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Sunday, January 11, 2015

**JANUARY 17TH M C

From the Lafayette Gazette of January 17th, 1903:




A Modern Theatre Building.


 A handsome fire-proof opera-house capable of accommodating high-class theatrical companies, is the new acquisition Lafayette is to have in the near future. This statement has been given out by Mr. Frank E. Moss since he has acquired the by purchase from Mr. C. D. Caffery the corner lot across the street from the First National Bank.

 Mr. Moss and his associates in this enterprise purpose to erect a two-story building and equip it throughout with all the latest devices and conveniences pertaining to places of high-class amusements. The floor space of the first story of the building is to be arranged conveniently for use of retail stores.

 The new opera house as planned is going to be a distinct improvement to the town. The stage is one of the greatest teaching agencies that have ever been given to man, ranking with the school and the press in this respect, as the amusements of the people have fully as important an influence in molding the lives as anything else in their environment, and it is well for the people of Lafayette that they should be placed in a position to enjoy some of the really good stage attractions touring this country.
Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.  



Progress of Opera-house Satisfactory.
 Mr. Salles informs us that he is making very satisfactory progress with the opera-house. His plans are about perfected and as soon as material can be secured the construction of the building will begin. He promises the theater-loving public a stage which will accommodate the best troupes and receive any scenery carried by the largest traveling companies. This means that in the future we shall get the scenic and mechanical effects as seen in the best appointed city theaters. Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.

 

Salles on the Opera-house.

 Mr. Salles informs us that he us making very satisfactory progress with the opera-house. His plans are about perfected and as soon as material can be secured the construction of the building will begin. He promises the theatre-loving public a stage which will accommodate the best troupes and receive any scenery carried by the largest traveling companies. This means that in the future we shall get the scenic and mechanical effects as seen in the best appointed city theatres. Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.




Carnival and Street Fair.

 We have been requested to announce that the voting contest for the queen of the Carnival and Street Fair will take place during the progress of the ball which will be given by the Sontag Band at Falk's hall on Thursday, Jan. 22. One vote will cost ten cents. The winner of the contest will be awarded a hundred dollar diamond ring. Tickets are sold at the following places: Moss Pharmacy, Guerre & Broussard's, Crescent News Hotel and Biossat's jewelry strore. There are no special candidates for the honor and the contest is open to everybody. Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.

   

Street Fair Preparations. - Extensive preparations are being made to make the street fair which is to be held here during the latter part of the month a success in every respect. Advertising bills are being sent to all the neighboring parishes to attract a large attendance from them, and it is assured that for a few days at least Lafayette will take on the airs of a little metropolis. Dr. Girard informed The Gazette that the contract with the persons promoting the fair had been signed, and the necessary eight hundred feet of fencing will soon be built to enclose the different exhibits. It would be unnecessary to describe the nature of the many attractions billed, as glowing accounts of them are being daily spread by bill-poster Hebert.  Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.




 School Attendance.
 LAFAYETTE, LA., Jan. 12, 1903.
     
Editor Gazette - Some weeks ago you published  at my request the magnificent percentages of attendance for the month of November from Superintendent Kramer of St. Mary parish. There was not one teacher in the list mentioned whose average was below 80 per cent. The average for the whole parish was about 84 per cent. The average monthly attendance of Lafayette parish last year was somewhere near 40 per cent. Hence we see that a dollar spent in St. Mary parish does two units of work when compared with Lafayette parish, and the average teacher receives $45 per month is actually paid $90 by the people because it takes two months under present conditions here to do what is done in one month of work in any regular system of schools. This calculation is based on units of work done - on results - but after all it is only results that count.

 Therefore the few teachers of this parish, who, by their personality, their untiring energy and their unswerving determination have raised their average attendance from 40 per cent last year to 80 per cent and more this year, are worth just twice as much to the parish as the teacher who is contented with an average attendance of 40 to 50 per cent. Any average attendance below 80 is not satisfactory.
Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903. 

   



SOCIETY.

