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Monday, January 12, 2015

**MARCH 7TH M C


 From the Lafayette Gazette of March 7th, 1903:


The Democratic Primary.


 The Democratic primary election called by the executive committee of the town to choose nominees for mayor, councilmen and an executive committee was held Wednesday, and proved to be a close contest between the two tickets in the field. The Caffery ticket, headed by the mayor now serving, was elected with the exception of one candidate for councilman, Mr. H. L. Fontenot, who was tied with Dr. J. D. Trahan, a candidate on the C. O. Mouton ticket.

The polls opened at 7 in the morning, with Galbert Comeaux acting as clerk, and Felix H. Mouton, R. C. Greig and Jos. Ducote as commissioners. Two hundred and six votes were cast, that number being almost the full qualified vote of the corporation.

Quite a number of challenges were made by advocates of each ticket on different grounds and several of these were maintained. Several voters were challenged, it being charged that they were not Democrats and could not participate in primaries held by that party.

They were sworn by the commissioners and declared that they were Democrats and consequently were allowed to vote. A number were denied the right of voting because they were non-residents. Each faction had alert workers at the polls and no chance to win a point was overlooked. Only one ticket was spoiled - a straight Caffery ticket. But a few qualified white voters failed to vote. By actual count, The Gazette found nine only who refrained from taking part in the primary because of fealty to the Republican party. The Democrats need fear no danger of a Republican victory in Lafayette.




Results of the Primary.

 The primary election Wednesday was warmly contested. The friends of both tickets worked zealously and as a result of the interest aroused almost the entire registered vote was cast, the total number of votes being cast 200.
The following shows the result:

FOR MAYOR.
C. D. Caffery - 103
Chas. A. Mouton - 100

FOR COUNCILMEN.
Felix Demanade - 113
Geo. A. DeBlanc - 102
A. Emile Mouton - 116
John O. Mouton - 104
D. V. Gardebled - 105
M. Rosenfield - 107
H. L. Fontenot - 101
Dr. J. D. Trahan - 101
C. D. Boudreaux - 100
 P. L. DeClouet - 98
Dr. F. E. Girard - 97
A. J. LeBlanc - 96
Gus. Schmulen - 92
Wm. Clegg - 90

FOR MEMBERS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
Wm. Campbell - 104
Julian Mouton - 104
I. A. Broussard - 105
Henry Church - 104
Alfred Hebert - 106
Simeon Begnaud - 98
Ed. G. Voorhies - 101
Dr. A. R. Trahan -100
John L. Kennedy - 100
R. H. Broussard - 98
Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903

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How to Enjoy the Carnival.
The Harlequin.

 Now listen!
 Your come here to enjoy yourself didn't you?
 Well, then, keep your temper.
 Remember that it matters not how hard a time you are having, it is nothing in comparison with the trouble some other people are having.

 Be good natured and you will and you will reap a harvest of returns for your pains.

 You know Carnival would not be Carnival unless the city were crowded as you see it. Think of what a Carnival it would be if you could walk along the streets without being elbowed; go to your meals and get served; find ample room to sleep in and have all the other comforts incident to normal life in the most delight arrangement of all cities.

 No, a part of the zest is your discomfort. You would not have the appetite you now have if instead of making you wait one hour for your ham and eggs, you waited five and half minutes.

 Be good natured. If you cannot stem the tide on Canal street or any other street after a half hour of trying, give it up. Don't swear or call the police. It is likely as not-if you do-he will run you in for disturbing the peace, as he should. No, simply turn right around and go with the current.

 Be good natured, if you are knocked down by a dray and your ear stepped on by a half a hundred pedestrians before you can get up, be disconcerted. Don't say hard things about the city. Don't try to assail the dray and every one who stepped on your ear. Get up and thank God you are still living.

