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Sunday, January 11, 2015

**JANUARY 14TH M C

From the Lafayette Gazette of January 14th, 1899:



Burglar Armed with a Shot-gun Frightens a Lady and Three Little Children.





 Mrs. Sue Spell and her children had quite an experience one day last week with a very bold scoundrel who, it is to be hoped, will be caught and made to pay the full penalty for his infamous conduct. Mrs. Spell lives in the Ridge neighborhood alone with three small children. At about dark she discovered a man armed with a shot gun prowling around her house. The lady was naturally frightened and ran to her first neighbor for assistance. When she returned to the house with a gentleman who had volunteered to accompany her, the culprit was gone. Mrs. Spell, however, did not care to remain the whole night with her children and went over with her little ones to the neighbor's house to spend the night. The next morning she returned home and found that it had been entered by the thief who had evidently gone back to the house. Some four or five dollars in cash were stolen. We are informed that other thefts have been recently committed in that vicinity.


Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899. 






 The Thieves Still at Work - More Burglaries Reported.


 Thursday night Gus Siadous' bedroom was entered by thieves who stole $25 in cash from under the young man's pillow. The thieves then raided the saloon down-stairs and carried away several small articles. The same night the culprits tried to break into Mrs. Landry's boarding, but failed as they were heard and chased away.



 Despite the efforts of the officers, these audacious robbers continue their nefarious work with impunity, and it seems impossible to capture them. Should they be caught, however, it would not be surprising if some of them are found dangling at the ends of ropes as the people of the town are highly incensed at the scoundrelism displayed by these criminals. Hardly a night passes without the commission of some burglaries. Every citizen should take the necessary precautions to be able to give the burglars a dose of lead. 
  Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.
 




Shooting with Intent to Kill.   
 

 John Tillman, who came here a year or two ago and passed off for a deaf mute and who left town subsequently returned and to the surprise of his friends showed that the possessed the sense of hearing and the faculty of talking in an eminent degree, has gotten himself into a bad row of stumps and if the facts are as they are reported he may have a hard time of it before he regains his freedom.


 Last Saturday while Constables Veazey and Hebert were making their usual round they were attracted near Leon Plonsky' s store by the loud talking of some men one of whom, John Tillman, was particularly boisterous. The officers drove on to where Tillman was to quiet him, when one of his companions told him, to be still as the officers were approaching. To this Tillman is said to have replied: "Let 'em come. I will shoot 'em," and the same time drawing a 38 caliber Colt revolver and firing one shot. The horse upon which both officers rode was frightened by the shot and it was perhaps due to this fact that the officers did not return the fire. Had they been less nervy men Tillman's reckless act might have cost him his life. Officers Veazey dismounted as soon as possible and pluckily stepped up to Tillman who was standing on the platform with a pistol in his hand. The officer succeeded to disarm his man and conducted him to jail where he still is under a charge of shooting with intent to kill which was made against him Monday morning.


 Tillman had been drinking heavily before the shooting. This is not the first time that he has been arrested since his residence in Lafayette. Twice before he appeared before the mayor for minor violations of the law.


 Tillman belongs to the sporting fraternity. He appears to be a man of some intelligence. He certainly has a most wonderfil self-control, as was shown by his successful impersonation of a deaf-mute. For months, he pretended to be deaf and dumb and although put through some severe tests at no time did he betray and indication that he could either speak or hear. Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.




REACHING AN END. -
The Case of the Consolidated Engineering Company vs. the Town Submitted.


 The suit of the Consolidated Engineering Company vs. the town of Lafayette has been tried and all that is required to end it as far as the district court is concerned is the decision of Judge Debaillon. Wednesday all the testimony had been heard and the attorneys made their arguments. Judge Clegg spoke for the plaintiffs and Judge Mouton and Mayor Caffery presented the town's case. Col. Breaux and Mr. Campbell did not speak.
Engineer Zell and his notorious boilers were scathingly arraigned and the Consolidated company was also the recipient of forensic bouquets. It is a cause of general congratulation that this suit is about to be settled. We are not a lawyer and do not know what law is applicable to this case, but from a standpoint of right and justice we believe the town ought to win. The town has been shamefully imposed upon and those responsible for it ought to be made to pay. Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.
 



Pack Peddlers. - Going out West the other evening on the 3 o'clock train from Lafayette we were struck with the pack peddlers who were on the train going out to all small towns along the road to sell their goods. No one has any idea of the money taken in by these walking merchants who go from house to house carrying their goods in bundles on their backs. They have no freight to pay on their goods and they live on very little per day so all they make on their goods above actual cost is clear money.
Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899. 
 

 Roy & Vidrine. - In another column appears the advertisement of Messrs. Roy & Vidrine, who have rented the new Begnaud building in which they have opened a saloon. These gentlemen are experienced in this line of business and we have no doubt that their new stand will always be entitled to a share of the public's patronage. They have in addition ro their bar, pool and billiard tables and well equipped rooms for those who wish to enjoy a quiet social game. A portion of the building will be occupied by Walker & Co. with a restaurant. Six large, airy rooms upstairs will be rented for lodging. The proprietors have engaged the services of Frank McBride and Pat Guilbeau, one of whom will wait upon the customers in the day and the other during the night. The saloon will be open at all hours.
Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.





Had to Pay. - The following is a special from New Iberia to the N. O. Times-Democrat of the 12th instant.


 "Some excitement occurred at the Southern Pacific depot yesterday when west-bound passenger train No. 18, rolled in. This train had passed the train having on it the Breaux Bridge excursionists at Olivier Station. The Lafayette excursionists boarded the regular train, and when they reached this place refused to get off, claiming the company had not kept its contract, in which it was stated the excursion train would run a half hour ahead of the regular. The conductor, the agent here and the brakeman all tried to persuade them either to get off or to pay fare. They refused to do either. The agent then sent down town for the chief of police, who took up with several officers, who convinced the excursionists that they must either pay their fares or go to jail. They paid their fares after having detained the train for two hours, and in the meantime the excursion train passed No. 18 at this place and reached Lafayette an hour before the regular."


 From the N. O. Democrat and in the Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.




