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Monday, January 12, 2015

**APRIL 29TH M C

From the Lafayette Gazette of April 29th, 1899:



Burglars Strike Again.

 Burglars made another raid in Lafayette Monday night. They entered the homes of Assessor A. M. Martin and Mr. A. B. Denbo. For the possible identification of the articles stolen we give an itemized account of them. From Mr. Denbo's residence, besides $40 in cash, the thieves got away with a ladies' gold watch with "Anna from Amzi" engraved on the case, a solitaire diamond ring, a pearl cluster with a diamond center, a gold band, scarf-pin and breast-pin. Mr. Martin lost his valuable gold watch and $10 in cash. The watch is an 18 carat one, with 1/4 split movement, horse timer, of the Mattas make. The name of R. L. McBride is engraved on case. It is an old style winder.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.




Officers Involved in Tussle.

 Police Officers Ulysee Himel and Hebert had quite a tussle with a negro named Thomas Crandall, whom they arrested Wednesday night. When under the influence of liquor Crandall is a desperate man, and it was only the officers' cool judgment that prevented them from using forcible means to incarcerate him. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1889.



 Some Citizens Critical.

 Some of our citizens are too prone to criticize the action of our police officers in resorting to harsh measures when dealing with desperate characters who resist arrest. In arresting a negro during the week officers Hebert and Himel had to severely with him in order to protect themselves. Had it not been for their cool-headedness he would have fared more roughly at their hands. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.



THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

 A few of the leading citizens of the parish assembled at the court-house last Saturday to take the proper steps to awaken the interest of all the people of this community in the establishment of the Industrial School in our midst. Our two other competitors have already made strenuous efforts to capture this much coveted prize, and it behooves every man and woman in the parish to do his or her utmost to help these public spirited men in their laudable undertaking. It is needless to say how much benefit the community would derive from such an institution.

 Ruston, in the Northern part of the State, without easy means of communication with the outer world, and where is located such an Industrial Institute, has built a State-wide reputation as an educational centre. It won for her about twenty-five well-trained teachers as citizens, and scores of young men and women from other parts of the State make Ruston their home for several months every year. Its value to us is inestimable and we hope that the gentlemen who have taken the lead in this movement will meet with the hearty co-operation of the people of this parish. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.

    



Century Club Entertainment.
 The Century Club entertained last Monday and Tuesday. The occasion was a billiard-playing contest among the members of the club. Many ladies and gentlemen witnessed the interesting game both evenings. The winners the first evening were Messrs. Denbo, Serrett, A. R. Trahan, Krauss, Don Caffery and Joe Mouton. The next day these gentlemen played among themselves and the number narrowed down to Messrs. Trahan, Mouton and Nickerson, who had substituted Mr. Denbo. The two latter gentlemen won the first and second prizes respectively. Miss Mattie Torian was the recipient of the ladies' prize donated by Mr. T. M. Biossat, the jeweler.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.



Business Men's Association. 


The Business Men's Association held a meeting at the court-house Saturday, and among the matters discussed by the members, was the proposed rail-road which is to run from some point between Arkansas to the Gulf. Lafayette should remember that she lost when she supinely allowed New Iberia to get the Abbeville road. The farmers living in the parish, especially, can realize what the road would mean to them now, and it is unpardonable if our carelessness and lack of enterprise again leave us in a lurch. We understand that the association of business men have taken this under full consideration and no stone will will be left unturned in the attempt to get the road to pass in the vicinity of Lafayette. A committee of citizens from the parish has been selected  and a meeting called to be held at the court-house to-day. We sincerely hope that practical steps will be taken in the right direction, and the people of the parish will have had the satisfaction of having done their best even if they are unsuccessful.  Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.


At the Compress. - The Lafayette Compress has closed a contract with the Munger Improved Gin Co. to erect for them an up-to-date and complete Munger system gin plant. It will be in operation by the first of August.
Laf. Gazette 4/29/1899.








Give Us the Industrial School.

 Primarily give us the Industrial School. It will be of incalculable value to everyone. It will soon be erected, it at all. We do not wish to detract a particle from the benefit to be derived from the proposed railroad, but let us go to work and do all in our power to get the school first and then we will see about the road. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.  






Store Sold. - Mr. G. H. Guilbeau has moved into the store building recently vacated by Mr. G. E. Brown. Mr. Guilbeau will continue, as heretofore, to keep a choice and large assortment of general merchandise, and do all in his power to afford satisfaction to his many customers. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.











A Delightful Evening.

 On Friday morning, April twenty-first, dark rain clouds dispersed the bright hopes of the ladies of the Tea Club, who were planning an entertainment for that evening at the home of Judge Parkerson, complimentary to their gentleman friends.

 When night came clearing skies and glowing star light tempted forth the guests, and they were delightfully welcomed in that elegant home.

 Miss Parkerson, the popular president of the Tea Club, received the guests with her usual gracious and charming manner, and bade them seek pleasure in the brilliantly illuminated parlors. These spacious rooms were made more attractive still with qualities of roses at every turn, and the air was perfumed with their sweet fragrance.

 Progressive euchre was the amusement of the hour, and seven tables seated the players. After ten games, Mrs. Davis received the lady's prize, a gold jeweled hat pin. Mrs. LeRosen was awarded in consolation, a fan.

 Messrs. A. B. Denbo and S. R. Parkerson competed for the gentleman's prize. and after a deciding game, Mr. Parkerson was the recipient of a silver mustache cup, decorated with the colors of the Tea Club, purple and white. Mr. Don Caffery consoled himself with the booby prize, a toy drum; and playing a spiritual march, he led the way to the dining room, complete in all its appointments, where the guests partook of delicious ice-cream, cake and strawberries.

 At the card tables delicate bon-bons were served for the delectation of the players.

 Music and repartee beguiled the hours until the good nights were given.

 The guests so charmingly entertained were: Mmes. Moss, Caffery, C. Parkerson, Blake, Denbo, Biossat, B. Clegg, Pellerin, Delaney, LeRosen and Davis; Messrs. Denbo, Biossat, B. Clegg, Pellerin, L. Hopkins, LeRosen, Davis, Givens, Elliot, Don Caffery and P. Torian. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.


Horse Races.

 The races which were advertised to come off last Sunday were witnessed by a large crowd of ladies and gentlemen. The honors were evenly divided, Lafayette being the winner of only one race. The horse belonging to Boagni & Ogden of Opelousas barely won the race against Lucien Roy's Boney. The Breaux Bridge horse, owned by Armand Broussard was defeated by the local one. Sunday week, Boney is matched to run against Boagni's horse at Opelousas. To-day and to-morrow there are races at Breaux Bridge. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.


 At Oak Ave. Park.

 Last Sunday while the races were being held at the Oak Avenue Park, a very interesting game of ball was played by the local Cosmopolitan Club and the St. Charles College boys, of Grand Coteau. The visitors were defeated by a score of 12 to 10. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.


THE MEETING TO-DAY.

 In another column of this paper appears a communication written by a gentleman engaged in farming, calling attention to, and commenting upon, the meeting which is announced to take place to-day at the court-house. From the tone of the communication The Gazette takes it that matters deeply concern the farmers of this parish.

