needed in Lafayette and it is to be hoped that the incoming Council will use every means in its power to have one built. It is useless to speak of the many advantages to be derived from a public market. We dare say that every resident of Lafayette would more than welcome the erection of a suitable building for market purposes. Under the present system the house-keeper is put to a great deal of trouble to procure the day's provisions. The revenues that would inevitably flow from a public market would in a short time pay for the building. Let the City Council think seriously of this matter. It is worth the attention of our councilmen who can not give their attention to a better cause.
Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.





Ball To-night.

The Gazette has received an invitation to be present at the ball to be given to-night at Falk's Opera House by the members of Morgan Lodge 317. The following are the committees.

Reception: J. B. Coffery, chairman; J. F. Bowen, W. A. Hebert, R. L. Cochrane, C. H. Snyder, I. N. Fields, A. J. Bru, W. A. Clark.

Floor Managers: J. B. Comes, chairman; J. F. Guidry, L. Bazun, C. J. Baudier, A. Comes.

Arrangement: H. Jagou, chairman; L. Bazun, J. B. Comes, J. F. Guidry.

Invitation: J. F. Guidry, chairman; F. H. Guidry, E. Pefferkorn.

Music will be played by the Breaux Bridge Band. Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.






School Board

Meets in Special Session - Schools Will Close on May 21.

 Lafayette, La., May 8, 1897. - The School Board met to-day in special session with the following members present: Messrs. Delhomme, Bailey, Hopkins, Clegg, Durke, Olivier, Dupuis, Broussard and Whittington. Absent: None.

 The committee appointed to secure a suitable building for the Peabody Summer Normal School, reported that Falk's hall could be rented for the sum of $2.50 a night. The committee was authorized to close with Mr. Falk.

 The resolution passed a the last regular meeting of the Board, closing the schools on the 28th of May was, on motion duly seconded, so amended as to read the 21st of May.

 The committee appointed by the teachers at the last meeting of the Parish Institute, appeared before the Board to urge the teachers' claim with regards to drawing pay during the session of the Summer Normal School. Mr. R. C. Greig was the spokesman and made a strong plea in favor of the teachers.

 The Board then went into executive session.

 The following resolution was offered by Clegg:

 Be it resolved by the School Board of the parish of Lafayette, in special session assembled, That owing to the fact that the schools will be closed May 21, and that there will be no schools running, that the teachers be requested to attend the Peabody Summer Normal to be held at this place from May 31, to June 26, said teachers to receive no pay for same.

 Resolved further, That the superintendent be instructed to keep a memorandum of teachers present and teachers absent, every day.

 Following is the vote on above resolution:  Yeas - Bailey, Clegg, Olivier, Dupuis, Whittington.  Nays - Delhomme, Broussard, Durke.

 On motion of Mr. Clegg, the superintendent was authorized to pay the teachers on half of their pay for the last month's work. The other half to be paid with the first money coming into the treasury.

 Board then adjourned.
     C. F. LATIOLAIS, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897.




Police Jury Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., May 6, 1897. - The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: R. C. Landry, C. C. Brown, Ben Avant, M. Billeaud, Jr., E. Primeaux, J. Whittington, Alonzo Lacy, and Alfred Hebert.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read approved.

 Hon. E. A. Duchamp of St. Martin appeared and called attention to the unsafe condition of Bayou Tortue bridge Mr. Billeaud was appointed to the attend to the matter in connection with the authorities of St. Martin.

 The committee appointed to settle with the sheriff and tax collector for parish taxes of 1894 and 1895, reported that after a thorough examination and verification of the statements and deductions lists, submitted by the collector for said taxes, all of said monies were found properly accounted for and quietus had been granted unto the said tax collector for licenses, for the said years of 1894 and 1895, and if found correct the committee empowered to grant a quietus for said licenses.

 By motion of M. T. Martin was appointed to assist the assessor in the assessment of lands, and $100 allowed for such service.

 Mr. Hebert reported that he had sold the scaffold lumber for $7.50. Approved.

 The committee on Darmas Broussard bridge was granted further time.

 Representatives of the Lafayette Sugar Refinery here appeared and asked that said plant be exempted from parish taxation. The request was approved.

 It was resolved that all persons having portions of public road with their private enclosures be and and hereby notified to remove their fences or obstructions to the public highways, otherwise the road overseers of the respective wards are authorized to remove said obstructions immediately.

 By motion it was resolved that each person called for road duty shall give at least eight hours work per day and the overseers shall prosecuted all delinquents in this respect.

 By motion of Mr. Primeaux the following jury of freeholders were appointed to trace and lay out a public road 40 feet wide according to law, from the corner of J. A. Laneville's and P. R. Landry's land running south to the limits of Vermilion parish: O. Cade, Ben Flanders, Sidney Dupliex, Octave Theriot, Clement, Romero and Aurelien Primeaux.

 By motion of Mr. Primeaux the following jury of freeholders were appointed to trace and lay out a public road forty wide according to law, from Royville, near A. L. Dyer's store, to connect with the road running from said town: O. Cade, Ben Flanders, Sidney Dupleix, Octave Theriot, Clement Romero and Aurelien Primeaux.

 By motion Sheriff Broussard was allowed 45 cents per day each for feeding prisoners provided that he maintains a keeper in the jail and obligates himself to keep said jail in proper sanitary condition. Sheriff Broussard being present accepted the above contract under the conditions stipulated.

