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Monday, January 12, 2015

**APRIL 11TH M C

From the Lafayette Gazette of April 11th, 1903:
SOUTHERN PACIFIC:



A Patriotic Corporation.

Dr. Moss' Request for Free Transportation for Saturday, Granted by Southern Pacific Officials.

The correspondence which follows is self-explanatory. The Gazette reproduces it as showing the evident interest taken by the Southern Pacific in the movement for better schools now being agitated throughout the parish. In view of the fact that that the railroad companies running through the parish would be heavily taxed in case a special tax is levied, their disinterested approval, as shown by the following letters, is a matter of congratulations:
                                         March 31, 1903.

 Mr. W. F. OWEN, SUPT.,
               ALGIERS, LA.

 Dear Sir - The progress and prosperity of a country is to be measured by the plane of intelligence of its people. There is a pressing need for more and better school facilities in Lafayette parish, as the present sources of revenue for carrying on the work of public education are entirely inadequate. The public school authorities here desire to enlist your interest in a movement to arouse public sentiment in favor of a special school tax to supply necessary funds to hasten the upbuilding and development of the country. A school tax is not to be regarded as an expense by those who pay it, but it is to be viewed in the light of a paying investment, and it is the duty and the business of those who properly understand this question to lend assistance possible to the good cause.

 Gov. Heard has expressed his willingness and his desire to serve our community in this connection by coming to Carencro to address a mass meeting, and he has written to me that it would be agreeable to him to visit our parish toward the end of next week. We are planning to draw in immense throng of people to hear the governor and Prof. Fortier (in French), and in this work of collecting the people at Carencro the Southern Pacific Co. can be of material assistance by furnishing transportation from Lafayette station to Carencro and return. Many persons in the parish would be induced to attend the mass meeting at Carencro it we were in a position to invite them to congregate at Lafayette on horse-back and carriages, and from thence travel by rail to Carencro and return, and the more people we can succeed in bringing under the influence of the governor and the other advocates of the school tax measure, the greater will be our prospects for carrying the movement to a successful issue.

 We believe the great merit of the cause will commend itself to your patriotism and public spiritedness, no less than to your good business judgment, and we hop for a favorable consideration of the proposition at your hands. Please bring the matter before the attention of your company in such a way as will secure for it the attention it deserves, and thanking you in advance for your valued services in this matter, I beg to remain,
           Yours very truly,
                       DR. N. P. MOSS.

{OFFICE OF SUPT, ALGIERS, LA, APR. 3, 1903.}

 Dr. N. P. Moss,
          Lafayette, La.
  My Dear Doctor - Your favor of March 31, to hand. Kindly advise Mr. C. C. Mallard, Acting Asst. Supt., Lafayette, on what date and hour you desire train service furnished from Lafayette to Carencro and return, and he will arrange for same.
                                  Yours very truly,
                                           W. F. OWEN.

                                    Lafayette, La., April 8, 1903.

 Dr. N. P. Moss,
                   Lafayette, La.
 Dear Sir - We will furnish train free, to take residents of Lafayette and vicinity, to the meeting, in the interest of education, at Carencro, Saturday, April 11, 1903. Trains to run as follows:
     GOING TO CARENCRO - First train leaving Lafayette 11:20 a. m., arriving at Carencro at 11:35 a. m. Second train leaving Lafayette 12:30 p. m., arriving at Carencro 12:45 p. m.
     RETURNING TO LAFAYETTE - First train leaving Carencro 5:40 p. m., arriving at Lafayette 5:55 p. m. Second train leaving Carencro 6:30 p. m., arriving at Lafayette 6:45 p. m.
     Wishing you all success in this movement,
                   I am yours truly,
                                 C. C. MALLARD, A. A. Supt.
Lafayette Gazette 4/11/1903.




BIG MEETING.
At Broussard in Favor of Special School Tax.
 Last Sunday the Broussard school-house was dedicated with appropriate exercises by the school children assisted by the public spirited Sontag Military Band.

 After the exercises by the school children, President A. Olivier, of the Parish School Board called the meeting to order.

 Mr. Gilbert St. Julien, in chaste French, paid an eloquent tribute to that great Southern educational leader Dr. Edwin A. Alderman, and to the distinguished guest of Broussard Professor Fortier. After warm words of welcome Mr. St. Julien introduced the principal speaker of the day, Professor Alcee Fortier, of Tulane University.

 Mr. Fortier delivered an address on the necessity of a special tax in order to maintain a good system of public schools. His language was simple and strong, and he illustrated his arguments copiously with examples taken from history. He dwelt upon the necessity of education for girls as well as boys and spoke of the aesthetic influence of music and drawing in the public schools. Education did not simply consist of the material side as represented by arithmetic and writing; there are the aesthetic or culture studies which was as important. But the great source of all knowledge was nature. Professor Fortier said that a public school-house should not be a hut. The building must itself be neat and attractive and should be of such a character as would materially contribute to the aesthetic training of the child.

 A school system properly conducted required funds far in excess of that generally obtained from the State and parish; and the only sure way of establishing a public school system on a sure footing was to supplement the State and parish funds with a special tax for schools.

 He deplored the condition of the ignorant and said that parents should  make every sacrifice for the education of their children, who were entitled to the best that could be done for them. Professor Fortier appealed to the parents to do their duty in this matter and he assured his hearers that he had a deep interest in this movement which meant so much for the parish of Lafayette.

 Mr. Fortier was followed by Judge Mouton, who though not on the program accepted President Olivier's invitation to say a few words in favor of better schools. Judge Mouton's knowledge of law enable him to explain fully the significance of a special tax. It is a sacred fund, he says, which must be expended for the purpose for which it is raised. The Judge relieved the heavy strain upon his audience by indulging in a bit of humor now and then. He said that the word tax was not harmonious to the ear as was the music by the Sontag Military Band. The word tax grates against the tympanum of the ear,  but after all there was nothing more than just than equitable taxation. He showed the necessity of a special tax in Lafayette parish. The parish had gone far in the march of progress and it should not stop until it had become one of the leading parishes of the State.