Many friends of Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Hopkins, Jr., were entertained at their home last Friday, at a "tacky party." The guests were Mr. and Mrs. Comstock, Mr. and Mrs. B. Clegg, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Victor Levy, Mrs. T. B. Hopkins, Sr., Mrs. T. N. Blakem Mrs. O. B. Hopkins, Mrs. A. B. Denbo, Mrs. DeLaney, Mrs. B. J. Pellerin, Misses M. Littell, L. Hopkins, A. Hopkins, L. Mudd, Louisa Tolson, Zelia Christian and Fadra Holmes, Messrs. P. Torian, E. Morgan, C. Debaillon, J. Givens, Drs. Beeler and Girard. Appropriate prizes were won by Mrs. O. B. Hopkins, Mrs. A. A. Morgan, and Mr. C. Debaillon.




Last Sunday evening Misses Irma Mouton and Philomene Doucet entertained their friends at the hospitable home of Mr. F. V. Mouton. After playing an interesting game of euchre, the lady's prize was awarded to Miss Philomene Doucet and the gentleman's to Mr. Adolph Mouton, and the booby prizes were won by Mrs. Albert Clark and Mr. Dautrive. The following were present: Misses Cora Desbrest, Mabel Dautrive, Eugenie Doucet, Lucy Judice, Rita Trahan, DeBlanc, Odille Smith, Corrine Guidry, Aimee Martin, Philomene Doucet and Mrs. Albert Clark. Messrs. Alley Sprole, F. E. Broussard, Albert Robichaux, Sam J. Leblanc, Frank Jeanmard, Chas. Broussard, Albert Clark, Dautrive, Geo. B. Harris and A. Mouton.  

Prominent among the social events of the week, was a reception given Tuesday afternoon by Mrs. Elizabeth Kennedy.

 The large hall and spacious parlor had been profusely decorated with gray moss, ferns and palms.

 An excellent orchestra furnished sweet music during the entire afternoon. An elaborate, but dainty buffet lunch was served in the prettily decorated dining rooms, where good cheer and mirth resounded until a late hour.

 The house party consisted of Mesdames W. P. Torian, P. D. Beraud, F. Demenade, A. Morgan, T. B. Hopkins, T. B. Hopkins, Jr., C. D. Caffery, E. P. Mills, L. J. Alleman, E. L. Stephens, J. Ramsey, W. Ramsey, M. Meriwether, T. N. Blake, C. G. Comstock, B. J. Pellerin, T. M. Biossat, C. K. Darling, J. A. Martin, F. R. Tolson, W. A. LeRosen, A. B. Denbo, R. M. DeLaney, J. J. Davidson, Crow Girard, J. Nickerson, S. R. Parkerson, Alfred Mouton, Alex Mouton, A. Doucet, Marion, Walters, B. Clegg, O. B. Hopkins, P. Girard; Misses Jennie Torian, E. Hopkins, Anna Hopkins, Lizzie Parkerson, Louisa Tolson, Sallie Torian, Maxim Beraud, E. Montgomery, H. McLaurin, Edith Dupre, Gertrude Mayfield, Z. Christian, F. Holmes, L. Singleton, Margaret Robertson and Lea Gladu.  

 Miss Rita Trahan gave a euchre party Wednesday evening at which many of her friends were hospitably entertained. Pretty prizes were given the winners of the card game. The following guests were present: Misses N. DeBlanc, of New Iberia, M. Lindsay, Sadie Mouton, Irma Mouton, Philomene Doucet, Lizzie Bailey, May Bailey, Laurence Campbell, Cora Desbrest, Mabel Dautrive, Mrs. Albert Clark, Fernand Mouton, Leo Judice, Geo. Harris, E. Morgan, A. Mouton, F. E. Broussard, H. Lindsay, C. Debaillon, Sam J. Leblanc, B. Dautrive, Drs. Mayer and Beeler, and Jerome Mouton.
Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.




Under New Management.

After to-day The Gazette will be under the editorial management of Jerome Mouton. This change is explained by my acceptance of a position in the office of The Baton Rouge Advocate.

It is with regreat that I leave my work here, and with sincere appreciation of the generous support I have received at the hands of this community.

My going away will not interfere with the publication of The Gazette. It will continue to be published as heretofore, at all times doing its best for this town and parish.

HOMER MOUTON.

Lafayette, La., Jan. 10, 1903.

 

 

The Mills Pond. - Several of our citizens residing in the neighborhood of the pond in the Mills addition have complained of the unhealthy conditions resulting from a stagnation of water together with an accumulation of trash in the pond. It is believed that the natural drains are obstructed, and several days after a heavy rain the water remains in the pond, which is made the dumping ground of an assortment of tin cans et cetera which does not in the least add to the salubrity of the surrounding atmosphere. We would ask the City Fathers to investigate this and act in the matter as soon as possible. Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.