Relics of Gen. Gardner.
 Mrs. M. Gardner, widow of General Frank Gardner, U. C. V.'s, the military uniform worn by her illustrious husband during his service in the Confederate Army. Mrs. Gardner has also given to the camp the sabre carried by the general when he was an officer in the Federal army, before he left it to join the Southern forces, and his sword with which he so gallantly defended Port Hudson. Among these valuable relics is a beautiful silk sash presented after the war by the ladies of New Orleans to the hero of Port Hudson. The relics have been encased in a neat box with a glass cover, which has been given to the First National Bank. Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.




Accidentally Killed His Friend.

 Last Saturday, while Ed. Vincent and Camille Caruthers were out hunting near their homes in Cote Gelee, the latter was accidentally killed by the farmer.

 Vincent came to town the same day and surrendered to the authorities. Judge Debaillon, knowing the accidental nature of the killing fixed Vincent's bond at nominal figures. The relatives of Caruthers exonerate Vincent of all blame in the matter. Caruthers and Vincent were close friends and the occurrence if greatly regretted by the friends and relatives of both. Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.




Public Funds.

The collections by Sheriff Broussard during October, November and December have exceeded those made in the same time in any previous year. The sheriff has turned over to the parish during the three months mentioned $16,347.79 and in his quarterly settlement which he has just made with the State he paid in $10,704.34, making the total collections $27,052.13. Of the amount paid the parish there were 1856 poll taxes and $472,50 from licenses. The sheriff is to be congratulated upon his good work and the tax-payers for their prompt payments. The showing made is certainly a splendid one. 
Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.



Domengeaux Takes Charge.

Louis Domegeaux has now full charge of the well-known stand of Mr. John O. Mouton. Mr. Domengeaux proposes to run a first-class establishment in every particular. In connection with the saloon he will have a thoroughly up-to-date restaurant. For this department he has secured the services of Mr. Gastinel, an experienced restaurateur, from New Orleans. He has fitted up a large room for that purpose and he will soon have it neatly and comfortably finished. 
Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.

  



THE POLICE JURY
HOLDS AN IMPORTANT MEETING AND ADOPTS THE LICENSE TAX FOR 1899.

 Lafayette, La., Jan. 5, 1899. - The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present:  R. C. Landry, C. C. Brown, Ben Avant, Alf. Hebert, Alonzo Lacy, Jno. Whittington, Jr., Jno. Primeaux. Absent: M. Billeaud, Jr.

 The reading of the minutes was dispensed with.

 By motion it was resolved that plans and specifications for the Whittington bridge be considered at the next regular meeting in February.

 A report from the supervisors of election showed that the vote on the liquor license question was as follows: For $200 license, 616; for $1,000 license, 72.

 The jury after passing upon a number of accounts adjourned until tomorrow, Friday, Jan. 6, 1899.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.

Jan. 6, 1899 - Pursuant to adjournment the Police Jury met this day with the following members present: R. C. Landry, C. C. Brown, Ben Avant, Alfred Hebert, Alonzo Lacy, Jno. Whittington, Jr., Jno. E. Primeaux.  Absent: M. Billeaud, Jr.

 By motion the following resolutions were adopted:

 1st. Resolved that the special license and poll tax, made under the provisions of Article 291 of the State Constitution shall be due and collectable on or before the first day of February, 1899, and all unpaid licenses and taxes shall thereafter become delinquent.

 2nd. Resolved that the tax collector shall after said date, advertise all delinquents showing the respective amounts due for said special license and tax, and after advertising said delinquent list for thirty days, he shall proceed to enforce the collection of said special tax and licenses by seizing and selling at public auction, any property in possession of said delinquents. Interest shall be computed at two per cent per month and all costs added.

 3rd. Resolved that a fine of $25 or in default thereof 30 days imprisonment in the parish jail be and is hereby fixed as penalty for nonpayment of the per capita tax herein levied and any person failing to make such payment shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

 4th. Resolved that the tax collector shall place upon a supplemental list all names of persons not assessed, together with the various items subject to the special road tax herein referred to and shall collect same giving the usual receipt. therefor.

 A petition from the citizens of the 8th ward praying for exemption from the special road tax and asking that they be allowed to continue road duty under the old system, was read and on motion refused.

 By motion the sum of $50 each was allowed the treasurer and secretary for extra duties imposed.

 By motion the sum of $201 was refunded Lehman, Stern & Co. for parish taxes, paid, on compress property said property having been exempted from parochial taxation.

 The sum of $12.50 cash was granted unto, Celeste Boudreaux and Julie Breaux indigents.

 Mr. Primeaux was authorized to act in conjunction with the authorities of Vermilion or purchasing land for the bridge keeper's house at Odilon Broussard Bridge; and also to contract with Jean Denise for keeping said bridge at $115 per year, half to be paid by Vermilion.

 By motion the public bridge at Darmas Broussard's and the public road on either side of Bayou Vermilion, leading thereto, is hereby condemned, and abandoned. Mr. Landry was appointed to report on the disposition of said bridge.

 Messrs. Alf. Hebert and R. C. Greig were appointed to investigate the treasurer's office, cancel his vouchers and grant him a quietus.

 The treasurer submitted the a report of parish funds as follows:

 To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La, - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of Parish funds since my last report:



 Respectfully submitted,
                       J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.

 Jan. 5, 1899.
     The committee appointed to ascertain the amount of unpaid approved accounts and the probable revenues for the current fiscal year submitted the following report which was adopted:

 To the Honorable Police Jury - We the undersigned committee, appointed to ascertain the amount of unpaid approved accounts of the parish and the probable revenues for the current fiscal year would respectfully report as follows:


Respectfully,
              R. C. GREIG, A. M. MARTIN, C. C. BROWN.

 Lafayette, La., Jan. 5, 1899.
      A motion duly made the following ordinances stating the license tax for the calendar year 1899, and providing for the collection of the same was unanimously adopted:

 AN ORDINANCE to levy, collect and enforce the payment of an annual license tax upon all persons, associations of persons or business firms and corporations pursuing any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, except those expressly excerpted from such license tax by Article 229 of the constitution; and prescribing the mode and method in which certain persons, subject to license, shall make report of their business.