 Be good natured. If your pockets are picked of a purse with two or three hundred dollars in it, rejoice in that next time you will know better than to go out with money during Mardi Gras. If your sweetheart or wife has a thousand dollar diamond earring snatched from her ear and all, or a finger dexterously cut off for a five thousand dollar solitaire just be sure she will never need to be instructed again on the vanity of going about in vast concourses with precious jewels exposed. In this world we have to pay for all we get-even experience is dear.

 Don't shove. Let others do the shoving. They will attend to it without any of your assistance. When the procession advances and you have placed yourself with all the hoodlums and hayseeds, inside of the necessary patch for the passing of the pageant, be sure you get all-fired mad and raise Cain the first first time the horse of a mounted policeman or knight steps on your foot and sends you to the Charity Hospital for repairs. Remember, of course, that these pageants are made of the invisible air and need no room to pass. Therefore, take up all the street.

 Be sure to try to drink up all the whiskey of every bum barroom in town, as you roam about. The fusil oil you will thus consume will benefit your liver, your nerves, your head, your temper, and indeed make you in every respect a better man.

 The chummier you become with the bunko fellow who grows wild with enthusiasm as the show passes, the earlier you will go home, if you can't draw on the house; and maybe the earlier you will wish you had gone home.

 But whatever happens, don't lose your temper.

 Thorough good nature, a determination to enjoy yourself whatever happens in the contiguous spirit of the season. If you ward off the disease, you are not a faithful subject of Rex and should not be here while he is king. Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.




Woman's Literary Club.

 The Woman's Literary Club held its usual bi-monthly meeting on last Saturday with Mrs. B. Clegg as hostess.

 An instructive paper on the industries of the Pelican State was read by Miss Dickson. This was followed by an entertaining sketch of Etienne de Bore and his work written by Miss Holmes. Mrs. B. J. Pellerin gave an interesting account of "Our Forests and Fisheries."

 A vocal solo sweetly sung by Miss Anna Hopkins closed the programme for the afternoon.

 A tempting repast was served in the dining room, where the color scheme of green and white was as refreshing to the eye as were the dainty viands to the palate.

 Welcomed guests on this occasion were Mmes. John Nickerson, C. Girard and Miss Ferguson of Virginia.

 The annual election of the Club's officers will take place on March the fourteenth at the home of Mrs. G. Comstock. Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.




Dedication of the Broussardville School House To-Morrow.
 To-morrow, Sunday, March 8, at 3 p. m., the handsome Broussardville school-house will be dedicated with appropriate exercises by the children of the school, with music by the Sontag Military Band, and with an address by Prof. Alcee Fortier of Tulane University, Prof. Fortier is one of Louisiana's sons who have won distinction in the field of letters and is one of the greatest living authorities on the history of Louisiana. He is at present engaged in writing a history of his native state. He has always shown great interest in the cause of education and has made several addresses in behalf of universal education in Lafayette parish. Professor Fortier has lectured at the principal universities of the country and at the celebrated Chautauqua in New York State.

 The Gazette hopes that a large delegation from Lafayette will attend the exercises and this avail themselves of the opportunity of hearing the address of the distinguished French scholar and of helping a good cause. Lafayette parish is rich enough to give its children the best system of schools that money can obtain and its leading citizens in all parts of the parish are directing their energy to this end which means that the thing will be accomplished.

 What a beautiful commentary on the public schools of a state when they are patronized by the children of the president of this country. Yet this is at it should be because the public school system is the most important department of the government and will soon be given the place of honor which it deserves in the cabinet of the President of the United States.

 The fact that education, for the first time in the history of the world, will be given the place of honor at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition to be held in St. Louis next year, is significant of the revolution of public sentiment in favor of universal education that has swept over the country in the past few years. No where has more activity been displayed than in the South, and we are proud of the fact that Lafayette parish is determined not to march at the tail-end of the procession.

 The largest gathering ever assembled in the history of the parish is expected to-morrow. The fifth ward is fortunate in being the first in the parish to take up the question of better facilities for schools. Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.      





