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Monday, January 12, 2015

**APRIL 16TH M C

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 16th, 1898:

GALA DAY!!

A Grand Success!

 Gala Day in Lafayette was great success. The firemen ought to be proud of their achievement. It shows what a united people can do. Last Sunday will forever linger in the memory of everyone who participated in the ceremonies.

 As arranged the fire department met at the Court House Square at 12:30 and went in a body to welcome the excurionists who reached Lafayette about 2 o'clock. The fire trucks were gayly decorated for the occasion.

 Home Fire Co.'s truck was a canopy of flowers pulled by three white birds and driven by a little girl (Lilian Van der Cruyssen) who was surrounded by three others, (Michael Martin, Bessie Trahan and Hinder Schmulen.)

 Lafayette Fire Co. No. 1 showed their apparatus as a bower of flowers surmounted by a golden and silvered arch under which was a little fireman. (Antoine Lacoste.)

 Lafayette Hook and Ladder Co.'s apparatus was not in the parade owing to lack of time in decorating it.

 As soon as the large crowd of excurursionists arrived, the parade was formed marching towards Falk's Opera Hall where the address of welcome was delivered by Mayor Caffery.

 The militia and a firemen company of New Iberia, the Breaux Bridge string band and the Broussardville band participated in the parade.

 The Century Brass Band of Lafayette, organized a few days prior to Gala Day decided not to take part in the parade not having a reasonable time to prepare itself.

 The matinee began soon after the address of welcome was delivered and not a corner found which was not occupied. The matinee and banquet were well patronized by an appreciative audience.

 To enliven the day an impromptu ball was organized between the matinee and 6 o'clock p. m, time of departure of the excursionists.

 At 6:30 p. m. the fire department met again in body to assist at the christening of Home Fire Co. Hose apparatus which took place at St. John Catholic church.

 To the pealing of bells a vast crowd estimated at 2,000 entered the edifice. There is no recollection of such a crowd ever having entered St. John's.

 The christening of Home Fire Co. was celebrated with great pomp. The sponsors were Mrs. John O. Martin and Dr. G. A. Martin.

 As soon as this vast crowd was seated and as if by magic the whole church poured forth a river of variegated electric lights whose brilliancy and beauty had never been witnessed and the surprise was so genuine and intense that the vast throng gave vent to its feeling to its feelings by a well hearted exclamation.

 This fairy scene will be engraved in the memory of all those who had the privilege of being present.

 The choir sung by Veni Creator after which the Rev. Father Forge delivered an address suited to the occasion.

 "The City of Lafayette," said he," has a right to be happy to-day."

 Since a long time our city was at the mercy of an element which though necessary to human life becomes, when unrestrained, a danger; an element which in its rage spread desolation and ruin.

 Whilst enjoying sleep to obtain new strength for the next day's work a cry in the silent hours of the night awakened us to find ourselves surrounded by smoke and columns of fire.

 In a few minutes the labor of good many years were reduced to a pile of ashes.

 Happy, yet, it we had not deplored the loss of a dear one.

 To-day the city of Lafayette a welcomes a friend, a powerful friend who will fight advantageously the common enemy.

 Powerful as they are, these apparatus are useless, they have need, to conduct and direct them, of an intelligence and will. The guns need soldiers, you are gentlemen of the fire department, that intelligence and will. While forming three companies you must walk but under the same flag and upon it.

 I would like to see inscribed:

 'Union, Courage, Devotedness,' The wisdom of the nations, said, 'Union is Strength' and if I would employ a more authoratative voice than the one of the wisdom of the nations, the voice of Him whose resurrection we celebrate to-day. It would say 'ANY HOUSE DIVIDED AGAINST CHIEF WILL FALL.' It is Him who to unite men has brought with Him this heavenly daughter that St. Paul put above all virtues, CHARITY. Courage, - I will not make insult to your generous heart in defining it. I am speaking to brave men, to volunteers; are you not, gentlemen, at least some of you, heroes sons who fought and spilled their blood to defend a principle, are you not the sons of those who in their defeat were more glorious than their victors. Devotedness, - it is not of this world which is essentially selfish, it comes from above.