 Judge Mouton ended with a strong appeal to the citizens of the parish to realize the full importance of the movement to raise ample funds for the public schools and said that he was very much mistaken in his judgment if the people of this parish did not do their full duty in this matter and vote the small tax proposed.

 The Reverend Father Roquet was next invited to express his views on the subject, and he did so concisely and forcefully. He heartily endorsed the proposed tax for schools. He did not believe in huts for school-houses. The proposed tax was a paltry one, only three mills, and he felt certain that  no property-holder would refuse such an i insignificant tax for such a grand cause. He was in favor of the tax and would be the first to sign the petition.

 Father Roquet's speech was received with much enthusiasm and his impromptu talk was a most valuable contribution to the success of the movement.

 The last speaker was Mr. St. Julien who made an eloquent plea for education. The proposed tax meant the annual payment of $1.50 by the average Lafayette farmer.

 After the addresses every one present signed the petitions and the meeting was pronounced by old citizens the largest ever held in Lafayette parish.

 Two very pleasing feature connected with the meeting at Broussardville was the sumptuous banquet tendered to Prof. Fortier and friends by Mr. M. Billeaud, Jr., and the splendid reception given to the Sontag Military Band and their friends, at the hospitable home of Mr. Hebert Billeaud.
Lafayette Gazette 4/11/1903. 



  

Confederate Veterans Meet.
 An enthusiastic meeting of Camp Frank Gardner, U. C. V., was held last Saturday at the court-house.

 It was called to devise means to have the Camp represented at the re-union of the Confederate Veterans in New Orleans during the month of May.

 Stirring addresses were delivered by several of the old soldiers.

 Lucien St. Julien and Arthur Greig were chosen delegates to the reunion and Col. G. A. Breaux and Judge C. H. Mouton, alternates.

Extremely low rates have been allowed by the railroad companies, and it is probable many of the veterans will attend the reunion.
Lafayette Gazette 4/11/1903.  






Governor Heard's Visit.
 The news of Governor Heard's coming to Carencro to talk to the citizens of Lafayette parish on the subject of education, has given widespread satisfaction to our people.

 Governor Heard regards wholesome public education as the chief basis of good citizenship, and he has always shown commendable interest in the betterment of that branch of the public service. The Governor has been a consistent advocate of a special tax for the support and extension of the public school system, and the purpose of his present visit to Lafayette parish is to give proof of his deep interest and earnestness in the cause of education, and to endorse by his words and his presence the movement on foot in our parish to levy a special school tax of 3 mills for a term of six years.

 The people of Lafayette parish will not fail to place a high value on the services rendered the State by Gov. Heard for the cause of education; and they will always feel under obligation to him for the special interest he has shown in their behalf by coming in person in their midst to encourage and inspire them in their efforts to attain to the highest point in all that is best in life.
Lafayette Gazette 4/11/1903.  

     

Gazette Issued Early.
 This week The Gazette is issued a little in advance of its usual time of publication. This is done in conformity with the request of the school authorities of the parish, who wish to give wide publicity to the visit of Gov. Heard and other prominent citizens of Louisiana to Carencro on Saturday, the eleventh. The Gazette has always done what it could in furtherance of the educational progress of Lafayette parish and was glad to have another opportunity to lend its assistance to the good cause. The people of Lafayette should show their appreciation of the interest taken in their school matters by Gov. Heard, Prof. Alcee Fortier and President Caldwell, by attending the mass meetings at Carencro on Saturday, April 11 and at Ridge on Sunday, April 12. They may well be proud of the visit of such distinguished educators. It is hoped they will do all in their power to contribute to the success of the meetings. Lafayette Gazette 4/11/1903. 



Carencro Is Astir.

 The mayor and citizens of Carencro held a meeting last Wednesday afternoon for the purpose of making arrangements to receive Governor Heard on the occasion of his visit to Carencro in the interest of public education. Committees were appointed to attend to the various details connected with the reception of the Governor and the entertainment of the great throng of people who will come to Carencro from every part of the parish.

 Nearly 200 school children will welcome the Governor at the railroad station and escort him to the park where he will deliver a public address. The meeting will be held in the open air in case of fair weather, otherwise it will be held in the large hall at the park.

 The governor and other guests of honor will be dined by Dr. P. P. Francez while in Carencro.

 The people of Carencro feel highly pleased and complimented that the chief executive of the State and other distinguished friends of education are going to honor them with their presence, and they justly believe that much good is going to result as a consequence to the educational interests of the parish. 
Lafayette Gazette 4/11/1903. 


School Board Proceedings.
 Lafayette, La., April 2, 1903.

 The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: M. Billeaud, Jr., F. G. Mouton, Alonzo Lacy, Saul Broussard, Alex. M. Broussard, J. O. Buchanan and P. R. Landry.

 The minutes of the previous meeting was read and approved:

 Attorney Mouton reported the adverse opinion of Attorney General Guion as to the right of the Jury to appoint more than one benefeciary cadet to the State University.

 By motion of Mr. Mouton, the following was duly adopted:  Whereas, numerous dams have been constructed across natural streams and drains in the second ward of this parish; and whereas, it appears that the obstruction to said streams and drains causes considerable damage to the public roads and interferes seriously with their maintenance:  Be it resolved, That Messrs. Alex M. Broussard and Tillman Spell be and are hereby appointed to notify the owners of said dams to remove said obstructions within four days' notice hereof and on failure to comply with this demand the committee hereby appointed as instructed and required to proceed forthwith and remove said dams at the expense of the owners.

 By motion of Mr. Mouton, the following was duly adopted:

 Resolved, that the building or the causing to be built of any dam or other obstruction across any bayou or natural drain in the parish of Lafayette is hereby prohibited and any persons violating this resolution and ordinance shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be liable to a fine of five hundred dollars ($500) and in default of payment thereof shall be imprisoned in the parish jail for a period of not more than one year nor less than six months. All ordinances in conflict herewith are hereby repealed.

 Mr. J. E. Mouton asked for equalization of assessment of presses of Louisiana Cotton Product the rights of the company will be protected.

 Messrs. Blanchet and Landry reported failure to examine the Broussard ferryboat and determine as to advisability of repairing same, owing to high water.

