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Monday, January 12, 2015

**SEPTEMBER 23RD M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 23rd, 1903:



THE TOWN SCHOOL.

Attendance Increasing Daily and Work Moving Along Smoothly.

 The attendance at the town schools is steadily increasing, and has now reached 360 and over, and everything points to the largest enrollment in the history of the public schools. This large enrollment has necessitated more room and more teachers, and the school board has promptly met the situation by securing the lower story of the Masonic Hall and employing Misses Kathleen Reed and Virginia Robinson, both of Baton Rouge, who come highly recommended. It is the hope and earnest wish of all true friends of the children to see a large brick building commensurate with the town's needs, as soon as possible. When better can not be done, the Board must of  necessity use what they can getm but the school houses we have at present are totally unfit for the purpose for which they are used.

 Misses Reed and Robinson are at the Masonic Hall and have about seventy-five pupils in the primer and first grades, Miss Reed began Monday, but Miss Robinson did not arrive until yesterday.

 Prof. Avery is busily engaged in classifying and organizing the year's work, and has practically got everything in smooth running order. In the various rooms of the schools work is going along well, and this session work will complement the splendid work which has already made Lafayette noted for her schools. The estimation in which our schools is held is shown by the a number of pupils entering from Grosse Tete, Grand Cheniere, Opelousas, Erath and Iberia parish. We have a splendid system of schools, teachers, and superintendent equal to any, and all we lack to complete our educational system is a modern public school building. This we must have in the near future, as certainly we can not afford to do without it. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.


Need a Practice Room. - The lower story of the Masonic Hall which has been used as a practice room by the Sontag Military Band, has been let to the School Board for school purposes and now the Band is without a home. Inasmuch as the Sontag Band is an institution of Lafayette, of which we are all proud, it would be a graceful act were the citizens to contribute enough to build them a home. We understand that the Masons have generously offered to let them build on their lot, and that the work could be done for less than $200, so that a public subscription could easily provide the funds without calling on anyone very heavily. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.  



INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE.
Successful Opening of Third Session. - Larger Attendance Than Ever Before, and Number Expected to be Greatly Increased.

 The third session of the Industrial Institute opened last Wednesday with the largest attendance yet recorded of the opening day, more than one hundred and twenty students. Others have been coming in during the week and the number is expected shortly to reach two hundred.

 The first day was spent in enrolling, examining, and classifying students; and the regular schedule was executed on Thursday and Friday. Monday morning everything was in complete working order, the students came to school ready for inspection and ready for recitation; and the year's work was successfully launched.

 All the teachers have arrived except Miss Blocker, the Art teacher, who is expected Oct. 1. Until that time her classes are being conducted by Miss Annie Bell of Lafayette, one of the brightest of last year's graduates in the Academic course.

 Miss Riis, the new teacher of Domestic science, has taken hold of the work in her department with enthusiasm and promises to awaken much interest in the work of her classes, adding courses in basketry and other valuable handiwork to the work already outlined in the Domestic Science Course.

 The work of Miss Leftwich in Latin and Mathematics has likewise begun with interest and promise.

 The work in Manual training gives great evidence of renewed vigor and interest. There are now in the shop some dozen or more pieces, of good strong, artistic durable, student-made furniture; beds, writing desks, chiffonier, book-cases, amours, tables and other things. It is being planned to sell these at auction; there have been a number of applications for them, and this is thought to be the best way or disposing of them. The money will be used to buy new material for the shop. In this way it may be possible to build up a valuable industry and many valuable industries both here and in adjoining territory.

 The Newcomb pottery, which now has world wide fame and is marketed in Europe was begun in just this way.

 The same plan might apply to work turned out by the sewing department and by other departments of the school.

 The formal opening exercises celebrating the beginning of the third session took place in the Auditorium last night. The following interesting program was carried out:

1. Invocation...Rev. C. C. Kramer
2. Selection...Sontag Military Band
3. Address...Hon. C. D. Caffery
4.Cornet Solo...Mr. Scott Heywood
5. Address...Judge Julian Mouton
6.Cornet Duet...Mr. Heywood and Prof. Sontag
7. Address...Rev. C. C. Kramer.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.



