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Monday, January 12, 2015

**SEPTEMBER 6TH M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 6th, 1905:



ANOTHER CASE OF YELLOW FEVER.




Mild Case With All Precautions Taken... 

 Saturday morning it was announced on the streets that a second case of yellow fever had been found. Dr. F. R. Tolson, President of the Board of Health was asked in regard to the matter and he stated that Dr. A. R. Trahan had reported Chas. Martin, as a suspicious case.

 A telegram was sent to Dr. Souchon requesting that a yellow fever expert be sent at once. Dr. R. H. von Endorf of the U. S. P. H. and M. H. Service came Sunday. He saw the case Sunday evening then again on Monday morning. After careful investigation he pronounced it a very mild case of yellow fever.

All measures for preventing the spread of the fever from this case have been taken. The attending physician had the patient placed under a mosquito bar while the chill was on and has been kept screened the entire time, so that it is believed that danger from the case had been reduced to a minimum.

Dr. von Endorf visited a number of sick people in company with the attending physicians, on Monday and yesterday, but found no other yellow fever case.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.









LECTURE ON YELLOW FEVER TRANSMISSION.

Dr. von Ezdorf, of the U. S. P. H. and M. H. S. Briefly Gives Life and Habits of Stegomyia, and Relates Experiments of the Service that...


...DEMONSTRATED HER TO BE THE CAUSE OF INFECTION.

 States Positively No Danger to Anyone Entering Town Unless They Enter Infected House and Be Bitten by Infected Mosquito.

 A large audience assembled at the Jefferson Opera House Monday evening to listen to a talk on yellow fever transmission by Dr. R. H. von Ezdorf of the U. S. P. H. and M. H. S. The stage was occupied by the Mayor and members of the City Council and Board of Health. Mayor Mouton introduced Dr. von Ezdorf who began giving a brief account of the life and habits of the stegomyia or yellow fever mosquito. He then briefly reviewed the experiments made by the Marine Hospital Service which demonstrated beyond a shadow of a doubt that yellow fever is transmitted by one particular species of mosquito, the one known scientifically as the stegomyia fasciata, and that the fever is transmitted in no other way. Where there is no stegomyia, there is no yellow fever. He cited an instance to illustrate, that in the city of Colon on the Isthmus of Panama, yellow fever prevailed in one block all the time and in the block adjoining not at all. In the infected block stegomyia existed, in the adjoining block the stegomyia were destroyed and none were allowed to breed. He stated that experiments had shown conclusively that no other mosquito than the house mosquito could convey yellow fever. Why that was true he knew not, nevertheless it was an absolute fact. It appeared to be a peculiarity of the disease that the germ, parasite or whatever microbe that caused the fever, required a certain host for its development and the stegomyia was the host provided by nature, just as they knew the anopheles mosquito was the only host or medium by which malarial fever could be transmitted. And in speaking of malaria he said that while no one has yet been able to find or isolate the yellow fever germ, they had isolated the malarial germ and found it to be an animal parasite which fed on the red corpuscles of the blood. In all cases of malaria an examination of the blood under a microscope will reveal these minute animal parasites. In yellow fever, however, nothing can be detected, yet from analogy it is certain that the yellow fever germ is also an animal parasite.

 Continuing he said that the only way to fight yellow fever is to kill the stegomyia. Persons nor clothing nor material of any kind can transmit yellow fever, nothing, absolutely nothing but the stegomyia mosquito can transmit it. There is the danger and the only way to remove danger is to destroy the mosquito. As to time of infection of the mosquito it had been proven positively, that the mosquito must bite the yellow fever patient during the first three days of his sickness. After the third day the mosquito might bite as early and as often as he wished but could not become infected. The necessary thing to do was to cover the patient with a bar the very moment his temperature reaches 100, and keep him screened until danger of infection of mosquitoes was passed. But, however, as soon as a case of fever is discovered the house should be screened to confine in that house every mosquito that could have become infected, so that when the house was fumigated the infected mosquitoes would be killed.

 As to the danger period of infection the mosquito became infected only by biting a yellow fever patient during the first three days of illness. Then 12 days had to elapse before the infected mosquito could transmit the disease. Once infected a mosquito remains infected as long as he lives which is 154 days, and after infection until the end of his life the mosquito can convey the disease. The only safety is to kill him.

 At the close of his remarks Mayor Mouton asked if there was any danger in country people coming to town. He answered, "None whatever, unless they go into an infected house. The stegomyia remained in the house, did not fly on the streets, and especially when infected stuck closely to the house. They would never go farther than the front porch to meet a visitor."

 A number of other questions were asked of the speaker for information. Before closing Dr. von Ezdorf declared that the vigorous measures which had been taken and were being taken by the Council and Board of Health made an epidemic impossible, and that a continuous fight on the mosquito would assure us of practical safety.

 Mayor Mouton then urged the necessity of continuing the good work and the vigorous co-operation of the people, stating that another fumigation day would be appointed.

 In reply to a question as to how to fumigate, Dr. von Ezdorf said that for every 1000 cubic feet - 2 pounds of pyrethrum powder or sulphur was required and the fumigation should last 2 hours. Pyrethrum powder, however, only stunned the mosquitoes, and after using it the room had to be carefully swept and the mosquitoes thrown in the fire. Sulphur killed them. When using sulphur all metals, pictures and mirrors should be removed. (This would include sewing machines).

 Dr. Babcock asked for a vote of thanks to Dr. L. A. Prejean and J. Edmond Mouton of the Parish Board of Health for the stand they had taken in regard to quarantining the town, which was unanimously and enthusiastically carried.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.





INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE.

Opening Postponed to October 18.

Expect a Change in Faculty.

 On account of the yellow fever situation in the State the Industrial Institute will postpone its day of opening to Wednesday, October 18, instead of September 20. It is believed that this time the fever will be so well controlled, and the method of avoiding it so well understood, that travel within the State will be entirely safe. Of course, all students must bring proper health certificates showing that they have not been exposed to the fever and they that they have a clean bill of health.

 Prof. E. F. Gayle, very much to the regret of his students and fellow teachers and of all the friends of the Institute, has resigned his position for the purpose of studying law - his chosen profession. He expects to study in Tulane Law School next winter, and complete his course in one year - since he has already completed half of the required study at Columbia University in New York.

 Mr. Gayle's successor as Professor of Science and Commandant of Cadets at the Institute will be Prof. F. H. Elson, a graduate of the University of Nebraska, who took the degree of B. A. and also had a full course in Electrical Engineering in that institution, and has since been Professor of Science and Manual Training and Commandant of Cadets in Kearney Military Academy for two years, whence he comes to the Institute.

 The new dormitory is now finished and ready to receive the young ladies who will occupy it next year, and, notwithstanding the uncheerful outlook due to the fever, reservations are being made daily and inquiries are coming in rapidly. It seems likely that there will be a goodly attendance, and that all dormitory space will  be filled. Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.




LET EVERY BODY HELP.

 Contrary to the hopes and expectations of everybody a second case of yellow fever has developed in Lafayette; but that fact should not necessarily cause alarm. The disease as manifested here is of a very mild type and fear of it should not prevail to any extent. Every precaution has been taken to prevent any spread from the second case and confidence is felt that no secondary infection can result from it.

 It will avail nothing to get excited nor is it worth while to become frightened. The sensible and practical thing to do is to lose no time worrying over yellow fever, but everybody lend a hand and at once take energetic measures to destroy all mosquitoes. The health authorities can be depended upon to do everything needful to protect the public and to take all measures possible to stamp out the fever but they require the prompt and vigorous co-operation of the citizens and this they should have without stint or limit. Meanwhile let it be war to a finish on the hateful stegomyia. Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.


PARISH QUARANTINE.