School Board Meeting.
Lafayette, La. 1903.
Jan. 7, 1903.

Among other business tended to....

The following petition was on motion of Dr. Young, seconded by Dr. Moss, ordered submitted without comments:

(PETITION FROM COLORED PEOPLE)

To the Hon. president and members of the School Board of the parish of Lafayette, La.

We the undersigned residents and taxpayers and patrons of the colored public school in Lafayette parish, having at heart the welfare of the State and community, respectfully petition your honorable body to submit to the General Education Board, incorporated in Washington, D. C., with your endorsement, the subjoined proposition for aid in securing for us and for our children the kind of education and instruction best calculated to make useful and self-respecting citizens of our race:

To the undersigned negro property taxpayers and patrons of the public school in Lafayette parish, La., being specially desirous of obtaining for ourselves and our children education and instruction of a practical and helpful kind, and that we may become a really useful class of citizens and a benefit to the country in which we live, most earnestly request your active interest in bringing about such a condition among our people in Lafayette parish, by cooperating with the regularly constituted school authorities on the following basis.

(1) We, the colored people in question, to provide the grounds and a school building adapted to the purpose and having a cash value of $3,000,00; the ownership and control of said property to be vested in the Parish School Board in accordance with law.

(2) To you, the General Education Board, to properly equip the said school building for the work in hand, and defray for the term of three years, the salary of a competent instructor in agricultural and industrial pursuits; this to be in addition to the regular teachers already being furnished by the Parish School Board under the free tuition to all residents of the parish.

We earnestly hope for your early and favorable consideration of the above proposition, a plan which, if put in practical operation, can not fail to be productive of great and lasting good to our people and to the community at large.

Respectfully submitted: P. L. Breaux, A. Johnson, W. D. Skinner, Joseph Dugas, Edward Wilson, Lawrence, J. C. Philips, Joshua Moore, Jos. Boudreaux, Luke Mouton, J. B. Babin.

Dr. Moss offered the following resolution:

Jan. &, 1903.

Appreciation the spirit that prompted a personal visit to Lafayette parish by the field agent, Mr. David E. Cloyd, of the General Education Board and being desirous of joining hands with them in their great work of educating the masses.

Be it resolved by the Board of School Directors of Lafayette parish, La., and believing the introduction of the central school idea to be the most effective means of reaching this end, they submit the proposition of funding jointly with the General Education Board a model central school to serve as an object lesson to the parish. With this aim in view the Parish Board proposes to provide a special taxation in a rural community a substantial, model, brick building containing six rooms, and invites a counter proposition, based on this proposition from the General Education Board.

Be it further resolved that the Parish Board Recommends the duplication by the General Education Board of $865.50 being the amount raised by seven communities, with the understanding that the amounts so raised would be duplicated by the General Education Board, as has been fully explained to Dr. Buttrick, Mr. Cloyd, and Dr. Alderman. Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.




School Board Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., Jan. 7, 1903. - A regular meeting of the Board of School Directors of Lafayette parish was held on the above date with the following members present: - A. Olivier, president; Alex Delhomme, Jasper Spell, Dr. N. P. Moss, Dr. R. O. Young, A. C. Guilbeau, P. R. Landry, S. J. Montgomery. Absent: H. Theall.

 The minutes of the previous meetings were read and adopted.

 Rules were suspended in order to hear Mr. J. R. Davis who presented a petition from the citizens of Duson. As a result of the petition Dr. Moss moved that a school be established at the village of Duson, on condition that the citizens build the school house, donate a suitable lot of land; that the School Board of Acadia parish appropriate $150 to the building fund and that the running expenses of the school be paid by the parish of Acadia and the parish of Lafayette in proportion to the number of children attending from each parish. The School Board of Lafayette agrees to appropriate as much to the building fund as is raised by the community.

 The school now conducted under the name of Duson and the Boudreaux school are to be closed permanently as soon as the new Duson school is opened.

  On motion of Dr. Young the president and secretary were authorized to repair the old Broussard school-house if in their judgment it is necessary.

 The secretary was instructed to notify Surveyor Francez that unless he surveyed the school land in the fourth ward by Jan. 15, the board would annul the contract with him.