 The Gazette is informed that the main purpose of the meeting is to discuss and consider the propositions that have been made to the cane-growers by the Lafayette Sugar Refinery. It seems that the contract which the farmers are asked to sign has caused very great dissatisfaction and may result seriously to the agricultural interests of this parish. The demoralizing prices of cotton have driven many of our farmers into the cultivation of cane which offered fair remuneration to the tiller of the soil and it is unfortunate if this industry should receive a setback at its very incipiency. It is to be hoped that the differences which have arisen between the producer and the manufacturer will be adjusted with reason and fairness and that which seems to be an impediment to the advancement of the cane industry will be satisfactorily settled.

 The cane farmers claim, and with reason, that the contract which they must sign in order to dispose of their crop, is a decidedly one-sided affair and while it fully protects the manufacturer affords no protection to the producer. The latter consigns himself to the tender mercies of the manufacturer and binds himself to concede the righteousness of all his grievances, be they real or imaginary. He agrees to a certain test made by a representative of the refinery whose judgment is as irrevocable as that of the Mikado or the Sultan and beyond which there is no  earthly appeal.

 We understand that at the meeting to-day a committee will be appointed to call upon the manager of the Lafayette Sugar Refinery and that an effort will be made to arrive at mutual agreement by which the interest of both sides will be protected. There is no reason why any differences can not be adjusted. If both parties want what is fair and what each is entitled to it can be settled and settled well.

 Prominent sugar-growers have assured The Gazette that they will ask only a square deal. It is to be hoped that they will be met in a spirit of councilman and fairness by the management of the refinery. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.


{Communicated.}
THE FARMER'S MEETING.

 I see a call for a meeting of the farmers in your last issue. To me this is the most important meeting that could be called or assembled at this time. In the  past most of our calls and meetings have been political ones to advance the interest or ambition of some favorite individual and without often any corresponding benefit to any one else. But few men in office ever vote for or favor a reduction in taxation, particularly if it is likely to take anything from their salaries. This call if I have rightly understood the signs of the times, is for discussing affairs that pertain directly to the interest of the farmers; whether or not, he shall retain his home, provide bread and meat and the common necessities for his family.

 This serious subject, he has now to consider. The farmer does not propose to make war on their interests, but should do all in his power to protect his own, give justice to others and retain his right to demand it from them. Farmers standing singly are thrust aside, and as sheep, dumb-led to the slaughter. What is a contract and what are we understand as the meaning of one, and for what purpose are they made? Is it for mutual protection and guidance and a voluntary agreement on the part of all parties concerned? Or is it a document from a Lord to a beggar demanding that he sign or be damned? I read a few days ago an interesting article in the Times-Democrat under the heading of The Position of Cotton, which should be a keynote to the Farmer, and a warning to trusts and monopolies. An extract is as follows:

 ----------------p. 2-------------------

 And it further says:

 ------------------p. 2------------------


 Now my friends, in conclusion I hope much from your meeting, even if not for the present. The future will bring its reward, if you are guided by wisdom, justice and fairness. You cannot fail. Remember  a true saying: The Lord helps those who help themselves. Yours truly.
    "REJECTED FOR ANY CAUSE WHATSOEVER."
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.





School Board Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., April 6, 1899.

 The School Board met this day with the following members present: Delhomme, Hopkins, Clegg, Dupuis, Broussard and Spell.  Absent: Durke, Olivier and Whittington.

 The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

 On motion of Mr. Clegg, Broussard was appointed to act temporarily in the place of Mr. Whittington on the finance committee.

 On motion of Broussard the president appointed the following committee to settle with the sheriff, Messrs. E. G. Voorhies, J. O. Broussard and Baxter Clegg.

 Mr. Dupuis reported having sold $3.40 of the lumber of the old school house at Carencro.

 The following report was made by Mr. Dupuis:

 To the Hon. President and Members of the School Board: - With regards to the old school house at Carencro I make the following report: Part of the lumber was used in the new school building and part of it for the separating fence made in the yard, amounting to about 2,000 feet of lumber.
             (Signed)  V. E. DUPUIS.

 The following report was received from the committee in charge of the new school at Carencro, La.

 April 3, 1899 - To the Hon. President and Members of the School Board in and for Lafayette Parish: - Following is a report of the funds received and disbursed in building the new school house at Carencro, La:

--------------p. 3--------------

 The bill of lumber bought from Sibille Bros. having been bought for cash we recommend the payment of the 8 per cent interest added thereto by the committee.
     Respectfully submitted,
            C. C. BROWN, Chairman; V. E. DUPUIS, Director; C. F. LATIOLAIS.

 Mr. Broussard moved that the report of the committee be accepted and voucher drawn for the balance due Sibille Bros.

 The superintendent reported a fund of $12.90 net proceeds of an excursion given to Huron for the benefit of the Carencro school house.

 The superintendent's report was read and ordered spread on the minutes.

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.

 Lafayette, La., April 5, 1899. - To the Hon. President and Members of the School Board. - Following is a report compiled from teachers' monthly reports as well as from personal observation relative to the condition of the schools under supervision of the schools under our supervision. The number of schools, and teachers employed in 1899, were as follows:

 -------------p. 3-----------------

 Having added 6 schools to the number existing in 1896, and employed to teachers more, we have the following monthly expense:

----------------p. 3-----------------

 The weather conditions during the fall and winter of 1898 were so inclement that our attendance was reduced by over two hundred pupils as compared to 1897 - the attendance being 974, which divided into the monthly expense, averages the cost per child to $1.56 per month.

 For the past few years a great deal of progress has been made in our public school system, but there is yet room for improvement. Our school property should be more carefully attended to. Parents whose children are attending the schools of our different districts should take pride in helping the school officials in maintaining the school houses and grounds in good shape. Whilst touching on this subject it will not be amiss to suggest to the teachers the importance of planting shade trees, as I have noticed that but few schools in our parish can boast of any shade on the grounds.

 With the increase in the state apportionments it will be easier for the Board of Directors to appropriate more liberally for the material interests of our school property. The trustees of the schools should be allowed certain discretionary powers whenever urgent necessity requires it.

 We have secured the services of competent teachers for our schools following the advice of our esteemed state superintendent, we have (as far as the law allows it) endeavored to employ home people as teachers, thus giving impetus to the educational cause.

 In few instances only have we had to close schools on account of lack of attendance. In the 2d ward more that anywhere else has this been the case. But it was due to indifference as much as to the dilapidated condition of two of the school houses in that ward.

 After a struggle for mere existence, our High School has become an institution of which any parish could be proud. The primary schools in our parish are doing such good work. The Carencro 6th ward school, although managed by efficient teachers, has declined considerably since the last two year, and unless better attendance is obtained in the near future it would be advisable to reduce the school to one teacher. On the other hand the Roger 6th ward school with an enrollment of 56 scholars and a daily attendance of over 40, will have to be provided with an assistant. Upon this point I would ask immediate action by the Board of Directors.

 The Lafayette Primary school is entirely too crowded for two teachers to work efficiently and should the City Council give any assistance the matter could be remedied at once.

 With regards to the other schools of the parish we think that they are sufficient to afford free access to all children who wish to attend (at least for the present) none of them being to numerously attended to prevent efficient work.

 To conclude I would suggest that the Board of Directors call upon all the teachers of our parish to gather in their pupils at the end of the present session, at some point in the parish so that a comparative estimate of the work being done by the different schools might have reached by the public in general.
                  Respectfully submitted,
                             C. F. LATIOSLAIS,
                                  Superintendent.

 On motion of Mr. Clegg, seconded by Mr. Dupuis, it was resolved that assistants be appointed for the Roger Sixth Ward School, the Lafayette (white) Primary School and Lafayette (colored) Primary School.