 The action of the Police Jury in re-instating, last Monday, the rigid quarantine originally established by the parish against the whole town of Lafayette, in opposition to the will of the Parish Board of Health and in contravention of the official agreement entered into by the parish health authorities with the health authorities of the town of Lafayette, has caused great surprise and disappointment, and is generally regarded by the people of the town and parish as being altogether unjustifiable from the standpoint of the public welfare.

 In the full knowledge of the actual conditions, and with the effective methods now known of controlling the spread of yellow fever, the drastic quarantining of over five thousand healthy inhabitants of a town because of an isolated, well guarded case of yellow fever in their midst, can no longer be considered as a wise or necessary measure to safe guard the public health.

 The plan of restricting the quarantine to a distance of 500 feet around a single suspicious or authentic case of yellow fever, mutually agreed to lately by the health authorities of the town and parish, is certain would afford as much protection to the people of the parish (with a minimum amount of inconvenience and loss and suffering), as might be secured by a quarantine against the whole town. This statement may be disputed by some, but against the opinion of such persons there stands the irrefutable proofs demonstrating the fact.

 In an editorial in the New Orleans Times-Democrat of Sept. 3, this phase of the question of quarantine against yellow fever is well covered in the following excerpt:

 A great deal of money has been wasted in senseless quarantines this season and much inconvenience and suffering caused, with no compensating protection to communities. The disease has generally appeared in those communities  which adopted the most rigid and senseless quarantines and been kept out of those which have enforced reasonable restrictions. As the success of the scientific measures for the stamping out of the disease in this city becomes daily more apparent, the outside world will view the situation more calmly and will undoubtedly reach the conclusion that the paralyzing of business is unnecessary in battling with an enemy now fighting in the open, and whose habits are so well known that successful expulsion of the disease is a matter only of concert of action.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.





POLICE JURY.
Demand on Parish Board of Health to Re-instate Guards Around Town of Lafayette.
Pin Hook, La., Sept. 3, 1905.

 Call meeting of the Police Jury was held this day with President M. Billeaud, Jr., presiding. Members present: A. Theall, J. A. Begnaud, L. G. Breaux, Pierre Landry, J. Edmond Mouton, Valery Boudreaux, Cornelius Spell. Absent: J. H. Connolly, W. A. LeRosen was appointed secretary pro-tem. President Billeaud stated that the meeting was called that the Parish Board of Health might submit its action for their consideration.

 Dr. Prejean, President of the Board of Health, stated that at a joint meeting of the Parish and City Boards of Health, it has been agreed that both bodies should co-operate in quarantining all cases of fever in the town or parish, no quarantine would be placed against the town or the parish as a whole, but that the infected localities only would be quarantined for a radius of 500 feet; that both the town and parish would place guards about the infected locality and bear the expense jointly. This action had been taken because, in the opinion of the Boards, it was the best, safest and surest method of quarantining.

 Mayor Mouton appeared and requested that the Jury allow citizens of Lafayette a hearing before final action was taken.

 Moved by Mr. Mouton that audience be allowed. Upon representation that some gentlemen from Carencro were present and wished to be heard, the motion was amended and carried to grant a hearing to members of the Boards of Health of Lafayette and Carencro.

 The Jury, after discussing the action of the Board of Health gave notification that they were ready to hear the views of the gentlemen who had requested an audience, and Mayor C. O. Mouton, Dr. Babcock, Dr. Clark and P. L. DeClouet, of Lafayette, and Dr. Lessley and Simonet Breaux, of Carencro appeared before the Jury. Mayor Mouton urged that the plan of quarantine adopted at the joint meeting of the Boards of Health was the safest and most effective and gave his reasons for believing so. Dr. Lessley, of Carencro, expressed himself in favor of quarantining the whole town and urged that the plan of the Board of Health was not as safe as the first method.

 It was then moved by Mr. Spell that the Police Jury demand of the Parish Board of Health that they reinstate the guards around the town of Lafayette.

 Yeas: Landry, Begnaud, Spell, Theall, Billeaud. Nays: Mouton, Breaux, Boudreaux.

 Moved by Mr. Breaux that the putting of the guards be left to the Parish Board of Health. Mr. Landry offered an amendment that the location of the guards be at discretion of Parish Board of Health, provided they be placed outside the corporation limits. Amendment accepted and vote carried.

 Yeas: Landry, Begnaud, Spell, Theall, Billeaud, Breaux. Nays: Mouton, Boudreaux.
      The Jury then adjourned.
         M. BILLEAUD, JR., President.
  W. A. LEROSEN, Secretary pro-tem.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.



Board of Health Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., August 31, 1905.

 The Parish and City Boards of Health, met this day in joint session at 6 p. m., all members present, with Dr. F. R. Tolson presiding.

 On motion of Dr. R. D. Voorhies duly seconded the following resolutions were adopted:

 For the purpose of establishing and maintaining a thorough and systematic quarantine for the mutual protection and safety of the citizens of the parish and town of Lafayette, without unnecessary restriction.

 Resolved, 1st, that in the event of a case of yellow fever in the parish or town only a radius of 500 feet from the infected point shall be quarantined.

 Resolved, 2nd., that the quarantine shall be raised at such time as may be determined by the parish and town boards acting conjointly.

 Resolved, 3rd., that the quarantine guards appointed to carry out the purposes of the above resolutions shall be selected as follows; one half of said guards to be appointed by the President of the Police Jury, and the other half by the Mayor of the town of Lafayette.

 On motion of Mr. J. E. Mouton, duly seconded, it was resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the Mayor and to the President of the Board of Health of the town of Carencro.

Moved by Dr. L. A. Prejean, that the resolutions in force before the town of Lafayette was declared infected be reinstated and carried out as before. Mouton seconded and carried.

 On motion duly seconded the meeting adjourned.
L. A. PREJEAN, M. D., President Parish Board of Health.
FELIX H. MOUTON, Secretary Parish Board of Health.
F. R. TOLSON, M. D., President City Board of Health.
GEO. C. BABCOCK, M. D., Secretary City Board of Health.
     By P. L. DeClouet, Assistant Secretary. Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.



Supposed Mad Dog. - Monday afternoon four shots in succession near the depot caused considerable excitement. In a few moments Sheriff Lacoste, officers of the town and large crowd gathered at the Brown News Hotel to investigate. It was found that Deputy Marshal Hebert had fired at a small dog which appeared to be suffering from rabies and was snapping and biting at other dogs. The bullets, however, missed their mark, but a shot fired by A. J. Sprole proved effective.  Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.





Right of Way Promised.

The following special from Baton Rouge to the Times-Democrat of Sept. 1, will be read with much pleasure here.

 General Agent Lee of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company has just returned from a tour of the route of the proposed road from Lafayette to Port Allen, and announces that practically the entire right of way has been promised and that the formal transfer of the property will be made in the course of the next few weeks. The fifteen or twenty miles of the road to be laid in West Baton Rouge parish will pass through the property of twenty-one land owners, and all of these have signified their willingness to have the road over their lands.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.






HEADQUARTERS AT LAFAYETTE.

Maj. J. M. Lee, General Agent of the Southern Pacific, to Move Here Soon.

 The following from Baton Rouge to the Times-Democrat of Aug. 30 will convey welcome and gratifying news to the citizens of Lafayette:

 General Agent J. M. Lee of the Southern Pacific Company, who has maintained temporary headquarters in this city for the past two weeks, will change his quarters to Lafayette within the next ten days. Mr. Lee, accompanied by A. V. Dubroca of West Baton Rouge parish, who was employed by the right of way committees to assist in securing the desired franchises for the proposed line between Port Allen and Lafayette, left this morning for a tour of the proposed line.

 The officials of the Southern Pacific state that it is the purpose of their company to begin active work on the Lafayette line at the earliest possible moment.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.

   


In Memoriam.