 The secretary was also instructed to visit the school land in T. 9 S. R. 5 E. and to lease the land if possible.

 The following motion of Dr. Young, seconded by Mr. P. R. Landry, was adopted: Any person now holding a lease of three years on school land in the fourth ward will be granted the privilege of leasing at $2.50 per acre on or more additional tracts for one year with the privilege of renewing the lease at the end of 1903 for two years.

 On motion, duly seconded, the resignation of Mr. C. K. Olivier was accepted.

 The petitioners from Milton, on Bayou Vermilion, are to be requested by the secretary to get a proposition from Vermilion parish relative to the establishment of a school on the bayou.

 The following petition was on motion of Dr. Young, seconded by Dr. Moss, ordered submitted without comments.

(PETITION FROM COLORED PEOPLE.)

 Lafayette, La., Jan. 2, 1903.

 To the Honorable president and members of the School Board of the parish of Lafayette, La.

 We, the undersigned residents and tax-payers and patrons of the colored public school in Lafayette parish, having at heart the welfare of the State and community, respectfully petition your honorable body to submit to the General Education Board, incorporated in Washington, D. C., with your endorsement, the subjoined proposition for aid in securing for us and for our children the kind of education and instruction best calculated to make useful and self-respecting citizens of our race:

 To the General Education Board Washington, D. C.:-

 We, the undersigned negro property tax-payers and patrons of the public school in Lafayette parish, La., being specially desirous of obtaining for ourselves and our children education and instruction of a practical and helpful kind, and that we may become a really useful class of citizens and a benefit to the country in which we live, most earnestly request your active interest in bringing about such a condition among our people in Lafayette parish, by cooperating with the regularly constituted school authorities on the following basis.

 (1.) We, the colored people in question, to provide the grounds and a school building adapted to the purpose and having a cash value of $3,000.00; the ownership and control of said property to be vested in the Parish School Board in accordance with the law.

 (2.) You, the General Education Board, to properly equip the said school building for the work in hand, and defray for the term of three years, the salary of a competent instructor in manual and domestic training and one competent instructor in agricultural and industrial pursuits; this to be in addition to the regular teachers already being furnished by the Parish School Board under the State school laws, which provides for free tuition to all residents of the parish.

 We earnestly hope for your early and favorable consideration of the above proposition, a plan which, if put in practical operation, can not fail to be productive of great and lasting good to our people and to the community at large.

 Respectfully submitted: P. L. Breaux, A. Johnson, W. D. Skinner, Joseph Dugas, Edward Wilson, Lawrence, J. C. Philips, Joshua Moore, Jos. Boudreaux, Luke Mouton, J. B. Babin, M. L. Baldwin.

 Dr. Moss offered the following resolution:

January 7, 1903.
  Appreciating the spirit that prompted a personal visit to Lafayette parish by the field agent, Mr. David E. Cloyd, of the General Education Board, and being in sympathy with the patriotic motives which have prompted the organizations of the General Education Board and being desirous of joining hands with them in their great work of educating the masses.

 Be it resolved by the Board of School Directors of Lafayette parish, La., in regular meeting assembled, that they hereby earnestly invite the cooperation of the General Education Board in furthering the cause if public education in Lafayette parish; and believing the introduction of the central school idea to be the most effective means of reaching this end, they submit the proposition of founding jointly with the General Education Board a model central school to serve as an object lesson to the parish. With this aim in view the Parish Board proposes to provide by special taxation in a rural community a substantial, model, brick building containing six rooms, and invites a counter proposition, based on this proposition from the General Education Board.

 Be it further resolved that the Parish Board recommends the duplication by the General Education Board of $865.50 being the amount raised by seven communities, with the understanding that the amounts so raised would be duplicated by the General Education Board, as has been fully explained to Dr. Buttrick, Mr. Cloyd, and Dr. Alderman.

The following bills were approved:
 There being no further business the board adjourned.
A. OLIVIER, President.
L. J. ALLEMAN, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.





Selected News Notes (Gazette) 1/17/1903.

 The City Council this week purchased from C. D. Caffery, I. A. Broussard, Dr. F. E. Girard, Felix Demanade and Wm. Campbell the two lots of ground situated near Castel's bakery for $2,100, for such public use as may be determined by the Council. Geo. A. DeBlanc accepted the lots for the town.