 Section 1.  Be it enacted by the Police Jury of the parish of Lafayette, State of Louisiana, that there is hereby levied an annual license tax for the year A. D. 1899, and for each subsequent year, upon each person, associations of persons, or business firms and corporations, pursuing any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, subject to licenses under Article 229 of the constitution.

 Section 2.  Be it enacted, etc., that the second day of Jan., A. D. 1899, and each subsequent year, the sheriff and tax collector shall begin to collect and shall collect as fast as possible from each of the persons or business firms, associations of persons, and corporations, pursuing within this parish, any trade, profession, vocation, calling or business, a license tax hereinafter graduated. All licenses shall be due and collectable during the first two (2) months of each year and all unpaid licenses shall become delinquent on the first day of March of each year and all firms that commence business after that date shall become delinquent unless the license is paid within (10) days.

 Section 3.  Be it further enacted, etc., that the annual license for all kinds of business hereinafter named except as afterward provided, shall be graduated in classes.

 MANUFACTURE.

 That for carrying on each business of manufacturing subject to license under Article 229 of the constitution, the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of said business, as follows:

 Class I.  When the said receipts are $25,000 or more and less than $30,000 the license shall be $19.50.

 Class 2. When the said receipts are less than $25,000 the license shall be $15.

BANKING.

 That for each business of carrying on bank, banking company, association, corporation or agency they shall be based on the declared or nominal capital and surplus as follows:

 Class I.  When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $100,000 or more and less than $200,000 the license shall be $150.

 Class 2.  When the said declared or nominal capital and surplus is $50,000 or more and under $100,000 the license shall be $75.

 Class 3.  When the said declared or nominal capital or surplus is $50,000 or less, the license shall be $50.

 The declared or nominal capital and surplus, as provided in this section, shall be ascertained and based upon the annual statement made in pursuance of existing laws.

 MERCANTILE BUSINESS.

 Section 4.   Be it further ordained, that for every wholesale mercantile business, whether as principal, agent or commission, by auction, representing foreign merchants or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross annual amounts of sales as follows:

 Class I.  When the gross sales are $250,000 and not more than $500,000, the license shall be $100.

 Class 2.  When the gross sales are $250,000 or less, the license shall be $50.

 Provided, that no person or persons shall be deemed wholesale dealers unless he or they sell by the original or unbroken packages or barrel only; and provided further, that no person or persons shall be deemed wholesale dealers unless he or they sell to dealers for resale. If they sell in less quantities than original and unbroken packages, or barrels, they shall be considered retail dealers, and pay the license as such. That for every business of selling at retail whether as principal, agent or commission, or otherwise, the license shall be based on the gross annual amount of sales, as follows:

 Class 1. When the gross sales are $40,000 or more and under $50,000, the license shall be $40.

 Class 2.  When the gross sales are $30,000 or more and less than $40,000, the license shall be $30.

 Class 3.  When the gross sales are $25,000 or more and less than $30,000, the license shall be $25.

 Class 4.  When the gross sales are $20,000 or more and less than $25,000, the license shall be $20.

 Class 5.  When the gross sales are $15,000 or more and less than $20,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 6.  When the gross sales are $15,000 or more and less than $20,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 6.  When the gross sales are less than $15,000, and more than $50,000, the license shall be $10.

 Class 6.  When the gross sales are less than $15,000, and more than $50,000, the licenses shall be $10.

 Class 7.  When the gross sales are $5,000 or less, the license shall be $5.

 Provided, that if any distilled vinous, malt or other kind of mixed liquors be sold in connection with the business or retail merchant, grocer, oyster house, confectionery, or in less quantities than five gallons, the license for such additional business shall be as hereinafter provided for; provided further, that no license shall issue to sell liquors in less quantities than five gallons, for less than $200.

 Provided, that retail drugstores, owned or controlled and managed by a regularly licensed graduate of pharmacy, and selling vinous, spirituous or alcoholic liquors in less quantities than one quart, as drug or medicine only, shall pay the license mentioned in this section and shall not be required to procure the license required for saloons, etc., under this act, as retail liquor dealers.

 Provided further that if drugstores, soda fountains, or other aerated water dealers offer for sale in connection, with such waters any vinous, spirituous or alcoholic, liquors such drugstores, soda fountains, or dealers shall be required to take out license as retail liquor dealers as saloons, barrooms, etc., as provided in section 10 of this act.

 Provided further, that farmers or planters having stores situated on their farms or plantations, and selling or advancing  supplies to their employes exclusively shall not be classed as merchants, nor shall they be required to take out a license under this act.

 Section 5.  Be it further enacted, that for carrying on each business or gaslight, electric light, waterworks, shoot-the-chutes, miniature railroad, saw-mills, employing ten or more hands, telephoning, (including local and district telegraph) telephoning express company, cotton compress or ginnery, cotton pickery, slaughter house, distillery and rectifying alcoholic, or malt liquors, brewing ale, beer, porter or other malt liquor, manufacturing tobacco, cigars or cigarette, refinery sugar or molasses or either of them, manufacturing cotton seed oil, oil cake or cotton seed meal, that license shall be based on the gross annual receipts, of each person association or persons, business firm or corporation engaged in said business, as follows:

 Provided that, this section shall not apply to planters and farmers grinding and refinery their own sugar or molasses or ginning their own cotton or that of their tenants or manufacturing their own cotton seed into meat, cake or oil, or work by machinery for plantation or farm purposes; provided that no license shall be imposed or collected on cotton gins ginning for line, not over four hundred bales of cotton per annum and provided further that this act shall not apply to those planters who granulate syrup, for other planters during the rolling season.

 Provided further that any agency for any or other establishment, selling by wholesale. ale, beer or other alcoholic or malt liquors in unbroken packages as usually contained in kegs, barrels etc., shall pay a license based as follows:

    When said gross sales are $5,000 or more the license shall be $500. When the said gross sales are less than $5,000 the license shall be $300.

 Class I.  When the said gross annual receipts are $200,000 or more and less than $150,000 the license shall be $500.