 Scarcely has an event occasioned more profound sorrow and overshadowed a community with deeper gloom than the lamentable passing of Mrs. T. M. Biossat at 10:15 a. m. Sunday August 20.

 Sustained by the most beautiful ideals engendered by a Christian creed and faith, Mrs. Biossat represents a most exemplary type of valiant womanhood in woman's noblest sphere - home. It was there, as an ideal wife and mother, she reigned queen while she faithfully administered to the joys and comforts of an affectionate husband and three fond children.

The organization of The Woman's Club may be accredited to Mrs. Biossat's able directorship. It was to the upbuilding of this she gave much of her time and most earnest efforts; and for a year this organization prospered under her wise instruction and tactful management. As a pioneer of this feminine endeavor she worked with untiring, cheerful zeal for the advancement of this club; and at all times proved an active, deeply interested member and zealous worker.

Possessed of many noble and womanly qualities of heart and mind, she worked with keen delight for the promotion of the social and educational interest of the community, and her invaluable services were rendered with that cheerfulness and promptness that bespoke generosity of the heart and nobility of the soul. Ever responsive to the calls of charity, ever willing to contribute a share towards a worthy cause, Mrs. Biossat's memory will be venerated by many who profited by her kind, dispensing hand.

Although the loss of a never-failing, devoted worker is deplored by The Woman's Club as an organization, and by each member individually, we will bow in humble submission to the decree of an all wise loving Providence, for: "Blessed are the dead who die for the Lord" - they are not lost but gone before us.

Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.                    A CLUB MEMBER.





Resolutions of Respect.

 Whereas, it has pleased the Almighty God in the inscrutable but all merciful ways of his diving providence to bereave The Woman's Club of its founder, Mrs. T. M. Biossat, and,
  Whereas, her demise has been a severe blow to The Woman's Club and a loss inexpressibly great to the entire community, and
   Whereas, by her tact, her prudence and her executive ability she organized The Woman's Club, acting, for a time, as president and proved an unfaltering, never-failing, devoted worker, and
   Whereas, our lamented member was a staunch and ardent defender of The Woman's Club, gave to it the strength of her own personal gifts as well as her influence, especially approving, encouraging, supporting, with a solicitude, all things for the advancement of this organization, therefore.

 Be it resolved, That we, The Woman's Club, give public expression to our sorrow at the death of a useful and ambitious member.

 We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved husband and children, also to the sisters, and pray our Father in heaven may assuage their grief. May his kind Providence soothe their anguish by the remembrance of her fond devotion, and may their overwhelming sorrow be calmed into the gentle tears of recollection.

 Be it also resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the family, to the town papers for publication, and a copy placed on record in the minutes of the club.
              MRS. A. B. DENBO,
              MISS LEA GLADU,
              MISS ROSE DEBLANC,
                        Committee.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.




ABANDONED WELL.
In Martin's Grove Near Lafayette Found to be Nearly Full of Oil.

 Last week Mr. A. M. Martin in company with several friends examined the oil well on his place near town, which was put down about two years ago and abandoned. The cap was removed and a bottle let down. On raising it, it was found to contain a pure heavy oil. Further examination showed that the well was practically full of oil, which confirms Mr. Martin's faith in the existence of oil on his property in paying quantities.

 Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.




The Advertiser's Advertisers, Advertising.
 
 Buy your groceries from Broussard Bros. You will like the kind you get and the prices will suit you.

If you want a comfortable shoe that has splendid wearing qualities, go to Schmulen's.

Fumigate with Lister's Formaldehyde Fumigators, the strongest known disinfectant. Full supply at Lafayette Drug Co.

High class groceries at Prudhomme & Mcfaddin's.

Ladies are cordially invited to call at the Specialty Store next to Pellerin & DeClouet's and inspect the beautiful line of fancy goods, Mexican drawn work, etc.

Fall Garden Seeds in bulk or packages at the Moss Pharmacy.

The Falk Mercantile Co. have a new rubber-tired hearse, and are well equipped to attend to funerals and grave work.

Good reliable groceries and the lowest market prices at Morgan & Debaillon's.

All ladies summer shirt waists at cost at Levy Bros.

Ramsay & Upton can supply you with meal, grits, feed oats, timothy alfalfa and prairie hay, wheat bran neutriline and other feed stuffs. Phone 192. 

 Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1905.










From the Lafayette Gazette of September 6th, 1902:



PRELIMINARY TRIAL.

Negroes Charge With Killing Coussa, the Peddler.

The five negroes charged with being accomplices in the killing of Coussa, the Syrian peddler, were given a preliminary trial last Monday before Judge Debaillon. District Attorney Campbell represented the State and John L. Kennedy, Esq., represented four of the accused. The only evidence heard was the confession of Anita Chapman made to Sheriff Broussard, the substance of which was published in The Gazette last Saturday. Judge Debaillon discharged Ida Scranton and granted bail to the other prisoners. He fixed the bail of Anita Chapman at $600 and that of Charles Paddio, Joe and Zenon Payne at $300. Bail was readily furnished.

 The case will be investigated by the Grand Jury.
  Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902. 
 



SLICK THIEVES.

 A Drummer Robbed of a Diamond Ring and Cigars.

 Last Sunday night a very slick thief entered one of the rooms at the Rigues House and got away with a diamond ring and box of cigars belonging to Mose Meyer, a drummer. The thief was evidently an expert in his line as he took the ring off Meyer's finger without waking him.
During the same night one of the guests of the Racket House was relieved of a watch and chain.


 The thieves left no clue and so far no arrests have been made. The following item from the Crowley News confirms the report that the burglar who entered the Rigues House has been captured in Crowley.

 "Louis Batiste, one of the burglars arrested last night, has confessed that he robbed a liquor drummer at Lafayette on Sunday night, taking a diamond ring which he sold to a pawnbroker on Rampart street, New Orleans. One of the pocketknives found in his possession was also identified by the liquor drummer, who is in town to-day."
Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.




Sixty-Four Retail Merchants. - The books of the town collector, Charles Debaillon, show that Lafayette has 64 retail merchants, 6 barrooms, 5 butchers, 3 bakers, 2 confectionaries, 5 drugstores, 10 fruit dealers, 14 drays, 2 pop factories, 3 lumber yards, 17 milk dealers, 8 foot peddlers, 7 wagon peddlers, 11 restaurants, 5 livery stables, 9 wood and coal yards, 2 grist mills. Twenty-four insurance companies are licensed to do business in this town. Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.



Will Bore for Oil. -Leo Judice, the president of the Lafayette Oil and Mineral Company, informs The Gazette that his company is considering several propositions to bore for oil. Mr. Judice believes that arrangements will soon be made and that a well will be sunk by the company in the near future.
Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902


Syrup Mills. - There seems to be an erroneous impression in this parish to the effect that a license is imposed on syrup mills, a number of which have been built recently. No license is collected on these small plants and it were well to have that fact well known as syrup-making is getting to be quite an important industry in this parish. These mills should make enough syrup to supply the local demand. The syrup made here is excellent and is so much better than the imported article that it will always command a ready sale at good prices.   Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.




THE COTTON SEASON
Opens With a Rush, Caused by an Early Crop and Good Weather.

 The gins at the Compress and at Gerac's have been quite busy during the week. Owing to the early maturing of cotton this year and the time weather for picking the gins did an unusually big business in the first week of the season. It is not believed that the amount of cotton to be ginned here this season will be as large as that of last season. The yield will be less than it was last year and several large ginning plants have been put up in the country which will, in all probability, reduce the volume of business done by the local gins. This reduction, however, will be small as the Lafayette gins give such advantageous terms and such excellent service that cotton growers come here with their crop from very remote points. Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.


FOR THE SAKE OF REGULARITY.