A Syrup Factory in Lafayette.
{Louisiana Planter.}

 In the parish of Lafayette, in the western limits of the famed Attakapas sugar fields, there is now promised a return to the old fashioned products of a generation ago, when pure Louisiana syrups were the pride of our State and the joy of the whole nation. Mr. Alexander Mouton is now building a small cane mill and factory in the parish of Lafayette and expects to have it ready in time to harvest the present growing cane crop. Mr. Mouton has ample experience in the sugar industry, and we may be sure that his contemporary establishment will be first class for the purpose for which it is designed. His present purpose is to turn out about 1,000 gallons of syrup every twenty-four hours, consuming for this some thirty tons of sugar cane.

 The Louisiana Planter has long urged the redevelopment of this cane syrup industry, and there is no reason why the planters along the Gulf coast parishes in this State should not also return to their first love and manufacture these syrups that are much in demand everywhere, and which all the world would buy if they were only satisfied that they were getting the genuine article. The chemically prepared glucose syrups made from corn may be difficult to displace, but their displacement is sure to come when consumers gain confidence in these home products.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.




FOR LUBRICATING PURPOSES.
Anse la Butte Oil Used at Jennings Oil Field in Crude State and is Excellent.
[Jennings Times-Record.]

 Dewey Heywood is authority for the following statement, which thoroughly shows the high grade of the Anse la Butte crude oil. Mr. Heywood says: "The different oil companies in the Jennings field are now using the oil from the Heywood Bros. Oil Corporation well No. 2 at Anse la Butte for lubricating purposes. The oil is used in its crude state, without going through settling process, and compare very favorably with oil sold a price ranging from 30 to 10 cents per gallon. This oil feeds through the lubricator without becoming distentegrated with steam. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.





THOMAS NELSON BLAKE.

Death of a Prominent Citizen of Lafayette.

 The announcement Thursday morning of the sudden death of Thomas Nelson Blake at 4:30 that morning was a great shock to the entire community. He had been unwell for some time and had returned only a short time before from Texas, where he went for his health, seemingly much benefitted. Sunday he was taken quite sick and acute. Bright's disease quickly caused a fatal termination.

 Mr. Blake was a man of fine character, generous, kindly and true, and had in a marked degree those amiable traits that readily win the esteem and confidence of one's fellow man. Every citizen of Lafayette, whose privilege it was to know him had the warmest regard for him, and felt his death as a personal loss. The community has lost a good citizen whose life both public and private was above reproach.

 The following from the Times-Democrat describes his character and gives a short history of his life.

 "Mr. Blake was a man who had worked his way to a high position in the business world by invariable courtesy. He won hosts of friends by his fairness and by his courteous regard and consideration for the feelings and rights of others. Many instances are told by those who knew him well, of his scrupulous observance of the golden rule. He had a high ideal of what a man should be in business and private life, and realized his ideal much more closely than the average man of high ideals. His countenance was that of a man of high character - clean cut, composed and kindly.

 Mr. Blake was born in New Orleans, Oct. 15, 1858. He was a son of Thomas Nelson Blake and Mary E. Dessac, both of Hudson, N. Y. He was educated in the common schools, and in early life managed his mother's plantation at Fausse Point, La.

 He started into the drug business for himself in Washington, La., in the early eighties, and in 1895 became traveling salesman for Finlat & Brunswig, afterwards L. N. Brunswig. Mr. Parker and Mr. Blake were two most trusted men for Mr. Brunswig, Mr. Parker being manager and Mr. Blake in general charge of out-of-town affairs. Together they formed the present Parker-Blake Company,Mr. Parker being made president and Mr. Blake vice-president, and bought out Mr. Brunswig.

 Mr. Blake married twice. In 1882 he married Miss Louise Nuckolls of New Iberia, who bore him six children. The three survivors are Bernard, eighteen years; Thomas Nelson, seventeen years, and David Todd, sixteen years, all of whom are at school in Bellbuckle, Tenn.

 He was married the second time to Mrs. Talleferro, nee Winne, of Washington, La., who survives him with a little daughter, Mary Bradley Blake, two years old.

 The funeral took place yesterday evening at Lafayette. Mr. Parker, Mr. Blake's partner, is on his way from Boston, where he was attending a convention, but a number of Mr. Blake's friends in the firm went to Lafayette to attend the funeral.