Race Track Excursions.
 There was a meeting of The Race Track Association at New Iberia, Monday, March 2, for the purpose of fixing dates for excursions to be run to Lafayette and other points. The parishes of Lafayette, Iberia, St. Mary and Rapides were represented. President Alfred Hebert and Manager C. A. Cochrane of the Lafayette Surrey Park Association were present and have made arrangements for excursions to be run to Lafayette in May, June, Aug. and Sept., 1903. Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.



COMMUNICATED.
Carencro, La., March 20, 1903.
Editor of Lafayette Gazette:
     It appears that some of the Argus-eyed reporters of Lafayette have recently taken it upon themselves to watch any movements and to draw conclusions from same which they busily circulate to my disadvantage and that I have gone over to the Republican party. I am not writing this for the purpose of making an apology but to refute and error.

 It is true that I met Messrs. Williams and Clark by invitation of Mr. J. T/ Breaux, in order to say a good word for him, as a friend and not as a Republican, as he is applying for the Lafayette Postmastership. The applicant assured me that it was not a political affair so far as I was concerned and relying on said assurance I accompanied him to the appointed meeting place.

 As soon as introductions were made the conversation immediately took a political turn and of course in the praise of the republican regime. I, thereupon informed these gentlemen that my business with them was not to discuss politics, but to say a few good words for my friend, a fellow townsman, Mr. Breaux. I plainly informed them that I was Democrat dyed in the wool, after which information they, as well bred gentlemen, dropped politics and conversed on other matters.
                    J. P. FRANCEZ, A. B. M. D.
Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.   







City Council.
Lafayette, La., March 2, 1903.

AMONG OTHER BUSINESS....

Dr. G. A. Martin appeared and asked for an appropriation of $28.36 to complete plank walk on North side of Lincoln Ave.

 Moved by F. Demanade, seconded by G. A. DeBlanc, that appropriation be made for paying balance on same. Carried.

 Moved and seconded, that an appropriation of $42.22 in addition to the $25 heretofore made, be now made to pay balance due on plank walk from court-house to Industrial Institute. Carried.

 Moved and seconded, that in view of the fact that the contract for oil has about expired, the question of renewing same be referred to water and light committee, with full power to act and to report to Council at next regular meeting. Carried.

 Moved and seconded that the sum of $42.00 be appropriated to assist in paying for police force during street fair. Balance of $56.00 to be paid by Dr. F. E. Girard. Carried. Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.

 For Sale. - Five acres of land in corporation with two-story residence, barns and other improvements. Also 2 lots adjoining with improvements. Terms to suit purchaser. Apply at Gazette office.
Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.





Police Jury Notes.
 The Police Jury met last Thursday in regular session with all members present except Mr. Saul Broussard of Carencro.

 Judge Julian Mouton appeared and presented the application of Master Rousseau Langlinais of the 6th ward, for appointment as beneficiary cadet to the Louisiana State University. Testimonials from Professors W. A. LeRosen and R. H. Broussard and President E. L. Stephens of the Industrial School, were produced showing the excellent character and studious habits of Master Langlinais. Mr. Buchanan moved to appoint the cadet, but on a question as the right of the Jury to appoint more than one withdraw the motion. By motion of Mr. Landry action on the application was deferred until next regular meeting in order to obtain legal advice.

 Mr. Lacy reported the public road at Mr. P. Gerac's and Alex Martin's still obstructed although proprietors had agreed to reopen. By resolution the road overseer of the first ward was instructed to cause the removal of said obstructions as well as at Dominique Bonnot's.

 Mr. Blanchet reported having rented a new ferry boat for the D. O. Broussard crossing for $1.00 per day, Vermilion parish to pay half. The old ferry boat belonging to Lafayette had been sold to Mr. H. M. Durke and by him handed ashore and found in fair condition. Mr. Durke agreed to return the boat, if the Jury desired to have it repaired. By motion Messrs. J. O. Blanchet and P. R. Landry were appointed to examine into the matter and decide best course to pursue.

 Messrs. Mouton and Greig were appointed to place an iron fence around parish jail if advisable.