 The treasurer's report was read and accepted as follows:

 To the President and Members of School Board, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of the parish school funds since my last report:

 ------------------p. 3--------------------


 Balance of hand, $673.03.
                Respectfully submitted,
                        J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.
Lafayette, La., April 6, 1899.

 The Board adjourned to 2 p. m. At 2 p. m. the Board convened with the same members present except Mr. Clegg.

 The following resolution was adopted unanimously:

 Resolved, That the president and secretary of the School Board together with the principal of the high school and Mr. Wm. Clegg, member of the State Board of Education, be authorized to sign the diplomas of the Graduates at the High School at the end of each session.

 Resolved, further, That every teacher in the Parish be invited to take part in the closing exercises of the High School, the programme for said exercises in to be determined by the president and secretary of the Board and the principal of the High School.

 A petition numerously signed by the patrons of the Lafayette High and Primary Schools, asking the board to grant one hour to the children for dinner was read by the secretary.

 The superintendent insisted on granting even one half hour for dinner but the petition was laid on the table by motion of Mr. Spell, seconded by Mr. Broussard.

 The resignation of Prof. R. E. Cunningham was read accepted.

 A petition from the patrons of the Stelly 6th ward school asking the appointment of Mr. A. L. Guilbeau was read and deliberated upon.

 On motion of Mr. Spell, seconded by Mr. Broussard, Mr. Dupuis was authorized to select a teacher for the Stelly school.

 The application of Miss Lucy Judice for the assistanceship in the Broussardville school was read and laid on the table.

 On motion of Mr. Dupuis, Mr. Marius Roger was appointed assistant in the Roger school.

 Miss Eliza Hopkins was appointed second assistant in the Lafayette Primary School.

 The superintendent and Mr. Delhomme were appointed a committee to investigate into the removal of the school house situated near Scott.

 On motion of Mr. Broussard the superintendent was instructed to draw the his salary quarterly.

 The Board after inquiring into the complaints made by the Grand Jury of irregularities in one of the 6th ward schools exonerated any and all parties who could have been implied by the Grand Jury's report.

 The following accounts were approved:

 ------------------p. 3-------------------

 Mr. Caffery reported the collection of $130.90 from rent of school lands.

 The Board adjourned.
                   C. F. LATIOLAIS, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.





 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 4/29/1899.

 Dr. Pepper has just arrived at the Lafayette Drug Company, and has come to stay.

 Mr. T. Eves was stricken down with paralysis during the week and was violently sick. He has now about completely recovered.

 Deputy Assessor Jos. Ducote has kindly given us the census of educable children between the ages of 6 and 18 in the town of Lafayette. There are 426 whites and 349 colored.

 Henry Hebert was painfully hurt last Saturday from falling off his horse. He lost control over the animal and was thrown to the ground. We are glad to say that he is again well and on duty.

 A neat house with 5 apartments; out-housed; orchard, flower garden; everything in good condition. For cash or on reasonable terms. Apply to Mrs. H. Garnier, Lafayette, La.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.



  

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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 29th, 1899:

VERY ACCEPTABLE.

Two weeks ago we published the following: "Hon. Adelma Guidry, member of the Police Jury of St. Landry is a candidate for Sheriff and his platform is somewhat appealing to the pockets of the people and this appeal when conscientiously done is always popular. He offers his services as Sheriff for a salary of $300 per year and deputyships to be given out to the lowest bidder."

 "There are other parishes which would like to have such an offer made to them."

 Our esteemed contemporary The GAZETTE takes issue with us and it its last number says:

 "The Advertiser's plan if carried to its legitimate conclusion would result in having some sweet scented bird in all the offices because it is a good policy to sell the sheriff's office to the lowest bidder the same methods ought to be employed in the selection of all the officers."

 First - This is not the ADVERTISER'S plan. It is Mr. Guidry's plan. When we added the wish that "other parishes would like to have such an offer made to them" - the heavy burden of taxation borne by the farming class in general came to our mind, and we thought that if Mr. Guidry, who is a member of the Police Jury and who probably knows the workings of a sheriff's office, could fill it at a SALARY of $300; other parishes might find other as patriotic men to do the same.

 Second - Had we in mind our own parish we would have said the parish of Lafayette would be glad to have such an offer made. No, if the people of our parish are willing to be taxed to death, we are but one of the people and we can bear it.

 But, as the GAZETTE has raised the issue as to this parish let's see as our contemporary says about one item: We use the argument and the figures from our esteemed contemporary and the whole reduced to its simplest expression, mathematically speaking, means that a sheriff at a salary of $300 for this parish would have to pay the traveling expenses of the prisoners sent by the parish by the parish to the penitentiary. This is certainly misleading as our esteemed contemporary knows full well that an appropriation of $2,300 is allowed the sheriff's office for this parish from which amount the expenses incidental to his office are paid, leaving him a personal salary.

 Now employing the figures of our esteemed contemporary, which of course are extreme in their moderation, we find that the expenses  of 25 prisoners a year (which is an average, so it is said) is costing $240.25. We are willing to do better than the GAZETTE, let the sheriff partake of meals at $1.00, let him rest his weary limbs in a good, soft, feather bed, allow him two packs of red cross or fair play, a dozen of 25 cent cigars, which will run up the estimate to $259.10 including a $50 watchman whose duty is not clearly deferred by our esteemed contemporary. Between $259.10 and $2,300 there is a wide margin.

 Of course, deputy-sheriffs are to be reckoned with, and we will for the sake of estimating put down 2 deputies at $35 per month each, say $840 per year; 2 horses' care $5 per month each, say $120 per year, and then we will have $259. - 10, $840, $120 total $1,219.10 leaving a margin of $1,080.90 of the appropriation of $2,300 which personal margin, Mr. Guidry propose to reduce the $300 saving thereby to the people $780.90.

 It is not for the ADVERTISER to say that a sheriff could live on $300 a year after having his expenses paid. This Mr. Guidry will be obliged, if elected, to demonstrate. But we suppose Mr. Guidry keeps in his mind the civil business of the office which may reach a couple of cool thousands, the individual criminal fines, the commission on taxes, state and parish, the bonus on delinquent axes, the arrestations  of the parish and other INS of the office.

 As for a sheriff to land in the Home for the Homeless Men, after receiving a salary of $300, we know not, but what we do know is that scores of our farmers are homeless in their own homes groaning under the heavy burden of taxation. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.

             

Honor Roll.

 Of the Lafayette High School, for the month of April, 1899: Martha Broussard, Gaston Toussel, Wallace Beadle, Eugene Hernandez, Onisia Beadle, Julia Tolson, Ezora Pefferkorn, Annie Bell, Perry Singleton, Willie Montgomery, Harold Demanade, Fred Voorhies, Pothier Voorhies, Charles Hernandez, Ned Voorhies, Louis Guerre, Anna Hopkins, Tom Wier.
Lafayette Advertiser  4/29/1899.  


       


ELECTION.

 Next Monday will be the day on which our Municipal officers will be elected.

 There being but one ticket before the people no excitement is to be feared and the whole thing will pass pleasantly and amicably.

 To the retiring members we wish a state of supreme happiness in being relieved of the cares and burdens of municipal worry.

 To the incoming members we will say: Success to you gentlemen.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.



CENTURY CLUB.

 As announced previously the billiard tournament took place at the Century Club on last Monday and Tuesday evenings. The rooms of the club were brilliantly illuminated and the ladies guests added an air of cheerfulness.

 Everything went as merry as a "marriage bell."