 Dr. Mayer appeared and called attention to the joint annual convention of the Louisiana State Agricultural Society and the Louisiana Stock Breeders' Association April 22, 23 and 24, at Alexandria. By motion of Mr. Mouton, Messrs. R. C. Landry, Alcide Judice, F. J. Mayer, Geo. Malagarie, C. C. Brown, Mr. Billeaud, Jr., and John Whittington were appointed delegates to said convention.

 By motion of Mr. Buchanan, Dr. Mayer was authorized to extend to the Agricultural Society and Stock Breeders' Association a cordial invitation to hold their next annual convention of 1904 in the town of Lafayette. President Billeaud appointed Messrs. Mouton and Buchanan to wait upon the City Council of Lafayette and secured its cooperation in extending the invitation.

 Attorney Jerome Mouton appeared and asked that the Jury accept a certain agreement and settlement of the Walker-Domingue road controversy. By motion of Mr. Buchanan, the following was adopted: Resolved, that the parish hereby relinquishes all rights to the road on Mr. Auguste P. Domingue's property which was abandoned by the parish in 1883 and that the present road through Mr. Domingue's property be accepted at the public road.

 Mr. F. G. Mouton is hereby appointed and authorized to represent the parish in any legal transaction necessary to effect a satisfactory settlement of the dispute.

 The committee appointed to settle with the parish treasurer submitted the following report which was approved:
Signed:  PIERRE LANDRY, F. G. MOUTON, R. C. GREIG, Committee.

 A communication from Governor Heard calling attention to the approaching convention of the National Good Roads Association at St. Louis, April 27 to May 2, was read, and by motion of Mr. Buchanan, the following gentlemen were appointed delegates: J. C. Buchanan, John Whittington and Saul Broussard. President Billeaud was appointed also.

 The donation of a certain strip of land along public highway in the first ward by Francois Thibodeaux for drainage purposes was accepted and ordered recorded.

 By motion of Mr. Mouton, Messrs. Paul Martin and L. E. Lacour were authorized to exchange the ditch running through their property for a strip of land eight feet in width along the public road adjoining their respective lines. Said persons to bear all costs of said exchange.

 A letter from Dr. Stubbs, State commissioner, urging a parish exhibit at the World's Fair was read and action deferred.

 Resolved that the parish treasurer be and he is hereby directed and instructed to prepare for publication and to publish a compiled statement of the transactions of his office from July 1, 1901 to July 1, 1902, showing the total receipts and disbursements as follows:

(Unreadable Portion)

 Messrs. Alex M. Broussard and Saul Broussard were granted lumber for bridges.

 Melanie Simpson and Mrs. Celeste Hernandez were allowed each $12.50 as indigents.

 By motion of Mr. Mouton, President Billeaud and Attorney Mouton were appointed to wait upon the tax collector and secure delinquent license lists for the years 1902 and 1903.

 Mr. Blanchet was instructed to notify his road overseer to remove all obstructions to the public highway between the properties of Messrs. Alexie Gilbert and Alcide Savoie.

Mr. Crow Girard submitted a statement of Industrial School tax funds as follows:

Respectfully submitted,
        CROW GIRARD, Treasurer,
                S. W. La. Industrial Institute.
Lafayette, La., March 3, 1903.
     The treasurer submitted his monthly report as follows:

 To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of the Parish funds since my last report:
 Respectfully submitted
                 J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.
Lafayette, La., April 2, 1903.

 To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of the road tax funds since my last report:
 Respectfully submitted, 
                    J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.

Lafayette, La., April 2, 1903.

 The following accounts were laid over:

 Leon Plonsky, blankets ... $11.00
 Moss & Co., lamps files, etc ... $3.75

 The following accounts were approved:
 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
M. BILLEAUD, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 4/11/1903.



Selected News Notes (Gazette) 4/11/1903.
 In view of the fact that a very large number of people intend going by rail to the mass meeting at Carencro, it would be advisable for as many as can do so to take the first excursion train to that place at 11:20 a. m.

 Sunday afternoon, April 12, at 2 o'clock, the new Burke school house near Ridge P. O., in the second ward, will be dedicated with appropriate exercises.

 The egg-hunt in Parkerson's grove Monday evening, April 13, at 4 o'clock, promises to be an event of great enjoyment to the children of the town. Ice cream and cake will be served, beginning at 4 o'clock, and the egg-hunt will begin at 5 o'clock.

Died. - Miss Mattie Clark, daughter of Senator A. O. Clark of this parish, died at the residence of her parents in the second ward, last Saturday night. She was buried at Rayne Sunday afternoon.

 Supt. L. J. Alleman, in company with Dr. Moss, went to Carencro Wednesday to attend to some public matters.
Lafayette Gazette 4/11/1903.





 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 11th, 1896:

 Telephone Changing Lives. 


Hello Advertiser!

Hello!

 I just want to say that I saw in The Advertiser that last Saturday was the opening day for Soda Water at the Moss Pharmacy, so I went around to sample the article. I found the first glass of the season so nice I have been going back regularly for some more each day. Next time you get thirsty order a glass of pine apple soda and see how palatable and refreshing it is. It is a simple mixture of fresh pineapple juice and pure rock candy syrup, and nothing could be nicer. Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1896. 


Small Pox and Vaccination.

 Almost each day brings information of the appearance of small pox in a new locality and the risk of propagation is constantly increasing. The disease is usually brought to a place by negroes tramping through the country and as Lafayette is a railroad division of some importance its population is more exposed to the introduction of small pox in its midst than ordinary inland towns. It behooves us all then to express the utmost vigilance and make sure use of every available provision against the introduction and spread of this mist loathsome and fatal malady. Of all means of protection vaccination is the best as also the most accessible, and should be eagerly sought by all classes of persons. We even believe vaccination ought to be made compulsory in view of the positive barrier it offers to the communication of small pox. The town authorities of Lafayette have done wisely to provide free vaccination to the people, thereby encouraging this form of protection to a much greater extent than would otherwise prevail. A large number of persons have already been inoculated but the good work should go on until every man, woman and child in the town and parish, has submitted to the little operation that proves the contraction of small pox.