 Those who went were: H. C. Mackie, Fowler Manning, D. L. Abadie, Thomas Eagan and P. H. Brown. C. C. Johnson, a close personal friend of the dead man, in charge of the house, and regretted very much his inability to leave. Others who attended the funeral were: Hon. Sam Nuckolls and Mrs. Farley of New Iberia, Miss Sadie Frith of Bunkie, and Mr. and Mrs. Pearce or Orange, Texas."

 Funeral services were held at the residence of the deceased at 5:30 p. m. Rev. C. C. Kramer of the Episcopal church officiating. A large number of friends were present and accompanied the remains to their last resting place in the Protestant cemetery. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.



Death of Mrs. E. H. Vordenbaumen. - The many friends of Mrs. E. H. Vordenbaumen will learn of her death in Shreveport, La. at 1 p. m. Friday Sept. 18 with regret, Mrs. Vordenbaumen had been ill a long time and while a fatal termination was not unexpected, yet her death comes as a shock. She was a lady of many estimable qualities and possessed the love and esteem of all those who knew her. The sympathy of our community is extended to Mr. Vordenbaumen and family in their great loss. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.   




Need a Practice Room.

 The lower story of the Masonic Hall which has been used as a practice room by the Sontag Military Band, has been let to the School Board for school purposes and now the Band is without a home. Inasmuch as the Sontag Band is an institution of Lafayette, of which we are all proud, it would be a graceful act were the citizens to contribute enough to build them a home. We understand that the Masons have generously offered to let them build on their lot, and that the work could be done for less than $200, so that a public subscription could easily provide funds without calling on anyone very heavily. 
Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.




CLEANLINESS AND BEAUTY ARE COMPLEMENTS.

 We took pleasure in commending to the City Council last week for its efforts to improve and beautify the town by replacing the unsightly and unsanitary plank walks with Shillinger walks, and would suggest now that as cleanliness and beauty are complements of each other, they direct their attention to devising some method of keeping all parts of town in as clean and sanitary condition as possible. The benefits are obvious. Lafayette compares in healthfulness with any place in the union and has an unrivalled climate. With proper sanitation and a reasonable regard for hygiene, causes of serious sickness should be few and far between. But in order to achieve anything like success along sanitary lines it must be done through the city authorities. This is a case where the community as a body must act through its representatives, as individual effort will invariably fail, owing to the disposition of some to do their part,

 When one considers the difference in doctor's bills between a clean town and a dirty one, not to mention or even consider the suffering caused by sickness, it seems absolutely astounding that anyone would for an instant be satisfied to live in unsanitary conditions, when the expenditure of a few dollars he could avoid both sickness and expense.

 Lafayette is not a clean town, and it is simply owing to the marvelous healthfulness of the place that our health rate is as good as it is.

 The streets should be put in a thoroughly clean condition, all the weeds cut off the sidewalks, and kept that way. The vacant lots should be kept in good condition, and the premises and outhouses over town receive a thorough cleaning up and be required to be kept clean. As a means of doing this, every person in town should be required to attend to his premises and it should be the duty of the police officers to make a weekly inspection. The city on its part should establish a scavenger service, which could be made self-sustaining by a small fee charged for its use, which fee would be very light upon all.

 This matter of keeping the town clean need not be burdensome nor expensive, but it does necessitate a sharp and continual vigilance upon the part of the officers. The benefits that would result are simply incalculable, and our City Council can do no greater or better thing for Lafayette than to make it thoroughly and wholesomely clean. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.




First Cold Snap.

 Thursday the first cold snap of the season made its appearance and gave us a taste of winter for several days. The days proceeding had been quite warm and the sudden change to shivering weather was felt very acutely. Fires were strictly in order and felt decidedly comfort able. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.




"Alphonse and Gaston" to Falk's.