 The winners of Monday night games were Messrs. Serrett, Denbo, Trahan, Krauss, Don Caffery and Joe Mouton.

 Miss Mattie Torian was the successful contestant in naming greatest number of winners and she won a beautiful amethyst pearl brooch, donated for the occasion by Mr. T. M. Biossat, a member of the club.

 On Tuesday night games were between the winners of the preceding evening and the successful ones were Joe Mouton, Trahan and Nickerson who substituted Denbo.

 The three winners played one game for prize, Joe Mouton, winning 1st prize, a beautiful set of gold center diamond cuff buttons and Nickerson 2nd prize.

 Those two nights were spent pleasantly affording good muscular exercise and rewarding for skillful playing.

 There was a large attendance on both nights and the occasion was pronounced a success. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.





HIGHLY APPRECIATED VISIT.


 The West bound train being quite late on last Thursday gave us the pleasure of a call from the ladies en route to the W. C. T. U., State Convention which met at Crowley, La.

 Mrs. I. I. Field, whose home is in Marksville, Avoyelles Parish being assistant editor of the Marksville New Enterprise decided to fill up the time by calling on the fraternity. We were pleased to meet her. Mrs. Field represents the Union of her town of which she is the vice-president; she was accompanied by Mrs. E. S. Gaines, the corresponding secretary of that Union.

 Mrs. M. H. Burch, of Shreveport, and Miss Louisa Holladay of Marthaville both delegates to the convention completed the party. We enjoyed their visit greatly. Our gallant real estate agent Mr. Amb. Mouton took the ladies in his charge and showed them the sights around Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.


Public Spirited.

 We took a peep at the house built for Home Fire Co., and found it completed. Upon inquiry we found that a dozen or more of our public spirited citizens had volunteered their services to build the same free of charge and under the leadership of Mr. Jno. Broussard the task has been accomplished. This speaks highly for those who have been engaged in the work and it is an act of commendation worthy of publicity. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.


Natural Talent.

 We are pleased to learn that Miss F. Estelle Mouton who has a natural talent in the photographic art, is perfecting herself in oil painting under the tutelage of an artist, and that she will soon exhibit portraits of some of our city people and solicit orders.

 Having seen some of her last work, we feel confident that she will give satisfaction and will be successful. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.


SHOEMAKER.

 I hereby inform my customers, my friends and the public that I am back at my old stand near John Vandergrift, ready to do your shoes repairing and also manufacturing new ones. I am doing first-class work in every respect and at living prices.
                           JOE CANATELLA.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.


Death of Sara Schmulen.

 Died at the residence of Mr. Melville Kahn, at Rayne, La., on Tuesday, April 25th, Miss Sara Schmulen, daughter of Mr. Samuel Schmulen.

 The burial took place last Wednesday morning at 9 a. m., in the pretty Jewish Cemetery located in our midst.

 The corpse came in Wednesday morning at 2 a. m., and was conveyed to the depot to the Synagogue where it stood exposed to view until the hour for burial.

 Miss Schmulen had been lingering off and on a bed of sickness for the last few months and finally the grim reaper of death came to claim its prey.

 She died of dropsy.

 Miss Schmulen was once a resident of Lafayette where she had many staunch friends and where her unassuming manners and gentleness of character was well remembered on as last Wednesday while she was lying sleeping in an unknown eternal rest her former friends of all creeds and walks in life send magnificent floral offerings in such a quantity as to completely hide her coffin from the gaze of the public.

 This was a touching tribute highly appreciated by the members of the family.

 A large crowd accompanied the remains to the cemetery and among those present we noticed: Mr. and Mrs. Kapplein, M. Blum, Felix Schmulen and Mrs. Florinne Kahn, of Crowley, La.

 Rayne, La., was represented by Mrs. Lehman and Messrs. M. Wier, David Levy, M. Schwartz, Albert Levy, E. Soloman, Melville Kahn and Alfred Kahn.

 Mr. Gus. Godchaux, of Abbeville and L. Levy of New Iberia were also present and many others whose names escaped out memory. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.





 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 4/29/1899.

 Father Forge administered the sacrament of Holy Baptism to the future editor of the Advertiser, H. A. Van der Cruyssen, Jr., on last Saturday afternoon.

 It is reported that the 24th Infantry, U. S. A. in which is our friend Lt. Moss has been designated for service in the Philippines.

 Mr. Chas. Lusted went to New Orleans last Sunday.

 Editor H. A. Van der Cruyssen left last Wednesday for New Orleans.

 Gazette editor Homer Mouton left last Sunday for Baton Rouge to attend the State Press Association.

 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Martin left last Monday en route to France where they will spend the Summer.

 L. O. Lisbony has bought the Lafayette Laundry and will commence operations next week.

 A freak of nature was show us by Dr. Hopkins - a Planchet rose with a well formed button and leaves in the center.

 Rev. Father Forge informs us that Mgr. Rouxel will be in Lafayette about the middle of next June to administer the holy sacrament of confirmation.

 Mrs. H. K. Ruger and children are now located in Lafayette. Mr. Ruger, the ever-smiling watchmaker at T. M. Biossat's had been here quite alone for a while.

 Don't forget the meeting of the farmers at the court house this morning at 10 o'clock. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1899.




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 From the Lafayette Gazette of April 29th, 1893:



A HOPEFUL STRAW.

 Saturday last, at the sale of the effects of the estate of the late Emile Creighton, some two hundred planted in cane, was sold for $10,500.

 Immediately after the sale. a gentleman, who seemed to be on inside remarked to the gentleman owning the adjoining property, that his future ease is assured, implying, I believed, that the erection of a central refinery would follow the sale. And so it will likely prove.

 Mr. Ferris and others are interested in the move. So that the people may reap some of the benefits certain to result from its operation, it has been decided to form a stock company, capitalized at $200,000, divided into 2,000 shares at the par value of $100 each. The main promoters desire the people to subscribe $25,000 of the capital stock, in money or kind, that is, a planter can take stock and pay $1 on every ton of cane, on account, that he may bring to the mill, which will be placed to his credit and payments continue until such installments aggregate the amount of his stock. for instance suppose he sells his cane to the factory for $4 a ton gross, he will pocket $3 and leave $1 to place against his stock, thereby becoming a co-owner. And right here we want to inject the observation that a $3 a there is more money in cane than in cotton at 10 cents a pound.

 The principal idea in asking the people to subscribe to some shares of the capital stock is more in the nature of a desire to have the people feel some personal interest in the matter than anything else.

 Mr. B. A. Salles has been authorized to solicit subscriptions to the stock, and has met with much encouragement, and thinks the outlook very fair for the realization of the amount.

 The Ferris Company are offered fine inducements at two other points to locate, but prefer the neighborhood of this town, if not on the Creighton tract, then in the vicinity, because the natural advantages adjacent thereto utilized will make the mill a paying property.

 Plans and specifications, we understand, for a 800 tons a day mill has been contracted for, and the early question confronting the people of Lafayette at present is whether they want this plant or not.

 It has been suggested that a mass meeting of the people, under the auspices of the Business Men's Association, be called at an early date, and in day time, when addresses in French and English are made upon the subject.

 There is one thing, we believe, the majority of the people of Lafayette are agreed upon, and that is the demand of the times is for a central sugar refinery, and it is further thought it would pay a handsome profit on the outlay and add the growing desire of our farmers to engage in the cultivation of the sugar cane, it would prove a paying institution to all.