 It is a satisfaction to know, also, that all the necessary arrangements have been completed for isolating and nursing any accidental case of small pox that may appear or develop in Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1903.

Leap-Year Dance.

 The Leap-Year ball given by the young ladies at Falk's hall on Wednesday night was a most delightful and brilliant event in the social triumphs of the season. The hall was most beautifully decorated in the fairest flowers Spring, and told eloquently that hands fairer than themselves, had designed and created the veritable bower of roses, that delicately intertwined with mosses and fringed with palms and evergreens, made a scene of charming loveliness like the poets vision of fairy-land. The rich full tones of the orchestra floated through the flower-crowned mingling it enchantment with their soft perfume, and the gay chatter of many young hearts, as they disported amid the utopian scenes.

 The grand march began at 9:30, led by Dr. Irion and Miss Bessie Cornay, and as the couples fell in line till they encircled the entire hall, it showed that the young ladies had been fully rewarded for their labor.

 The programme consisting of 28 dances was continued far into the evening; and when the familiar notes of the "home-sweet-home" warned the reveler that the joyful event had passed into memory, many a regret was felt that it had ended all too soon.

 The young ladies have most happily demonstrated their ability to conduct a dance beyond a peradventure.

 They deserve praise for their energy and pains-taking, and for the pleasure for which all who were present at Wednesday nights reception are indebted to them.

 There were a number of visitors present among whom were: Miss Emma Frere, of Franklin; Miss Virginia Beruic and brother, of Bayou Salle; Miss Peare Harmanson, of Opelousas;  Dr. Voorhies and Mr. DeGeneres, of New Iberia, and Mr. Gooch, of Pattersonville. Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1896.



Proclamation.

 By virtue of the powers in me vested by law, and in accordance with resolution of the City Council of the town of Lafayette, of date March 25th, 1896, I do hereby proclaim that the total votes cast at the special election held at the Court House in the town of Lafayette to determine the question of levying a special tax of five mills on all property subject to taxation within said town for a term of ten years, beginning Jan. 1st, A. F., eighteen hundred and ninety-six, to procure, construct and operate a Waterworks and Electric Light system in said town, under Article two hundred and nine of the Constitution of the State of Louisiana, and Act number one hundred and twenty-six of Eighteen hundred and eighty-two of the General Assembly of said State, to be voted on by the property tax payers of said municipality entitled to voted under the election laws of said State, on Monday March, twenty-third, A. D., eighteen hundred and ninety-six, as per proclamation of the Mayor of said town and due notice thereof by the Supervisors of election in and for Lafayette parish by publication according to law and after twenty days official publication of the petition and ordinance ordering the election in the manner provided by law for judicial advertisements, resulted, according to the returns of the commissioners of said election, and of the supervisors of said election, and of the supervisors of election in and for Lafayette parish and that of the Clerk of the District Court in and for said parish ex-officio returning officer of said town, as follows, to wit :

 Total number of property taxpayers of the town of Lafayette, La., entitled to vote under the election laws of the State, as per certificate of Assessor of Lafayette parish and Registrar of voters, dated March 21st, 1896.     192.

 Total assessed valuation of property taxpayers of the town of Lafayette, as now constituted, entitled to vote under the election laws of the State, as per said certificate of Assessor and Registrar of voters :   $176,866.50.

 Total number of votes cast for said special tax.   130.

 Total number of votes cast against said special tax.   0.

 Total amount of assessed valuation of properly assessed to property taxpayers entitled to vote under the general elections laws of the State, as per said certificate said Assessor and Registrar, who voted for said special tax, one hundred and fifty thousand, two hundred and fifty thousand, two hundred and ten 50/100 dollars.   $150,210.50.

 Against.     $00.00

 The vote cast at said special election in favor of said special tax of five mills, for a term of ten years, beginning Jan. 1st, 1896, being a majority of the property taxpayers entitled to vote thereat under the general election laws of the State, in number and in value, voting at said election, and of said town, I, A. J. Moss, mayor of said town, do hereby proclaim and promulgate, that said special tax, for said term and for said purposes, has been voted for according to law.

 In testimony whereof, witness my official signature, at Lafayette parish of Lafayette, La., this twenty-fifth day of March, Anno Domini, Eighteen hundred and ninety-six.
A. J. MOSS, Mayor of Lafayette.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1896.  

  



City Council Proceedings.
Compilation of Votes.
 Compiled statement of the total votes cast at the special election held at the court house in the town of Lafayette, to determine the question of levying a special tax of five mills on all property subject to taxation within said town for a term of ten years, beginning Jan. 1st, A. D. 1896, to procure, construct and operate a waterworks and electric light system in said town, under article two hundred and nine of the constitution of the State of Louisiana, and act number one hundred and twenty-six of eighteen hundred and eighty-two of the General Assembly of said State, on Monday March twenty-third, A. D., eighteen hundred and ninety-six, as per proclamation of His Honor, A. J. Moss, mayor of said town and due notice thereof by the Supervisors of election in and for Lafayette parish by publication according to law, and after 20 days official publication of the petition and ordinance ordering the election in the manner provided by law for judicial advertisements.

 Total number of property taxpayers of the town of Lafayette, La., entitled to vote under the election laws of the State, as per certificate of the assessor of Lafayette parish and registrar of voters, dated March 21st, 1896. One hundred and ninety-two.  192.

 Total assessed valuation of property taxpayers of the town of Lafayette, as now constituted, entitled to vote under the election laws of the State as per certificate of assessor and registrar of voters in and for Lafayette parish, dated March 21st, 1896, one hundred and seventy-six thousand, eight hundred and sixty-six 50/100 dollars.  $176,866.50.

 Total number of votes cast for said special tax, one hundred and thirty.  $130.
 Total number of votes cast against said special tax.  0.

 Total amount of assessed valuation of property assessed to property taxpayers entitled to vote under the general election laws of the State as per said certificate of Assessor and Registrar, who voted for said special tax, one hundred and fifty thousand, and two hundred and ten 50/100 dollars.  $150,210.50.    Against:   $00.00

 This is to certify that the above and foregoing is a true and correct compilation of the votes and valuation of property assessed to each vote, as cast at said special election.