 "After you Gaston," "No, after you Alphonse." These expressions have become has common, almost, as "Not on your life", "You can bet your bottom dollar", and other phrases equally slangy. The two foremost originated from the series of "Alphonse and Gaston" illustrations which have appeared for nearly two years in the New York Journal, and which have made cartoonist F. Opper better known than any of his creations. With the permission of W. R. Hearst, proprietor of the New York Journal, the illustrated story of the vicissitudes of Alphonse and Gaston, which happy caused them so many unhappy moments, and the readers of that paper so much fun, these two characters are seen on the stage now for the first time. "Alphonse and Gaston" have been made the pivotal characters in a farce company - a good farce full of wholesome fun, which has more of a plot than most plays of this kind, and with a musical setting in songs and choruses composed by Ben M. Jerome and Harry Von Tilzer, two of the foremost song writers of the present time. A large company and chorus of handsome girls who can sing, will give voice and melody to the thirty musical numbers, and will make this one of the most to be enjoyed musical farces that has been introduced to the public this season. Falk's Opera House, Friday, Sept. 25. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.        








 Death of Editor Mouton.

 [From the N. O. States.]

 If the Destroyer had caused to pass in review before him and all the editors on the country press of Louisiana with a view to selecting the most promising one for his own, his selection could scarcely have been other than Homer, or Lafayette Gazette, Youth, ability, the highest sense of honor, a passionate devotion to duty, true and loyal in his friendship, he was abundantly equipped to make his mark in Louisiana journalism, and indeed he had already made it.

 Mr. Mouton was the founder and proprietor of the Lafayette Gazette, and his thorough knowledge of the newspaper business, together with his integrity and ability as a writer, soon enabled him to make it one of the papers whose opinions were read and considered in Louisiana. He came of an ancient and honorable Louisiana family, his father Judge C. H. Mouton having been at one time lieutenant governor of the State, and for years a leading member of the State judiciary, while Alexander Mouton, United States Senator and Governor, was a near kinsman. Homer was modest and retiring in disposition, but his abilities were such that he speedily took high rank among his coworkers upon the press of the State, and his popularity among his brethren o the press was unbounded. He was an uncompromising Democrat, and the scintillations from his able pen in the defense of the principles to which he adhered were instructive, vigorous, and oftentimes almost worthy to rank with the classics of political philosophy.

 He never trimmed his sails to the popular breeze, but adhered steadfastly to his convictions of right and duty, and while always taking part in the current discussion of the day he was a just and manly antagonist who never was known to seek to take an unfair advantage in a discussion. Consequently his newspaper wielded exceptional power locally and among leaders of thought the State, and its splendid young editor gave great promise of a brilliant future of usefulness and and honor.

 We grieve his early demise. This writer or years watched with interest the deadly rise of this manly young son of Louisiana, and on more than one occasion our paths have been parallel and our interests intermingled until their separate identity has been extinguished, as the lawyers say, by confusion. But above and beyond all matters o merely personal affection, it is not overstating the fact to assert that the life and personal example of Homer Mouton illustrates the best and highest there is in country journalism, and his memory will long remain a benediction to those who knew him and constant inspiration to higher and nobler standards in the profession which his eminent virtues and abilities so richly adorned.

 He died in the odor of sanctity, comforted by the sacrament of the church, conscious of a record "void of offense towards God and man," and with his aged and honored father and mother brightening the passage which they too must soon take. To those, and to his sorrowing sisters the sympathy of The States is earnestly extended. From the N. O. States and in the Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.



T. M. Biossat Back in Town.

 T. M. Biossat, our popular jeweler, returned with his son, Moore, from a ten day's outing at White Sulphur Springs in Catahoula parish Saturday. Fishing was fine and for a good taste of country life, T. M. Biossat, says White Sulphur is the proper thing. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.      

   

   

 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/23/1903.

 The Lafayette Fire Department has received an invitation, through Chief A. J. LeBlanc, to be present at the fair to be held in Thibodaux Sunday, Sept. 27.

The new court house at Crowley was accepted by the police jury on Sept. 14.

 Frank Mouton has returned from New Orleans where he underwent an operation for appendicitis, and his many friends will be glad to know that he is doing nicely.

 Miss Edna Sprole is visiting friends in New Orleans.

 Doctors Octave Duhon and John Tolson returned from Sewanee Saturday. Dr. Tolson will practice in Lafayette, while Dr. Duhon will return to Mauriceville.