 Capital has made the first advances, shall we repel or bid it welcome ?
Lafayette Gazette 4/26/1893.


  


THE GARDEN SPOT.

 The beauty which characterizes the scenery of Southwest Louisiana, is no where more perfect and grand than in Lafayette parish - the Carencro region on the one side and the Cote Gelee hills on the other - has been pronounced by travelers superb and that it rises to the majestic in its splendid grandeur.

 But beauty aside, you see a happy and well-clad people, denoting contentment and prosperity.

 But prosperity aside, you see prairies that are covered with luxuriant wild grasses, whose nutritive and lasting qualities permit a range for cattle that furnishes sustenance winter and summer, where cattle need no housing in winter, and are generally sleek and fat.

 But, range facilities aside, you see lands susceptible of the highest development, lands that will produce several crops in nine months.

 But fertility of the soil aside, you see a hardy, healthy looking people who are unacquainted with those ailments so common in the north - consumption, asthma etc - thus denoting a salubrious climate.

 But salubrity as of climate aside, you see a population, who a few years ago, in the manners and customs, presented a foreign admixture, to-day this same population is abreast of the times, and this is due to the educational facilities keeping step with the demand of the times.

 Thus this section combines every advantage for the establishment of prosperous and happy homes. Men who are willing to rely on their own energies, exertions, and means, and do not expect a fortune in a year or two, who will find an ample reward, and will succeed in making for themselves homes. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.





  Advantageously Situated.

 There is not a town more advantageously situated than Lafayette for manufacturing enterprises. The obstacle is want of knowledge of the fact, and were it known abroad, we have not the least doubt that the money, brains and brawn that is so essential would come to us. The principal step is to reach the people we need, and how best to do this is the problem confronting us, and it should and can be solved, but it will necessitate a small expenditure of money. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.   




Municipal Ticket.
 We, the undersigned, respectfully submit out names, for mayor and councilmen to the white voters of the town of Lafayette at the election to be held on Monday, May 1, 1893.

 Our faith and steadfastness to Democratic principles cannot be questioned, and if elected we will administer the public affairs of this town in a business-like manner, without fear or favor, of prejudice against any one, and place the good name of the town of Lafayette among the first in the State for good government honestly administered.

For Mayor: WM. CAMPBELL

For Councilmen: A. CLAUS, A. T. CAILLOUET, A. M. MARTIN, WM. GUCHEREAU, A. CAYARD, J. O. MOUTON, J. N. SATTERFIELD.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.  





A Mistrial.

 The case of the State of Louisiana vs. G. Derouen, for violation of the Sunday law was called up Tuesday and placed on trial. The best part of the day was devoted to the taking of evidence and arguments of the lawyers. The case was submitted to the jury early in the evening, and they retired for deliberation. At eight o'clock word was sent to the judge that the jury was unable to agree; the judge ordered the jury locked up for the night. At 10 o'clock next morning court was opened and the jury called in; still unable to agree the jury was discharged and mistrial entered. The jury stood eight for acquittal and four for conviction. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.




 Lamps Being Installed. - The fifty odd street lamps ordered some time since by the city authorities have arrived and are being placed in different parts of town ;  combined with those we now have Lafayette can boast of having a first rate street light system, and one that will prove a great convenience to the public. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893..




Immigration Convention.
The suggestion of our neighbor, the Advertiser, for the calling of an immigration convention of the parishes of Vermilion, Iberia, Acadia and Lafayette, to be held in this town encompasses a splendid idea, and one to which The Gazette gives its warmest concurrence, and would further suggest the that the parishes of St. Martin and St. Landry be added. We think the organization formed of representative men from each of these parishes could do a world of good. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.





A Picnic With Father Forge. - Madame E. Mouton, as chaperone, and the Misses E. Mouton, Alix Judice, Aimee Mouton, Minnie Cornay, Ada Moss, Marthe Mouton, and Nellie Bailey, and Messrs. H. H. Eastin, Henry Gerac, C. O. Couvillon and George Guidry, members of the Catholic choir, went out to Chargois' grove last Sunday to enjoy a picnic tendered them by Father Forge. They report having spent a most enjoyable time.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.




District Court.


 The criminal docket at this session of court is a large one, and among the number of cases some are very serious, involving death should be unqualified verdicts of guilty be returned. The trial of these cases must neccessarily consume much time, but the judge, district attorney, and court officials seem to be willing to give their best efforts. Last Wednesday court opened at 10 o'clock, and continued in session, with only two recesses, until 10 o'clock that night, and took adjournment to 8:30 the next morning, thus demonstrating that public officials are alive to the public interests, and for which they deserve much praise. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.    


 A Lovely Spot.

 Situated on the beautiful Bayou Vermilion, one mile from the town of Lafayette, and owned by Major Sosthene Mouton, is the lovely and picturesque Beausejour park.

 Nature has, indeed, been lavish in her gifts to the Parish of Lafayette, and, to no spot has she been more liberal in bestowing her favors than on this beautiful place.

 There stands the large and umbrageous oaks, robed in silvery moss drapery, defying, Ajax-like, the destructive hand of Time ;  the gorgeous verdure and flora of exquisite tints ;  and, the bubbling springs, the water of which is as clear as crystal, - the living evidence of Nature's masterful performance. To this, and which enhances very much the natural beauty of the place, is a large platform, architecturally tasty, and circular in form, for dancing ;  a rostrum, from which many an address has been delivered ;  a merry-go-round and see-saw, for the children ;  comfortable benches, for the weary ;  arbors, with growing trellis, sentimentally denominated lover's retreat ;  the ever-flowing spring, whose limpid cool and invigorating water invite the thirsty ;  the well-arranged, neat bath-rooms, are some of the accessories that go towards making the whole the lovely place that it is. The major is contemplating some additional improvements, and on this line has already set out a number of rose bushes.

 That the beauty and conveniences are appreciated is attested by the large number of pleasure seekers who throng the grounds, and it is recognized to-day as par excellence the ideal place for a recreative outing.

 The water of the spring has been partially analyzed and show :

 The chlorides of calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium.

 Dicarbonates of potassium and magnesium.

 Carbonates of calcium, magnesium and sodium.

 Iron and Phosphoric acid.

 Total solids 10.84666 grains to gallon. Organic matter 2.098 grains to gallon.

 And the report adds :  A very good water for ordinary purposes, and may be of value medicinally owing to the amount of magnesium carbonate and dicarbonate present.

 It has passed into a truism that one who employs liberally this water for drinking and lavoratory purposes, can dispense with the services of a doctor, for he is not likely to suffer with the ordinary ailments of life, thus proving that this water possesses much medicinal virtue.

 The major is in love with his place, and he has every reason to be. His greatest desire is to embellish it, and solely for this purpose he will make a moderate charge for bathing privileges, and the use of the park.

 To those who wish to enjoy a quiet pastoral life, during the heated term, of those suffering from distressing stomach or kidney troubles, this place, and waters - proved efficacious in these affections - offers special advantages.

 Board in the town can be obtained at very reasonable rates, and the distance to the springs is a pleasant walk, the greater part of the way being through an alley of oak trees.

 The place is well worth visiting.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.


Jim Crow Car Law.