 P. E. Voorhies of New Orleans was in Lafayette Monday.

 Hon. Laurent Dupre went through town Sunday on his way to Crowley on legal business.

 S. R. Parkerson, T. M. Biossat and C. M. Parkerson returned Sunday from  New Orleans.

 Sheriff Broussard returned Sunday after spending several day in New Orleans. Lafayette Gazette 1/17/1903.







 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 17th, 1903: 


A NEW BRICK OPERA HOUSE.


 Last Wednesday Mr. F. E. Moss purchased from Mr. Chas. D. Caffery the lot opposite Moss & Company's store, known as the McBride

 property, the purchase price being $6,000.00. The ground measuring 140 feet on Vermilion street and 192 feet on Jefferson street and is justly regarded as being an exceptionally desirable business corner. Mr. Moss has decided to utilize a portion of the ground for the erection of a substantial brick and iron opera house, complete and up-to-date in all its appointments. He has enlisted the support of a number of leading business men of this town in the project, who recognize that the time has come when special provision must be made to meet the urgent need of the community in this regard, and that this provision must be carried out on an ample scale and in a manner that will reflect credit on the community.

 The proposed location of the new brick opera house is very central, and in other respects will prove to be an ideal one for the purpose intended and success will no doubt attend the venture as it is going to be launched under exceptionally favorable circumstances.

 The first floor of the building will contain two or three commodious rooms with plate glass fronts to be arranged for use as retail stores.   Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903. 
 





Rural Free Delivery. 
 The annual report of Postmaster Payne, in speaking of the rural free delivery service, says that it is no longer in the experimental stage, and undoubtedly congress will continue to increase the appropriation for this service until all the people of the country are reached, where it is thickly settled enough to warrant it. The estimates of the department are to the effect that the available territory for this service embraces about 1,000,000 square miles, or one-third of the country's area exclusive of Alaska. The 11,050 routes now in operation cover about one-third of the available territory. From this it will be seen that it will require 27,000 employees additional to those now in service, to cover this territory. If congress shall make the necessary appropriations, it is believed that within the next three years the extension of the service will have been completed.

 The Postmaster General further says that millions of our people live more or less remote from any post office, and a very large proportion of them are not able to buy money orders or bank drafts without great inconvenience. It is not unreasonable to expect from the government that it will provide an easy, convenient and safe method to transmit small sums, say $2 or less in amount, without putting the sender to the inconvenience and expense which now obtains in the purchase of a draft or post office money order.

 The total receipts in 1901 were $111,631,193.39, and in 1902 the receipts were $121,848,047.26. The expenditures in 1901 were $115,554,920.87 ;  and in 1901 the expenditures were $124,685,687.07.

 With the extension of rural free delivery thus actively progressing complaints arise in other communities. Cities of 10,000 population, or $10,000 gross receipts, receive a free delivery service at least twice a day, in many cases oftener. Residents of remote rural districts to which the service has been extended have a free delivery of mail brought within reach of them once a day. Residents of towns of less 10,000 population or $10,000 gross postal receipts, have no free delivery at all. There is a popular demand which is based on equity and reason, that the space which now intervenes between city and rural service should be diminished by extending free delivery to towns of not fewer than 5,000 population or not less than $5,000 gross postal receipts. Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903.
 




New Technology at Clerk of Courts. - Mr. E. G. Voorhies, our efficient clerk of court, is wide awake on all occasions, especially in matters pertaining to his office. To improve work in the office he has secured a typewriter which writes directly on all books. This will make the records plainer and neater than ever. Laf. Adv. 1/17/1903.




"Mr. Plaster of Paris."  - There are various kinds of liars, out of the lot for "Mr. Plaster of Paris" has them all beat - in fact, he might be called a unique liar. He will lie at Falk's Opera House, Monday, Jan. 19th. Along with him comes a clever comedy coterie of comedians, attractive girls, specialties galore and the funniest play that is being exploited this season, different from most comedy productions, en-tour. An attractive special scenic mounting has been given. "Mr. Plaster of Paris," in consequence this funny play is seen to the best possible advantage. The costuming has not been overlooked and the latest and most popular music runs through the piece, giving it a happy swing. Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903.





The First National Bank.