 It is a mixture of spirit, of sacrifice and love for his neighbor. I am assured that this noble sentiment beats in your hearts, but gentlemen, if guns can't peel forth their thundering sound without intelligence and will which directs them; neither can guns, intelligence or human will do anything without the superior intellect and will of Him who spoke to the Ocean 'Thou shalt go no further," and who by His will can command the other destructive element.

 You have understood this, gentlemen, and your presence here in this building is an act of faith, a grateful act to Him who is the creator and preserver of all things.

 With gratitude and confidently, the city of Lafayette, put into your hands to-day this apparatus blessed of God, to be used for its protection and prosperity.

          
 The great concourse of people who came from neighboring towns and parish to take part in this gala day renders Lafayette twice happy and I believe to be only its interpreter when I say 'Thank you."

 I will conclude, gentlemen, by a vow from the bottom of my heart as a priest and a citizen: 'May these powerful means to be always as to-day decorated with flowers, may they be used as to-day to triumphantly ride about these earthly angels who are the future of Lafayette and who like our city, throw themselves trusting into the arms of its protectors."

 The christening ceremony which was very elaborate and imposing was performed by the Revs. Father Forge, de Stockalper, Baulard and Grimaud.

 Two large blue ribbons descending from the canopy were held by each of the sponsors.

 The night concert was also a great success. There was an immense and appreciative audience. This terminated one of the most beautiful and successful of gala days. Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.




LAFAYETTE FIRE CO. NO. 1.
GRAND BALL TO-NIGHT AT FALK'S OPERA HOUSE.
 Let our people be out in full force to-night at the ball. A worthy cause and help must not be lacking. Lovers of the dance will be gratified. The Breaux Bridge's band will be on hand.

 The following are the committees:

 RECEPTION COMMITTEE.
Lafayette Fire Co. No. I.

 B. Falk, Jno. Marsh, Homer Mouton, J. P. Revillon, Ike Plonsky, A. J. LeBlanc and Chas. Debaillon.

Home Fire Co.
Dr. G. A. Martin and T. M. Biossat.

Lafayette Hook and Ladder Co. No. I.
A. E. Mouton and M. Rosenfield.

FLOOR MANAGERS:

Lafayette Fire Co. No. I.
Gus. Lacoste, F. E. Moss, Judge O. C. Mouton, Dr. F. E. Girard and A. J. Sprole.

Home Fire Co.
Frank G. Mouton and Gus. Schmulen.

 Lafayette Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1.
Emmanuel Pellerin abd Geo. A. DeBlanc. Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.


Opposed to Gala Day.
 It is with regret that we are obliged to relate that some persons were opposed to gala day and that they have worked to lessen the success which was desired by the majority of the population.

 As to us, we don't believe there will ill-will but only lack of knowledge or lack of reflecting. But it with a full knowledge they have worked in opposition to the success of gala day, we will say that they have acted without judgement that they have shown to be devoid of sentiment and above all they have been guilty of laboring against a people who in case of conflagration is ready to sacrifice itself not only to save the property but the life of others; against a people that sustain a cause which has for object to fight the most destructive element which sometimes brings death and consternation.

 These persons knew perfectly well that the fire department had for a long time planned the program of gala day and that to assure the success of it a great outlay of money had been disbursed without counting the trouble occasioned. Until the day before no other advertisement had appeared besides the firemen's gala day, when all of a sudden and underhanded came the advertisement of a base ball game to be held at Oak Avenue Park. All arrangements had been made by the promoters of this underhanded process, to allure the most people at the track to the detriment of the firemen, but we are happy to say that their success has been very lean and that the only thing they can boast of is the rebuke given them by the population and if we speak thus it is but what we have heard repeated a thousand times during last Sunday.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.



