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Monday, January 12, 2015

**MARCH 21ST M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 21st, 1903:


THE SEPARATE CAR LAW/LA.- UPHOLDS "JIM CROW" BILL.
[From the New Orleans Daily States.]

 
Our distinguished morning contemporaries received a hard bump yesterday when the Supreme Court of the State of Louisiana declared the Wilson  separate care law to be unconstitutional. The aforementioned contemporizes, when the law was pending in the Legislature and after its passage, seemed to sympathize more with the Street Railway Corporation than with the negro-afflicted public, but everything comes out all right in the end, although there may be a wail attached to the finis, it we are permitted to draw upon our French. We cannot refrain from reproducing the following excerpt from the editorial columns of our most talented and pious friend, the Picayune. It will be observed that in the excerpt there is something that closely approaches a how of distress and a lusty kick. Our most esteemed contemporary says:


"The law was declared unconstitutional by the judge of the Second Inferior Criminal Court, in a case in which the president and other officials of the City Railways Company were cited into court for failure or refusal to obey the law. When brought before the Inferior Criminal Court, the judge thereof pronounced the law unconstitutional and dismissed the cases brought under it. The right of that court to decide constitutional questions seems extremely doubtful. It would seem that the power to declare such matters is confined to the Supreme Court, and the inferior tribunal has nothing to do but to enforce the laws as they stand, otherwise any inferior magistrate might work havoc with the statute book of the State. Under such conditions no law would be constitutional unless so declared by the highest tribunal, whereas under the ordinary usage every law demands obedience and enforcement until it shall be pronounced null and void by a competent authority.

 "When the law in question was unceremoniously kicked out of the State statutes by the judge of an inferior court the effect was to absolve all violators of the act from any risks or liabilities they might have incurred by their share of kicking against the law that had met only official as well as lay contempt. But the effect by the decision by the Supreme Court will be to revive all the accusations and charges against reported violators, and they should all be held to the strictest responsibility. If a law if for any good reason generally objectionable, steps should be taken to secure its repeal, but for law officers and judges to trample it under foot because it may not happen to agree with their special notions cannot fail to have a most injurious effect in encouraging lawlessness.

 "The 'Jim Crow' act is now the law of land, and that settles it."

 We are more than anxious to shake out pious contemporary by the hand, and do it warmly. We are also more than willing to confabulate with him and assure him of his truthfulness when he said, "The 'Jim Crow' act is now the law of the land, and that settles it." This is a real expression of opinion on the part of the Picayune and we appreciate it very much, because we do not get such expressions often. But may we be permitted to ask why the Picayune allowed its temper to so overcome its piety that it hurled its boot under the coat tails of the unsophisticated, yet gentle judge of the Second Inferior Criminal Court? The whole city knows that the judge of that particular court "handed down no law in his decision," but merely performed a friendly act in order to expedite the separate car case on its way to the Supreme Court of the State, where it was determined yesterday, to the entire satisfaction of the people of New Orleans. Our pious contemporary, the Picayune, was very much "again the law," just as the judge of the Second Inferior Court showed himself to be, yet, to our great grief and astonishment, we have detected the Picayune in the act of booting the judiciary. Strange things happen in the world, but the strangest of them all is the most unexpected kick administered by the Picayune this morning. While we have profound sympathy for the booted judge, we cannot refrain from shouting over the assurance of the Picayune that the separate car act is "now the law of the land."

 From the N. O. Daily States and in the Lafayette Gazette of 3/21/1903.

 

Promulgation!

 Promulgation of the result of the Democratic primary election held in the town of Lafayette, La., on March 4th, 1903, to select candidates for the municipal officers to be voted for at the regular election to be held in said town on May 4th 1903, is hereby made as follows:

 Certificate of Nominations: 
State of Louisiana, Parish of Lafayette, Town of Lafayette.

 We certify that at a primary election held in the town of Lafayette, La., on March 4th 1903, under Act. No. 133, of the Acts of the Legislature of the year 1900, pursuant to a call of the Democratic Executive Committee of said town, the following named Democrats were duly nominated as candidates for town officers of the town of Lafayette in the parish of Lafayette, to be voted for at the election to be held in said town on the 4th day of May 1903, as follows:

 Political designation "Democrats."

 For Mayor: Chas. D. Caffery, term two years.

 For Councilmen: A. E. Mouton, Felix Demanade, M. Rosenfield, D. V. Gardebled, John O. Mouton, Geo. A. DeBlanc, H. L. Fontenot for a term of two years.