 Mrs. C. W. and children returned Saturday from Schriever after a delightful visit to her father, Mr. E. Falgout. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1903.


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From the Lafayette Advertiser September 23rd, 1899:


Quarantine.                                  

 The great scare crow yellow fever, has been domiciled for the last ten or twelve days in New Orleans. Quarantines far and wide have been promulgated against the yellow fever. 

 Our town and our parish have quarantined and while we applaud to the alertness of our health officers, yet will someone tell us what good will it do? The parishes below us have not been quarantined, New Iberia is opened to and from New Orleans, and we don't see how quarantine will fulfill its purpose.

 For instance, anyone can buy a ticket to New Iberia and from thence to New Orleans and then coming back to Lafayette with a stop at New Iberia.

 Unless the region below us is quarantined we don't see any good of it.

Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1899.                                                                                        




A SUCCESS. 

 The concert given last Friday night at Falk's Hall for the benefit of the Industrial School scored a great success financially and otherwise. The program was well rendered and several numbers had to be repeated. 


 After the concert, a contest took place between the bald headed men. Amongst the candidates Prof. Simmons, received 9 votes; I. A. Broussard, 16 votes; B. Coronna, 19 votes; and T. M. Bioasat, 24 votes. Consequently this last one won the prize - a "comb."

 Another contest of the most popular young lady was won by Miss U. Coronna, whose prize was a splendid belt.

 Stands furnished with cakes and refreshing beverages had the power to attract numerous customers. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1899.















 From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 23rd, 1893.

Train Plunges Into Canal.


 Accidents happen evidently on the best regulated railroads as well as with the best regulated families.


 On Sunday evening last while the bridge at Harvey's Canal on the Southern Pacific railroad was open a relief train consisting of an engine and caboose, running at twenty-four miles or more an hour, dashed along and in an instant were piled helter-skelter in the canal. Mike Lynch, an experienced engineer of the road, had charge of the engine and in the caboose, some five or six men. A negro was on board, stealing a ride. In a most miraculous manner they all escaped death and even serious injury, except the negro. He was caught under the tender and so badly hurt that he died a day or two after. Among those on the train was Engineer Jos. Vallier of this place who jumped from the engine and landed in the middle of the canal and swam out. He escaped but with a slight bruise on the hand. There seems to be considerable talk as to how the accident happened but General Manager Kruttschnitt says the engine ran past two plainly visible danger signals. The bridge had been opened to permit a boat to pass and the tenders were about to close it when the train came thundering along.

 Mr. Kruttschnitt, in his interview, shoes plainly that the best safe-guards known to science or suggested by experience are employed by the Southern Pacific to prevent such mishaps.

 The accident was one of those strange unaccountable occurrences that take place in spite of untiring vigilance and prudence. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893. 

(Interesting note: The Lafayette Gazette also ran this story but made no mention of the negro killed.)  





TRESPASSING TRAMPS.

They Enter Capt. Mitchell's House and are Discovered but Escape.

Last Friday evening, the 15th inst. about 8 o'clock, Capt. James Mitchell, the well known Assistant Master Mechanic of the Southern Pacific Co., and Mrs. Mitchell were sitting quietly on their front gallery, when the attention of the latter was attracted by a noise in the back yard. Going to a side window she saw a man in the act of climbing the fence from the street into the yard; she at once called to her husband and the intruder taking warning, disappeared in short order. This man was without a coat and wore a white shirt.

 Taking their seats again upon the gallery, Mrs. Mitchell rose and went to the dining room to light a lamp, and in so doing so discovered the person of another intruder. Upon being discovered he made an effort to strike her. Alarmed of course, she screamed and Capt. Mitchell coming at once to her relief, the trespasser jumped out of a window and escaped, notwithstanding prompt assistance from neighbors and friends. The man was dressed entirely different from the one first seen, showing there were two. The motive of their visit was clearly robbery and it is not too much to say from the general known character of this species of the human race, that to take life or inflict great bodily harm is of little or no consequence to them though the ulterior motive be to accomplish a minor offense or to escape detection for such. Mrs. Mitchell may therefore consider herself fortunate in one respect; the escape of the villains is to be regretted. Two men answering the description given by Mrs. Mitchell were arrested but owing to the darkness and other circumstances she was unable, naturally, to identify them. They were very probably the men wanted, but without evidence they could not be held.