Scott Represented at Gala Day. -Great Scott was well represented at the Gala Day in Lafayette on the 10th, inst. Lafayette has always extended a helping hand to Scott, and it was just that the many courtesies be returned.  Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.


Weird Duck Egg. - Mr. P. A. Delhomme, in Scott, has on exhibition at his saloon a freak unknown, a large duck egg perfect with all the elements inside and on breaking the large shell a small egg perfectly hard was found on the inside making a double egg. This is the first ever heard of, and Mr. Delhomme will try and preserve the freak. 
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.



BASE BALL.

"You can't prevent that."
 The above was an expression repeated many times during last Sunday while the base ball game at the race track, but we affirm that "you can't prevent" could have been prevented that" could have been prevented very easily. Look at Carencro, our gentlemanly neighboring town. They had races billed up for last Sunday but on hearing of our gala day and of the object in view they postponed their attraction unanimously and we know that their program was quite more attractive than the base ball game. However Carencro showed a different spirit.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.



Crayfish Reservoir. - J. P. Perez, the erstwhile Crapeauville merchant having moved to Scott has built a crayfish reservoir and will offer for sale at a moment's notice crayfish and frogs from a gallon to ten barrels full, to be shipped to any point, from Great Scott, as indicated by the purchaser. This is a new and valuable industry and we wish Mr. Perez all possible success in his new and novel enterprise. Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.




 School Board Proceedings.
 Lafayette, La., Apr. 7, 1898.

 Board met with the following members present: Messrs. W. G. Bailey, H. M. Durke A. Olivier, V. E. Dupuis, J. O. Broussard and Alex Delhomme. In the absence of the President Mr. J. O. Broussard was elected President pro tem.

 On motion the president and secretary were appointed a committee in announcing to the Police Jury that a conference with that body was desired. The appointment by Mr. Dupuis of Louis Prejean to the Dominghue School vice Theophile Breaux resigned was approved by the Board. The board adjourned to 2 p. m. whilst awaiting an interview with the Police Jury.

 Board met with same members present and proceeded to the room of the Police Jury. Mr. Broussard explained in a few words that the object of the meeting was to render an account to the Police Jury of the funds appropriated by that body, and stated that a larger appropriation would be required in order to maintain our schools in the following condition that they are in. Mr. Broussard commented on the decrease in the appropriation for school funds reported by the Budget Committee. The Parish Sup't of Public Education submitted to the Police Jury a report of the present educational conditions of the Parish. After the reading the report, the Supt. asked of the Police Jury whether the School Board could depend on the balance due on last year's appropriation for school purposes. After due deliberation the Police Jury transferred one thousand dollars of the parish funds, leaving a balance of $1,500 on the appropriation.

 The treasurer is ordered to set aside $200 subject to the order of the committee in building for the Carencro School House. Mr. Dupuis was authorized to sell the old school building at Carencro.

 The resignation of Profs. V. H. and E. R. Rutherford was read and accepted.

 The board adjourned subject to call by the Superintendent.
        C. F. LATIOLAIS.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.




 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 4/16/1898.
 A steamboat excursion at Abbeville to-morrow.

 Which is the next street to your residence?

 Mr. Rosemond Lorio, a popular young tonsorial artist of Thibodaux was a visitor in Lafayette last Sunday.

 Mr. A. Bacque bought the property of Dr. F. R. Tolson near L. Noville and we learn that a new baker will be opened.

 Mr. Grenaard, agent for the American Harrow Co., of Chicago, will please accept the heartfelt thanks of Home Fire Co, for the loan of his stylish turn-out in the parade.

 The members and those interested in the Protestant Cemetery Association, are urgently requested to meet at the Methodist church, on Saturday May 1st, at 3 o'clock p. m.

 Home Fire Co, return thanks to all persons who have participated and contributed to the success of gala day. To the musical talent are they more especially indebted for their help in the concerts which were a musical treat.