                   W. B. BAILEY,
   Clerk of Court of the 17th. Judicial District of La., for the Parish of Lafayette and ex-officer of the Town of Lafayette, La.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1896. 
      



  
Notice of Election.
Lafayette, La., March 20, 1896.

 Notice is hereby given that an election will be held throughout the parish of Lafayette at the polling places hereinafter designated and established by law, on Tuesday, the 21st day of April, 1896, (it being the Tuesday next following the third Monday of said month, being the day fixed by the constitution and laws of the State) from six o'clock in the morning until seven o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of electing the officers hereinafter mentioned and for taking the vote of the qualified electors of this State on the proposed amendments to the constitution of this State, which have been adopted by a two-thirds vote of all the members elected to each house of the general assembly of this State, at its regular session of 1896, and which have been published as required by law; the officers to be elected being as follows:

 One senator from the 11th Senatorial district, composed of the parishes of St. Martin, Iberia and Lafayette, for the term of four years.

 One representative from the parish of Lafayette for the term of four years.

 A governor, a lieutenant-governor, a secretary of state, an attorney-general, a state treasurer, an auditor of public accounts and a superintendent of public education for a term of four years.

 One judge and one district attorney from the 17th Judicial district, composed of the parishes of Vermilion and Lafayette, for the term of four years.

 One justice of the peace, one constable and one police juror from the first ward of said parish, for a term of four years.

 One justice of the peace, one constable and one police juror from the second ward of said parish, for a term of four years.

 Two justices of the peace, two constables and one police juror from the third ward of said parish, for the term of four years.

 Two justices of the peace, two constables and one police juror from the fourth ward of said parish, for the term of four years.

 One justice of the peace, one constable and one police juror from the fifth ward of said parish, for a term of four years.

 Two justices of the peace, two constables and one police juror from the sixth ward of said parish, for a term of four years.

 One justice of the peace, one constable and one police juror from the seventh ward of said parish, for the term of four years.

 One justice of the peace, one constable and one police juror from the eighth ward of said parish, for a term of four years.

 The polling places at which said election shall be held, and as now fixed by law, are:

  Poll 1, ward 6, at Hervillien Simonaux's.
  Poll 2, ward 1, at Scott (Jules Guidry hall).
  Poll 3, ward 2, at Ford Hoffpauir's.
  Poll 4, ward 8, at School-house.
  Poll 5, ward 6, at Carencro (Guilbeau Hall).
  Poll 6, ward 3, at court-house.
  Poll 7, ward 4, at Royville (H. Theall's warehouse).
  Poll 8, ward 7, Anse Pilette school house.
  Poll 9, ward 5, Broussard (Farmer's Alliance hall).
  Poll 10, ward 3, Mouton Switch.
     A. L. DYER,
     HERVILLIEN BLANCHARD,
     D. A. COCHRANE,
Supervisors of Election for Lafayette.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1896.
  



Police Jury Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., April 14th, 1896.

 The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry, C. C. Brown, A. A. Delhomme, H. M. Durke, J. G. St. Julien and Alfred Hebert.  Absent: Jos. W. Broussard.

 The minutes of the previous meetings were read and approved:

 By motion duly made, the Road overseers of the respective wards are hereby required to file reports every quarter exhibiting the number of days labor was actually performed by each person subject to road duty ;  2nd, a complete list of said persons together with the number if days still due. 3rd, an inventory of all implements in possession. Resolved further, That said reports shall date from Jan. 1st, 1896, and the secretary is hereby instructed to withhold payment of salary until the provisions of this ordinance be complied with.

 The following Commissioners were duly appointed for the several Drainage districts to wit:

  1st District. P. A. Delhomme, P. A. Chiasson, and Jean Begnaud.
  2nd District, ........................
  3rd District, Ludovic Billeaud, Capt. J. C. Buchanan, and Dr. T. B. Hopkins.
  4th District, Olivier Blanchet, Theodule Broussard, and F. O. Broussard.
  5th District, Alphonse Girouard, Anatole Monte, Edmond Comeaux.
  6th District, O. H. Breaux, A. C. Guilbeau and S. J. Breaux.
  7th District, Eloi Bonin, J. O. Broussard, and A. L. Broussard.
  8th District, Antoine Broussard, L. G. Breaux, and A. D. Landry.

 The President was authorized in conjunction with Dr. A. R. Trahan, the Health officer, to procure vaccine points and arrange for free vaccination throughout the parish.

 By motion of Mr. Brown the following Jury of freeholders was appointed to trace and lay out a public road according to law from the Broussard public road to the Opelousas public road to the Opelousas public road across Bayou Carencro; Jos. Potier, F. A. Broussard, H. E. Toll, Edward Guilbeaux.

 The sum, of $100 was appropriated to build a bridge across Bayou Carencro at Boagni and Broussard plantations.

 Mr. A. D. Landry was authorized to remove and rebuild the bridge across Coulee Isle de Cannes near Dolze Duhon's place.

 By motion of Mr. Durke the tendered donation by Mr. Darmas Broussard, of a public road through his place connecting the Abbeville road on the west bank of the Vermilion river, with that on the east bank, was accepted said road shall be 36 feet wide on the west bank and 40 feet on the east bank and all in accordance with petition on file. The President was authorized to accept said donation.

 By motion of Mr. Durke the question of constructing a bridge at Darmas Broussard's, as per offer of that gentleman, was taken up. Mr. Durke then moved the acceptance of Mr. Broussard's proposition to build the bridge for an amount not to exceed $500 and await one year for payment etc.

 Mr. Brown offered as a substitute that the president be authorized to consult an attorney relative to Mr. Broussard's proposition and report at next meeting.  Lost.

 The original motion of Mr. Durke was then adopted as follows: Resolved that the proposition of Mr. D. Broussard to build a bridge across Vermilion river near his place at a cost not to exceed $500 payable in one year without interest be and is hereby accepted. Resolved further that it is hereby agreed and provided that the said Darmas Broussard shall maintain said bridge for one year at his own cost, and further that he shall place and maintain in good traveling condition the public road by him donated this day.