 The regular annual election of directors of the First National Bank of Lafayette took place last Tuesday. The entire old Board of Directors was re-elected, composed of the following well known business men and capitalists; J. G. Parkerson, P. B. Roy, Chas. O. Mouton, C. D. Caffery, M. Billeaud, Jr., C. C. Brown, F. Demanade, John Whittington, J. Arthur Roy  and N. P. Moss.

 The election of directors was followed two days later by the election of officers for the ensuring year, as follows; N. P. Moss, president; J. G. Parkerson, cashier; F. V. Mouton, assistant cashier; C. D. Caffery, attorney; O. C. Mouton, notary.

 With deposits amounting at present to $350,000.00 and total resources of half a million dollars, the First National Bank by a conservative  and intelligent management has come to occupy a foremost position among the financial institutions of this section of the business world. Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903.   



Push it Along.

 The Business Men's Association held a meeting last Monday night to take action on the proposition submitted by McKinney, the general agent of the Emigration Bureau of the Southern Pacific and Illinois Central railroads, that his bureau would distribute free of charge fifty thousand booklets or folders describing the natural resources and advantages and educational facilities of Lafayette town and parish. There is to be no expense whatever attached to the service rendered by the bureau, but the community, is expected to furnish the advertising matter, which can be obtained at the trifling cost of one cent a copy for a 24 leaf folder or pamphlet, provided not less than 50,000 copies be ordered at one time.

 The bureau in question operates through nearly 700 agencies scattered throughout the north, east and middle west and each agency is in command of the very best facilities for distributing advertising matter in a thorough and effective manner. Through the personal efforts of President Stephens of the Industrial Institute, Mr. McKinney, the chief of this Emigration Bureau, was induced to spend a short while in Lafayette last Saturday and explain to a number of our citizens who were able to meet him on the short notice given, the best means by which Lafayette town and parish might reap some of the advantages of the general emigration movement southward being stirred up by the united efforts of the Southern Pacific and Illinois Central railroad companies. Mr. McKinney's suggestion that we adopt the plan of Iberia and other parishes in Southwest Louisiana which have entered in this movement, met with the approbation of those who happened to be present when the plan was explained, and it was decided to bring the matter before the Business Men's Association for final action. Recognizing the advantage it would be to the town and parish to present to the people of North, East and West, in a practical and effective way, the vast resources of this section and extending to these same people a cordial invitation to come and join hands with us in the development of these resources, the Business Men's Association endorsed the movement on behalf of the community and appointed committees to raise the required amount of $500 by popular subscription, and the expectation of reasonable appropriation by both City council and Police Jury, inasmuch as the establishment of a cotton mill, furniture factory or similar industry in our midst, for which we have an abundance of raw material, would redound to the great and general good of the town and parish. And the Business Men's Association is convinced that if the subject is presented in the intelligent and forceful manner now contemplated, to 50,000 people interested in buying homes and making investment in the South, that the $500 it is proposed to spend in the effort, will bring certain and handsome returns.

 The Advertiser is thoroughly in accord with this movement for the up-building of Lafayette town and parish, and concurs in the opinion that good results will follow the plan it is proposed to carry out for advertising in a special way the advantages and the needs of our section of country, at a time when the railroad companies we have already named are busily engaged in arousing an active interest in Louisiana and Texas among many thousands of good people of intelligence and capital who are desirous of changing their homes to a milder climate, or who wish to invest their money in the development of the boundless idle resources of the country. Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903.




       

 
 Gratified With the Progress of Lafayette.

Mr. E. H. Vordenbaumen of Shreveport was a visitor to Lafayette during the week. He came to attend a meeting of the stockholders of the Vordenbaumen Lumber Company, Limited.

 While here Mr. Vordenbaumen expressed himself as highly gratified with the progress of Lafayette. While speaking of the greatly improved schools and of the awakened school sentiment here, he said not a resident of Lafayette, nevertheless he would willingly contribute to the Lafayette schools as much as any citizen of the town. He also expressed the belief that good schoolhouses were a necessity, and that every community was benefited by having them in many ways. Mr. Vordenbaumen is a progressive man, and his ideas are practical and worth consideration. Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903.  