 B. Falk says he dosen't want war with Spain but he can make war with his fellow merchants in cheap goods such as clothing, shoes and furniture.

 Mr. Alfred Hebert will sell old lumber from the Pin Hook's bridge at 4 o'clock Saturday evening at Pin Hook bridge.

 The pharmacy of Jos. C. Caillouet and Co. is now open. A fresh stock of goods is on hand abd prescriptions are carefully compounded. Give them a call.

 Mr. Charles (unreadable last name) who was arrested Sunday evening April 3 and having been charged with stealing a coat and vest from the residence of Mr. G. Martin was given a trial Wednesday and was discharged by the Justice of the Peace.

 Mr. Wade J. Landry, a polished and handsome young society lad of West Baton, came down on the excursion Sunday to spend a few hours with his chum Omer Patureau. He expressed himself highly pleased with the people and town of Lafayette and of the many recent improvements.

 The many friends of Mr. C. Higgenbotham will regret to learn that he is now suffering with a cut wrist which disabled him for a few weeks. Mr. Higginbotham is considered one of the best barbers in the parish and he will be sadly missed at this place of business by his many customers. Mr. Chas. Collings of New Orleans, a first class barber has been secured to fill his place.

 The home of Mrs. A. Deffez on Lincoln Avenue, was the scene last Tuesday, the 12th, of a very pleasant affair. It was the occasion of Mrs. Antonia Deffez's birthday which was celebrated in a very charming style. Compliments, cakes and refreshments were as plentiful as war news and the guests greatly enjoyed the festivities which terminated only several hours of darkness had spread its mantle over the earth. Your quill driver was present and wishes to return his thanks for being remembered with an invitation. May Mrs. Deffez find each succeeding birth-day as delightful and memorable as this one.

 The Ice Factory started for the season on last Tuesday. Remember that the plant has been renovated and that its new managers are men of business capacity who will do their very best to please their customers.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.


 School Board Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., Apr. 7, 1898.

 Board met with the following members present: Messrs. W. G. Bailey, H. M. Durke A. Olivier, V. E. Dupuis, J. O. Broussard and Alex Delhomme. In the absence of the President Mr. J. O. Broussard was elected President pro tem.

 On motion the president and secretary were appointed a committee in announcing to the Police Jury that a conference with that body was desired. The appointment by Mr. Dupuis of Louis Prejean to the Dominghue School vice Theophile Breaux resigned was approved by the Board. The board adjourned to 2 p. m. whilst awaiting an interview with the Police Jury.

 Board met with same members present and proceeded to the room of the Police Jury. Mr. Broussard explained in a few words that the object of the meeting was to render an account to the Police Jury of the funds appropriated by that body, and stated that a larger appropriation would be required in order to maintain our schools in the following condition that they are in. Mr. Broussard commented on the decrease in the appropriation for school funds reported by the Budget Committee. The Parish Sup't of Public Education submitted to the Police Jury a report of the present educational conditions of the Parish. After the reading the report, the Supt. asked of the Police Jury whether the School Board could depend on the balance due on last year's appropriation for school purposes. After due deliberation the Police Jury transferred one thousand dollars of the parish funds, leaving a balance of $1,500 on the appropriation.

 The treasurer is ordered to set aside $200 subject to the order of the committee in building for the Carencro School House. Mr. Dupuis was authorized to sell the old school building at Carencro.

 The resignation of Profs. V. H. and E. R. Rutherford was read and accepted.

 The board adjourned subject to call by the Superintendent.
        C. F. LATIOLAIS.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1898.



 From the Lafayette Gazette of April 16th, 1898:


The Complex Process of Water & Lights.




City Council Proceedings
Lafayette, La., April 2, 1898.

The City Council met this day in special session with the following members present: Mayor Caffery, Councilmen Hahn, Hopkins, Landry, Martin and Mouton.