 In its issue of Aug. 23, The Gazette stated that the delegates elected at the Democratic primary of Dec. 9, 1899, would represent this parish at the convention to be held in Baton Rouge on Sept. 23, 1902, to nominate a railroad commissioner. By reference to the proceedings of the executive committee held to tabulate the returns of the primary of Dec. 9, 1899, we find that the delegates were elected to "represent the parish at the State and senatorial conventions." We do not think that these delegates are authorized to represent the Democracy at the convention to be held at Baton Rouge on Sept. 23. It is neither reasonable nor customary to select delegates to a convention 32 months before it is held.

 The Gazette believes that the committee should meet and take steps to elect a new set of delegates, empowered to act for the Democracy of this parish at the Baton Rouge convention. Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.




FOR RAILROAD COMMISSIONER.

 Mr. Overton Cade, of this parish the present incumbent in the office of railroad commissioner for this district, is a candidate for the Democratic nomination for the position which he now holds.

 The announcement of Mr. Cade's candidacy was followed by the profer of support from leading men in the several parishes composing this district. Mr. Cade is well known throughout this district. Mr. Cade is well known as a member of the Legislature, superintendent of New Orleans Mint and railroad commissioner. Since the time that he entered public life he has enjoyed the confidence and esteem of the people, and we believe that his nomination for railroad commissioner will show that in his present office he has done his duty to the satisfaction of his constituents.

 In all his political aspirations Mr. Cade has received the endorsement of the people of his home parish where his good qualities as a citizen and Democrat are well known and appreciated at their true worth, and we have no doubt that in the present instance his candidacy will, as usual, be backed by the Democracy of Lafayette.

 Mr. Cade is the peer of any one of the several estimable and worthy gentlemen who aspire to the office of railroad commissioner in this district and the Democracy will make no mistake in selecting him as its standard bearer. Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.

       


REPUBLICAN POLITICS.
Mass Meeting to be Held to Elect Delegates to Congressional Convention.

 The Gazette is requested to publish the following call which explains itself:

 MASS MEETING.

 "By order of the Republican Congressional committee of the 3d district, the Republicans of Lafayette parish are urged to meet in Co. Breaux's office, at 3 p. m., on Saturday, Sept. 13, for the purpose of electing eleven delegates to the nominating convention to be held in New Iberia, on Sept. 20."

 Though the Republicans no doubt realize the fact that they have no chance to win in this district, it is evident from the foregoing notice that they will put out a candidate. Among those mentioned as probable candidates are Mr. Dugas of Terrebonne, Mr. Godchaux of Lafourche and Mr. Pugh of Ascension.
Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.  




PARISH AFFAIRS.

Jury Refuses to Separate School Funds and Leaves the Matter to the Judgment of School In Whom it Has Entire Confidence - Other Important Business Transacted.

 The Police Jury met last Thursday with all the members present.


 Mr. J. D. Coulter appeared and stated that he had purchased at State tax sale 1,000 acres of land for which he could find no title. He asked that the Jury refund parish taxes paid and take such steps as would enable him to present his case properly before the State authorities for relief. The Jury refused to grant the requests upon the ground that the matter was one of title over which the body had no jurisdiction.

 Attorney Elliot appeared in behalf of Mr. Albert Laurent relative to a public road in the fourth ward. Mr. Laurent offered to raise no objection to the maintenance of said road, but inasmuch as the property was not used by the parish he asked that all rights, if any, possessed by the parish restored to him. No notice of any expropriation proceedings had been served and by motion of Mr. Mouton the Jury declared that as the parish had no authority over said road the same be abandoned insofar as the property of Mr. Laurent is concerned. Mr. Labbe voted nay.

 Messrs. Ben Avant and Hugh Hutchinson appeared and asked for an appropriation of $125 for the Duson school building.

 Messrs. Joseph Ledoux and Abel Hoffpauir appeared in behalf of the Indian Bayou school asking for an appropriation of $75. By motion of Mr. Mouton the petitions were referred to the School Board and the Jury resolved in the future to grant no further appropriations for schools other than the regular item included in the budget, the sense of the body being that the School Board could grant relief to the various wards far more intelligently and satisfactorily. A substitute offered by Mr. Buchanan to grant the appropriations asked was lost.

 President Billeaud in behalf of the committee appointed to confer with a committee from the City Council of Lafayette relative to some arrangement whereby the town schools could be run independent of the parish schools, reported that in the opinion of the committee such separation was not advisable. Beside the fact that there was no warrant in law for the proposed transfer to the town of the three-mill criminal tax levied on the town for parochial purposes, the Jury had entire confidence in the fairness and ability of the School Board to distribute the funds to the best interest of all concerned. By motion of Mr. Buchanan the report of the committee was accepted and endorsed.

 Mr. Whittington reported the completion of Onezime Trahan's bridge, at a cost of $32.85. Approved.

 Mr. Fernard Broussard, of the 6th ward, appeared and complained of the condition of a certain road in said ward. By motion of Mr. Labbe, President Billeaud appointed Messrs. Buchanan and Lacy to investigate and report on the public roads from Carencro to Broussard's bridge and from Broussard's to Ovide Guidry's. Subsequently this motion was reconsidered and the Jury authorized Police Juror Broussard to repair the roads complained of so soon as the parties complaining should remove their fencing and other obstructions and open up the roads to public traffic.

 Mr. Blanchet was appointed to examine the proposed site for a new bridge across Vermilion river at Columbus Broussard's just above the site of the old bridge at D. O. Broussard's.

 By motion of Mr. Mouton the rate of parish taxation was fixed at ten mills on the dollar, distributed in accordance with the items of the budget.

 The treasurer's reports showed cash balance in general fund, $3.65; special road fund, $138.118. Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.



    
City Council
[Special Meeting.]


 Lafayette, La., Aug. 11, 1902. - A special of the City Council was held this day, Mayor C. D. Caffery presiding. Members present: G. A. DeBlanc, F. Demanade, J. O. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, H. Hohorst. Absent F. E. Girard.

 The City Council met this day in special session pursuant to adjournment to consider the application of Mr. Jno. A. McIlhenny for a right of way through certain streets of this town for the construction of a railway.

 The council having deliberated on the matter thereupon adopted the following ordinance unanimously.

 An ordinance granting to John A. McIlhenny and assigns certain rights and privileges on and through the streets in the city of Lafayette.

 Be it ordained by the City Council of the city of Lafayette:

 Section 1. That John A. McIlhenny and assigns be, and are hereby granted for the term of fifty years, the right to lay, construct, and maintain on and through the streets hereinafter mentioned, (with all necessary curves, cross-overs, and turnouts, sidetracks and switches) track or tracks for railway purposes, and to operate thereon cars and trains propelled by electric of other motive power except steam.

 Section 2. The street or streets upon which such tracks may be laid and over and along which such railway may be operated are as follows: Beginning on Lincoln avenue to Pierce street, then along Jefferson street, thence along Jefferson street to city limits.

 Beginning on Jefferson street at Lamar street, to Industrial avenue, thence along Industrial avenue to Lafayette street, thence along Lafayette street to city limits.

 Beginning on public road at Mudd avenue, thence along Mudd avenue to Sterling avenue, thence along Sterling avenue to Simcoe street and thence along Pine street to Pine street to Lincoln avenue.

 Section 3. Said grantee and assigns shall so construct said tracks so as not to interfere with the convenient use thereof by the public, and shall bury all cross-ties and structures so that the top of the rail shall not be more than two inches above the surface of the street.

 Section 5. Said grantee and assigns shall, during the existence of this grant, keep the streets upon which said tracks are laid in repair between the rails and for twelve inches on the outside thereof.

 Section 6. This grant is made upon the conditions that the grantee or assigns shall commence work or construction within twelve months from the date thereof and shall complete same throughout the city limits within eighteen months thereafter.