 We further certify that Dr. J. D. Trahan, another candidate at said primary election, received the same number of votes as H. L. Fontenot, but that he as addressed to the undersigned chairman of the Democratic Executive Committee of said town has written withdrawal as a candidate for councilman, which is hereto annexed, and we have heretofore placed the name of H. L. Fontenot on the certificate of nomination as a candidate for councilman "Original signed."
     Julian Mouton, Chairman Democratic Ex. Committee, Town of Lafayette.

 Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day of March 1903.
    Ed. G. Voorhies, Sect'y Democratic Executive Committee, town of Lafayette, La.

 John L. Kennedy, Notary Public.
   Filed March 19th, 1903, and promulgated in the official Journal of Lafayette, La., this March 21st 1903.
                        A. M. MARTIN,
                        Assessor and Registrar.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1903.



 Special Meeting of the City Council.
 Lafayette, La., March 18, 1903.

 Special meeting of the Council met this day, Mayor C. D. Caffery presiding.

 The object of the meeting was to entertain the proposition of Mr. J. G. Harrison representing the M. L. & T. R. R. & S. S. Co., in regards to contracting with the City for water supply.

 Moved and duly seconded that the proposition be referred to the Water & Light committee to investigate the whole subject with view of furnishing applicants water if it be of interest to the town to do so and report to the Council as soon as practicable.

 There being no further business the Council Adjourned. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1903.


 Notice of Registration.

 To the voters of the Corporation of Lafayette. Take notice that the registration office will be open at the Court House of said parish on Monday, March the 30th 1903, for the purpose of supplementing the registration. All persons who are not already registered are hereby notified to register according to law. So as to be qualified to vote at the Municipal election to be held on Monday the fourth day of May 1903, in the town of Lafayette, La.
           A. M. MARTIN, Registrar.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1903.




Hope Lodge No. 145 F. & A. M.

 Meets at 7:30 p. m. in the Masonic hall, Lafayette, as follows.

March 20th.
April 3rd & 17th.
May 1st & 15th.
June 5th & 19th.
July 3rd & 17th.
August 7th & 21st.
Sept. 4th & 18th.
Oct. 2nd & 16th.
Nov. 6th & 20th.
Dec. 4th & 18th.

Chas. D. Caffery, W. M.
V. L. Roy, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1903.

 

Shooting Affray. - There was a shooting affray on the Bernard plantation Monday in which Placide Washington shot and fatally wounded Gustine Guilbeaux, Nehia Guilbeaux was also wounded. The cause of the trouble was jealousy. All parties connected with the shooting are negroes. Sheriff Broussard went at once in pursuit of Washington. 
Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1903.

 

Triay Case.
 The case of F. C. Triay before the district court last Wednesday resulted in a mistrial after the jury had been locked up over night. Triay was immediately released on bail. The general impression is that the evidence brought out in the trial does not justify the graver charge than assault and battery, and this charge Triay had previously pleaded guilty before the Mayor's court.

 The indictment under which Triay was prosecuted in the District court specified lying in wait and striking with a dangerous weapon with intent to murder, and it is under this indictment that a mistrial has been entered in the case. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1903.  



  Women's Literary Club. - The Women's Literary Club held a meeting with Mrs. Comstock on last Saturday. There was no program rendered as this was the meeting appointed for the election of officers for the ensuing year. The election resulted as follows: Mrs. Blake, President; Miss. Lea Gladu, Vice President; Mrs. Comstock, Recording Secretary; Mrs. Victor Roy, Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. Martin, Treasurer; Mrs. Denbo, Librarian. The Club adjourned to meet with Mrs. Davis on April 4, after which the hostess served dainty refreshments. Lafayette Advertiser 2/21/1903.



MARRIED. - Mr. Davis Church and Miss Susanne Bienvenue were married at St. John's Catholic Church, Thursday evening. The Advertiser extends best wishes for their future happiness. Laf. Adv. 3/21/1903.




  From the Lafayette Gazette of March 21st 1903:

 
Lebesque Plantation.



 The property popularly known as the Lebesque place, situated on the road between Lafayette and Carencro, and belonging to the Gauche heirs of New Orleans, was sold last Saturday at public auction by Sheriff Broussard, to effect a partition among the heirs.

 It contained 873 arpents, most of which is soil of a superior fertility. The plantation was divided into 19 lots of acreages of 31 to 50 arpents for the purposes of the sale, and was sold on easy terms. The following was the result of the sale: Jean Breaux bought 50 arpents for $1800.00; Antonine Conque, 50 arpents for $1650.00; Ernest Bernard, 50 arpents for $2325.00; Edmond Couret, 35.63 arpents for $1375.00; Gabriel Dugas, 31 arpents for $1550.00; Antoine Conque, 35 arpents for $1050.00; P. H. Mouton, 37 arpents for $1125; Adam Arceneaux, 48 arpents for $1400.00; Dr. Fred J. Mayer, 48 arpents for $1400.00; Willie Couret, 48 arpents for $1400.00; Gaston Francez, 48 arpents for $1725.00; Alexandere Hernandez, 48 arpents for $1900.00; Alcide Judice, 48 arpents for $1225.00; Theo. Matthieu, 48 arpents for $1125.00; Albert and Jean B. Arceneaux, 48 arpents for $1200.00; Alonzo Lacy, 48 arpents for $1150.00; Mrs. Jno. Gauche, 48 arpents for $900.00; and a tract of woodland, containing 25 arpents, was sold to Wm. Butcher for $230.00.