 The object of the meeting was to receive the report of the waterworks and electric light committee, and to finally accept the waterworks and electric light plant from the Consolidated Engineering Co., Limited.

 The following is the report of City Enginner Zell:

 Hon. Chas. D. Caffery, Mayor, and Water and Lighting Committee, of Lafayette, La.

 Gentlemen: - Having made the necessary tests of the waterworks and lighting plant, I submit for your consideration the following report:

GENERAL CONDITION OF PLANT.

 I find the general condition of plant in good order, with the following exceptions:

 Standpipe leaking badly in seams, which must be made perfectly tight and repainted before acceptance, this leakage has saturated the surrounding earth and effects both and engine foundations, and I think is the cause of vibrating of same. When the earth becomes dry this will disappear.

 There is a leak in the bricked up well around the artesian well pipe which allows water to flow into well. This can be stopped by a caulking.

 The drain pipes from the pumping engine all discharge in the well. These pipes must be run outside the building, as they make the well hole unpleasant and rust the machinery.

 I recommend that the wall of well hole be whitewashed and the pipes cleaned off and painted, as soon as the above change is made.

 Also the iron ladders be fastened by bolts securely (they are held by rope now). This well hole should be in such condition that the engineer in charge may go down into the well at all times, particularly when pumping engine is in operation.

 There should be a gate valve put in exhaust pipe between the heater and direct pipe to atmosphere.

 The additional instruments for switchboard must be put in place and wired up, the Fort Wayne Electric Co. notify me they have been shipped (also the rod attachment for holding windows open must be furnished as directed.

NO. 1.   BUILDING AND FOUNDATIONS.

 The steel building covered with iron has been completed and presents a neat appearance, at the same time being a perfectly fire proof structure, the foundations under stand-pipe, boilers, etc., are in good condition and meet the requirements for which designed.

NO. 2.  PUMPING ENGINE AND FIRE TEST.

 The Vertical Duplex Compound Pumping Engine works satisfactorily. It was guaranteed to pump 750,000 gallons of water in 24 hours by actual test, making 90 feet piston speed; started pumping engine at 2:25 p. m. with 48 feet head of water in stand-pipe, and 75 lbs boiler pressure, pumped 27 feet of water in 35 minutes, as each foot the stand-pipe, holds 846 gallons and 846 gallons by 27 feet equals 22,842 gallons divided by 35 minutes makes 642 gallons per minute by 60 equals 39,120 gallons per hour, this pumping engine discharged into stand-pipe 7870 gallons more per hour than guaranteed.

 I then tested the pumping engine by closing off the stand-pipe valve and pumping direct into street mains with following result:  With 80 lbs. steam pressure on boiler and one and a quarter 1 1/4 inch hose nozzle open at court-house, we maintained a static pressure of 80 lbs. on gauge at power house.

 Same result from hydrant at bank; at Southern Pacific Railroad Crossing and Lincoln avenue, we started with 127 lbs. pressure on gauge and 95 pounds on boiler and maintained the pressure on street mains, then used two 1 1/4 nozzles with excellent results. The pumping engine worked smooth and cool and is fully up to all requirements and guarantee.

NO. 3.  STREET MAINS, HYDRANTS, VALVES AND VALVE BOXES.

 The street mains, hydrants, and valves were tested to 127 lbs. pressure, and did not develop a leak. I consider the quality of this work first class and the Corry (Corey?) Hydrants and Renssalaer valves, not permitting of any water ram in the pipes which insures the durability of the entire pipe system. I recommend the acceptance of the above.

NO. 4. STEAM, WATER AND EXHAUST PIPING, VALVES, FITTINGS, ETC.

 This part of the work has been satisfactorily done (with the exceptions referred to) and is in accordance with the intention of the specifications, except the so-called "Steam Loop" which was put in without my consent. I have this connection changed and connected to the Webster Vacuum Heater, where it should be connected.