 Judge Theard, of the civil district court in New Orleans, decided Wednesday the case of Isaac A. Broussard vs. the Louisville, New Orleans and Railroad company. The suit was originally for $10,000 damages for having been ejected from one of the defendant's trains, but by remittitur the demands were afterwards reduced to $2,000. The plaintiff, claimed that in June, 1891, he purchased two first-class tickets for passage from New Orleans to Ethel, for the purpose of transporting a negro named Mouton to the insane asylum at Jackson under an order of court. The plaintiff chained his colored charge in the smoking division of the coach assigned to negroes, and plaintiff, being unwell, seating himself in the non-smoking division of the same coach. The conductor requested him to go to the smoking car, and ordered in the alternative that he go into the coach set apart for white passengers only. This plaintiff refused to do so, and demanded the right to go into the white coach and to carry his colored prisoner with him, which request was declined by the conductor on the ground that it made no difference whether he sat in the negro coach with the negro, or the negro sat in the white coach with him, but the conductor again informed him that the smoking car was common place of resort provided for both races, and that if he so desired he could sit in the smoking car with his prisoner.

 Plaintiff insisted upon his right as sheriff not to be separated from his prisoner, whereupon the conductor informed him that the law made no exception in such a case and that he must either obey the law or get off the train. Plaintiff at first elected to leave the train voluntarily, but upon reflection told the conductor to eject him at his peril. The train by that time had reached the Illinois Central junction within the city limits, and, as usual, has come to a stop, when the conductor, without violence or undue force, ejected plaintiff and his prisoner from the train. The next day, at the personal request of the attorney general and the local counsel of the company, plaintiff was permitted, as a favor to ride in the negro coach with his charge.

 Judge Theard Wednesday held that under Act No. 111 of 1890, railroad companies in the State are compelled upon a penalty therein imposed to provide equal and separate accomodation for white and colored passengers, whom they contract to carry, and that no person can be permitted to occupy seats in coaches other than the ones assigned to them on account of their race, and if a person refuses to accede to such rule the railroad official can refuse to carry him. The law is plain, and no exception is made in favor of a sheriff or officer of the law in charges of a prisoner. Any argument or inconvenience resulting must be addressed to the Legislature. There being other means of transportation than that by rail, plaintiff cannot claim that the enforcement of the law as to him would amount to a defeat of justice. In the absence of a special contract made at the time the tickers were purchased that he would be separated from his charge, he has no cause of complaint against the company. Judgment is, therefore, given for defendant. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.




School Board.
Lafayette, La., April 22nd, 1893.

 Pursuant to call the School Board of this parish met this day in special session with the following session with the following members: Julian Mouton, president; H. Theall, D. Bernard, A. C. Guilbeau, J. O. Broussard, and J. S. Whittington.  Absent: Dr. W. W. Lessley and Jasper Spell.

 The reading of the minutes was dispensed with.

 On motion of A. C. Guilbeau, seconded by J. O. Broussard, the following resolution was adopted:

 Resolved, That, Mr. Chas. Hieckchiem who has been selected by the committee for the selection of teacher, as assistant to Mrs. E. W. Glenn's school in Carencro, be and is appointed assistant thereto, provided that an addition or extension be made to the said school at the expense of the people, and that the salary of said assistant be and is hereby fixed at $30 per month, and that said assistant enter upon his duties at once, provided that he uses Dr. J. Francez;s building adjoining said school until said addition, extension or improvement be made.

 Resolved further that the committee for the selection of teachers, be and are hereby authorized to also appoint teachers and assistants when in their judgement it becomes necessary, and they fixed the salary of assistants at any amount not exceeding $30 per month.

 A petition from the colored citizens of the 1st ward asking that the colored school be opened and that Mr. W. H. Williams be appointed teacher was received and referred to the proper committee.

 The following accounts were approved:

 H. Theall, balance due on Royville school, $34.00; to R. C. Greig, repairing school house, $1.90; A. C. Guilbeau, director's per diem two meetings $4.00.

 There being no further business the Board adjourned.
JULIAN MOUTON, President.
H. E. TOLL, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.




 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 4/29/1893.

 Reports reach this office that notwithstanding the cool spell presently experienced, retarding somewhat the growing crops, still everything considered the outlook is very promising.

 Mr. J. E. Trahan sold a piece of property in the neighborhood of the Catholic church to Mr. Walter Mouton recently, the consideration being $2,500. Mr. Trahan proposes to build a residence next to his drugstore, which, when finished, will be occupied by his mother.

 A merry party of picnickers were out last Sunday chaperoned by Mrs. F. Rigues.

 Misses Alix Judice and Lea Gladu visited Carencro Tuesday.

 Mrs. Conniff, of New Orleans, is the guest of her sister, Mrs. John Hahn.

 Miss Zerelda Bailey is spending some days in Broussardville with her sister, Mrs. J. A. Roy.

 Mr. J. Revillon, Miss Louise, his grand-daughter, and Mrs. Wm. Campbell, are sojourning in the Crescent city.

 Mr. Ike Bendel, a popular young merchant of Lake Charles, was in town this week visiting his relatives, the Falks.

 Rev. Forge participated in the ceremonies attendant upon the celebration of the Catholic diocese of New Orleans on the 25th instant.

 The High School fund has been enriched $110, being the net proceeds from the Little Diamonds entertainment. The expenses were only $15.

 Judge C. H. Mouton is in Lafayette attending to the present session of court, where he is interested in some cases. The judge, however, found time to call at The Gazette den.

 We are pained to hear the that our good friend Alfred Hebert is on the sick list, but hope ere this number of The Gazette is printed to see him up and about and in the enjoyment of his accustomed good health. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.







A HOPEFUL STRAW.


 Saturday last, at the sake of the effects of the estate of the late Emile Creighton, some of the two hundred acres of land, including one hundred planted in cane, was sold for $10,500.

 Immediately after the sale, a gentleman, who seemed to be on the inside remarked to the gentleman owning the adjoining property, that his future ease is assured, implying, it is believed, that the erection of a central refinery would follow the sale. And so it will likely prove.

 Mr. Ferris and others are interested in the move. So that the people may reap some of the benefits certain to result from its operation, it has been decided to form a stock company, capitalized at $200,000, divided into 2,000 shares at the par value of $100 each. The main promoters desire the people to subscribe $25,000 of the capital stock, in money or kind, that is, a planter can take stock and pay $1 on every ton of cane, on account, that he may bring to the mill, which will be placed to his credit and payments continue until such installments aggregate the amount of his stock. For instance, suppose he sells his cane to the factory for $4 a ton gross, he will pocket $3 and leave $1 to place against his stock, thereby becoming a co-owner. And right here we want to inject the observation that at $3 a ton there is more money in cane than in cotton at 1- cents a pound.

 The principal idea is asking the people to subscribe to some shares of the capital stock is more in the nature of a desire to have the people feel some personal interest in the matter than anything else.

 Mr. B. A. Salles has been authorized to solicit subscriptions to the stock, and has met with much encouragement, and thinks the outlook very fair for the realization of the amount.

 The Ferris company are offered fine inducements at two other points to locate, but prefer the neighborhood of this town, if not on the Creighton tract, if not on the Creighton tract, then in the vicinity, because the natural advantages adjacent thereto utilized will make the mill a paying property.

 Plans and specifications, we understand, for a 800 tons a day mill has been contracted for, and the only question confronting the people of Lafayette at present is whether they want this plant or not.

 It has been suggested that a mass meeting of people, under the auspices of the Business Men's Association, be called at an early date, and in day time, when addresses in French and English be made upon the subject.

 There is one thing, we believe, the majority of the people of Lafayette are agreed upon, and that is the demand of the times is for a central sugar refinery, and it is further thought it would pay a handsome profit on the outlay, and add the growing desire of our farmers to engage in the cultivation of the sugar cane, it would prove a paying institution to all.