 This attempt to enter a dwelling in the early evening, on a much frequented street and when the occupants were sitting on the front gallery was rather audacious, to say the least of it. Tramps, however, seem to have been plentiful of late, but the police officers say they will use their best endeavors to keep the town free of them.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893.     






A NOBLE INSTITUTION.

 One of the largest, as well as one of the most striking, architecturally speaking, buildings in the town of Lafayette is the Convent. Besides the main structure, there are several outbuildings, including a large class room devoted to the exclusive use of a boys school, and, also, a fine chapel where religious services are held every Friday morning. Contractor Fred Mouton has just completed the erection of an extension rendered necessary by want of additional room, which will be used principally as a class room for girls in the first and second grades. Heretofore the commencement exercises were witnessed by only a limited number of people because there was no available room to accommodate them, but now this new hall will give ample room, and hereafter the class exhibitions will be opened to the public.

 All the buildings have been erected with the single view to compass the best results. This is noticeable in the main building where spacious galleries afford the girls ample play room during rainy weather. The class rooms are large and airy, furnished with automatic desks and other accessories necessary to a thorough course of instructions.

 The buildings are nearly surrounded by huge and magnificent oaks casting a perennial shade over the neat and attractive playground. This well kept lawn forms a fine recreative spot which is fully appreciated by the children, and it is indeed a pleasure to the passer-by, during recess hour, to hear the peals of merry laughter, and so hearty and happy it rings out, that it becomes contagious, clearly indicating the existence of the most cordial relations between teachers and pupils.

 For the pleasure of the boarders, during evening recreation hours, there is a large play room in which are several pianos, where the time can be most profitably and enjoyably spent until the retiring hour.

 The course of study is broad and liberal and the constant aim is to employ the means best adapted to enable a steady advancement in all departments. The faculty embraces eight sisters of the order of Mt. Carmel, with Mother Patrick as superioress. The present attendance is about 30 boys, and 100 girls of which the latter number 32 are boarders, the boarders being mostly from the adjoining parishes, and a few from New Orleans.

 A writer in "Current Topics", who visited the place not long since, expresses the subjoined impression:

 "... The convent, a fine educational institition is as pictureesque as it is deserving of note. It covers with its several buildings and wide lawns and gardens a large area of ground and is presided over by Mother St. Patrick and sweet sisters and nuns who hold such a loving place in the hearts of all Louisianians. ..."

 In a hasty newspaper article it is possible to mention only a few of the main features of an institution of this kind, therefore necessarily very incomplete. However this we wish to impress upon the mind of the reader: This splendid educational institution is located in a most healthful locality, and the rates of tuition and board are decidedly low.

 The people of Lafayette are, and have every reason to be proud of this noble institution. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.



New Private School.

 Miss Isaure McDaniel, a recent graduate of our Mount Carmel Convent has opened a private school in a building near her father's residence in McComb addition. Miss McDaniel, as a pupil was very highly spoken of by her preceptors. We have no doubt she will succeed in her new sphere. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893. 



      
Property Transferred.

 Formal transfer of a lot of ground with small buildings on it facing the west side of Mrs. Sprole's store, was recently made by Mrs. M. L. Monnier to Mr. Jules Dugas, for the consideration o $150.00. The building has been converted into a meat market by Mr. Dugat. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893.


Base Ball.

 Lafayette has assumed an air of interest in the base ball field. The "Favorite" will play Isle Pilette to-morrow, and have several other engagements to fulfill, and before the season closes, offer a challenge to any amateur team in the State with the exception of New Orleans. The club follows in the common role of the exercises :  A. Otto, Ed. Matthews, W. Graser, Jno. Coffey, Ed. Parker, J. Bowen, J. Graser, Paul Castel, Jim Marsh. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893.



 Wheelmen from Opelousas.

 Messrs. J. T. Skipper, F. Dietlein, F. A. Voorhies, R. Wallior, J. L. Cain and L. Fontenot, of the Opelousas Cycling Club, left Opelousas last Sunday at 5:30 a. m., and arrived here at 8:30 a. m. covering the distance between the two points in exactly three hours, in spite of several stretches of very heavy road. Three of the party, Messrs. Skipper, Deitlein and Wallior continued on to New Iberia as was planned when starting out on what is known as a "century run" - a ride of one hundred miles on a bicycle. A broken wheel caused the other members of the company to proceed no further on the route than Lafayette. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893.