 It is a very wrong idea to connect any piping to the water column connections and steam boiler inspectors and insurance companies will not allow any interference with same. I therefore condemned this connection and had it changed. With the part of the installation.

 I wish to say here that my specification should have required  all the steam and feed pipes, I don't see how I can compel them. If they don't think it to their credit to do so it only shows their close construction of the terms of the specifications.

 The heater works well and the feed pump is ample to feed both boilers and works entirely satisfactorily.

NO. 5. BOILERS, STACK AND CONNECTION.

 The two New Zell Boilers and connections are erected according to specifications and tested as per annexed paper covering trial. I would recommend that you purchase a good boiler compound and use same in boilers to prevent the accumulation of scale in same, and that the boilers be blown off each day with steam blower.

 NO. 6. STANDPIPE.

 The standpipe will be satisfactory when made tight by proper caulking and pained; the material is all according to specifications and contract.

 NO. 7  BRICK WELL HOLE AND ARTESIAN WELLS.

 After much trouble and expense the contractor has made a good job of the well hole, but we cannot recognize any responsibility for this work as the representatives of the contractor in charge evidently was not accustomed to this class of work and made it cost much more than it should.

 In its present condition, we will accept same when the pipes are made tight where they pass through the walls. The artesian wells will afford more water than the capacity of the present pump, and are good for over a million gallons every 24 hours constant pumping. The quality of the water is good and the wells are all we could expect them to be.

 NO. 8. ENGINES AND ELECTRIC PLANT.

 The two skinner engines run smooth and regulate closely. They are entirely satisfactory and are good engines of their kind and comply with all the conditions of the specifications.

 The dynamos run cool and spark-less and equal to any machines of their type. They are connected properly and will prove to be good serviceable machines.

 The switchboard (when the additional instruments and appliances have been placed in position) will comply with all the terms of the specifications and the wiring of same has been done in a first-class workman-like manner.

 The poles, mast arms and line wires have been properly erected and are of sizes intended in specifications; the lights, both arc and incandescent are are up to standard; are the best lights I have seen in the State of Louisiana.


 This part of the plant is perfectly satisfactory and you can accept same. Taking the plant in its entirety I consider it first class. I know of none elsewhere superior to it, and when the things specified are done that are referred to herein, I see no reason why you should not accept and pay for the plant in full and that there are no outstanding claims for material or labor, that have been used in the plant.

 It is also included that a hood be placed over main wires entering the building, also that the leaks in steam pipes be made tight, any leaks in the roof of the building be closed and same made watertight.
             Respectfully submitted,
               ROBERT R. ZELL,
          Superintending Engineer.

The waterworks and electric light committee reported as follows:

 We hereby approve the foregoing report, and in view of the defects therein specified and cited, necessary to be remedied, and in view also of the agreement of the Consolidated Engineering Company limited, to furnish a whistle, we recommend that the plant be finally accepted, and the final payment made thereon, saving and reserving the sum of $1,000 as a guarantee  that the said defects will be corrected and remedied in thirty days from this date, conditioned that on the failure of the contractors to do the same in that time, that the council shall correct the said defects at their said expense; provided that if the foregoing be complied with in less than thirty days that the $1,000 be paid thereupon.

 We also recommend that the superintending engineer be paid balance due him of $200.

 T. M. Biossat, Jno. I. Bell, T. B. Hopkins, G. A. Martin, John Hahn, Committee.

 The Consolidated Engineering Company, Limited, hereby accepts the reservations contained in the foregoing reports of the superintendent engineer and Water Works and Electric Light committee, and agree to correct the defects therein specified in thirty days from date.
CONSOLIDATED ENGINEERING CO. LTD., Per.  C. M. Pasquier, V
                                                                                                    Vice President.