 Capital has made the first advances, shall we repel or bid it welcome?
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.


THE GARDEN SPOT.

 The Beauty which characterizes the scenery of Southwest Louisiana, is no where more perfect and grand than in Lafayette parish - the Carencro region on the one side and the Cote Gelee hills on the other - has been pronounced by travelers superb and that it rises to the majestic in its splendid grandeur.

 But beauty aside, you see a happy and well-clad people, denoting contentment and prosperity.

 But prosperity aside, you see prairies that are covered with luxuriant wild grasses, whose nutritive and lasting qualities permit a range for cattle hat furnishes sustenance winter and summer, where the cattle need no housing in winter, and are generally sleek and fat.

 But, range facilities aside, you see lands susceptible of the highest development, lands that will produce several crops in nine months.

 But fertility of the soil aside, you see a hardy, healthy looking people who are unacquainted with those ailments so common in the north - consumption, asthma, etc. - thus denoting a salubrious climate.

 But salubrity of climate aside, you see a population, who a few years ago, in their manners and customs, presented a picture of foreign admixture, to-day this same population is abreast of the times, and this is due to the educational facilities keeping step with the demand of the times.

 Thus this section combines every advantage for the establishment of prosperous and happy homes. Men who are willing to rely on their own energies, exertions, and means, and do not expect a fortune in a year or two, will find an ample reward, and will succeed in making for themselves comfortable homes. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.



A Lovely Spot.

 Situated on the beautiful Bayou Vermilion, one mile from the town of Lafayette, and owned by Major Sosthene Mouton, is the lovely and picturesque Beausejour park.

 Nature has, indeed, been lavish in her gifts to the Parish of Lafayette and, to no spot has she been more liberal in bestowing her favors than on this beautiful place.

 There stands the large and umbrageous oaks, robed in silvery moss drapery, defying, Ajax-like, the destructive hand of Time; the gorgeous verdure and flora of exquisite tints; and, the bubbling springs, the water of which is as clear as crystal, - the living evidence of Nature's masterful performance. To this, and which enhances very much the natural beauty of the place, is a large platform, architecturally tasty, and circular in form, for dancing; a rostrum, from which many an address has been delivered; a merry-go-round and see-saw, for the children; comfortable benches, for the weary; arbors, with growing trellis, sentimentally denominated lover's retreat; the ever-flowing spring, whose limpid, cool and invigorating water invite the thirsty; the well-arranged, neat bath-rooms, are some of the accessories that go towards making the whole the lovely place that it is. The major is contemplating some additional improvements, and on this line has already set out a number of rose bushes.

 That the beauty and conveniences are appreciated is attested by the large number of pleasure seekers who throng the grounds, and it is recognized to-day as par excellence the ideal place for a recreative outing.

 The water of the spring has been partially analyzed and show:

 The chlorides of calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium.

 Bicarbonates of potassium and magnesium.

 Carbonates of calcium, magnesium and sodium.

 Iron and Phosphoric acid.

 Total solids 10.84666 grains to gallon.

 Organic matter 2.098 grains to gallon.

 And the report adds:  A very good water for ordinary purposes, and may be of value medicinally owing to the amount of magnesium carbonate and bicarbonate present.

 It has passed into a truism that one who employs liberally this water for drinking and lavatory purposes, can dispense with the services of a doctor, for he is not likely to suffer with the ordinary ailments of life, thus proving that this water possesses much medicinal virtue.

 The major is in love with his place, and he has every reason to be. His greatest desire is to embellish it, and solely for this purpose he will make a moderate charge for bathing privileges, and the use of the park.

 To those who wish to enjoy a quiet pastoral life, during the heated term, or those suffering from distressing stomach or kidney troubles, this place. and waters - proved efficacious in these affections - offers special advantages.

 Board in the town can be obtained at very reasonable rates, and the distance to the springs is a pleasant walk, the greater part of the way being through an alley of oak trees.

 The place is well worth visiting.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.


Jim Crow Car Law.

 Judge Theard, of the civil district court in New Orleans, decided Wednesday the case of Isaac A. Broussard vs. the Louisville, New Orleans and Railroad company. The suit was originally for $10,000 damages for having been ejected from one of the defendant's trains, but by remittitur the demands was afterwards reduced to $2,000. The plaintiff, who is the sheriff of the parish of Lafayette, claimed in June, 1891, he purchased two first-class tickets for passage from New Orleans to Ethel, for the purpose of transporting a negro named Mouton to the transporting a negro named Mouton to the insane asylum at Jackson under an order of court. The plaintiff chained his colored charge in the smoking division of the coach assigned to negroes, and plaintiff, being unwell, seated himself in the non-smoking division of the same coach. The conductor requested him to go into the smoking car, and ordered in the alternative that he go into the coach set apart for white passengers only. This plaintiff refused to do this, and demanded the right to go into the white coach and to carry his colored prisoner with him, which request was declined by the conductor on the ground that it made no difference whether he sat in the negro coach with the negro, or the negro sat in the white coach with him, but the conductor again informed him that the smoking car was common place of resort provided for both races, and that if he desired he could sit in the smoking car with his prisoner.

 Plaintiff insisted upon his right as sheriff not to be separated from his prisoner, whereupon the conductor informed him that the law made no exception in such a case and that he must either obey the law or get off the train. Plaintiff at first elected to leave the train voluntarily, but upon reflection told the conductor to eject him at his peril. The train by that time has reached the Illinois Central junction within the city limits, and, as usual, had come to stop, when the conductor, without violence or undue force, ejected plaintiff and his prisoner from the train. The next day, at the personal request of the attorney general and the local counsel of the company, plaintiff was permitted, as a favor to ride in the negro coach with his charge.

 Judge Theard Wednesday held that under Act No. 111 of 1890 railroad companies in the State are compelled upon a penalty there in imposed to provide equal and separate accomodation for white and colored passengers, whom they contract to carry, and that no person can be permitted to occupy seats in coaches other than the ones assigned to them on account of their race, and if person refuses to accede to such rule the railroad official can refuse to carry him. The law is plain, and no exception is made in favor of a sheriff or officer of the law in charges of a prisoner. Any argument or inconvenience resulting must be addressed to the Legislature. There being other means of transportation than that by rail, plaintiff cannot claim that the enforcement of the law as to him would amount to a defeat of justice. In the absence of a special contract made at the same time the tickets were purchased that he would not be separated from his charge, he has no cause of  complaint against the company. Judgment is, therefore, given for defendant.

 Original source unknown. In the Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.



Street Lamps.

 The fifty odd streets lamps ordered some time since by the city authorities have arrive and are being placed in different parts of town; combined with those we now have Lafayette can boast of having first rate street light system, and one that will prove a great convenience to the public. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.

  

District Court.

 The criminal docket at this session of court is a large one, and among the number of cases some are very serious, involving death should be unqualified verdicts of guilty be returned. The trial of these cases must necessarily consume much time, but the judge, district attorney, and court officials seem to be willing to give their best efforts to expedite court affairs. Last Wednesday court opened at 10 o'clock, and continued in session, with only two short recesses, until 10 o'clock that night, and took an adjournment to 8:30 the next morning, thus demonstrating that our public officials are alive to the public interests, and for which they deserve much praise. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.


A Mistrial.