 Mr. Jerome Mouton presented the matter of Walker-Domingue road controversy and offered for acceptance and agreement between parties establishing said road. No action.

 Mr. Wm. Gordon representing Planters' Compress Company asked for refund of taxes and equalization of assessment on certain presses in the parish. The Jury refused to refund but assured petitioner that in future his rights would be protected.

 Mr. S. Bernard was reappointed bridge keeper at same salary.

 Mr. Judice appeared and again urged appropriation for flood-stricken portion of the 2d ward. By motion of Mr. Mouton the committee appointed at a previous meeting was again instructed to make report to the Grand Jury next week of any violations of law respecting dams, etc. By motion of Mr. Mouton the sum of $50.00 was appropriated to the drainage fund of each ward in addition to the amount already allowed.

 Messrs. Mouton, Greig, and Landry were appointed to settle with the parish treasurer.

 An ordinance for hiring and working the prisoners in the parish jail was adopted and will appear in proceedings next Saturday.

 The Treasurer's reports showed cash balances on hand, general fund $8,558.99, and special road fund $1,500.10.

 After approval of accounts the Jury adjourned.

 The Jury regretted the failure of the Vermilion Police Jury to respond to the demands for a conference on the D. D. Broussard bridge question. No answer had been received by the secretary to the official communication sent. Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.



Selected News Notes (Gazette) 3/7/1898.
 Judge H. L. Monnier united in wedlock Mr. Chas. O. Bertrand of New Orleans and Miss Clotilde M. Brien of Acadia parish last Thursday. The marriage ceremony was performed at Domengeaux Hotel.

 Do not miss the Wendling lecture at the Auditorium next Thursday night, March 12, at 7:30.

 Mr. F. Otto has just completed an up-to-date regulation meat market, with cement floors, etc., in her property on Lincoln Ave. Such a market has been much needed in that neighborhood. It is occupied by F. Wilkins.

 George R. Wendling is the greatest living platform lecturer in America. Hear him next Thursday night.

 Deputy Alcide Landry has returned from New Orleans after several days spent in witnessing the carnival.

 Mr. C. C. Mallard has replaced Mr. G. F. Hawks as assistant superintendent of the Louisiana lines of the Southern Pacific.

 Sterling Mudd was in Lafayette Wednesday.

 E. Mouisset who is now a resident of New Orleans visited our home during the week. Lafayette Gazette 3/7/1903.





 From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 7th, 1903:


THE ELECTION.
 If the primary of last Wednesday was notable for the activity and earnestness displayed by the two sides interested in the contest, it was also characterized but the greatest good-naturedness on the part of all concerned. Both sides went in to win, if possible, and each side recognized the right of the other to contest for every point of advantage ;  and it is safe to say that the men who suffered defeat will philosophically acquiesce in the will if the majority as expressed at the ballot box. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1903.

   
New Century Club House.
 We have had the privilege of seeing the plans for the new Century Club house which will soon be erected on the Club's lot on Jefferson street. It will be a most comfortable home for the Club, and at the same an ornament to the town. The erection of such a handsome structure speaks well for the finances of the club, the stock of which, is considered very valuable. Ever since its organization the Club has prospered and grown, and now with its hundred active members, demonstrates that it is filling a most useful purpose in the social life of the town. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1903.



Officers Elected. -  The Home Fire Co., at their last meeting elected the following officers: C. O. Mouton, President; Ed. G. Voorhies, Vice-President; Felix Voorhies, Rec. Sec.; A. V. Labbe, Fin. Sec.; Dr. G. A. Martin, Foreman; Gus. Schmulen, First Foreman; W. Riu, Sec. Foreman. Standing committee: Joe E. Mouton, Frank Hopkins and Ned Voorhies. Next Monday at 8 p. m. at Falk's Opera House, will take place the election of the officers of the Fire Department. Lafayette Advertiser 2/7/1903.


Passed the Test. - Mr. Geo. E. Jeanmard, son of Mr. Jules Jeanmard of Carencro, last week successfully passed an examination for qualified assistant pharmacist before the State Pharmacy Board in New Orleans. The Advertiser offers congratulations to Mr. Jeanmard.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1903.