 
  Crow Girard of Lafayette and Edwin T. Merrick of New Orleans are the attorneys of the Gauche heirs.

 
  The land sold has a number of years remained uncultivated, and the fact that the purchasers are farmers who own prosperous farms, is a matter of congratulation for the parish. Lafayette owes its prosperity in a great measure to the large proportion of farmers who own their own land, thus establishing an even distribution of the soil perhaps not equaled in any other parish of the State. The establishment of homes in the Lebesque place augurs will for the prosperity of that section and of the parish.

Lafayette Gazette 3/21/1903.





Court Items.
On Monday Judge Debaillon tried the motion made for a change of venue made by the attorneys of McCoy, J. L. Kennedy and Crow Girard. In view of the fact that a number of witnesses testified that the accused could get a fair trial in this parish, the attorneys for the defense did not persist in their efforts to obtain a change of venue. McCoy's case re-flexed for Thursday, but on account of the indisposition of one of his lawyers, it was not taken up on that day, and was re-fixed for the 24th.


 F. C. Triay, charged with lying in wait and striking with intent to murder, Louis Bazin, was tried Wednesday. He was defended by J. L. Kennedy. The following were chosen on the jury: Elias Spell, jr., Alonzo Lacy, Aug. F. Voorhies, O'Neil Guidry, Saul Broussard, O. H. Theriot, J. Romaine Melancon, Hyman Plonsky, J. Meo Broussard, Aurelian Olivier, A. V. Labbe and B. J. Pellerin. The jury failed to agree on a verdict and remained in the jury room overnight and were discharged by Judge Debaillon Thursday morning.


 The following cases are fixed for to-day: Chas. Thibaut, charged with maiming; Eloi Daniel, charged with striking with intent to kill and Walter Hebert, charged with larceny.


 The cases against Marquis Mouton are fixed for Monday, and S. S. Simms, accused of manslaughter will be tried on the 25th.
Lafayette Gazette 3/21/1903.
 


The Woman's Literary Club. - Held its annual election of officers on last Saturday afternoon at the residence of Mrs. G. C. Comstock. The following officers were elected to serve the ensuing year: Mrs. T. N. Blake, president; Miss Lea Gladu, vice-president; Mrs. G. C. Comstock, secretary; Mr. V. Roy, corresponding secretary; Mrs. J. A. Martin, treasurer; Mrs. A. B. Denbo, librarian. The committee appointed to communicate with Prof. Ficklen stated that he would lecture on Louisiana History, March 28.
Lafayette Gazette 3/21/1903.






GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD
Appropriate One Thousand Dollars for Lafayette Parish.
 Last week Dr. Wallace Buttrick, secretary and executive officer of the General Education Board, telegraphed Supt. Alleman went and the result of the interview was an appropriation of one thousand dollars for the public schools of Lafayette parish.

 Readers of The Gazette will remember the visit of Prof. E. Cloyd, the field agent of the Board, last October. Mr. Cloyd visited several of the schools of the parish, and met in conference with members of the School Board and other friends of education to whom he explained the object of the organization of his patriotic Board. Prof. Cloyd was favorably impressed with the progressive spirit of the educational movement in the parish and was especially pleased to report to his Board that the leading citizens of the town and parish regardless of religious or political affiliations, were of one mind on the great question of universal education. It was the report of such a condition that claimed recognition of our merits and when it is remembered that the General Education Board does not give away one cent, the people of the parish have to be proud of the compliment paid them by the Board which is composed of the best business brains of the country, North and South. The appropriation of one thousand dollars to Lafayette means that the people are helping themselves and that our claim, so to speak, was recognized among thousands of others. Hence it is that The Gazette thinks the action  of the Board a compliment to the parish.

 Dr. Buttrick is very well pleased with the promising condition of the public school system of the parish and it is his confidence in the ultimate result here that has prompted him to lend a hand at this time when it is most needed.

 The Gazette has always maintained and still maintains that Lafayette parish is rich enough to maintain a first-class system of school throughout the parish, but the facts remains that the parish has never done it, and until we have established such a system we need feel no hesitancy in accepting and from such public-spirited and patriotic citizens as compose the General Education Board.