 The case of the State of Louisiana vs. G. Derouen, for violation of the Sunday law was called up Tuesday and placed on trial. The best part of the day was devoted to the taking of evidence and arguments of the lawyers. The case was submitted to the jury early in the evening, and they retired for deliberation. At 8 o'clock word was sent to the judge that the jury was unable to agree; the judge ordered the jury locked up for the night. At 10 o'clock next morning court was opened and the jury called in; still unable to agree the jury was discharged and mistrial entered. The jury stood eight for acquittal and four for conviction.
Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.


Pic-Nic Courtesy of Father Forge.

 Madame E. Mouton, as chaperon, and the Misses E. Mouton, Alix Judice, Aimee Mouton, Minnie Cornay, Ada Moss, Marthe Mouton, and Nellie Bailey, and Messrs. H. H. Eastin, Henry Gerac, C. O. Couvillon, and George Guidry, members of the Catholic choir, went out to Chargois' grove last Sunday to enjoy a pic-nic tendered them by Father Forge. They report having spent a most enjoyable time. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.




Drug Store & Residence.

 Mr. J. E. Trahan sold a piece of property in the neighborhood of the Catholic church to Mr. Walter Mouton, recently, the consideration being $2,500. Mr. Trahan proposes to build a residence next to his drugstore, which, when finished, will be occupied by his mother. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.


No Better Place.

 There is not a town more advantageously situated than Lafayette for manufacturing enterprises. The obstacle is want of knowledge of the fact, and were it known abroad, we have not the least doubt that the money, brains and brawn that is so essential would come to us. The principal step is to reach the people we need, and how best to do this is the problem confronting us, and it should and can be solved, but it will necessitate a small expenditure of money. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.









 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 4/29/1893.

 Reports reach this office that notwithstanding the cool spell presently experienced, retarding somewhat the growing crops, still every thing considered the outlook is very promising.

 A merry party of picnickers were outn last Sunday chaperoned by Mrs. F. Rigues.

 Misses Alix Judice and Lea Gladu visited Carencro Tuesday.

 Miss Philomene Judice spent a few days in Royville, last week, the guest of her aunt, Mrs. Geo. Scranton.

 Miss Zaza Cornay was the guest of Miss Maude Young at Royville Friday and Saturday.

 Mr. J. Revillon, Miss Louise, his grand-daughter, and Mrs. William Campbell, are sojourning in the Crescent city.

 Mr. Ike Bendel, a popular young merchant of Lake Charles, was in town this week visiting his relatives, the Falks.

 A very enjoyable soiree dansante was given by the young people at Falk's Opera House Saturday.

 The High School fund has been enriched $110, being the net proceeds from the Little Diamonds entertainment. The expenses were only $15.

 Judge C. H. Mouton is in Lafayette attending the present session of court, where he is interested in some cases. The judge, however, found time to call at The Gazette den.

 A very pleasant and enjoyable ice-cream was given at the hospitable home of Mr. John Tierney last Sunday, in honor of her little daughter Annie May's first birthday. There were present about twenty children and as many as many grown persons. Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1893.





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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 29th, 1882:


THE FLOOD.

 Telegraphic reports from the overflowed regions indicate the decline of the flood to be more rapid than anticipated. There is no water on the track of the Morgan road above Washington, over which trains will shortly run. The greatest depth on the track between bayou Sale station and Berwick is six inches ;  the greatest depth between these these points when the floods was the highest was five feet. The decline East of Morgan City has been equally rapid. The work of repairing the damage done to the road bed near bayou Sale, is well under way and we are informed that the greatest force the nature of this work will permit or will be employed. The bridge at Morgan City remains intact ;  it has unquestionably gone through a trying ordeal and the success with which it is withstood the force of the strong and rapid current proves it a substantial structure, and a monument to the skill and knowledge of the builders and engineers.

 We have good reason to think that trains will run through again before the middle of next month. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1882.


 Too Quiet.

 Any stranger visiting Vermilionville within the past few months must have been struck with the lethargy that exists in business circles. Our streets are deserted, storekeepers have nothing to do, but wait for something to "turn up." Their drawbacks have been numerous ;  with a very mild winter, preventing the sale of heavy goods that must necessarily be kept over, and now an unusually dull spring and summer trade, it is a wonder to us how they keep up under such adverse circumstances. The terrible flood that has ruined and devastated so many homes, has not been immediately upon us, but its oppressing effects are everywhere ;  all who have a dollar to spend, look at it over and over and then conclude to "lay it up for a rain day." In the interim the merchants, with their shelves loaded with goods, must watch and wait, and have confidence in the future, which we trust will be brilliant, so as to compensate them in some manner for their losses now. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1882.





Municipal Ticket.

 The following ticker for Mayor and Councilmen will be submitted to the voters of the Corporation of Vermilionville at the election on Monday, May 1st, 1882.

For Mayor: M. P. YOUNG.

 For Councilmen: J. J. Revillon, J. O. Mouton, Ed. Pellerin, F. Lombard, B. Falk, P. Gerac, W. B. Bailey. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1882. 




 Death Warrant Issued.
[Baton Rouge Capitolian-Advocate, 25.]

 The Governor has issued a death warrant addressed to the Sheriff of the parish of Lafayette to carry into execution the death sentence which was passed upon Joseph Padillo, on the 23d day of March, 1882, in the parish of Lafayette. He was tried and convicted on the 22d day of March, 1882, before the District Court of the parish of Lafayette, and sentence of death pronounced upon him on the 23d day of said month. The day of execution is fixed for Friday, the 9th day of June, A. D., 1882, between the hours of 11 a. m., and 2 p. m. Lafayette Advertiser 4/29/1882.



      

      
lagniappe:
THE BURNING OF SAM HOSE.



 The whole State of Georgia has been stirred to its utmost boundaries, by the series of incendiaries, murders, and lynchings which have swiftly followed one another. The people and press of the North will again raise a howl of indignation, but that one, as all the preceding ones, will be of no avail. The Atlanta Constitution's editorial commenting on this subject is an able one and expresses the opinion and sentiments of the Southern people. The constitution says:

 "The terrible expiation which Sam Hose was forced to pay for his crime will arouse a flood of discussion carried on by those who know the facts on the one side, and by those who do not care for the facts on the other.

 "But, while the form of this criminal's punishment cannot be upheld, let those who are disposed to criticize it look into the facts, and by these facts temper the judgment they may render.

 "An unassuming, industrious and hard-working farmer, after his day's toil, sat at his evening meal. Around him sat wife and children, happy in the presence of the man who was fulfilling to them every duty imposed by nature. At peace with the world, serving God and loyal to humanity, they looked forward to the coming day.

 "Noiselessly the murderer, with uplifted ax, advanced from the rear and sank it to the hilt in the brain of the unsuspecting victim.

 "Tearing the child from the mother's breast, he flung it into the pool of blood oozing from its father's wound.

 "Then began the culmination which has dethroned the reason of the people of Western Georgia during the past week. As critics will howl about the lynching, the Constitution will be pardoned for stating the plain facts.

 "The wife was seized, choked, thrown upon the floor, where her clothing lay in the blood of her husband, and assaulted.

 "Remember the facts! Remember the dark night in the country home! Remember the slain husband, and, above all, remember that shocking degradation which was inflicted by the black beast, his victim swimming in her husband's warm blood as the brute held her to the floor!

 "Keep the facts in mind! When the picture is painted of the wretch in flames, go back and view that darker picture of Mrs. Cranford assaulted in the blood of her murdered husband!"

Lafayette Gazette 4/29/1899.






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