The following was introduced by Mr. Mouton and seconded by Dr. Hopkins:

 Be it ordained, that the City Council hereby adopts the foregoing reports of the city engineer and the waterworks and electric light committee, and it is therefore further ordained, that the final payment of $5,340 be made to the Consolidated Engineering Co., Lt'd., less $1,000 and subject also to the all the conditions and reservations therein contained, as well as the conditions of the bond heretofore given by said Consolidated Engineering Co., Lt'd., for the faithful performance of its contract, which bond is to remain in force for one year.

 Yeas - Hahn, Hopkins, Landry, Martin and Mouton and Mouton. Nays - None.

 The following resolutions were adopted:

 Be it resolved, that a warrant be issued to Mr. C. M. Pasquier for the sum of $100, for services rendered as broker for the sale of the $2,000 of bonds at par, for the purpose of purchasing hose, hose carts, carriages, etc.

 Be it resolved, that a warrant be issued to Mr. R. R. Zell, for the sum of $200, balance due him for services rendered as superintending engineer for the city of Lafayette.

 Be it resolved, that the Council extend their earnest thanks to Mr. R. R. Zell and son, H. E. Zell, for their untiring efforts as superintending engineers in securing Lafayette a plant superior to any in the smaller cities of the State, and to Mr. C. M. Pasquier, vice-president and general manager of the Consolidated Engineering Co., Lt'd. and Mr. Frank Printz, superintending engineer for the company, for their courteous treatment and kindnesses shown to the members of the Council and waterworks and electric light committee and for their conscientious energy in giving to the people of Lafayette a first-class plant, and to Messrs. Widmer & Sprangley for their kind and courteous treatment and for giving to Lafayette a fine system of arc lights.

There being no further business the Council adjourned.
 CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor,
STERLING MUDD, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 4/16/1898.




The Compress and the Refinery. - A gentleman who has been very active in the movement to secure the establishment of a compress at this place informs us that it is an assured fact that Messrs. Lehman, Stern & Co., of New Orleans, will begin the building of the compress at an early date. The committee appointed by the Business Men's Association has done some very effective work. The required number of shares has been placed among citizens of this community and the exemption from parish taxation for a term of ten years has been granted by the Police Jury at its last meeting. This community has shown its entire sympathy with the move and the promoters of the enterprise have been extended every encouragement that was in the power of our people to give. The work of constructing the compress will be done during the summer and the money that will in this way be put into circulation during the dull months will prove quite an impetus to the local trade. The money spent by the compress people will be greatly augmented by the funds to be disbursed by Messrs. Gumbel & Co., in the construction of their refinery. The money that will be circulated by these enterprises will have a most salutary effect upon the business of this town and the "dog days" will not be as bad as they would otherwise have been. Lafayette Gazette 4/16/1898.




A Great Success.

 The celebration by the Home Fire Company on Easter Sunday was a great success. Over $250 was realized by the firemen. The excursion from New Orleans brought in a large number of people, among them being the military and fire companies of New Iberia.

 The fair and concert at the ball were well patronized by the townspeople and the excursionists. The members of the Home Fire Company have reason to congratulate themselves upon their success.

 The christening of the hose-cart at the Catholic church was a very beautiful ceremony. The church was brilliantly lighted by electricity, and the hose-cart, which had been tastefully decorated by Mr. Van der Cruyssen, was very pretty. Father Forge delivered a short sermon before performing the baptismal ceremony. The sponsors were Mrs. Jno. O. Mouton and Dr. G. A. Martin. During the ceremony the members of the three fire companies stood in the aisle.

 The whole affair was well managed and reflected much credit upon the ladies and gentlemen who assisted to make it what it was - a great success.
Lafayette Gazette 4/16/1898.