 The supreme object in the organization of the General Education Board is to assist struggling communities to establish good rural schools. The Board recognizes the fact that the crossroad school-house with one teacher and forty children in four or five grades has prove a failure; that is an absolute impossibility for one teacher to cope with such a school. The General Board believes in the consolidation of country schools and in transportation of the children to these schools at public expense.

 Such a system does not cost more and the results are increased about three-fold. It is better to go four miles to a good strong school than to attend a third rate school at your door. Lafayette Gazette 3/21/1903.



   
City Council.

 A special meeting of the City Council was held this day with Mayor C. D. Caffery presiding. The following members were present: F. E. Girard, H. H. Hohorst, F. Demanade, G. A. DeBlanc, A. E. Mouton. Absent: J. O. Mouton.

 The object of the meeting was to entertain the proposition of Mr. J. G. Harrison, representing the M. L. & T. & R. R. & S. S. Co., in regard to contracting with the city for water supply.

 Moved and seconded, that the proposition be referred to water and light committee to investigate the whole subject matter with a view of furnishing applicant water if it be of interest to the town to do so, and report to the Council as soon as practicable. Lafayette Gazette 3/21/1903.





 From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 21st, 1891:


 PROJECTED RAILROAD TO BATON ROUGE.
  [N. O. Times Democrat]

A survey party representing Philadelphia and Eastern capitalists are now making a preliminary survey of a route of railroad from the first high ground on the Illinois Central railroad to Baton Rouge, with a view of constructing a railroad across the country to connect with the Grosse Tete road and the projected line of the Louisiana central to Lafayette, La. The recent sale of 15,000 acres of Louisiana land, reported a few days ago in the Times-Democrat, is supposed to have been made in connection with this movement.

Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.
 


THE GAME LAW.
 The following are the dates during which the game law is in force in this State: Deer - From March 1st to October 1st, penalty, from $25 to $50.

Wild turkey - From April 15th to October 1st, penalty $10 to $15.

Quail, Partridge and Pheasant - From April 1st to October 1st penalty $10 to $25.

A penalty of from $2 to $25 is imposed for the destruction of Whippoorwill, Nighthawk, or Blackbird, except when same are destructive to the fruit or grain crop.

A penalty of from $5 to $25 for robbing or destroying the nest of eggs of any wild bird whatsoever, except those of a predatory nature, and destructive of game and insectivorous birds.

Section 12 of the Game Law provides that all fines collected for violation of any of the provisions of the act one half the said fine shall go to the informer and the other half paid to the Treasurer of the Parish School Board of the public schools.  
Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.  




Who Shall Be Candidates?

The question as to who shall be candidates for election as mayor and aldermen of our town, at the election which will occur the first Monday in May next, is now somewhat agitated by our citizens. We believe the most satisfactory plan will be to have a primary election by the white citizens for choice of candidates, the result of which all should feel bound to abide by. This is the true Democratic principle.  Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.



DIED. -  At her residence near the town of Lafayette, La., on Saturday, March 14th, 1891, MRS. LEOCADE BOUDREAUX, wife of the late Hon. Francois Daigle, aged 58 years.

Deceased was married to Francois Daigle in 1850, the issue of the marriage being fives sons, one of whom died in 1882. Four sons survive her, the youngest of whom is 16 years of age. She was a loving wife, a devoted mother, a kind friend, and her loss is deeply felt by a wide circle of friends and relatives. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.


DIED. At her residence in this parish on Sunday, March 15th, 1891, Mme. DOMINGUE ARCENEAUX nee Martin, aged 85 years.

 Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.


Gunpowder Explosion.
The Abbeville Meridional of the 14th says: At his home near Hayes bridge on Bayou Queue Tortue, in the 5th ward, Mr. Venance Richard was last Monday evening made the victim of an unfortunate accident. He was engaged in loading cartridges and was seated a short distance from an open fireplace. A stick of wood having burned in two the ends, the ends fell throwing a live coal into the large cup in which there was about a pound of gunpowder. In the explosion which instantly followed Richard burned his face blackened and burned beyond recognition, his hair singed off, the skin on his left arm and hand cooked to a crisp until it hung in great shreds. Dr. E. Tilly attended the unfortunate sufferer and while his injuries are very severe has hope for his recovery. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.





Lafayette's Post Office.

 Following is the schedule of the arrival and closing of the mail at the Lafayette, La., post office.

  Arrives from the East twice daily--6 a. m. and 1:15 p. m. Closes for the East at 1:15 p. m and 6 p. m. daily.

 Arrives from the West twice daily--8 a. m. and 1:35 p. m. Closes for the West at 1 p. m. and 6 p. m. daily.

 Alexandria--Arrives at 1:15 p. m. Closes at 1 p. m., daily.