 Section 7.  Said grantee and assigns shall have the right to connect the track or tracks constructed by them outside the corporate limits of the city, so as to form an interurban railway between this city and the adjacent towns and village.
  
 C. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
 LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.






THE CITY SCHOOLS.

 The schools of the town, both public and private, opened Monday morning and began the work of another scholastic year. Hundreds of bright and happy boys and girls will resume the lessons designed to prepare them for the serious and active responsibilities of life. How important the education of the youth of the country may be at least partly appreciation when it is considered that the rising generation will soon be called upon to shape the destinies of this great nation; that the schools of today contain in embryo the criminals or the philanthropists of the future - the liberty-loving patriots or the death-dealing anarchists. Which shall it be depends upon the education and training now given, for soon the die of character will be stamped indelibly upon each soul and the plastic clay will soon either in lines of beauty and symmetry or in those hideous deformities of life which shock every sensibility of refinement and contribute so largely to fill the cup of human misery and unhappiness.

 It is with these impressions and convictions that The Gazette at the beginning of this new scholastic year would tender its humble services to the people of both town and parish in this vital and all important matter. Let all concerned, teachers, pupils and last but not least, parents, unite as essential factors in this work and by harmonious and intelligent concert of action render the current session the most profitable and successful in the history of the community. It might be well for us all to remember that neither of the factors enumerated has exclusive jurisdiction in the domain of right and it may possibly happen that little Bill may be wrong after all. Finally, let parents insist upon prompt and regular attendance and our word for it, nine-tenths of the school troubles and difficulties will disappear like a mist before the rising sun.
Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.




THE ONLY WAY OUT OF IT.

 We believe it can safely be said that Lafayette pays less for its public schools than any town of its size and importance in this State. If we have secured the services of good teachers it has been due more to our good fortune than to anything else, for, it is well known, the salaries paid have been clearly inadequate.

 Among the teachers in the town schools last year were two young ladies who did splendid work and whose services could have been retained for this term if it had been in the power of the school authorities to increase their salaries. We have every reason to believe that their successors are equally well fitted for the work and will give entire satisfaction, but it is safe to say that after teaching one session here they too will have to go elsewhere to find fair compensation for their services.

 It is patent to every one who has given any thought to this matter that the funds available for school purposes in this town are insufficient. More money is needed. Money is needed to build new school-houses and to secure and retain the services of good teachers. Without increased revenues the public school system of this town can never be what it should. The funds derived from the regular sources are not sufficient to establish and maintain a school system commensurate with the needs of this community, and experience proves that it is not wise to depend upon appropriations from the City Council. However willing that body may be to help the schools, it can not be relied upon with any degree of certainty. Sometimes it is able to give and at other times it is not.

 We believe that special taxation alone offers the means which will give to this town a system of public education that will meet the requirements of the community. A special school tax only will furnish the necessary funds. Of course this pleas for better schools must not be understood as disparaging to the present schools which are in every respect worthy of the support of the people, but what The Gazette pleads for is an awakening in this community which will result in better school-houses, well-paid teachers and an educational system maintained by a fund large enough to insure its excellence and permanency.

 If the people of Lafayette want improved school facilities they must put up the money. They must help themselves. That is the way the States of the West and East built their fine system of schools. The South will have to do likewise if it desires to stay in the procession. Be it said to their glory the people of Lafayette have never turned a deaf ear to an appeal in behalf of education.
Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.


   
   
SCHOOL BOARD
Holds a Regular Monthly Meeting.

 The School Board met last Thursday in regular session. There were present: A. Olivier, president; L. J. Alleman, secretary; Alex Delhomme, Jasper Spell, H. Theall, Dr. N. P. Moss, A. C. Guilbeau, P. R. Landry, S. J. Montgomery. Dr. Young was absent on account of professional duties.

 It was decided by the Board to open the country schools on Monday, Nov. 3. The schools at Carencro, Youngsville and Broussard are not included in the list of country schools. The schools in those places opened last Monday. It was resolved to advertise for bids to have the school lands in the fourth ward surveyed.

 Matters of minor importance were attended to and the Board adjourned.

 Lafayette Gazette 9/6/1902.












 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 6th, 1902:

Martin Oil Co.
Capital $5,000,000.
Full Particulars of this Organization.
 

 Thursday, Aug. 26, 2 p. m., a number of gentlemen representing the Martin families of Calcasieu, Acadia, Lafayette, St. Landry, St. Martin and Orleans parishes, met in the parlors of the Crescent News Hotel, and organized the "Martin Development Oil Company" with a capital stock of $5,000,000. The purpose of the company is to develop oil lands belonging to the Martin family, which constitute the most valuable holdings in Southwestern Louisiana. 

 Lafayette was selected as the meeting point owing to its central location, and the many important advantages it has in other ways, and will be the domicile of the company.

 Beginning at the Welsh oil field the Martin Company owns 25 acres in feel simple in close proximity to the Welsh Oil Development Co.'s well No. 1, which is now being bored, and is the same which had such a tremendous explosion of gas two weeks ago. They also have Bayou Wycoft oil field in Acadia parish, where gas and oil indications are so strong that it resembles Anse La Butte, field, The North Star Oil Co. of Crowley will bore a well at Bayou Wycoff within the next two weeks.

 They have holdings in Bayou Point Lyon, where a well is now being sunk by the Acadia Oil Co. and at which point surface indications are very strong. They also own large tracts of land at Anse la Butte, parish of St. Martin, where oil paying in quantities has been found by Moresi. At Prairie Sorrel, Lafayette parish, where oil and gas lows naturally from the ground, they have considerable land. They have a large tract at Bayou Bouillon, where three wells are being put down by Heywood Bros., the Marine Oil and Transportation Co. and used by the Sherwood and Maxwell Oil Co., of Beaumont, Texas.

 They have holdings near the Stelley gas well in St. Martin parish, where the Southern Pacific Railroad has contracted to bore a well in 30 days. This is know as Cypress Island Oil Field. At the Isle Ronde oil field, the newest in Louisiana, they have some choice property and also at Bayou Portgage Guidry in St. Martin parish where gas has been found escaping.

 A number of these gentlemen have already been identified with the oil development of South Louisiana, and in organizing this company, it is the object of pushing this development forward rapidly, and exploring the immense oil field of the parishes in South Louisiana. The corporation has been organized along strictly business lines and will begin active operations as soon as the necessary stock is subscribed. Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1902.





Falk Continues Boring For Oil.

 Mr. Israel Falk returned from New Orleans on Wednesday, and will continue, so he informed an Advertiser reporter, boring for oil. He is expecting his drilling outfit very soon, and will begin operations immediately upon his arrival. His outfit consists of a double traction drill, and pipes 3, 2, and 1 1/2 inches. The sample of oil, he took from his well two weeks ago is now in the hands of a chemist. Mr. Falk says that he is confident that oil in large quantities and of a high grade exists on his land and that he is not going to quit until he brings in a gusher. The Advertiser admires his courage and wishes him a deserved success.   Lafayette Advertiser  9/6/1902.

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The Times-Democrat Flyer.

 On September 1st, The Times-Democrat sent a special from New Orleans, bearing its mammoth trade edition to the people of Louisiana and Texas. The train was scheduled to make the fastest time ever attempted in the history of southern railroad, and was named the Times-Democrat Flyer, and it was a flyer, making over 60 miles an hour from New Orleans to Dallas. The Flyer left New Orleans on time and reached Lafayette promptly to the minute, distributing the special edition all along the line. The flyer consisted of two baggage cars and a chair car, the last artistically decorated; but when it reached Lafayette the decorations were badly torn and disarranged by the rapid speed of the cars, and wet from a heavy rain through which the train passed. Mr. L. Cunningham of Lafayette was the engineer on the flyer and being a very able employee of the Southern Pacific, he was the one to which the flyer was left in card.