 Class 2.  When the said gross receipts are $150,000 or more and less than $200,000 the license shall be $375.

 Class 3.  When the said gross receipts are $100,000 or more and less than $150,000 the license shall be $250.

 Class 4.  When the said gross receipts are $75,000 or more and less than $100,000 the license shall be $187.50.

 Class 5.  When the said gross receipts are $50,000 or more and less than $75,000 the license shall be $125.

 Class 6.  When the said gross receipts are $37,500 or more and less than $50,000 the license shall be $93.75.

 Class 7.  When the gross annual receipts are $25,000 or more, and less than $39,500 the license shall be $62.50.

 Class 8.  When the said gross receipts are over $20,000 and less than $15,000 the license shall be $50.

 Class 9.  When the said gross receipts are over $15,000 and less than $20,000 the license shall be $37.50.

 Class 10.  When the said gross annual receipts are less than $15,000 the license shall be $20.

AMUSEMENTS.

 Section 6.  Be it enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping a theater, opera-house, ampitheater, academy of music, museum, menagerie, circus or other traveling show, the license shall be based upon the number of the attaches whether proprietors, performers, or other employees, as follows:

 Class 1.  When the number of said persons is one hundred or more the license shall be $500.

 Class 2.  When the number of said persons is seventy-five or more and less than one hundred the license shall be $400.

 Class 3.  When the number of said persons is fifty or more and less than seventy-five the license shall be $300.

 Class 4.  When the number of said persons is thirty or more and less than fifty the license shall be $250.

 Class 5.  When the number of said persons is twenty or more and less than thirty the license shall be $200.

 Class 6.  When the number of said persons is ten or more and less than twenty the license shall be $150.

 Class 7.  When the number of said persons is five or more and less than ten, the license shall be $100.

 Class 8.  When the number of said persons is four the license shall be $75.

 Class 9. When the number of said persons is three the license shall be $50.

 Class 10.  When the number of said persons is two the license shall be $40.

 Class 11.  When the number of said persons is one the license shall be $30.

 Provided, that the license for every hall, or place where public entertainments are given, not provided for in the section shall be based upon the seating capacity as follows:

 Provided, that the license for every hall, or place where public entertainments are given, not provided for in this section shall be based upon the seating capacity as follows:

 When the number of seats or spaces number 500 or more the license shall be $25.

 When the number of seats or spaces, number less than 500 the license shall be $20.

 Provided further that no license shall be required for balls given by private persons or for charitable purposes.

 RAILROAD AGENTS, ETC.

 Section 7.  Be it further enacted that each person carrying on the business or calling of selling or, dealing in, railroad or steamship tickets whether said tickets are sold on the streets, in the office of the company he represents, or that of any other company, shall pay an annual license graded upon the number of companies he represents to wit:  On company $25;  two companies, $40; three companies $50.

PEDDLERS AND HAWKERS.

Section 8.  Be it further enacted, etc., that each and every peddler or hawker shall pay an annual license graded as follows:

 When traveling on foot, $5;  when traveling on horseback, $10; when traveling in one-horse vehicle, $20; when traveling in two-horse vehicle, $37.50; when traveling on any kind of a water craft $100.

 Provided that, no person shall be allowed to sell goods, as clerk or clerks, of any peddler or hawker but that he or they must pay a license, in his or their own name but that this proviso shall not apply to watercraft.

 It is further provided that all parochial executive officers are hereby empowered and directed, to cause all peddlers or hawkers, to exhibit then parish license, and that the said peddlers or hawkers, failing to produce or exhibit the same, the said officers are directed and empowered by this act to seize said stock of merchandise and turn the same over to any court of competent jurisdiction with due information as to the violation of this act. Provided further that the said executive officers shall be entitled to receive as fees, the sum of $5 in each and every case from any peddler or hawker, clerk or clerks employed by said peddler or hawker, when peddling without a license in violation of this act. The said amount of $5 to be recovered before any court of competent jurisdiction out of the goods so seized.

 Provided further that no licenses shall be issued to any peddler or hawker for less than full rate for the current year.

 HOTELS, ETC.

 Section 9.  Be it further enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping a hotel where lodging and eating are combined the license shall be based upon the number of furnished lodging rooms for guests, as follows:

 Class 1.  When the said rooms are forty-five or more and less than seventy-five the license shall be $200.

 Class 2.  When the said rooms are thirty or more and less than forty-five the license shall be $150.

 Class 3.  When the said rooms are fifteen or more and less than thirty the license shall be $100.

 Class 4.  When the number of said rooms is twelve or more and less than fifteen the license shall be $75.

 Class 5.  When the number of said rooms is nine or more and less than twelve the license shall be $50.

 Class 6.  When the number of said rooms is six or more and less than nine, the license shall be $50.

 Class 6.  When the number of said rooms is six or more and less than nine, the license shall be $40.

 Provided that no license shall be required when the number of said rooms is less than six and that for every business of lodging alone the license shall be estimated on the same basis, as for hotels but graduated at one-half rates; provided that boarding houses shall pay sixty per cent of the rates of hotels.

 BARROOMS, ETC.

 Section 10.  Be it enacted that for every business of barroom, cabaret, coffee-house, cafe, beer saloon, liquor exchange, drinking saloon, grogshop, beer house, beer garden or other place, where anything to be drunk or eaten, on the premises is sold directly or indirectly the license shall be based on the gross annual receipts of said business as follows:

 Class 1.  When the said gross annual receipts are $10,000 or more and less than $15,000, the license shall be $400.

 Class 2.  When the said gross receipts are, $7,500 or more and less than $10,000, the license shall be $300.

 Class 3.  When the said gross receipts are $5,000 or less the license shall be $200.

 Provided, that no license shall be charged for selling refreshments for charitable or religious purposes, and provided further that no establishment, selling or giving away or otherwise disposing of any spirits, wines alcoholic or malt liquors in less quantities than one pint, shall pay less than $200. 

 Provided further that when any kind of business provided for in this section, shall be combined with any other business provided for in section 9 the same classification shall be made as provided in this section, but the price for the licenses shall be, equal to the price of the license required for each business separately.