 Breaux Bridge--Leaves at 2 p. m., arrives at 12 m., daily except Sunday.

           PAUL DEMANADE, Postmaster.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.


LEVEES--Reports from the levees in Louisiana show that they are in magnificent condition, and no further break is imminent. The Ames break is the only one reported. The river is falling slightly. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.


Raffle to Benefit Railroad Widow.
 Mr.  Wm. Dalton, conductor between here and Algiers, died about a month ago, leaving a widow and seven children. The family are now in rather straightened circumstances. His former friends and associates on the road, appreciating the burdens the widow has to bear, and wishing to make them lighter, have clubbed together and bought an elegant open face, 14-karat gold case watch, with the latest improved Raymond movement, costing over $70.00, which is to be raffled off for her benefit at $1.00 a chance. It is to be hoped that our boys here will not stand back, but will come forward and cheerfully contribute their quota towards the success of this most worthy undertaking. Remember, the heart will always feel lighter for help bestowed upon the widow of the fatherless. Mr. A. P. Church will supply tickets and give further information. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.


Meeting to Discuss a High School.
 At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Lafayette Educational and Dramatic Association (in the interests of a high school), held last Monday evening at the Crescent Hotel, much important business was transacted, every member of the Board displaying a great deal of interest in discussing the best plan of action towards the accomplishment of the high school. A committee of three, composed of Messrs. Julian Mouton, John Hahn and Chas. O. Mouton, was appointed on "Site for School House," consequently, anyone wishing to donate, sell or exchange a lot of ground suitable for above mentioned purposes will do well to interview the committee. Dr. T. B. Hopkins and C. P. Alpha were appointed a committee on "Plan, Style," etc. Messrs. Julien Mouton and R. C. Greig were appointed a committee and requested to call on the City Council and ask an appropriation from that body for the high school fund. The next meeting of the Board of Trustees will be held on Monday next, 23 inst. Already several progressive and far seeing citizens, who do not wait for 10 o'clock sun to pull their eyes open, have interviewed the "Committee on Site," and it looks as if the prompt and determined action of the Board of Trustees was destined to be fruitful of good results. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.



Lafayette's Advantages.
 Lafayette, with its advantages and inducements, is attracting widespread attention, although the fact may not be generally known to our citizens. During the winter, and especially within the past two or three weeks, we have noticed quiet, solid looking visitors, who were evidently men of means. They did not go out on the streets with a big brass horn and proclaim their object and intentions, but made their observations in a quiet and unpretentious manner, and were evidently well impressed. They mean "business," and we will hear from them in good time. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.           

   

Australian 99 Cents Store.
 Don't fail to visit the "Australian 99 Cents Store," which is a novel attraction just opened by Mr. H. R. Camp at the storehouse formerly occupied by Mr. Veazey, on Lincoln avenue, two blocks this side of the depot. Every article in the store is sold for 99 cents on the Australian plan. Among the numerous articles on exhibition are watches, jewelry, clocks, silverware, hardware, musical instruments, smokers' articles, albums, oil paintings, chromos, cutlery, toilet articles, bric-a-brac, etc. etc. The plan of selling is new, and cannot fail to please. Go and see how the goods are sold in the far off country of Australia. If you desire to make a nice present to your mother, wife or sister (or some other fellow's sister), you cannot fail to be suited to your entire satisfaction. Mr. Camp has positive engagements elsewhere, and will remain here only a few days longer. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.    



Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 3/21/1891:

Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Caillouet, of Franklin, are the guests of Mr. A. T. Caillouet.

Mr. G. C. Salles, who has been attending Medical lectures in New Orleans, returned home Wednesday.

Mr. W. G. Butcher, living in Carencro section, called on us the latter part of the week.

On the night of 2nd of April, 1891, a grand ball will be given at J. Batiste Peres' hall near town. The public is invited to attend.

Members of Hope Lodge No 145 F. & A. M., are notified that a meeting will be held at the Lodge room to-night, at the usual hour.

Build up your home by patronizing home. When your last fire insurance policy expires, renew it with Moss Bros. & Co.

We return thanks to Hon. Andrew Price for favors in the way of valuable Public documents.

We have been blessed with delightful weather during the week. Our farmers have picked up their spirits, backed their cars and "lit in" with hearty good will, and soon we expect to hear good results. There is nothing like energy and determination to overcome all obstacles.

Mrs. John O. Mouton returned from New Orleans last Saturday, where she had gone to purchase a supply of Spring and Summer goods. She invites the ladies to call and examine her fine line of millinery and other goods.

Mr. J. E. Trahan has purchased the property of Mrs. Frank Gardner on Lincoln avenue, and will soon remove his Drugstore from the corner of Washington and Vermilion streets to that place.