 The Times-Democrat deserves the highest praise for its enterprise, and the hearty support of the people of New Orleans. The New Orleans people have been slow in the past commercially, and it is to be hoped for the honor and success of Louisiana, that they will catch the spirit of the Times-Democrat and lead on to great things for the metropolis of the South Trade is commanded to a great extent by factories, and New Orleans must be a manufacturing city to reach out for Texas or any other trade. The day of the jobber is waning, and the maker of the goods gets the orders. 
Lafayette Advertiser   9/6/1902.




Chloroformed by Thief. - Last Sunday night a thief entered the room of Mayer, a cigar drummer, at the Rigues House, through the window, and relieved that gentleman of a box of cigars and a fine diamond ring, which he wore on his finger. Mr. Mayer says the thief chloroformed him in order to take the ring from his finger. No clue as to the robber has been discovered.  Laf. Advertiser 9/6/1902.


Unfortunate Accident. - A very unfortunate accident happened at the Oil Mill on Thursday, one of the oil burners bursted and a young colored man by the name of Albert Broussard was badly burned about the head and body.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1902.





The Proposed McIlhenney Electric Railway.

 The Lafayette City Council having deliberated on the matter thereupon adopted the following ordinance unanimously.

 An ordinance granting John. A. McIlhenny and assigns certain rights and privileges on and through the streets in the city of Lafayette.

 Be it Ordained by the City council of the city of Lafayette.

 Section I. That John A. McIIlhenny assigns he, and are hereby granted for the term of fifty years, the right to lay, construct, and maintain on and through the streets hereinafter mentioned, (with all necessary curves, cross-overs, and turnouts, side tracks and switches) track or tracks for railway purposes, and to operate thereon cars and trains propelled by electric or other motive power except steam.


 Section 2. The street or streets upon which such tracks may be laid and over and along such railway may be operated are as follows : Beginning on Lincoln avenue at city limits, thence along Lincoln avenue to Pierce street, thence along Pierce street to Jefferson street, thence along Jefferson street to city limits.

 Beginning on Jefferson street at Lamar street, thence along Lamar street to Industrial avenue, thence along Industrial avenue to Lafayette street to city limits

 Beginning on public road at Mudd avenue, thence along Mudd avenue to Sterling avenue, thence along Sterling avenue to Simcoe street, thence along Simcoe street to Pine street and thence along Pine street to Lincoln avenue.


 Section 3. The said grantee and assigns shall have the right to use and operate said tracks or or railway purposes through said town for the transportation of freight and passengers.

 Section 4. Said grantee and assigns shall so construct said tracks so as not to interfere with the convenient use thereof by the public, and shall bury all cross-ties and structures so that the top of the rail shall not be more than two inches above the surface of the street.

 Section 5. Said grantee and assigns shall, during the existence of this grant, keep the streets upon which said tracks are laid in repair between the rails and for twelve inches on the outside thereof.

 Section 6. This grant is made upon the conditions that the grantee or assigns shall commence work of construction within twelve months from the date thereof and shall complete same throughout the city limits within eighteen months thereafter.

 Section 7. Said grantee and assigns shall have the right to connect the tracks laid under this grant any track or tracks constructed by them outside the corporate limits of the city, so as to form an interurban railway between this city and the adjacent towns and villages.

 C. D. Caffery, Mayor.
 Louis Locoste, Secretary.

 Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1902.






Falk Continues Boring For Oil.

Mr. Israel Falk returned from New Orleans on Wednesday, and will continue, so he informed an Advertiser reporter, boring for oil. He is expecting his drilling outfit very soon, and will begin operations immediately upon his arrival. His outfit consists of a double traction drill, and pipes 3, 2, and 1 1/2 inches. The sample of oil, he took from his well two weeks ago is now in the hands of a chemist. Mr. Falk says that he is confident that oil in large quantities and of a high grade exists on his land and that he is not going to quit until he brings in a gusher. The Advertiser admires his courage and wishes him a deserved success.   Lafayette Advertiser  9/6/1902.



Mass Meeting. - By order of the Republican congressional committee of the 3rd district, the Republicans of Lafayette parish are urged to meet in Col. Breaux's office on Saturday, Sept. 13, inst. at 3 p. m. for the purpose of electing eleven delegates to the nominating convention to be held in New Iberia Sept. 20.    Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1902.


Robbery at Rigues Hotel. - Last Sunday night a thief entered the room of Mayer, a cigar drummer, at the Rigues House, through the window, and relieved that gentleman of a box of cigars and a fine diamond ring, which he wore on his finger. Mr. Mayer says the thief chloroformed him in order to take the ring from his finger. No clue as to the robber has been discovered.
  Lafayette  Advertiser 9/6/1902.



Married. - Mr. N. J. Clesi of New Orleans and Miss Victoria Price were married at St. John's Catholic church, Wednesday, Sept. 3, Rev. Father Forge officiating. A large crowd of friends were present at the ceremony. Mr. J. J. Castello was best man and Miss Florence Price was the charming bridesmaid, Miss Francis Clark extra brides maid. The newly wedded pair left on the night train for New Orleans which will be their future home. To both the Advertiser extends  best wishes for their future happiness.   Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1902.



Opening of the Public School. - The public schools had a very flattering opening last Monday, although it rained early all the morning. At the High School nearly 100 pupils presented themselves for enrollment, and an equal number at the Primary school.
Laf. Advertiser 9/6/1902.




City Council Proceedings.
 Lafayette, La., Sept. 1, 1902.

 The minutes of previous meetings were approved as read.



 The water and light committee reported that they had closed contract with Higgins Oil and Fuel Co., for oil for plant for the term of six months at 58c. per barrel delivered, beginning Sept. 9, 1902.

 The committee further reported that by removing the strainer from the well at plant and putting a new strainer and a 6 inch pipe on inside of well that they obtained a supply of water sufficient for present needs, and that in their opinion it will be necessary to bore a new well in order to obtain the quantity of water necessary for general use in town.

 The following bills were approved:

 -------------------p. 2----------------

 The treasurer's report was accepted as follows:

 -----------------------p. 2------------------

 Be it ordained by the City Council that the regular tax for the general expenses of the town be and is hereby fixed at 7 1/2 mills on the dollar of the assessed value or property in the town for the year. 1902. Adopted.

 There being no further business the Council adjourned.

 C. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 9/13/1902.


 Special Meeting of City Council.
Lafayette, La., Aug. 11, 1902.

 A special meeting of the City Council was held this day, Mayor C. D. Caffery presiding. Members present: G. A. DeBlanc, F. Demanade, F. Demanade, J. O. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, H. Hohorst. Absent: F. E. Girard.

 The City Council met this day in special session pursuant to adjournment to consider the application of Mr. Jno. A. McIlhenny for a right of way through certain streets of this town for the construction of a railway.

 The council having deliberated on the matter thereupon adopted the following ordinance unanimously.

 An ordinance granting to John A. McIlhenny and assigns certain rights and privileges on and through the streets in the city of Lafayette.

 Be it ordained by the City Council of the city of Lafayette:

 Section I.  That John A. McIlhenny and assigns be, and are hereby granted for the term of fifty years, the right to lay, construct, and maintain on and through the streets hereinafter mentioned, (with all necessary curves, cross-overs, and turnouts, side tracks and switches) track or tracks for railway purposes, and to operate thereon cars and trains propelled by electric or other motive power except steam.

 Section II.  The street or streets upon which such tracks may be laid and over and along which such railway may be operated are as follows:  Beginning on Lincoln avenue to Pierce street, thence along Pierce street to Jefferson street, thence along Jefferson street to city limits.

 Beginning on Jefferson street at Lamar street, thence along Lamar street to Industrial avenue, thence along Industrial avenue to Lafayette street, thence along Lafayette street to city limits.