At Anse la Butte. - Dr. F. R. Martin of Crowley, who to who to interested in the Heywood Oil Co, was here Wednesday. He bore three new wells on different holdings the have at Anse la Butte, which field Dr. Martin says is now recognized as a paying oil field, and that it is the opinion of all oil men that it will be a large one. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1903.

Dissolution. - The partnership heretofore existing under the name Mouton & Salles is this day dissolved, by mutual consent the business and assumes all liabilities and will collect all outstanding accounts due the firm.
               Maurice Mouton, L. F. Salles, Lafayette, La., Feb. 17, 1903.
               Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1903.


Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 3/7/1903.

Tuesday was another wet disagreeable day. It rained steadily the whole day.

 Regular services at the Episcopal church to-morrow evening at half past seven o'clock.

 Mr. and Mrs. James Hannen are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Chas. H. Lusted.

 The new trial of E. A. Batson charged with the murder of the Earle family near Welsh over a year ago, is expected to begin to-morrow at Lake Charles.

 Mr. John T. Dowdell, of San Antonio, Texas, died at his home in that city on the 4th inst. He was several years a resident of this place, and favorably known to many people here. He was a brother-in-law of Mayor Caffery. His wife and two children survive him.

 Next Monday at 8 p. m., at Falk's Opera House will take place the election of officers of the Fire Department.


 Morgan's Louisiana & Texas Railroad and Steamship Company will sell tickets from Lafayette to California Common Points at a rate of $30, on account of Colonist rates Feb. 15th, to April 30th. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1903.

  
 From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 7th, 1891:
Need for Artesian Wells. 




 We see that nearly all towns of importance in our section of the State have or are having bored artesian wells. Although the matter has been agitated here for several years, Lafayette's has failed to materialize. The town of Plaquemine, with not near our wealth or population, has an ice factory, a cold storage and refrigerator warehouse and a magnificent artesian well. If Lafayette ever has "fire department" we must first have a source from which an unfailing supply of water can be obtained. Let us be successful in obtaining one satisfactory artesian well (and it might be accomplished easier and cheaper than is anticipated), and others will surely soon follow. From these wells water could be conveyed to tanks and reservoirs for fire purposes; besides, they would be of the greatest possible public convenience. You may say, "Oh, we don't need it just now!" Probably not to-day, nor to-morrow; but when you do need it, you'll need it "bad!" And remember the old adage: "You'll never miss the water, till the well runs dry." Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891.




Blind Tom at Falk's To-night!
"Blind Tom" could not reach Lafayette to fulfill his engagement at the Opera House last Monday night, but will certainly give one of his wonderful performances to-night (7th inst.) Do not fail to go and hear him, and take your wife, daughters of sisters. Those young men who have no sisters can take somebody else's sister.
 


District Court.

[We are indebted to the courtesy of Mr. M. T. Martin, Deputy Clerk, for our minutes, which are up to Thursday morning, 5th inst.]

 State vs. James Raylie, concealed weapon; fined $25, inclusive of costs, and ten days imprisonment; or, in default, 60 days additional.

 State vs. Abraham Green, same offense; same judgement.

 State vs. Manuel Poterno, shooting at ;  trial by jury, and verdict of guilty.

 State vs. Joseph Duhon, putting obstructions on railroad track; trial by jury, and verdict of guilty.

 State vs. Josh Washington, trespass; plead guilty.

 Gus. A. Breaux vs. F. Otto; trial by jury and verdict for the defendant, F. Otto. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891.


Bridge Builder Passes Through. - Saturday we had the pleasure of a call from Mr. S. A. Olivier, of Houston, Tex., who represents the well known King Iron Bridge Co., of Cleveland, Ohio. He was on his way to look after an important bridge contract in Avoyelles parish. It will be remembered that his establishment built our beautiful iron bridge across Bayou Vermilion at "Pin Hook." Mr. Olivier has been instrumental in the erection of many fine structures in Louisiana. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891.  