Sunday was a cold, drizzly, disagreeable day, and a slight sleet fell between 9 and 10 o' clock in the morning.

It cures headache only - Preston's "Hed-Ake."

Miss Kate Owens, sister of Superintendent F. W. Owens, spent Saturday and Sunday with Mrs. Jno. Hahn, at the Crescent Hotel.

Mr. F. C. Triay has contracted with Mr. Auguste Degrez to build for him a neat cottage on his lots in Mouton's addition. Work has commenced on the same, and in a short time "Bud" will shelter his family under his own roof.

The committee consisting of Messrs. Jas. Hannen, Chas. D. Caffery, A. Labe and Alcide Mouton were appointed to let the contract for building a plank walk from the Post office via Lee avenue to the Crescent Hotel, report that they have let the contract to Mr. Auguste Degrez, for 16 cents per lineal foot, he being the lowest bidder. Work will be commenced on the walk Monday.

We are glad to learn that Mr. J. F. Mitchell, Master Mechanic of the Southern Pacific Railroad at this point, who has been quite ill for several weeks past, is now convalescent, and will resume charge of affairs again in a few days.

Mr. Wm. Dalton, conductor between here and Algiers, died about a month ago, leaving a widow and seven children. The family are now in rather straitened circumstances. His former friends and associates on the road, appreciating the burdens the widow has to bear, and wishing to make them lighter, have clubbed together and bought an elegant 14 karat gold watch, with the latest improved Raymond movement, costing over $70.00, which is to be raffled off for her benefit at $1.00 a chance. It is to be hoped that our boys here will not stand back, but will come forward and cheerfully contribute their quota towards success of this most worthy undertaking. Remember, the heart will always feel lighter for help bestowed upon the widow and the fatherless. Mr. A. F. Church will supply tickets and give further information.

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Lafayette Educational and Dramatic Association (in the interests of high school), held last Monday evening at the Crescent hotel, much important business was transacted, every member of the Board displaying a great deal of interest in discussing the best plan of action towards the accomplishment of the high school. A committee of three, composed of Messrs. Julian Mouton, John Hahn and Chas. O. Mouton, was appointed on "Site for School House," consequently, anyone wishing to donate, sell or exchange a lot of ground suitable for above mentioned purpose will do well to interview the committee. Dr. T. P. Hopkins and C. P. Alpha were appointed a committee on "Plan, Style," etc. Messrs. Julian Mouton and R. C. Greig were appointed a committee and requested to call on the City Council and ask an appropriation from that body for the high school fund. The next meeting of the Board of trustees will be held on Monday next, 23rd inst. Already several progressive and far seeing citizens, who do not wait for a 10 o'clock sun to pull their eyes open, have interviewed the Committee on Site," and it looks as if the prompt and determined action of the Board of Trustees was destined to be fruitful of good results.

Posters are out for a grand ball to be given at St. Julien's hall, Broussardville, by Messrs. Latioslais & Reaux, on Sunday night, March 29th. Music by Professor Fabre's string band. All are invited to attend, and a general good time may be expected.

Miss Louise Revillon has been kept busy since the reception of her new stock of millinery, ladies' and misses' shoes. Call early and make your selections.

The horses that fly by steam have flown off, but we have an equally engrossing attraction in the "Australian 99 Cents Store" which opened at Veazey's old stand on Lincoln avenue. This enterprise seems to have struck the citizens in just exactly the right spot, and the store is crowded day and night. Mr. Camp, the manager, invites the public to call and purchase early, as he will only remain here a few days longer.
Lafayette, with its advantages and inducements, is attracting widespread attention, although the fact may not be generally known to our citizens. During the winter, and especially within the past two or three weeks, we have noticed quiet, solid looking visitors, who were evidently men of means. They did not go out on the streets with a big brass horn and proclaim their object and intentions, but made their observations in a quiet and unpretentious manner, and were evidently well impressed. They mean "business," and we will hear from them in good time.


 Don't fail to visit the "Australian 99 Cents Store," which is novel attraction just opened by Mr. H. R. Camp at the storehouse formerly occupied by Mr. Veazey, on Lincoln avenue, two blocks this side of the depot. Every article in the store is sold for 99 cents on the Australian plan. Among the numerous articles on exhibition are watches, jewelry, clocks, silverware, hardware, musical instruments, smokers articles, albums, oil paintings, chromos, cutlery, toilet articles, bric-a-brac, etc., etc. The plan of selling is new and cannot fail to please. Go and see how many goods are sold in the far off country of Australia. If you desire a nice present to your mother, wife or sister (or some other fellow's sister), you cannot fail to be suited to your entire satisfaction. Mr. Camp has positive engagements elsewhere, and will remain here only a few days longer.         Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.