 Mr. P. A. Chiasson was authorized to remove and rebuild a bridge in the first ward at a cost not to exceed $35 said bridge being the personal property of Mr. Chiasson.

 The treasurer submitted his monthly report as follows:
 Respectfully submitted,
       WM. CLEGG, Parish Treasurer.

 The following accounts were rejected:

 A. Gladu, viriving body of Ella White ... $5.00
 Geo. DeBlanc, coal ... $1.40

 The following accounts were approved:
 The Police Jury then adjourned.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1896.





  
City Council Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., April 4, 1896.

 The Council met this evening following members present: Mayor A. J. Moss, Messrs. T. M. Biossat, O. C. Mouton, B. Falk, Dr. J. D. Trahan, Jos. Ducote, J. O. LeBlanc and Leo Doucet. Absent: None.

 Minutes of March 2nd and special meeting of March 3rd, 7th and 25th, read and approved as read.

 The finance committee was granted further time in which to look into the matters concerning Mrs. Sprole's license.

 The following accounts were approved:
               Lafayette, La., April 6, 1896.
  To the Hon. Mayor and Members of the City Council of Lafayette:
 An ordinance authorizing the Mayor of the town of Lafayette to contract with Messrs. Raymond Stearnes & Gray, lowest and successful bidders, for the erection of a water works and electric lights plant or system for and in this town of Lafayette, according to plans and specifications of Robert R. Zell, C. E., and bid of said Raymond Stearnes & Gray therefore; providing for the payment of the contract price thereof with six per cent, per annum interest, and authorizing said Mayor to issue for and in the name of said municipal corporation, certificates of indebtedness or promises to pay, in denominations of five hundred dollars, with interest coupons attached to each, at six per cent per annum, payable yearly ;  said notes to be paid in one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine and ten years and on March first of each year ;  providing what portion of the capital shall be paid yearly.

 Be it ordained by the City Council of the town of Lafayette, State of Louisiana, in legal session assembled.

 That Hon. A. J. Moss, Mayor of the town of Lafayette, be and is hereby authorized to contract for and in the name of said municipality with Messrs. Raymond Stearnes & Gray, for the erection of the water works and electric lights plant of system for and in the town of Lafayette, according to plans and specifications by Robert R. Zell, C. E., and the bid of said Raymond Stearnes & Gray therefore, for the price and sum of thirty-four thousand, five hundred dollars, with six per cent, per annum interest payable as follows. - March 1st, 1897, fifteen hundred dollars; March 1st, 1899, two thousand and five hundred dollars; March 1st, 1900, three thousand dollars; March 1st, 1901, three thousand, five hundred dollars; March 1st, 1902, four thousand dollars; March 1st, 1903, four thousand, five hundred dollars; March 1st, 1904, four thousand and five hundred dollars; March 1st, 1905, four thousand, five hundred dollars; March 1st, 1906, four thousand, five hundred dollars of the capital of said contract price.

 Be it further ordained etc., that said yearly payment of capital shall be represented by notes or certificates of five hundred dollars, signed by Mayor for and in the name of said town, to each of which shall be attached interest coupons at the rate of six per cent per annum, which interest shall be payable on the first day of March of each year; said notes and interest coupons to be made payable at First National Bank of Lafayette, La., or at The Chase National Bank of New York.

 Be it further ordained etc., that in advance to the five mills tax voted for by the property taxpayers of said town on March 23rd, 1896, according to law, for a term of ten years, beginning in the year 1896, for the purpose of paying the construction and erection of said system of water works and electric light for and in said town, the net revenues derived by said town from said system, be and are hereby set aside and dedicated to the payment of said contract for the erection and construction of said water works and electric light system.

 Be it further ordained, etc., that to cover any possible deficiency in the revenue from said special tax of five mills and the operation of said system, as above provided, there shall be, and is hereby appropriated and set aside out of the general revenues of said town, the sum of one thousand dollars, annually; said amount being the same as now expended annually to operate the present system of lights in said town.

 Be it further ordained, etc., that this ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage.
     Approved, March 6th, 1896.
                    A. J. Moss,
                           Mayor of Lafayette, La.

 VOTES:
 Yeas: T. M. Biossat, O. C. Mouton, Jos. Ducote, B. Falk, Leo Doucet, J. O. LeBlanc, Dr. J. D. Trahan.  -  Nays: None.

 An ordinance authorizing the Mayor to purchase for and in the name of the corporation of Lafayette, the site for the erection of the water works and electric light plant for the town from Dr. Thos. B. Hopkins and others; said lot being described and located within the motes and bounds, with streets adjoining on the East and North, as appear by plat of survey made by A. D. Martin.

 Be it ordained by the city council of the town of Lafayette, La., in legal session assembled, that the Hon. A. J. Moss, Mayor of said town, be and is hereby authorized to purchase, for and in the name of said town, the lot of ground, adjoining streets dedicated to public use as shown by plat made by A. D. Martin, surveyor; said lot having the form and dimensions designated on said plat; said lot being purchased for the purpose of erecting thereon, the water works and electric light plant for said town.

 Be it further ordained, etc., that said Mayor is hereby authorized to pay such sum as may be agreed upon with the vendors; provided however, that it does not exceed the sum of two hundred dollars.

 Be it further ordained, etc., that if possible, he is authorized to secure time within which to pay for same, and in that event he is authorized to issue notes for the purchase price remaining unpaid, for and in the name of the corporation.

 Be it further ordained, etc., that this ordinance take effect from and after its passage.
                    A. J. MOSS,
              Mayor of Lafayette, La

 Yeas: T. M. Biossat, O. C. Mouton, Jos. Ducote, B. Falk, Leo Doucet, J. O. LeBlanc, Dr. Trahan.  Nays: None.

 Moved and seconded that A. D. Martin be tendered a vote of thanks for the plans and survey of location for the water works and electric light plant. Also for nice chart of same to be preserved in archives of council.

 Moved by O. C. Mouton, seconded by Ducote that secretary issue a warrant in favor of Mayor when called for the purpose of paying for the lot bought from Dr. Hopkins for location of plant.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.
A. J. MOSS, Mayor.
B. CLEGG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1896.