 Section 11.  Be it enacted, etc., that for every business of keeping billiard tables, pigeon hole, Jenny Lind, pool or bagatelle tables, and ten pin alleys, from which revenue is derived a license of $10, for each such table or alley shall be required and paid in addition to any other license due by the establishment, in which said pool tables or alleys may be situated. Provided that all persons, association of persons or business firms, and corporations engaged in the sale of soda water, meads, confection, cakes, etc., exclusively, shall be rated as follows:

 Class 1.  When the gross annual sales are three thousand dollars and more than $2,000, the license shall be $10.

 Class 2.  When the gross sales are less than $2,000, the license shall be $5.

 Provided, that this provision shall not apply to places where alcoholic, vinous or malt liquors are sold, and provided that, druggists selling soda water, mead, etc., shall be required to take out a license under this act.

 Section 12.  Be it enacted etc., that for every individual or company carrying on the profession or business agency for steamboats, draying, trucking, keeping cabs, carriages, hacks or horses for hire, undertakers, owners or lessees, of toll bridges and ferries, master builders, stevedores, bill posting or tacking contracting and mechanics who employ assistance, the license shall be graded as follows:

Class 1.  When the gross annual receipts are $1,000, or more the license shall be $20.

 Class 2.  When the gross receipts are $750, or more and less than $1,000, the license shall be $15.

 Class 3.  When the gross annual receipts are less than $750, the license shall be $5.

 PROFESSIONAL.

 Section 13.  Be it enacted, that every individual or individuals carrying on the business or profession or physician attorney-at-law, editor, dentist, oculist, photographer, jeweler and all other business not herein provided for shall be graded the same as set forth in section 12 of this act, but graded at one half rates, and provided that no license shall be issued hereunder for less than $5.

 Section 14.  Be it further enacted, that all traveling vendors of stoves, lightning rods, and clocks, shall pay a license annually, of $100, whether traveling as peddlers or not. For every trading stamp company issuing stamps to merchants, and all other dealers of every kind whatsover, where the gross annual receipts are less than $5,000 the license shall be $125 and when the gross receipts are less than $5,000 the license shall be $125 and when the gross receipts are above $5,000 the license shall be $250.

 Section 17.  Be it further enacted that for carrying on the business pursuits known as cotton factorage, grain and produce commission houses, or any other factorage or commission business, brokerage in stocks, bonds, real estate produce, sugar, cotton, or other brokerage business whether buying or selling for actual, spot or future delivery where the intention of the parties is to make an honest, bonafide delivery, the license shall be based, on the gross annual commissions and brokerage on sales and purchases as follows:

 Class 1.  When the annual gross commissions exceed $5,000, and are no more than $10,000, the license shall be $50.

 Class 2.  When the annual gross commissions are $5,000 or less the license shall be $25.

 Section 18.  Be it enacted that for every lumber yard, whose gross sales are $2,000 or less the license shall be $10 and when the gross sales exceed $2,000 the license shall be $20.

 Section 19.  Be it enacted that for every sewing machine agent or agency, fruit stand soda stand, horse and mule trader, cigar and tobacco stand, the license shall be $5.

 Section 20.  Be it enacted that when any two or more kinds of business, are combined except as herein expressly provided for there shall be a separate license required for each kind of business. Where any company or association shall lease, operate, manage or control, the business franchise or property of other corporations, association or firms, they shall pay a separate license for each business.

 Section 21.  Be it enacted, etc., that annual receipts, capital sales, and premium in this act, referred to as basis of license are those for the year for which the license is granted; the standard for their estimation shall be prima facie of the preceding year, of the business has been conducted, previously by the same party or parties to whom they claim to be successors. If the firm or company be new, of gross sales for the first two months shall be considered as the basis, and six times that amount shall be estimated as the annual receipts of such business. Provided that any person, commencing business after the first of July, shall pay one half of the above rates.

 Section 22.  Be enacted, etc., that the business of the previous year, as also the actual condition and results of the business of the current for the new firms, associations or corporations for the purposes of calculating licenses shall be ascertained by the tax collector in the sworn statement of the person, or persons in interest, his or their duly authorized agent, or officer made before the tax collector for his deputy; provided that the tax collector be not satisfied with the said sworn statement he shall traverse the same by a rule, taken in proper court. On trial of said rule the books and written entries, and memoranda of said person or persons, firms, companies, corporations or parties, shall be brought into court, and subjected to the inspection, and examination of the court, the officer who took the rule, and such experts as he may employ or the court may appoint, provided that this inspection shall not be construed as entitling the defendant to introduce in evidence said books and documents any more than he would have been without such inspection; provided also that the license shall issue in accordance with the said sworn statement, notwithstanding the prospect or pendency of the rule, and the final ratification shall be made as ordered by the court.

 Section 24.  Be it further enacted, that if, any business shall be conducted, without a license in case herein provided, the tax collector shall through the attorney appointed by the State for such purpose, on motion in the proper courts as provided in the Constitution and which shall be without deposit or advance costs, take a rule on the party or parties, doing such business to show cause on the fifth day, exclusive of holidays, after the service thereof, why said party or parties should not pay the amount of license claimed and penalties or be ordered to cease from further pursuit of said business, until after having obtained a license; and in case, said rule is made absolute the order therein shall be considered a judgment in favor of the parish, for the amount decreed to be due, by defendant for license, and penalty and costs, heretofore and hereinafter provided for, and shall be executed in the same manner as other judgments. Provided that in addition to the commission allowed, the attorney, a penalty of 25 per cent on the amount sued on, is hereby fixed and provided, which penalty shall be turned into the general fund of the parish.

 It is hereby expressly provided that each person, association of persons, business firms or corporations, required to take out a license under this ordinance shall be required to post, the same in a conspicuous place in his or their place of business under a penalty of not less than $10 nor more than $100 recoverable by the collector before any court of competent jurisdiction and it shall be the duty of the tax collector, to visit in person or by deputies the several places of business herein mentioned and ascertain that the provisions of this section are strictly carried out.