 The petitions of Mrs. C. Willy and F. Trahan, for pensions, were again refused.

 The sum of $25 was granted unto Geo. Gaspar and wife, indigents.

 The treasurer submitted his monthly report as follows:

  To the President and Members of the Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Gentlemen - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of parish funds since my last report.


--------------------p. 3-----------------------

 Respectfully submitted,
              J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.

 Lafayette, La., May 6, 1897.
    The following accounts were approved:




-----------------------p. 3----------------

 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned until Thursday, May 13, at the usual hour.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 5/13/1897.



 From the Lafayette Advertiser of May 15th, 1908:

 OUTING AT SOUTHWEST PASS.
(By One of the Outers.)

 A party consisting of Auguste Maitre, Frank Poimboeuf, N. Abramson, Paul Robichaux and M. Y. Moore left Chargois' landing Sunday morning at 5:25, in the Little Florence, for a five day outing on the Gulf. The little Florence, Aug. Maitre captain, moved off at a lively rate and all were enjoying the early morning ride down the bayou anticipating a quick run to Vermilion bay, but about 9 o'clock the boat struck a jam of water hyacinths at Durratt' ferry, but after about an hour and half pushing, pulling, backing and poling through about a half mile of this obnoxious pest they were cleared, and while there were numerous other jams none of them impeded the party's progress to any great extent. Abbeville was passed about noon. A cold lunch was prepared and eaten without a stop. Alligators, snakes and turtles were shot at with shotgun and Colts' automatic without any apparent effect. About 3 p. m. a stop was made to fill up the tank with cistern water, after which it was steady running until the bay was reached at 6:30, when the boat was slowed up and a consultation was held to determine whether it was advisable to try to cross the 7 mile stretch of water to Lake Fermin, as a strong south wind was blowing and the water looked rough to the inexperienced eyes. On the advice of Capt. Maitre it was decided to go as far as Shell Island, about a mile out, and if things were not too equally, to proceed. Accordingly, with Paul Robichaux and Frank Poimboeuf taking turns at the wheel, and Maitre at the engine, speed was increased and the Little Florance drove her prow into the first of the waves and had not gone far until both pilots were enjoying (?) a briny face wash and shaking the spray from their hair. However, the weight of the five men and provisions, camping outfit, etc., made sufficient ballast to hold the boat steady, and as she was facing the wind there was very little rolling. By the time Shell Island was reached nerves were somewhat steadier, and as everybody was wet, it was decided to continue across the bay, which was done, and the boat was steered into a canal leading into Lake Fermin, which was crossed easily, and the party passed through Bayou Fermin and into the bay once more near Cox' Shell beach, where they went into camp for three days fishing, bathing and hunting. The fishing proved good as sheepheads, drums, mullets, croakers, sea trout, crabs, oysters and stingarees were caught in abundance. The bathing was delightful during the first two days, but on the third day the north wind made it rather cool. The hunting trip was abandoned at the last minute on account of reports of the mosquitoes, which were said to be out in force back in the marsh. However, the party obtained all the deer meat they desired from an old hunter who called at the camp and partook of refreshments from the interior. On the afternoon of the third day it was decided that, on account of the extra low tide caused by the north wind preventing a return through Lake Fermin, to start for home and cross the bay around Red Fish Point that evening, giving an early start from the mouth of the bayou for the run for Lafayette. And right here the worst experience of the trip came in. The wind had gone down some and the bay looked quiet, but no sooner had the boat turned Red Fish Point for the twelve mile run back to Shell Island than the wind raised again and things got rough. Another consultation was held, but it was concluded to go ahead. The waves may not have been high to old seamen, but they looked to the helmsmen (who were the same as on the down trip) to be sky high, and every other one had a white crest. Everyone got thoroughly drenched, also all the bedding, tents, etc. The boat was steered for Mud Point. After about three miles of rough water things became somewhat calm and there was considerable relief all around. About 8:30 the first plantation was reached and two of the party were told off to negotiate for a barn or shelter of any kind, and to the great relief of all, beds with feather mattresses were obtained with mosquito bars hung already; also an abundance of fresh milk and butter. After a night of unbroken slumber the party embarked for the home stretch, and with a fast uninterrupted run, Chargois landing was reached about 5:30 p. m., from which place to town all proceeded to limber up after the eight hours continual sitting in the boat.

 For a pleasant outing, good fishing and delightful bathing at a minimum cost the trip to Vermilion bay or Southwest Pass is ideal. Lafayette Advertiser 5/15/1908. 

                

   































 














LAGNIAPPE:

Bishop Sessums of New Orleans.

 Some of the preachers of New Orleans are up in arms because Bishop Sessums, who compares with the whole set intellectually as a mountain does with a molehill, has recently expressed in a sermon profound in wisdom, ideas and views in line with modern thought. Mr. Sessums is responsible to his church alone for his religious actions, deeds and words, and just what a lot of cantankerous Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists and Lutheran preachers have to do with his service to the church, is far from clear. Their recent protest is an exhibition of arrant ignorance, despicable intolerance and contemptible inter-meddling propensities. The church, Christianity and the worship of God is elevating to humanity, without which the earth would be a veritable hades. But frequently the action of some of the self-styled ministers of God would disgrace, if credited to, the inmates of a State prison. 

From the Iberville South, Democrat and in the Lafayette Gazette 5/15/1897


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