 Beginning on public road at Mudd avenue, thence along Mudd avenue to Sterling avenue, thence along Sterling avenue to Simcoe street, thence along Simcoe street to Pine street and thence along Pine street to Lincoln avenue.

 Section III.  The said grantee and assigns shall have the right to use and operate said tracks for railway purposes through said town for the transportation of freight and passengers.

 Section IV.

 Said grantee and assigns shall so construct said tracks so as not to interfere with the convenient use thereof by the public, and shall bury all cross-ties and structures so that the top of the rail shall not be more than two inches above the face of the street.

 Section V.  Said grantee and assigns, during the existence of this grant, keep the streets upon which said tracks are laid in repair between the rails and for twelve inches on the outside thereof.

 Section VI.  This grant is made upon the conditions that the grantee or assigns shall commence work of construction within twelve months from the date thereof and shall complete same throughout the city limits within eighteen months thereafter.

 Section VII.  Said grantee and assigns shall have the right to connect the tracks laid under the grant with any track or tracks constructed by them outside the corporate limits of the city, so as to form an interurban railway between the this city and the adjacent towns and villages.
C. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
LOUIS LACOSTE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 9/13/1902.

      



    

  










   





Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/6/1902.

 The Morgan's Louisiana and Texas Railroad and Steamship Company will sell tickets from Lafayette to San Francisco and return Oct. 7 to 11, 1902, with return limited Nov. 15, 1902, at a rate of $67.50 on account of National Wholesale Druggists Association.

 Last Monday quite a nice shower fell, not enough to do any damage to the open cotton, but plenty to lay the dust and cool off the hot weather which had become almost unbearable.  

Buildings are going up in all parts of the town. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crow Girard returned from Hot Springs, Ark., where they spent two months. 

For Sale. - Corner lot and improvements on Vermilion and Madison st. with a fine established bakery business, with an up to date oven and everything necessary to carry on the business. Contact Advertiser.

 For Sale. One of the most comfortable residences in the town, corner of Buchanan and Congress street, two large lots with three cabins and other improvements also go with it. Contact Advertiser.

 Mr. Archie Morgan resigned his position with the Racket Store and will associate with his brother Eben Morgan in the feed business.

 Don't miss the races at Carencro to-morrow. They will be very interesting and good horses will take part. Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1902.












From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 6th, 1890:


VOLUME XXVI.

 With this issue the ADVERTISER enters upon its 26th year. We are truly grateful for the patronage which has sustained us thus far, and which has enabled us to begin this volume with a larger subscription list and more encouraging prospects. We see every evidence of a bright and prosperous future for our State and Parish, and trust that we will ever be found "heart and hand" with our whole people in the development and promotion of their best interests. Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1890.






THE MASS MEETINGS.

 Mass meetings will be held in each ward in the parish to-day by white Democrats, to chose delegates to represent this parish in the 3rd Louisiana Congressional District Democratic Nominating Convention to be held at Lake Charles Sept. 16th, 1890. We call attention to the apathy which has heretofore existed among our people regarding these meetings, and we desire to see a change of sentiment in the matter. This is a critical period in Louisiana's history, and it behooves every white Democrat in the parish, who really has the interests of the State at heart, to attend his ward meeting and express his choice for the man he believes will best reflect the sentiment of the white Democrats of his ward in this Convention. This is true Democracy, which desires that every man should give free expression of his opinion in affairs of Government. Turn out and show yourself to be a live Democrat, and enjoy the consciousness of having done your duty as such.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1890.


 Surprise Party. - Quite a pleasant social episode last Friday evening was a surprise party tendered Misses Alix and Louise Judice, at their hospitable suburban home, by a party of young folks, who were made to enjoy themselves to the fullest. They lingered to a late hour, and reluctantly forsook the pleasures and amusements of the evening. The party consisted of Misses Stella and Haydee Trahan, Marie and Louise Revillon, Anita Hohorst, Effie Young, Zaza Cornay, Lea Gladu, Beula Kavanagh, of St. Landry, Andrea Dechamps, of Lake Arthur, and Nellie Bailey, Walter Mouton, Arthur Breaux, Alfred Mouton, F. Cornay and Gaston Gladu. Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1890.





City Council Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., Sept. 1st, 1890.

 The City Council met this day in regular session and there were present: W. B. Bailey, Mayor; A. J. Moss, Pierre Gerac, J. G. Parkerson and John O. Mouton. Absent: O. J. Sprole, Ed. Pellerin and F. Lombard.

 The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

 Prof. R. C. Greig, for the assessor, presented the roll of property situated in the Corporation for the year 1890 - and on motion a committee composed of Messrs. A. J. Moss, John O. Mouton and Chas. D. Caffery was appointed by the Mayor to examine said roll and if correct to approve and receive the same, - and to issue a warrant in favor of Messrs. Greig & H. Jameison, Jr., for a sum not exceeding seventy-five dollars for said roll.

 The account of Dunn Bros., for nine dollars for blank assessment roll book, approved and warrant ordered to issue.

 The following was adopted: Resolved, That the rate of taxation for the year 1890 be and is hereby fixed at five mills on the dollar - which tax is hereby levied on each dollars worth of property situated with the Corporation of Lafayette as shown by the roll of said year.

 The following accounts of J. G. Gardemal, for board of prisoners, were approved and warrants ordered to issue:

 For July ... $18.40
 For August ... $53.05.

 The account of Dr. Gladu, for $10.00, for viewing body of Jos. Macey, was postponed until next meeting.

 The reports of Collector and Treasurer for period extending from May 5th to Sept. 1, 1890, were presented and referred to the Finance Committee.

 The committee appointed to open Garfield street reported that they had acquired of lots of ground prices as follows: From Bennett Lilly, $100; from Mrs. J. G. Parkerson, $75; from Chas. D. Caffery, $58.68; as shown by acts of sale of record; and that warrants had been drawn for said sums; and that warrants had been drawn for necessary acts as follows:

 D. A. Cochrane, Deputy Clerk ... $3.00
 Wm. Campbell, Notary Public ... $3.00
 Chas. D. Caffery, Notary Public ... $3.00

 And that said street had been opened, worked and bridged.

 On motion the report of the committee was approved and the committee discharged.

         The Council then adjourned.
                     W. B. BAILEY, Mayor.
         CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1890.












 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 6th, 1879:


THE STORM.


Last Sunday evening at about four o'clock a rain storm commenced and lasted with some few intervals all night. About seven o'clock Monday morning the wind freshened up; at nine o'clock it was blowing a gale; by eleven o'clock a storm unprecedented almost was raging and continued its fury until late in the afternoon. Tuesday morning the town looked wrecked. Portions of every fence were down scattered over the sidewalks. Trees bent and twisted or prone on the disregard every yard.

 R. L. McBride's large shop building fell about noon smashing a buggy and slightly injuring two of his horses that happened in there. Shortly after the Market house lay flat. At about two o'clock the steeple of the Catholic Church gave way and with a crash fell - and now the handsomest spire in South western Louisiana, the pride of our village lies an unsightly mass of ruins.

 All day Tuesday and Wednesday and Thursday the sound of the hammer and ax greeted the ear from every direction.

 No lives were lost or injuries done to persons in the village.

 In the country houses were blown down, cabins and houses unroofed, fences laid flat and the crops ruined. Below we give some of the particulars.

 In the northern and western portions of the parish the damage done is confined almost wholly to the crops.

 In the eastern and southern portions of the parish the storm seems to have gathered strength. The Catholic Chapel at Broussardville was seriously damaged. The school house was lifted from its foundation and carried several feet from its place, and many small buildings in that neighborhood were unroofed and blown down.

 The gin house of Mr. Lasalle - as well as Mr. Aurelien Primieaux's gin and mill, was overturned.

 As the storm traveled south it increased in fury.