 Section 25.  Be it further enacted that the only legal evidence that a license has been paid shall be the appropriate form of license adopted by the Police Jury and no receipts issued by the tax collector in place of the license itself shall be valid and this clause shall be construed to prevent the tax collector from issuing a receipt in lieu of the appropriate form to any person, association of persons or business corporations; provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed as to exclude oral evidence of lost or destroyed licenses.

 Section 26.  Be it further enacted that, the tax collector shall prepare and keep a book in which he shall record or file, the statements made under oath or all persons, associations of persons, business firms or corporations, who may apply for license to pursue any trade profession, vocation calling or business under this act.

 Section 27.  Be it further enacted that the tax collector is hereby empowered and required to administer oath to any person, associations of persons, business firms or corporations applying for license under this act, and any tax collector or ex-officio tax collector who shall sign any jurat or certify to the correctness of any oath without administering the oath in person to the applicant shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction be dealt with in accordance with existing laws, relative to dismissal from office or such officer or officers, and in addition to which they shall be subject to a fine of not less than $100 or more than $1,000. That when the oath is taken before the collector no charge shall be made for the same. Any false swearing as to the gross receipts of any person or persons or corporations through their president or proper officer or agent applying for license shall constitute the crime of perjury to be purchased as directed by existing criminal laws of the State.

 Section 28.  Be it enacted that the tax collector is hereby required to keep a license register in which he shall enter the names of every person, association of persons, business firms or corporations with the trade, profession, vocation, calling or business pursued, the class and graduation of the same, the amount of the license thereon, and the date of the collection or payment thereof. The collector shall before the end of the calendar year submit to the jury a full and complete transcript of said register.

 Section 19.  Be it enacted, that the tax collector or ex-officio tax collector violating any of the provisions of this act or who shall willfully rate any persons, association of persons, business firms and corporations at a less graduation than the law contemplates or who shall issue to any said persons, associations of persons, business firms or corporation a license for a less sum than that corresponding to their graduation shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor in office, and shall on conviction, before a competent authority be summarily dismissed therefrom.

 Section 30.  Be it enacted that on the second day of March of each year the tax collector, or ex-officio tax collector shall deliver to the attorney appointed by State, for the purpose a complete list of all delinquent license payers together with their location and kind of business, and the attorney shall immediately proceed to collect same in accordance with this act, and if not collected within thirty days from the date of delivery of the lists of the collector of taxes or ex-officio collector of taxes, it shall be the duty of said attorney to render a written report giving the reasons for non-collection to the collector whose duty it shall be to report same to the Jury.

 Section 31.  Be it enacted, that in addition to the penalties provided in this ordinance, all unpaid licenses shall bear interest at the rate of two per cent per month from the first day of March, and the payment thereon shall be secured by first mortgage in favor of the parish on the property, movable or immovable, of the delinquent owing the license and the tax collector shall collect said interest as provided by existing law and provisions of this ordinance.

 Section 32.  Be it enacted that a person, firm or company, having more than one place of business.

 Section 33.  Be it enacted that all laws or parts of laws in conflict with this act are hereby repealed.

 Section 34.  Be it enacted that, the licenses issued in pursuance of this ordinance, shall be for the calendar year beginning Jan. 1, 1899 and ending Dec. 31, 1899.

 Section 35. Be it enacted that this ordinance take effect from and after its adoption by the Jury.

 The following account was laid over.

 Wm. R. Foote, service on committee ... $10.00

 The following accounts were approved.
 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.


Selected News Notes (Gazette) 1/14/1899.
 There will be a ball to-night in Sibille's Hall, Carencro. Music will be furnished by the Breaux Bridge and Duhon bands.

 Felix Salles made a short visit to the Crescent City this week.

 Judge Julian Mouton returned from Opelousas this week where he and Judge Blackman held a regular term of the Court of Appeals.

 The stock-holders of the First National Bank held a meeting last Tuesday and re-elected the following Board of Directors: Ed. L. Estorge, J. S. Whittington, C. C. Brown, P. B. Roy, J. G. Parkerson, Charles O. Mouton, C. D. Caffery, A. J. Moss, N. P. Moss.

 Jno. Greig has resumed his former position in the Gardebled drug-store. John requests The Gazette to state that he will be pleased to wait upon his friends.

 B. N. Coronna, manager of the compress, returned from New Orleans last Tuesday.

 Sterling Mudd has enjoyed a well earned rest from his work at the Southern Pacific depot. During his vacation he visited New Orleans.
Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.
  








 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 14th, 1899.



Burglars Break Into Advertiser Office.

 It seems that we have a few night marauders among us but so far we have not missed any types. The only thing that is scarce around here is ----------------. If you know what is missing in our office, bring, bring it to us. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.




A DESPERATE CHARACTER.

 Last Saturday night the peace officers landed in jail a fellow named John Tillman, alias "Dummy." They had quite an exciting time as the fellow pulled out a large pistol and fired point blank at the officers, cursing and swearing that he would make away with them. The fellow had partaken of too much low license whisky and he will now have the time to see the evils of it. Too much praise can't be afforded the officers for their cool demeanor. 
Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.




Letter to the EDITOR:
 LAFAYETTE ADVERTISER.


Dear Sir,
I have visited the great State of Texas as a member of the Farmer's Congress which met at Ft. Worth in December. Ft. Worth is a city of 32,000 inhabitants and is the county seat of Tarrant county.

 It's public buildings are fine and costly. The city has all modern improvements and is watered by artesian wells. I did not see a cistern, they would do no good as it rains too little to depend on. Artesian water is not as clear or does it taste as well as cistern but it is said to be very healthy. Ft. Worth is on the Trinity river about 500 miles from its mouth for it is quite crooked. It has nine railroads running out of if and has a large trade in live stock, wheat and cotton.

 The governor and mayor welcomes us and the kind enterprising people of Ft. Worth entertained us royally. My lot was cast with Mr. and Mrs. Andrews of the Tremont Hotel and they were so kind to me that I was sorry to part from them.