Prospectors Visit Lafayette. - D. L. Haggard and D. A. Hull, of Missouri, visited this parish during the past week and were shown the country adjacent to this town. They were driven through the richest portions of the parish by the local real estate agent, Amb. Mouton. After visiting the Gumbel refinery and several sugar farms the visitors expressed themselves as being very favorably impressed with the country, and the adaptability of our soil to the cultivation of cane. They stated that they had visited several sugar parishes in this State, but nowhere were the advantages offered for cane culture equaled to ours. After comparing notes and ascertaining the cost of raising cane they expressed the intention of returning here with the view of investing.
Lafayette Gazette 4/16/1898.







From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 16th, 1912:

The Berwick-Caffery Wedding.

 A most beautiful home wedding occurred in Lafayette on Thursday evening, April eleventh, when Mr. and Mrs. Chas. D. Caffery gave in marriage their only daughter, Bessie, to Dr. Clarence Berwick.

 Loving hands had decorated the spacious rooms of the Caffery home until it looked like a flower land. At the first strains of the wedding march, played expertly by Miss Maxine Beraud, all eyes were turned to the stairway and soon the maid of honor, Miss Lucille Mouton, looking lovely in lavender chiffon and carrying a bouquet of sweet peas, gracefully down the long stairway, at the foot of which was an arch wreathed with white locus vines, through which she passed on her way to the altar which was at the end of the library. The bride, leaning on the arm of her father, never looked lovelier than on this happy occasion, when gowned in a handsome white satin robe trimmed in real lace that was her maternal grandmother's wedding veil, with her veil falling from her fair head and carrying her bouquet of bride's rose buds, lillies of the valley and asparagus ferns, she joined Dr. Berwick at the flower laden altar, where Rev. Gibbs of the Episcopal church, performed the impressive ceremony that made them man and wife. After congratulations the bride and groom led the way through an arc of flowers to the dining room, followed by the maid of honor and the best man, Mr. Frank Vaughn, and the friends and relatives. The color scheme in the dining room was green and white. Beautiful roses could be seen every where, while the round mahogany table with its handsome lace cloth held a cut glass vase of white sweet peas, and its sides four silver stick candle sticks with green and white shades which cast a lovely color over the bride's cake, which late caused much merriment when the young folks cut for the ring and which was cut by Miss May Parkerson. Mrs. Russell Caffery served delicious fruit punch and the bride's cousins, Misses May Parkerson, Clark, Alice and Eppie Moss, served the guests to delicious chicken salad, turkey sandwiches, olives, green and white brick ice cream, the best of cake, and green and white mints.

 Only relatives and a few close friends were invited. The out of town relatives present were Mrs. Russell Caffery, of San Antonio, Texas, Mr. and Mrs. Don Caffery of Alexandria, Miss Clark, Atlanta, Mr. Sterling Parkerson and Miss May Parkerson of New Orleans. The many gifts of silver, cut glass and linen showed the popularity of the young couple. Dr and Mrs. Berwick left on the midnight train for New Orleans, and sailed Saturday for Panama. On their return they will live at Morgan City. Lafayette Advertiser 4/16/1912. 




lagniappe:
What Fitz Said.

 An heroic character made famous, if not actually created, by the genius of Sir Walter Scott, on an occasion in one of the scenes in which he figured, said:

  "Twice have I sought Clan-Alpine's glen,
   In Peace; but When I come again,
   I come with banner, brand and bow,
   As leader seeks his mortal foe."

 The lines quoted above were attributed to Fitz James, who was James V, of Scotland, in an interview with Rhoderick Dhu. They, or words expressing sentiments akin to them, were doubtless present in the mind of another Fitz, Fitz Lee, when he was so churlishly and ungraciously refused on Saturday, at Havana, an interview with General Blanco, upon whom he called to bid a courteous farewell. Should it turn out that Fitz Lee will return to Havana with gun and brand, or sword, for that is the meaning of brand in the text quoted, he would be virtually fulfilling Eitz James' poetic boast. Both the Fitzes were fighters, most gallant chivalrous in their several ways, and the living Fitz may not yet have come to the end of his military career.

 From the Daily Picayune and in the Lafayette Gazette 4/16/1898.



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