   

City Council Proceedings. 
Lafayette, La., Feb. 19th, 1891.

 A special meeting of the City Council was held this day, and there were present: W. B. Bailey, Mayor; A. J. Moss, J. G. Parkerson, F. Lombard and John O. Mouton. Absent - Ed. Pellerin and P. Gerac.

The Mayor stated the object of the meeting to be to consider the petition of certain citizens and taxpayers of the corporation, asking for the opening of Congress street to Lafayette street, which said petition was read and after discussion thereon, the following was adopted :

Resolved, that the Mayor be and is authorized to appoint a committee of three to consider the expediency of opening said street as prayed for, and said committee is hereby instructed and empowered to negotiate with owners of lots necessary for the opening of said street, and to obtain from them such portions thereof needful for the continuation of said street at such prices as they may seem just and reasonable to said committee.

The Mayor appointed on said committee Messrs. John O. Mouton, A. J. Moss and Leo Doucet.

The Council thereupon adjourned.
W. B. BAILEY, Mayor.

Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891.




IN DISTRICT COURT.
[We are indebted to the courtesy of Mr. M. T. Martin, Deputy Clerk, for our minutes, which are up to Thursday morning, 5th inst.]

State vs. James Raylie, concealed weapons; fined $25, inclusive of costs, and ten days imprisonment; or in default, 60 days additional.

State vs. Abraham Green, same offense; same judgement.

State vs. Manuel Poterno, shooting at; trial by jury, and verdict of guilty.

State vs. Joseph Duhon, putting obstruction on railroad track; trial by jury and verdict of guilty.

S tate vs. Josh Washington, tresspass, plead guilty.

Gus. A. Breaux vs. F. Otto; trial by jury and verdict for the defendant, F. Otto. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891




Police Jury Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., March 2nd, 1891.
  
 The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: C. P. Alpha, J. G. St. Julien, C. C. Brown, A. A. Delhomme, Ford Huffpauir, R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry and O. Theriot.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 The petition of Mr. Clemille Simon, through his attorney Crow Girard, Esq., expressing dissatisfaction with the action of the jury of freeholders in tracing a public road across his land, and praying for an appeal to the District Court, was read and on motion duly made, the prayer of the petitioner was granted; and the president authorized to see to the parochial interest involved in the matter.

 The jury of freeholders appointed to trace a public road in the 8th ward made the following report which was accepted, the road declared a public highway and the documents ordered filed and recorded appointed and sworn to trace and lay off a road from the points marked A and M, to the public road to Lafayette at the points marked G and H, as per diagram hereto annexed in said parish and to assess whatever damages may be done to the parties through whose land said road may pass, have traced and laid off said road as follows:

 The following parties donate to the parish the land along their respective lines:  Auguste Lagneaux, Sosthene Duhon, Valerien Domingue, Martial Duhon, Charles Hernandez, Balthazar Alemande, and John Whittington, Jr.

 The following party refuses to donate and we have appropriated the land and assessed the damages as follows:  Clairville Francois, $30.00.
           Respectfully submitted, FAUSTIN VINCENT, C. DOUCET, ALCIDE TRAHAN, LOUIS ROHEE, CHAS. ALLEMANDE, MARCEL GUIDRY.

By motion of Mr. Delhomme, Messrs. C. P. Alpha, J. G. St. Julien and C. C. Brown were appointed a committee to consider and report on the best  means of imposing a road tax.

 Agreeable to a petition from the citizens of the 2nd ward, the following resolution by Mr. St. Julien was adopted: Be it
     Resolved, That the sum of $200.00, or as much thereof as is necessary, be and is hereby appropriated for the purpose of building a school house for white children, on an acre of ground to be donated by Mr. H. Hutchinson; the aforesaid amount to the subject to the order of Mr. Ford Huffpauir and to be drawn after the School Board shall have received the said donation. Provided that there are sufficient funds in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated.