 This Farmers Congress is a grand thing. It is composed of representatives of most all the States and Territories of the Union. Gov. Hoard, the great dairy man from Wisconsin, is the president; T. L. Maxwell, a large cotton planter from Madison parish, La., is one of the vice-presidents, Chicago furnishes the secretary and New York the treasurer. Our next meeting will be in Boston, and if I can go, I will try to have the congress of 1900 meet in New Orleans. I have many promises of help from delegates of various States. Nebraska and Ohio were very favorable to the proposition.


 Texas has over two and one-half millions of inhabitants and if were not for the towns you could not find where they lived. Seventy-five millions would not be crowded at all. There are yet many counties of fine fertile land not even organized. It is a stock raising state. I saw about 35,000 specimens mostly in feed pens being fed on cotton seed meal an hulls.
 

 I visited Houston which is a very active town, though its surrounding lands are not so fertile as farther West, but its railroad shops and its great number of railroad employees distribute monthly a vast amount of money. It rains there about as much as Louisiana. One does not notice much change until about eight miles N. W. of Houston, there it is visible that the rains are lighter.


 From Houston to Ft. Worth there is only a small amount of scrubby timber only fit for word, most of their building lumber lumber comes from East Texas and Lake Charles. Cypress for finishing purposes is obtained from Bayou Teche, La., and they raise cotton and cattle to pay for it.


 I never saw so much cotton as I saw in Houston. Two millions of bales were handled in that city last year.
  All in all it was a profitable trip.
  ORGERON.
   Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.
 




New Quarters.
The Bank of Lafayette has taken possession of its new building, which presents an attractive sight and does honor to Mr. Daily the architect of New Iberia. The counters were made by Numa Broussard and Alfred Bonnet and are faultless in workmanship. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.



New Saloon Opening.
Messrs. Roy and Vidrine, two gentlemen of sterling qualities, have opened a first class saloon in the building of S. Begnaud opposite the Court House. Any one will find it a nice place, well conducted, and the proprietors have resolved to keep only -- what may be called good goods. Some nice rooms will be found on the second floor where parties can enjoy themselves. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.


Always In Order.

 On last Sunday Rev. FATHER FORGE entertained the members of his choir to a bountiful repast. It is unnecessary to that the menu of the Rev Father are always up-to-date. Cheerfulness and cordiality were prominent around the festive board and every body went away delighted to have been a participant in the occasion. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.



AN APPRECIATED GIFT.
Mrs. Gardner, wife of the late Gen. Gardner No. 580, the uniform and of her lamented husband. The whole is placed in a glass case and can be seen in the building of the First National Bank of Lafayette. These historical relics have a great value specially to the veterans whose proverbial love to their late commander is well known. Besides the younger generation the abnegation and devoted patriotism of their ancestors to their south land. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.




Private Phone Line.
A private telephone line has been put up by the Cotton Compress Co., from their office to Washington and Opelousas. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.



Fire on Lincoln Ave.

On last Monday afternoon the floor of the attic in the residence of Mr. Blanchard on Lincoln Avenue was found to be partially on fire. Fortunately the fire being in its incipience a few buckets of water were all that was required to extinguish it. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.




Water Works.
The Water Works case has occupied the attention of the Court during the first two days of the week. Considerable testimony was adduced. The case was finally closed and counsel on both sides addressed the Court. Judge Debaillon will probably render his decision sometime in February.
 Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.




Racing News.
Pellerin Bros., have put up a black board which records daily the race winners at New Orleans Louisiana. The news is received by special telegraph and telephone lines. Bets are occurring daily. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.



New Restaurant Opening.
Walker and Co., opened up a new restaurant in the rear of Roy's new saloon near the court house. Give them a call. They will be pleased to wait on you. They will continue to run the American Exchange under the supervision of Mr. Preager in the usual metropolitan style. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.




Shields' Wagon Show.
Shields' big show gave an entertainment here yesterday the 10th. inst. and was well patronized. Part of the proceeds goes to the Catholic Church of this place. All things considered, the many difficulties to be met and overcome by these wagon shows makes this one of the best we have ever attended. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.



A GOOD ORDER. 

 The chief of police in Shreveport has issued positive instructions to his subordinates to arrest any and all persons, white or black, who were without any occupation and had no income, or other means for a livelihood. The city of Shreveport is determined to clean up, and clear out all those who live by their wits, gambling, begging, or other rascality, and let some other town furnish a support for them.

 Lafayette in common with other towns could spare a few of this class of people.  Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.   





Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 1/14/1899.  

 -- A day or two since, a son of Mr. Despaliere Rotchin, of Acadia Parish while in the act of getting onto the bridge over Bayou Plaquemine, and not knowing that the embankments nearest the bridge had been carried away by the heavy rains, plunged down by the heavy rains, plunged down and was drowned, his body being recovered some two miles from the scene of the accident. His horse swam ashore. The young man was to be married in a few days.

 
 -- Don Greig who has seen service in Santiago during the late war but who came back to Lafayette on account of ill-health has been honorably discharged from the army.

 -- Pellerin Bros., have put up in their saloon a black board which records the daily winners at New Orleans La. The news is received by special telegraph and telephone lines. Bets are occurring daily.

 -- Messrs. Roy and Vidrine, two gentlemen of sterling qualities, have opened a first class saloon in the building of S. Begnaud opposite the Court House. Any one will find it a nice place, well conducted, and the proprietors have resolved to keep only - what may be called good goods. Some nice rooms will be found on the second floor where parties can enjoy themselves.

 -- Walker and Co., opened up a new restaurant in the rear of Roy's new saloon near the court house. Give them a call. They will be pleased to wait on you. They will continue to run the American Exchange under the supervision of Mr. Preager in the usual metropolitan style. 
  -- This is an age of rapid progress, and however tabooed now the independent men of politics may be, still they stand the true representative of advanced thought. It matters not how disinterested and well meaning a man may be, many persons will always be found ready to asperse his character and misconstrue his motives. Call him "mugwump" or what you will, the independent man in politics holds a healthy balance of power.

 -- Why not every man form his own conclusions upon all subjects and then abide come what may? Why follow blindly in the wake of party leaders who, as a rule, are just as unprincipled or unscrupulous as indeed they are human and surely as such are not infallible.