Selected News Notes Advertiser 4/11/1896.

A fine lot of lamps at Racket Store.

Miss Gussie Wolfe, of Washington, La., is visiting the family of her uncle Leon Plonsky.

Those who need slips for their tickets for election day will do well to let us know in time.

The Lafayette Minstrel Co., assisted by the orchestra, will give their entertainment on Sunday, April 26th. The company under the direction of Prof. Frank Howard, who is a professional minstrel man.

Capt. J. N. Pharr, candidate for governor will be in Lafayette Monday, April 13,th and address the people.

The meeting will take place at 3:30 p. m. at Falk's Opera House.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1896.






 From the Lafayette Advertiser of April 12th, 1874:


WHO SOWED THAT WIND?

 Our exchanges inform us that the negroes of the parish of Grant have driven all the office-holders out of the parish. Fearing the usual excesses of a mob, many families have fled to other parts for safety.

The offices were all in the peaceable possession of Republicans, but it seems they were all carpet-baggers and scalawags. The unpleasantness is no doubt a sequel of the proceedings had a large colored meeting in New Orleans not long since, in which they explained that the colored republican vote in the State 70,000 and the white republican 6,000, and yet their more acute and tricky white brothers occupied nearly all the offices.

 We are opposed to violence and mob rule, and sympathize with those families who were forced to leave for safety, but if this fight is between the colored republicans and their white office-holders -- we are not in -- that whirl-wind don't belong to us. Grant parish is not the only one where the colored republicans have just cause of complaint and ought to clean out their carpet-bag and scalawag masters. Lafayette Advertising 4/12/1874.



Revillon Back. - We had the pleasure of welcoming home, yesterday, our friend L. P. Revillon, Esq., where he has been for several months. Mr. Revillon returns among us in excellent health and fine spirits, and with a diploma as Attorney and Counselor at Law. We wish our young friend success, and hope, at some future day, to see him the peer of the highest legal lights at the Louisiana Bar. Lafayette Advertiser 4/12/1874.


SUICIDE. - Treville Duhon, and old and respected citizen of this parish, committed suicide at his residence by shooting himself in the head with his revolver killing him. Mr. Duhon has always borne the reputation as an honest, hard working, sober man, and the only cause which led him to self destruction is supposed to be a violent bout of rheumatism, from which he has been suffering for some time, and which no doubt affected his mind and caused him to put an end to his existence. He leaves a wife and large number of children to mourn his loss ; but it is consoling to say, that he has left his family in possession of a neat farm and ample means of support.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/12/1874.





Police Jury Proceedings.
VERMILIONVILLE, PARISH OF LAFAYETTE, 
March 2, 1874.

Present: G. Duhon, President, R. C. Landry, R. Leblanc, S. J. Montgomery.
 Absent: Jean Bernard.

 The President called the meeting to order, when on motion, the reading of the minutes of the last meeting was dispensed with.
 On motion, resolved that the sum of seventy dollars be and the same is hereby appropriated to pay the work to be done by Cesaire Dupuis at the south end of the Carencro Bridge, and that a warrant issue for the same on the order of the committee on public works.

 On motion, resolved that the sum of two hundred dollars be and the same is hereby appropriated to pay to pay the work to be done by J. S. Rand in the lane of Mrs. Scranton to Mine's Coulee, and that a warrant issue for the same on the order of the Committee on Public Works.

 On motion, resolved that the sum of fifty dollars be and the same is hereby appropriated to pay the work to be done by J. S. Rand on the lane between A. Mouton's and the plantation formerly belonging to B. C. Crow, from the Hebrew Rest to the Protestant graveyard, to the Protestant graveyard, and that a warrant issue for the same on the order of the Committee of Public Works.

 R. Leblanc was then called to occupy the President's chair, when,
  On motion, further time was granted to the Finance Committee to report.

 On motion of G. Dubau, resolved that after the passage of this resolution, all warrants to be issued by the clerk of the Police Jury, shall be made payable to the order of the person to whom the amount shall be due, and not to hearer.

 On motion of G. Dubau, resolved that the sum of twenty-five dollars be and the same is hereby appropriated out of the general fund to C. H. Mouton, Clerk of the Police Jury, to buy stationary for the one of the same for this year, and that a warrant for the same issue to this order.

 On motion of G. Dubau, resolved that hereafter the parish Treasurer and parish tax Collector are hereby ordered to receive parish warrants at par in payment of all debts and taxes due this parish.

 The President then resumed his chair, and on motion of R. C. Landry, it was resolved that the clerk of Police Jury is authorized to keep the books and papers belonging to the Police Jury in his law office in Vermilionville.

 On motion of S. J. Montgomery the following accounts were approved and warrants ordered to issue for the same:

 J. Y. Gilmore, $29.90; J. Y. Gilmore, $55.40; H. Eastin, $27.50; H. Eastin, $14.00; H. Eastin, $60.00; H. Eastin, $27.50; H. Eastin, $14.00; H. Eastin, $60.00; H. Eastin, $10; E. F. Beauchamp, M. D., $10.00.

 On motion of Rosemond Leblanc the Police Jury adjourned sine die.
G. DEBAU, President.
C. DEBAILLON, Deputy Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 4/11/1874.




lagniappe:
FIELDING; ON BUSINESS.
He Gives a Few Tips Appropriate to the Hard Times.
[COPYRIGHT, 1894.]

 I take a deep personal interest in business. It possesses for me that fascination which always attaches to the mysterious unknown. Personally I haven't business sense enough to lie to a tailor. When I get a publisher's check I tell my wife the size of it; and, in fact, there's no hope for me in a business way.

 But though destitute to that happy faculty which makes some men rich, while, by a curious coincidence, those about them are poor, I can appreciate it in others. Nobody is quicker than I am to recognize that faculty, and keep out of the way of it. For instance, I was in a publisher's private office the other day when an elderly man with tangled black hair and a loosely folded cotton umbrella ran to the door. He was closely pursued by a long-legged office boy, but the race is not always to the swift. The elderly man effected an entrance.

 "My dear fellow," said the elderly man to the publisher, "lend me one hundred thousand dollars."