 From the Lafayette Advertiser March 21st, 1874. 

Railroad News.

We copy the following from the N. O. Picayune of the 18th :We had the pleasure of meeting yesterday, Judge J. F. Crosby of Houston, Texas, former Receiver of the Texas and New Orleans Railroad, now attorney and agent of the line from the Sabine to Houston. Judge Crosby reports that the owners of the Texas and New Orleans Railroad are ready and anxious to put the road in perfect order from the Sabine to Houston, as soon as arrangements are consummated for the building of the line from New Orleans to the Sabine.

Morton, Bliss & Co., E. D. Morgan, and the capitalists who control the Texas and New Orleans, are ready with the cash to complete and stock their end of the line.

The people of Houston are deeply interested, and anxious to see the work commenced on the New Orleans division.

We learn that a meeting of the first mortgage bondholders of the New Orleans and Texas Railroad Company (Western Division), held in New York on the 10th inst., a resolution was passed instructing the President L. H. Meyer, to call on the bondholders to subscribe $300,000 to finish the road to Grand River, in order to buy additional rolling stock, etc., provided Gov. Kellogg signs the bill passed by the Legislature at the last session, in the interest of the road.


 From the N. O. Picayune and reprinted in the Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1874.



FIRE. - On Wednesday night of last week, the dwelling of Mr. Best, the former Andre Nero plantation, about two miles this side of Arnaudville, on Bayou Teche in this parish, was entirely consumed by fire. Mr. Best and wife were awakened late at night by the noise of the burning roof, and they barely had time to escape with their children. Nothing scarcely was saved, not even the clothing and shoes they wore the previous day. The fire is supposed to have been caused by a defective chimney.

 From the Opelousas Journal and printed in the Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1874.
 



Will Entertain at Convent. - We have the pleasure of announcing to our readers that the celebrated Doctor Mehay, the great legerdemain, will shortly give an entertainment in Vermilionville, for the benefit of the Mount Carmel Convent. The entertainment will take place in the new Convent building ; the exact time of the Doctor's arrival will be here will be made known to the public. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1874.


 
Patrons of Husbandry. -
A Grange of the Order of Patron's of Husbandry, was organized at Hebert's Hall in Vermilionville, on Monday the 16th inst., by Col. Daniel Dennett, Special Deputy of the Order for Southwest Louisiana. The names of the officers and members of this, the first Grange organized in the parish of Lafayette are as follows:

OFFICERS : -Alex Mouton, Master; J. R. Creighton, Overseer; J. J. Caffery, Steward; T. B. Hopkins, Assist. Steward; C. T. Patin, Gate Keeper; H. A. Kennedy, Lecturer; H. Jamieson, Jr., Secretary; T. F. Webb, Chaplain; A. Greig, Treasurer; Mrs. A. Greig, Flora; Mrs. M. Gardner, Ceres; Mrs. T. B. Hopkins, Pomona; Mrs. T. F. Webb, Lady Assist. Steward.

Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1874.




From the Lafayette Advertiser of March 21st, 1911:

THE HEALTH TRAIN.
Dr. Dowling Inspects Town - Lectures at High School.

 The long expected visit of the State Health train occurred Saturday when the two coaches attached to a local train rolled into the station at eleven o'clock, bringing with it the long wished for rain. As some one pleasantly remarked it seemed quite natural after all that the train coming from Rayne should bring rain. Quite a crowd was at the depot some to welcome the health officials and others to meet the Opelousas basket ball visitors. Mayor Martin, Councilmen Caffery and Montgomery, Rev. Father Teurlings, President E. L. Stephens, Judge O. C. Mouton, Dr. L. O. Clark, Editor LeRosen and other prominent citizens stepped aboard the train and welcomed Dr. Dowling and his staff of assistants. Dr. Dowling kindly explained to his guests the exhibits on the car and impressed all with the importance to the effort to educate the public along hygienic and sanitary lines. The train was soon well filled with spectators and for some time a continuous stream poured in and out. Dr. Carey, Miss Agnes Morris and Miss Fannie B. Nelkins composed Dr. Dowling's corps of assistants and many ladies of the town and members of the Institute faculty helped to make the welcome warm for these distinguished visitors.

 During the afternoon Dr. Dowling accompanied by Drs. O. L. Clark, J. F. Boyd and Mayor Martin, made a tour of inspection visiting a half dozen dairies, several meat shops, hotels and bakeries. Sunday the inspection was continued and the work was not completed until yesterday morning just before the departure of the train. Dr. Dowling gave out an official expression but is was quite evident that he found some things that will call for rather severe criticism. Among other things it appears that none of the dairies come up to the standard requirements as to floors, etc., and the slaughter pens will come in for a few suggestions. Despite the strenuous efforts to clean up the town in anticipation of this inspection, many heaps of garbage and refuse were still visible on many streets, as the wagon force was inadequate for the work.