-- The great mistake of the Republican Party after the war of endowing the ignorant negro with unrestricted franchises, must not frighten anybody at this late day. The Anglo Saxon race is the ruling race in America, and never do you fear negro domination that question is good enough only for backwoodsmen to discuss.  


  -- Don't allow those political demagogues to throw and pull the wool over your eves with this bugbear of political supremacy. The negro is the descendant of an inferior race, the ANGLO-SAXON, the product of ages, culture, and refinement, not wanting in wisdom and backbone.
Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1899.








 From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 14th, 1882:

 SINKING OF THE STEAMER EXCHANGE. 
 [Abbeville Meridional.] 

 Tuesday morning about seven o'clock on her down trip as the Wise Line Steamer Exchange was making the bend above Sosthene Herpin's - about a mile below Abbeville, she struck a snag and sank in a few minutes. The crew all jumped off and swam ashore as she was going down. At present writing she lies close into bank in about 20 feet of water. Most all of the (unreadable word) light freight was saved together with the cabin and of the furniture, but the sugar and freight on deck and in the hold will prove a total loss. It is supposed that all of the sugar and cotton are insured. If not it will prove a terrible blow to the owners.

 Messrs (unreadable names) had shipped their entire crop, a huge amount of cotton and sugar.

 So soon as the report reached here there was a great rush for the scene of the disaster and the town was for a time almost depopulated. People living in the neighborhood who owned skiffs and others made quite a handsome haul pulling up floating tobacco, - one man alone saved fifty bales.

 Chickens, geese, and ducks that were floating around in their coops were drowned or near so.

 Much credit is due the engineer and pilot on watch at the time of the accident. Both stood at their post until every one was off of the sinking craft. Mr. Solomon Wise left last evening for New Orleans, to bring back a wreck boat to raise the Exchange. From reports of parties versed in such matters it will require only a few days, after the arrival of the wreck boat, to raise the sunken steamboat. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1882.
   






CITY COUNCIL OF VERMILIONVILLE.
Regular Session, Dec. 5th, 1881.


 Present: M. P. Young, Mayor, and Councilmen Bailey, Mouton, McBride, Lombard and Falk. Absent:Alpha and Revillon.
On motion, the reading of the minutes of the preceding meeting was dispensed with.
 


 The following ordinance for the prevention of vagrancy was read and, on motion, unanimously adopted :
 


 Be it ordained by the City Council of Vermilionville,

 That all idle persons who, not having visible means to maintain themselves, live without employment ; all persons wandering abroad and lodging in market places, sheds, barns, uninhabited buildings, or in the open air, and not giving a good account of themselves ; all persons wandering abroad and beggings, or who go from door to door, or who place themselves in the streets, passages, or other public places, to beg or receive alms, shall be deemed vagrants.
 

 Be it further ordained, etc., That is shall be the duty of the Constable or any of his deputies, whenever required by any person, to carry such vagrant before the Mayor for the purpose of examination ; and if the Mayor be satisfied by the confession of the offender, or by competent testimony, that he is a vagrant within the description aforesaid, he may fine or imprison such vagrant, the fine not to exceed twenty-five dollars, and he may cause such vagrant to work upon the streets, at the rate of one dollar per day, until the fine imposed shall have been paid ; and if such a vagrant be a proper object of charity he shall send him to such place of refuge as shall be provided by the City Council.
 

 Be it further ordained, etc., That this ordinance take effect from and after its passage.


 On motion of Mr. Lombard, the Constable was ordered to enforce the ordinance in regard to sweeping or cleaning of chimneys within the limits of the Corporation. On motion, it was resolved that persons hauling logs, or buildings over the bridges of this Corporation and breaking or tearing up the same, will be required to repair such bridges immediately, under the penalty of a fine of not more than five dollars, nor more than five days imprisonment for each bridge broken or torn up.

  
 On motion it was resolved, that hereafter all persons are prohibited from driving wild cattle through the streets of this town under a penalty
 On motion the Council adjourned. M. P. Young, Mayor. E. M. Bailey, Secretary.

  Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1882.



From the Lafayette Advertiser of January 14th, 1913:


TROLLEY PROPOSITIONS.

 The people of Lafayette have now before them propositions to vote a mill and half tax for ten years in favor of the Southwestern Traction and Power Co. - the Goudchaux road, and a similar tax in favor or the Louisiana Traction and Power Co., represented by E. E. Shackford.

 The advent of the trolley interurban to Lafayette, we consider a great step in the line of progress for our city, because of the facilities it will give us, to increase and develop our trade. It will also add to the value of the country through which it passes by making it more desirable as a residence and more valuable for diversified farming.

 Both roads will afford great convenience to our own citizens in the way of visiting our sister towns and in pleasure rides, and will, because of Lafayette's central location, easily make this point headquarters for traveling men, who will patronize our hotels and other business places.

 The roads will carry freight and so bring to Lafayette produce for sale and shipment and thus add to our trade. The possibilities along this line of course, depend upon the activity or our urban business men.

Interurban lines are developers of the country wherever they are built and the opportunity is now afforded to Lafayette to become the center of the trolley system of this section with headquarters for one of the lines here and in our judgement we should embrace this opportunity and get both roads. Lafayette Advertiser 1/14/1913.




lagniappe: 
ROOSEVELT.

Theodore Roosevelt, the present governor or the great State of New York, is one of the biggest men in American politics, to-day. Roosevelt is the very highest type of an American. Before the recent war, however, very little was known of Roosevelt outside of the reputation he made for the honest administration of New York City's police force. At the very moment war seemed certain he resigned his position as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and began the organization of the famous regiment of Rough Riders. At once the eyes of the whole Union were upon him and his heroes. Much was expected of him and his regiment, and these expectations were more than satisfied. While Roosevelt is a Republican in politics he is like that great Democrat. Grover Cleveland, above the usual party dictations. He is absolutely fearless in every thing. America admires such a type as Roosevelt, and whether we be Democrat, or Republican, we can not help cheering the successes of such a man.

Lafayette Gazette 1/14/1899.


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