 That was his pleasant way of starting the conversation. Of course he did not really need the money. He simply desired to attract attention. The publisher felt in his vest pocket. He did not find the some mentioned, but tucked the corner of a dollar bill further down, so that it would not show. Meanwhile the elderly man continued:

 "I've just got hold of a rare book."

 "One that the author got paid for?" I suggested.

 "Rare, very rare. Dictionary of literary dialect. Think of the difficulty of compiling the work. Nobody ever heard of these dialects except the authors, and most of them have starved to death. So, as the thing is practically out of print, it can't be duplicated ever in this world. It will be very useful to you in your business, if the fashion for that sort of thing comes round again. I'll sell it to you for a dollar because I'm just a little short to-day.

 Well, it looked reasonable, and the publisher went down into that vest pocket. He came up, with that dollar, and the elderly man quickly retired. Then the publisher detained me with honeyed words till lunch time. He had a pretty good business head, too, and, as the dollar happened to be the only one he had, he invited me to lunch, and I settled the bill. But the point is, that when we emerged from the building where the publisher's office is located, we found a man on the edge of the curb selling books. He had only one work but his barrow was full of copies. It was the Dialect Dictionary, and he was selling it for five cents. The elderly man had bought a copy on his way in.

 Now, that's what I call business all around, for when I had got a little wine into the publisher I sold him a story of sea bathing on the Jersey coast, though it was then, past the middle of December, and when he had sobered up he simply changed the scene to the Sandwich islands, robbed my characters of half the little clothing I had bestowed upon them, and made a good thing out of the story. The public paid for the dictionary, the lunch and the story, and why shouldn't it?

 If tips like the above can help people along in these hard times, I say that it's a man's duty to give them. I get hold of lots of those games here in New York, and I'm too charitable to keep them to myself. Some of them are played on me and others come to me in the night watches. There's no time so good for thinking of business. Nothing in this world can make a man feel so mean as lying awake at night. I've been kept awake by a cold lately.

 Speaking of that cold reminds me of another business scheme which I discovered recently. When times are dull it's the man of a single trade who suffers. The man who sells firewood and fans is busy year round.

 Well, I went to see a doctor about this cold. He asked me where I was living, and I told him the truth, for I really meant to pay his bill. But I couldn't see how the question properly bore upon the state of my health.

 Then he asked me how many rooms I had in my flat.

 "One room, one closet, two cuddies and niche," I replied; "but what has that got to do with -----"

 "What do you pay?" he inquired.

 "Forty dollars a month."

 "It's too much."

 "I agree with you; but as to the state of my health-----"

 "Look here," he said. "you'll never be well in such a place as that. Now you just come with me around to the corner of Ashbarrel avenue and Mudd street, and I'll show you some flats that will make you stick out."

 He clapped on his hat; grabbed me by the arm, and hurried away. When we reached the flats, we found that the workmen had not yet put in the doors and windows. The plastering on the walls was not dry, and didn't seem to be making any reasonable effort in that direction. It was a discouraging day for drying - one of those days when it snows perpendicularly, if you don't carry an umbrella, and horizontally, if you do.

 "Talk about sanitary conditions," he said. "What do you think of that for ventilation?"

 I was bound to admit it seemed ample. The snowflakes which came in at the front, went clear through the flat except when they hit me. With a handkerchief in each hand, I explained to the doctor that, as I had a cold----

 "Come around to Thirteenth and Coffin streets," said he. "Perhaps this doesn't exactly suit you. I'll show you what you want."

 I followed my medical adviser. We reached an imposing structure at last, and climbed many stairs. We passed a tenor, a domestic difficulty, a piano, a bull fiddle, a baby and a boiled dinner, and on the seventh floor we halted. Through a scuttle above our heads I could see that the heavens were directly over us, but, though substantially ready both in body and spirit, I decided to pause before ascending further.

 "This top flat is vacant," said the doctor, "and you'll like it. The rent is forty-seven dollars, but you don't have to pay it the first of the month. You can pay it the last of the month before, if you want. The landlord is an easy man. What's this? Door locked? Well, well, I'll have to run around to Sharkey street and get the key.

 He left me sitting on the top step. The snow filtered through the scuttle and fell soft and moist around me, while the boiled dinner came up from below and turned the pure snow flakes green around the edges. I was irresistibly reminded of my own contact with the world.

 The next thing I remember is sitting in the doctor's office.

 "As I understand it," he was saying, "you've decided to take Thirteenth street flat, and-----"

 "Doctor," said I, weakly, "I'll take some of your medicine first, and if that doesn't kill me I'll try one of your flats. I should get a prescription written by the author of 'Called Black,' and the louder the call the better, for I'm pretty well along."

 He was touched. He wrote me this prescription:

  Quniniae Sulph. gr. x.
  Spts. Frumenti quan. suf.
  P. S. Look at the flats over the drugstore. You may like them.

 "Will you have these separately or together?" asked the obsequious druggist.

 "What does the prescription call for, anyway?"

 "Whisky and quinine."

 "Do you mean to say that the medicated sugar-coated real estate agent charged me five dollars for recommending whisky and quinine?"

  "That is what he prescribes."

 "Well, I won't take it. I wouldn't touch it if I knew it would cure me. I'm going to take a wigwam sweat."

 "What's that?"

 "Why, you fill a big pan with New England rum, and set it afire. You put a chair over the pan. Then you drink half a gallon of the rum, and sit down in the chair. You hold up a broomstick and your wife builds a tent of blankets around you, making a wigwam - a sort of little house, you know."

 "Speaking of little houses," said he. "I know a nice little house around the corner that can be had for-----"

 "What! are you in it, too? Good day to you, sir."

 I went home and took the wigwam sweat. When I got too hot inside the wigwam, I stuck my head out between the blankets and related to Maude the experiences of the day.

 Until that moment I had not believed there was any business in the doctor's scheme. Alas, when shall I learn to understand women? No sooner had I spoken of those flats to Maude than she was filled with a desire to see them. The more I ran them down the better she liked the idea of taking one.
                     HOWARD FIELDING.
Lafayette Advertiser 3/3/1894.



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