 Saturday night Dr. Dowling gave a stereoptican lecture at the High School, but on account of the threatening weather the attendance was small. Miss Morris and Dr. Carey also spoke. The views shown were very instructive and at time amusing. The fly, hookworm, tuberculosis, etc., were among the subjects presented and graphically portrayed. Sunday night another lecture was given and the High School auditorium was fairly well filled. Dr. Martin called the meeting to order and introduced Dr. F. J. Mayer, who spoke briefly but pointedly on the menace of the fly and mosquito, and the importance of safeguarding the purity of the milk supply. Dr. Dowling then gave in a general way the result of his inspection tour, saying he had seen many things worthy of commendation and others not very complimentary. He urged good drainage and insisted strongly on a sewerage system. The big ditch along Lee avenue should be filled immediately. All the slaughter pens were condemned and all but two could only be rectified by fire; the meat markets and bakeries with two exceptions in each class were not up to standard; all hotels could be improved and one establishment was given 24 hours to clean up; no dairies were found to be up to requirements. The City Council should appoint a health board and sanitary inspectors, all of whom should be well paid.

 Miss Morris spoke along sociological lines, advocating pure water and food and more fresh air in the homes. The stereopticon pictures were then shown and evidently instructed and entertained the audience.

 Yesterday morning the children of all the town schools and students of the Industrial Institute paid a visit to the health train and were photographed in a body. Dr. Dowling and party left at eleven o'clock yesterday morning for Broussard. The official report of the inspection here will not be made for several days and will be transmitted to the council for consideration. Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1911.



        

         












lagniappe:
A Chivalrous Form of Treachery.

 The love of the Sioux for his horses and firearms is proverbial. He hates to be degraded to the character of a squaw. To lose his horse and his gun means to him a humiliation the most unbearable. Big Foot's band were willing to make a surrender in form - they would willingly give up a few old firearms in token of submission - but when it came to parting with their pet Winchesters there was an end of parleying. The white match was applied to the Sioux powder barrel, and it exploded with most fatal results to both parties. The action of the Sioux may have been treacherous, but it was a chivalrous form of treachery - A Spartanic treachery, in fact. They were confronted by at least four times their number of troops. Their village, containing their women and children and all their worldly wealth except their firearms, was covered by the Gatling guns and Hotchkiss cannon that also bent their deadly muzzles upon the fated warriors. One Sioux, more fiery than his fellows, felt the stinging insult of search and preferred revenge, even it it brought death, to degradation. There was a flash, a report and the daring and terrible deed of dead Sitting Bull's chosen band passed into history, covered with blood and glory - but more particularly with blood. Stout Wallace and thirty troopers went to rejoin Custer beyond the eternal river, and the Gatlings and Hotchkisses sent many an Indian ghost to hobnob with the prophet of the race on that great reservation where the paleface is unknown, and where the buffalo is never scarce. A poet has sung:

     Manhood's proudest duty
        Is to fight for manhood's faith,
     And true courage has a beauty
        That not even crime can scathe.

 Looking at the Wounded Knee fight from the standpoint of settlement it must be confessed that Big Foot and his comrades fought and died for what they believed to be their rights like gentlemen, and like native American gentlemen at that. The greatest obstacle in the way of Big Foot's immortality will be the great difficulty future poets may have in finding rhyme for his most unpoetical name. In this respect the Sioux chief is more unfortunate than Byron's Amos Cottle. "Phoebus! what a name!" 


From the Chicago Herald and in the Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1891.



LAGNIAPPE#2
IMMIGRATION INTO THE UNITED STATES.


Washington, March 17. - A paper has been prepared by Mr. Pratt, a member of the centennial staff, showing from the official statistics of immigration from 1869 to 1873, that the average increase of immigration into the United States for those four years was over a hundred thousand a year over that for any preceding period of four years, and was largely due to our representation of the national resources and the products of industry at the Paris exhibition in 1867, together with the information disseminated by the commission. The lowest estimate by statisticians and political economists upon the average value of immigration is $800 apiece to the country, so that the increase of immigration for those four years amounted to $320,000,000. It was predicted by Gen. Banks, Mr. Beckwith, S. B. Ruggles and others, that a great immigration would follow such an exhibit as we made. What, then, will be the effect of a full exhibition in 1877 of all our marvelous and varied resources. These immigrants are, many of them skilled farmers and artisans of the most thrifty nations of Europe, and every State of the South which makes, at the exhibition, a proper exhibit of agricultural and mineral wealth, will secure a share of this immigration, composed entirely of the white people.


Original source unknown. In the Lafayette Advertiser 3/21/1874.

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