Personal Dispute Leads to Arrest.

  In the stable of the latter on Wednesday evening last Mr. Preston Guilbeau of Breaux Bridge and Mr. E. Constantin became involved in a personal dispute wherein Constantin was struck by Guilbeau. Constantin sought to strike back with a stick of some sort, when Guilbeau placed his hand upon his pistol, and we learn the parties were in this position when Constable Bienvenu appeared on the scene and arrested them. A hearing was had before the District Court, to answer the charge of carrying a concealed weapon. The bonds were promptly furnished with Mr. Orther C. Mouton, as surety. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893.  




Suspicious Negro. - A suspicious looking negro was held up here yesterday, by Sheriff Broussard, giving his name as Geo. D. Martin. He was first seen in the jewelry store of Mr. T. M. Biossat, where he went to have a watch repaired, wearing a brakeman's cap and claiming to be a member of the order. Sheriff Broussard, upon notification, arrested him after a long search and difficulty, thinking him to be the murderer of Jeff. Gibbs, wanted in Copia county, Mississippi. A 38 caliber pistol was in company with his baggage.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893. 


Storms Did Us Good. - It now seems to be definitely settled that the storm on the 8th inst. was an actual benefit to the cane crop. It is contended by experienced and intelligent cane growers that the yield will be increased by a considerable per centum and they support their judgment by very plausible reasoning as well as knowledge of similar occurrences in the past. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893.


Laf.'s Fire Company. - If our business men and other substantial citizens would co-operate with, and give financial support to, the lately re-organized Lafayette Fire Co., the community would soon enjoy the fruits of such action in a material reduction of the exorbitant fire insurance rates prevailing here at present. Why not change our ways and all be benefitted for having done so?
Lafayette Advertiser 9/21/1893.


Demanade. Demanade, the live Grocer, corner of Vermilion street and Lee Avenue, has just received an assortment of fresh goods, such as spare ribs, shrimp, herring, pig feet, sour kraut and such like. Give him a call. Laf. Advertiser 9/23/1893.


New Restaurant. - Mrs. Achille Weber has recently opened a restaurant next door to the Club Saloon now owned by Crouchet and Romero. Oysters "as you like it" will be served in the restaurant and families supplied as well.
Laf. Advertiser 9/23/1893.





 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/23/1893.

 The cane crop to the satisfaction of our people, has straightened up from the effects of the storm, and is now reported as being in a nominally good condition.


 Several more weddings on the tapis.

 Don't forget races today ;  they will be worth the time and money.

 Mr. Oren B. Hopkins has lately accepted a clerkship at Moss Bros. & Co.

 The attendance at the public schools throughout the parish is on a very favorable increase.

 Hay has been coming in town in large quantities, and is being stowed away by its purchasers for winter use.

 Mr. A. E. Mouton of the popular lumber dealers Moss & Mouton, made a flying trip to Patterson this week.

 We are pleased to announce the return of the urbane manager of the Crescent Hotel, Mr. John Hahn, and his amiable wife, and after an absence of several 

 Messrs. Crow Girard and Leo Judice report a most enjoyable time at the Fair from which they have recently returned.

 Mr. Sidney Mouton and wife arrived from Lake Arthur on the 15th inst., to take up their permanent abode in Lafayette.

 Mrs. B. J. Pellerin, the charming wife o the acting R. R. Agent here, arrived on the 16th inst., and is the guest of Mrs. A. C. Young.

 Among those recently registered at the Colombian Fair we notice Mr. E. H. Vodenbaumen and wife and Mr. J. J. Davidson our railroad agent.

 It is reported that Mr. Pierre Dugat contemplates opening a bar-room in the Constantin building fronting the Court House, about the 1st October.

 Our young friends Sterling Mudd and Don Greig, took their leave on the 15th inst., for another term at the Chamberlain Hunt College, at Port Gibson, Miss.