 In New Iberia a number of houses were blown down and several stores and other buildings unroofed.

 At Franklin the two steamboat warehouses, the ice-house and the Catholic Church were blown down.

 Along the Teche the effects were terrific as appears by the following telegram to the New Orleans papers :


 Sugar houses entirely blown down or partially destroyed : Col. Bosworthh, Matilda plantation ;  Dr. Sanders, Lucland Plantation ;  Dan Thompson, Calumet ;  John Pharr, Fairview and Glenwild ;  Steel & Clark, Lagonda ;  Lyon & Stout, Point Pleasant ;  Louis Grevemberg, Albania ;  James Todd, Arlington. In fact, scarcely, a place has escaped between Morgan City and New Iberia. The destruction to the cane and fruit crop is appalling - larger that was ever known by any previous storm in this locality.
   Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1879.





City Council of Vermilionville.
Special Session - August 16th, 1879.

 The Council met this day and were present; Councilmen Alpha, Bailey, Lacoste and McBride. Absent: Mayor Clegg, and Councilmen Landry and Mouton.

 The reading of the minutes of the last meeting was dispensed with,

 The Treasurer presented his monthly report, and on motion, the same was adopted and ordered to be filed.

 On motion duly seconded, it was unanimously Resolved, that the Secretary give notice to Chs. G. Bienvenue, late collector, to settle the amount due by him to this Corporation within ten days from notice, and should he fail to settle the same, the Mayor is hereby instructed to institute suit against him and his sureties on his official bond for the amount due.

 On motion duly seconded, the following ordinance was unanimously adopted:

 Be it ordained, by the Mayor and City Council of Vermilionville, that each and every peddler or hawker shall obtain a license in due form before offering, or exposing for sale, or selling any of his goods or wares. That any peddler or hawker who shall sell or offer to sell his goods or wares before he has procured and paid for his license as such, shall be subject to a fine of not more than ten dollars or imprisonment not more than five days, or both, at the discretion of the Mayor.

 That this ordinance take effect from and after its first publication.

 No motion the Council adjourned.
      C. P. ALPHA, Mayor pro tem.
H. M. BAILEY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1879.

    
 



  From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 6th, 1873:
 

Sad and Fatal Accident.

 It is with feelings of pain and deep regret that we announce the untimely and lamentable death of a most worthwhile citizen. Whilst engaged in repairing his cotton gin, Mr. Onezime Mouton was caught in the saws, which were in motion with the apron up, and before assistance could be rendered, his arm was lacerated and mangled to the elbow. More than half an hour elapsed before he could be extricated from his terrible position. Physicians and friends were promptly on the spot, but the nervous shock was such, that all efforts to produce a reaction failed, and he expired last Wednesday at 3 o'clock p. m., and in less than twenty four hours after the accident. We are informed that if reaction could have been secured, amputation and the saving of a valuable life would have been possible.
On Thursday last, the remains of the deceased were accompanied to its last resting place, by a large number of distressed relatives and sympathizing friends. During the imposing funeral ceremonies, Father Gonallez very feelingly paid a just and deserved tribute to the many virtues of the deceased, as an honest man, a kind friend, a devoted husband and parent, a good citizen and a sincere Christian.

 The community has suffered a serious loss and his afflicted family, and that is irreparable, and that they have our sincere sympathy.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1873. 
 
 




The Champion of the Louisiana Central Railroad.

 Mr. G. W. R. Bayley continues to give to the public the benefit of his knowledge and experience in railroad matters. Mr. Bayley's ability as a civil engineer never questioned. His prolific pen has long since made his name quite familiar. As the employee of the old Opelousas Company and of the N. O. M. & Texas Railroad Company, he has by turns ably advocated their respective interests. The conspicuous part he took many years ago, upon the question of closing the Bayou Plaquemines and other outlets, brought upon him the accusation of advocating not only the interests of the company of which he was the employee, but also that he owned lands affected by Mississippi water, in a certain locality.

 So far as concerns present purposes, it is immaterial what Mr. Bayley's motives were then or what interests may influence him now. The Legislature and the capitalists who will encourage and undertake the building of railroads, will certainly not be influenced in the least, by the fact that Mr. Bayley or any one else is the advocate of the Louisiana Central line or owns lands contiguous to that route. If we are not mistaken Mr. Bayley was the Chief Engineer of the N. O. M. & T. Railroad Company when their present lines were surveyed and located, and we feel confident, that is he was yet in their employ, his able pen would champion the route from New Orleans to Shrevepot via Vermilionville as superior to all others. We cheerfully concede, that Mr. Baylet's opinions upon railroad matters, divested of all suspicion of bias, would be entitled to considerable weight. Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1873.
 
 
 
 




City Council of Vermilionville.
Regular Session, Aug. 4th, 1873.

 Present: Aug. Monnier, Mayor; and Councilmen L. P. Revillon, F. C. Latioslais, H. Landry, Jos. O. Girouard, and R. L. McBride. Absent Messrs. Brandt and Oliver.

 The reading of the minutes were dispensed with, and
   On motion it was resolved, That the Committee on streets wait on Mr. A. Judice, street Contractor, and confer with as to the fulfillment of his contract, and that said Committee make their report to the Mayor on Monday the 11th. inst.

 The following accounts were read and approved:

 C. C. Bailey, Coms. Election ... $2.20.
 L. Hirsch, Police Officer ... $2.20.
 On motion, the Council adjourned.
                 A. MONNIER, Mayor.
 H. M. BAILEY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1873.




OFFICE BOARD SCHOOL DIRECTORS,
Parish of Lafayette.
August 11, 1873.

 At a special meeting of the School Board, held this day, the following named persons were appointed as public school teachers in the parish of Lafayette, to wit :

  1st Ward ... Mrs. Virgiana Melchoir.
  3rd Ward ... Mr. John R. Freeman, boys, and Messrs. W. H. Williams & Bro., colored school, in Vermilionville, and Mr. J. L. Flechet, in Carencro.
  4th Ward, Mrs. S. T. Rand.

 The above named persons will signify their acceptance or non-acceptance of said appointment by calling upon the President or Secretary of the Board, at an early day.

 All teachers will be required to sign a contract with the President of the Board, before entering upon their duties, and in all cases, they will also be required to exhibit a certificate of competency from the Division Superintendent before obtaining such contract.

 Under no consideration, whatever, will teachers be paid for services, before rendering their "monthly school report." Blanks and time-books will be furnished by the Secretary.

 The 2nd and 5th wards will be supplied with teachers as soon as practicable.

 The schools will be opened on the first Monday in September next.

 The following accounts for past dues, were approved and ordered to be paid:

 W. H. Williams & Bro. ... $375.00
 Mrs. S. T. Rand ... $50.00
 Total $425.00.

 There being no further business the Board adjourned.
A. MONNIER, President.
L. E. SALLES, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/6/1873.






 LAGNIAPPE:
Woman's Walk.

 It can not be out of place to suggest the advisability of opening classes in schools where children, girls especially, might be taught the science of walking. Mothers should be natural teachers, but many who are rigidly careful in all other particulars seem absolutely indifferent on this important point. In fact, after showing them navigation by means of their legs, duty is believed to be at and end, and, no matter how wretchedly a child moves, the parent is satisfied with only sporadic attempts at correction. Whether the ungraceful wobble, the halting step, and painful stoop so commonly seen is attributable to carefulness or unnatural dressing, certain it is that six out of every ten women walk abominably. To be upright and easy in one's movements is only as nature intended, and unless deformed there is not the slightest excuse for the absurd locomotion noticed in the streets every day. Why children are permitted to grow up pigeon-toed, round-shouldered, crooked, and awkward is a proposition left open for further discussion.

 Original source unknown. In the Lafayette Advertiser 9/6/1890.  


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