 By motion of Mr. Theriot, the following jury of freeholders was appointed to trace public roads in the 4th ward:  S. L. Broussard, Antoine Boudreaux, E. Duhon, Ursin Mouton, Desire Sellers and A. L. Dyer.

 By motion of Mr. Brown, the Coroner, Dr. A. Gladu, was allowed a salary for services as parish physician of $150.00 per annum, to date from the first of March 1891, and payable quarterly.

 By motion of Mr. Huffpauir, the following road overseers were declared derelict in their duties and their pay up to March 1st, 1891, forfeited: Hynes Huffpauir, C. D. Harrington, Ralph Duhon, W. G. Bailey, H. P. Kotch, Burton Smith and Felix Duhon.

 Mr. Jean Salviat was appointed overseer in the 2nd ward, vie W. G. Bailey resigned, and F. Siadous instead of Ralph Duhon resigned.

 By motion of Mr. Huffpauir the following jury of freeholders was appointed to trace a public road from Alcide Hank's land to the bridge on Bayou Queue Tortue: Hugh Wagner, Louis Bonin, Wm. Stutes, Jr., Thos. Morgan, Bolden Huffpauir.

 By motion of Mr. Landry, Pierre Smith was granted permission to place his fence about six feet upon the public road in 7th ward, provided that no obstruction results.

 By motion of Mr. Delhomme, the following was adopted:

 Resolved, That all persons having fences that cross natural drains of this parish shall be required to put flood gates in the said natural drains; and under no circumstances shall the said drains be damned by earthworks or crossed by solid stationary wood or wire fencing. It is further
    Resolved, That each road overseer is hereby instructed in case any natural drains are obstructed in violation of this act to remove the same at once at the expense of the party so violating.

 This act shall take effect thirty days after its passage.

 The treasurer submitted his monthly report, as follows:

 To the President and members of the Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette:

 Gentlemen: The following is a statement of the receipts and disbursements of Parish funds since last report:


Respectfully submitted, 
                      WM. CLEGG,
                          Parish Treasurer.

       Lafayette, La. March 2, 1891.
  The following accounts were laid over:



 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
C. P. ALPHA, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891.


        
 From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 7th, 1891:
Need for Artesian Wells. 




 We see that nearly all towns of importance in our section of the State have or are having bored artesian wells. Although the matter has been agitated here for several years, Lafayette's has failed to materialize. The town of Plaquemine, with not near our wealth or population, has an ice factory, a cold storage and refrigerator warehouse and a magnificent artesian well. If Lafayette ever has "fire department" we must first have a source from which an unfailing supply of water can be obtained. Let us be successful in obtaining one satisfactory artesian well (and it might be accomplished easier and cheaper than is anticipated), and others will surely soon follow. From these wells water could be conveyed to tanks and reservoirs for fire purposes; besides, they would be of the greatest possible public convenience. You may say, "Oh, we don't need it just now!" Probably not to-day, nor to-morrow; but when you do need it, you'll need it "bad!" And remember the old adage: "You'll never miss the water, till the well runs dry." Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891.



Blind Tom at Falk's To-night!
"Blind Tom" could not reach Lafayette to fulfill his engagement at the Opera House last Monday night, but will certainly give one of his wonderful performances to-night (7th inst.) Do not fail to go and hear him, and take your wife, daughters of sisters. Those young men who have no sisters can take somebody else's sister.
 


District Court.

[We are indebted to the courtesy of Mr. M. T. Martin, Deputy Clerk, for our minutes, which are up to Thursday morning, 5th inst.]

 State vs. James Raylie, concealed weapon; fined $25, inclusive of costs, and ten days imprisonment; or, in default, 60 days additional.

 State vs. Abraham Green, same offense; same judgement.

 State vs. Manuel Poterno, shooting at ;  trial by jury, and verdict of guilty.

 State vs. Joseph Duhon, putting obstructions on railroad track; trial by jury, and verdict of guilty.

 State vs. Josh Washington, trespass; plead guilty.