At Falk's. - There are various kinds of liars, but of the lot "Mr Plaster of Paris" has them all beat - in fact, he might be called a unique liar. He will lie at Falk's Opera House, Monday, Jan. 19th. Along with him comes a clever comedy coterie of comedians, attractive girls, specialties galore and the funniest play that is being exploited this season, different from most comedy productions, entour. An attractive special scenic mounting has been given "Mr. Plaster of Paris," in consequence this funny play is seen to be the best possible advantage. The costuming has not been overlooked and the latest and most popular music runs through the piece, giving it a happy swing. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903.


Educated Horse. - Those who missed seeing the educated horse, Forest Tempo at Falk's Hall, missed a good chance of seeing what an (unreadable word) can do, and what many people can't do. This horse's accomplishments, among which may be mentioned writing names, and figures on a black board, and solving arithmetical problems, demonstrated what can be done by careful patient, and intelligent teaching. He was well worth seeing, for he is a wonder.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903.




 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 1/17/1903.

 Mr. Jules Jeanmard of Carencro spent a few days of last week in Lafayette to recuperate after an illness of four weeks.

 It is reported that all the wells at Anse la Butte are full of oil, and that very soon a pumping system will be put in.

 A meeting of the Merchants Protective Association was held last Monday. Among other business considered, the nonpayment of bills due by different parties to firms in the Association, was taken up, and very strict measure were adopted to force payment. The association is improving all the time, and has more than justified its establishment.

 Mr. E. G. Voorhies, our efficient clerk of court, is wide awake on all occasions, especially in matters pertaining to his office. To improve work in the office he has secured a typewriter which writes directly on the books. This will make the records plainer and neater than ever.

 There will be a competitive drill during the Street Fair between the Opelousas and New Iberia Militia Companies.

 The Insurance firm of Parkerson & Mouton will soon be located in the building lately occupied by the Lafayette Gazette. Their office will be handsomely furnished and will be be up to date. The firm is doing a very prosperous insurance business and they represent the strongest companies of the world.

Notice. - By order of the Board of Directors of the Century Club, a special meeting of the stockholders will be held at the Club rooms, Tuesday, Feb. 17th, 1903.  H. A. VAN DER CRUYSSEN, Secretary.


 Excursions from all points will be run to Lafayette during the Street Fair. Also a special excursion from New Orleans will come here Feb. 1st.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1903.








 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 17th, 1874.

THE LOUISIANA CENTRAL RAILROAD.
PROMISING OUTLOOK FOR ITS EARLY COMPLETION.
[From the N. O. Times.]

 Concerning the anticipated action of the Northern capitalists, who have undertaken the construction of the Louisiana Central Railroad ti extend from Vermilionville to Shreveport, and thus creating an unbroken line of railroad communication between New Orleans and Texas, it will be a cause for public gratification to learn that recently received dispatches from Mr. G. B. Ward, of Detroit, Michigan - the leading spirit in the enterprise - work on the road will be commenced forthwith.

 On the 6th inst. Governor Kellogg received the following.

         DETROIT MICH., Jan. 5, 1874.
Gov. Kellogg:
   Will immediately commence and complete road according to terms of charter.
                                   G. D. WARD.

 Gov. Kellogg telegraphed back that the bill had become a law, and received the following in reply:
                                     DETROIT, Jan. 7.
Gov. Kellogg:
   Am much gratified by your action. The people of your city and State will heartily approve. Will comply with terms of charter. G.D. WARD.

 From the N. O. Times and in the Lafayette Advertiser of January 11th, 1874.



STATE VS. BREAUX.

 The case of the State vs. Adrien Breaux who killed J. P. Duffy on the 24th of December last, came up before Judge Eraste Mouton on Thursday the 15th instant for preliminary examination. The District Attorney being absent, the Court appointed L. P. Revillon, Esqr., to represent the State in his absence. The accused was represented by Ed. E. Mouton, and Col. Wm. C. Crow. The examination commenced at an early hour on Thursday and continued until evening, when District Attorney J. A. Chargois, who had just arrived from New Orleans, made his appearance in Court and asked that the case be continued until the following day. On Friday, the case was proceeded with by the District Attorney, assisted by Mr. Revillon, and Messrs. Mouton and Crow for the defence.

 Notwithstanding the extreme inclemency of the weather, the Court House was crowded with spectators attentively listening to this testimony of the different witnesses. The testimony was closed at a late hour last evening, an after eloquent and able arguments by the District Attorney and Col. Crow the case was submitted, and the Judge fixed the bond of the accused at $10,000 to answer to the charge of homicide at the next term of District Court. The required bond was immediately furnished.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1874.