 Gus. A. Breaux vs. F. Otto; trial by jury and verdict for the defendant, F. Otto. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891.


Bridge Builder Passes Through. - Saturday we had the pleasure of a call from Mr. S. A. Olivier, of Houston, Tex., who represents the well known King Iron Bridge Co., of Cleveland, Ohio. He was on his way to look after an important bridge contract in Avoyelles parish. It will be remembered that his establishment built our beautiful iron bridge across Bayou Vermilion at "Pin Hook." Mr. Olivier has been instrumental in the erection of many fine structures in Louisiana. Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1891.  




lagniappe:
MADAME X AT THE JEFFERSON.
[Times-Democrat, Feb. 10.]

 A stirring tale of the love an unfortunate mother for her only child, a son she had not seen since his infancy, when she was enticed away from her home by a man who had promised to give her the pleasures of life, which she craved and of which she thought her husband was depriving her, is told in the great drama, "Madame X," playing here Monday, March 10, by a capable company, with Adelaide French in the title role.

 The story deals with the life of hardship led by Jacqueline, wife of Louis Floriot, deputy attorney of Paris, who, after being turned away from her home and child by her husband, after she had repented of her faithless act, wanders around the world trying to conceal her identity, so that the story of her shame might not be told to her son, who was led to believe that his mother had died during his infancy. The unfortunate woman comes in contact with the lowest class of the underworld, and in an effort to forget her past life becomes addicted to the use of drugs. Twenty years after her departure from her home she becomes the companion of one Laouge, an adventurer, who learns from her, while she is under the influence of opium, of her past life, and of her dowry of 150,000 francs, which was to become the property of her son upon his reaching the age of maturity. Laroque decides to go to Paris to inform Louis Floriat, who has since become president of the Toulouse Court, that his wife is alive and in want of the money. To prevent this journey of Laroque, the woman, crazed by the desire to protect the memory in the the mind of her son, kills him.

 The final act is the scene in the court room where Madame X is being prosecuted for the murder. She is defended by her son, who has taken this, his first case, to defend the woman who is known to no one and who callers herself Madame X. The identity of the young lawyer is made known to the woman when the prosecuting attorney, in concluding his address to the jury, said that the prisoner would be defended by Raymond Floriat.

 Throughout the brilliant appeal of the young man, who has case aside his notes and pleads with an earnestness made real by the sight of the pitiful woman before him, and it is only after her acquittal that her identity is made known to him by his father, who presided on the bench. The final scene between the mother and the son is possibly the most touching part of the play, and so emotional was the acting of the two players that the feminine part of the audience was swayed to tears.

 Miss French showed herself a talented actress, and in her emotional parts, especially when she killed Laroque, and later, when she was made known to her son, remind one of the immortal Bernhardt. Her interpretation of the character is masterly and her enunciation perfect.

 As Raymond, the son, Malcom Owen pleased the audience. His address in the courtroom scene was impressive, and the feeling he put into his words was sufficient not only to impress the jury, but to make the audience see that the crime as he explained it was one for which the prisoner should not be convicted. In his love scenes with Helen, daughter of the prosecuting attorney, he is a pleasing young man, no one would suspect of being such a capable criminal lawyer.

 Frederick Smith, as Louis Floriat, husband of the unfortunate woman, is strong. His repentance for his hasty action after his errot had been shown him by his friend, Noel (capably played by Henry Sharpe) was natural, and won the applause of the audience.

 Ability as a character actor is shown by Dane Hamlin in his interpretation of the part of Victor, porter of the inn in which the murder is committed. His smirking manner reminds one of Uriah Heap, and his work was greatly appreciated.

 Beatrice Abbey, as Helen, the sweetheart of the young lawyer, is pleasing; William Hamilton, as Perrisard, a confidential agent, and Thomas Blondin, his assistant, received applause for their interpretation of their parts. The remainder of the company is satisfactory.

 At the Jefferson Theater next Monday, March 10.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/7/1913. 

   

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