     

At Mt. Carmel. - We received a kind invitation from the Superior of Mont Carmel Convent of this place on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday last, with perfect satisfaction to all present. In our next issue we will give a full report of the examination.   Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1874.

New Goods. - Mr. Ed Cain, the popular merchant on the corner of Main and St. John streets, has received a large stock of goods of all descriptions, which he is offering to the public at the very lowest cash rates. His accommodating young clerks, A. Monnier, jr., and Lucius Nevue, will take pleasure inn showing, to all who visit the store, the fine assortment of goods on hand.   Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1874.



MEETING OF THE SCHOOL BOARD.

 A special meeting of the Public School Board of the Parish of Lafayette was held on the 14th of Jan. 1874. Present: A. Monnier, President; B. A. Salles and J. J. Caffery. Absent: L. E. Salles and M. G. Broussard.

 On motion, B. A. Salles was appointed Secretary pro tem.

 On motion it was resolved, that the President of the Board and J. J. Caffery be and are hereby authorized to lease all Public School lands in this parish to the last and highest bidder, on the following terms and conditions; one third cash and the balance at the end of the year, said lessee or lessees to furnish their notes with two good securities in solido. All improvements on said lands to be held as a pledge until full and final payment of all notes given for rents of said lands.

 There being no further business the Board adjourned.
A. MONNIER, President.
B. A. SALLES, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/17/1874.

  

    
lagniappe:
THE TABLOID AGE.

 This is the tabloid age, physically and mentally, also politically, says the London Tatler. Few people have time to read speeches. Only the great phrases are remembered; telegrams, too - sometimes. "Peace with honor" will live as long as the genus stump orator, and "Peace, retrenchment, and reform" is as fine a vote-catcher with the yokel as "Economy and efficiency" is with the struggling small tradesman in the towns. "Ireland a nation" will doubtless ring the ages, and if in response to the trumpet call there is never a parliament house on College Green you may be sure of a succession of witty fighting men at St. Stephen's. Mr. Gladstone's great phrase, "Government of the people for the people and by the people," appealed to the popular imagination and captured many a seat. In practice it at present finds a counter-blast in the aphorism. "The Englishman loves a lord." "Trade follows the flag" is an assertion that has rallied business men to imperialism, and Mr. George Gaber's succinct injunction to "Vote khaki" rang through the whole British Isles at the last election. From the London Tatler and in the Lafayette Gazette of 1/17/1903.
   



Lagniappe: 
ATTENDED HIS OWN FUNERAL.
 How a Drummer Reached Home to Find Another's Body Being Buried For His.
  
Two drummers had scraped an acquaintance on a train. Both had told stories of experiences when one asked: "Did you attend your own funeral?"

 "Why no," replied the other.

 "Well, I have. It happened this way. I was in Buffalo three years ago, and telegraphed my firm in Connecticut that I would take a certain train for home that night. Luckily for me I changed my plans at the last moment and did not leave, some business having cropped up that would require my presence there for a few more days, and I telegraphed my firm accordingly. That train was smashed up in a collision, and a large number of persons were killed.

 "I arrived at my home four days later, just as a funeral procession was leaving it. For a moment I was too astonished to move, but finally mustered up sufficient courage to ask a bystander whose funeral it was. What was my amazement to learn that it was my own. According to my informant, I had been brought home two days previously, crushed and unrecognizable, out of the wreck on the Grand Central.

 "The funeral cortege had got some distance away before I had recovered sufficiently to produce a conveyance to go in pursuit. Not wishing to create a scene in the street, I determined to wait until the church was reached. I therefor fell into line and joined my own funeral procession.

 "Arrived at the church, the coffins was lifted out and carried up the aisle, and the burial service was just about to begin when I stepped to the chancel. My appearance created an instant panic, everybody tumbling over themselves to get out of the edifice. I was left alone with the officiating clergyman.

 "In a few moments however, my friends and relations began to come back into the church. I called to them and told them that far from being dead I was never more alive. Then explanations ensued. It appeared that my second telegram had never been received, and believing me to be in the wreck, they had picked out the most likely-looking corpse as mine." 


From the New York Herald and in the Lafayette Advertiser 1/19/1895.




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