 The ball last Saturday night was well attended by the young ladies and gentlemen of our town, as well as a number of visitors from other points. The music was good and dancing was freely indulged in.

 The average merchant has commenced to wear his customary smile at this season, now the crops have begun to move and money to circulate more freely. Trade has been given a very perceptible stimulus since a few days.

 Dr. E. J. Chachere is at his home post of duty again, having returned from Abbeville Monday.

 Mrs. L. E. Salles and daughter, Miss Genevieve, of New Orleans are visiting the family of Mr. W. B. Bailey.

 We received a communication this week from J. Nickerson, upon the subject of the flat cultivation o sugar cane, which arrived too late for insertion.

 It is said another long-haired medicine man expects to make a stay of several weeks in Lafayette in the near future, to exchange his cure-all for the bright silver dollars of the people. Lafayette Advertiser 9/23/1893.

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 From the Lafayette Gazette of September 23rd, 1893:


Captured After an Exciting Chase.

Sheriff Broussard last Thursday morning captured a negro fugitive from justice after a most exciting chase. The negro who gave his name as Geo. D. Morton, had visited Biossat's jewelry store to have a watch repaired and while there acted in a very suspicious manner and gave evidence of an uneasy frame of mind. Sheriff Broussard on being informed of the matter began a search for the man, who had in the meantime retired to Jake Brown's cabin in Mouton's Addition. The officer proceeded thither and on approaching noticed a negro boy standing sentinel, disappeared in great haste toward the rear of the house. By the time the sheriff arrived the negro fugitive had fled through a back way and was quite a distance away. The pursuit now began in earnest, the sheriff discharging several pistol shots to cause his man to heave to, but all in vain. The negro finally took refuge in Mr. Jean Vigneaux's field and continued for some time to evade the sheriff by dodging about in the high weeds. Our plucky sheriff at last worked his "rabbit foot" successfully put his man under arrest, although the latter had two "rabbit foots" in his pocket. The sheriff found a Colt's pistol, 38 caliber and a large valise filled with clothes, a watch and several smaller articles of jewelry in possession of his prisoner, whom he believes to be Jeff Gibbs of Copiah county, Miss., and wanted for the murder of J. C. Davis in October, 1892. The negro claimed that he was from East Texas, a brakeman by avocation and a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen whose badge he wore. The representations however are deemed false and the sheriff will hold Morton, until he ascertains positive information as to his crimes or misdeeds.    Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.








A Murderous Assault.

 A murderous assault was made on Ed. Brown, a brakeman, Wednesday night at about 9:30, in the railroad yards at this place. It appears that two Mexicans, who were on their way to New Orleans, arrived here Wednesday morning and spent the day around the depot. They made the acquaintance of Brown who invited them to take a drink which they accepted. Brown says that after taking their drinks they walked to the yards, apparently on friendly terms, when to his utter surprise, one of the Mexicans knocked him over the right eye with a piece of stone, inflicting a painful and serious wound. It is not known what their motive was, but the assault was most cowardly. The Mexicans made their escape, but Sheriff Broussard is after them, and is doing all in his power to effect their arrest. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.  





Accidental Shooting. - An accident which came near resulting fatally occurred at the residence of Mr. Gabe Martin last Tuesday. It appears that one of Mr. Martin's little boys took from his father's bureau a loaded Colt revolver and while handling the arm accidentally pulled on the trigger, and fired, the bullet passing through the upper lip and grazing the shoulder of his little brother who was standing near by. Dr. Gladu was immediately called and dressed the wound and assured the parents that there was nothing serious. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.












A NOBLE INSTITUTION.

 One of the largest, as well as one of the most striking, architecturally speaking, buildings in the town of Lafayette is the Convent. Besides the main structure, there are several outbuildings, including a large class room devoted to the exclusive use of a boys school, and, also, a fine chapel where religious services are held every Friday morning. Contractor Fred Mouton has just completed the erection of an extension rendered necessary by want of additional room, which will be used principally as a class room for girls in the first and second grades. Heretofore the commencement exercises were witnessed by only a limited number of people because there was no available room to accommodate them, but now this new hall will give ample room, and hereafter the class exhibitions will be opened to the public.

 All the buildings have been erected with the single view to compass the best results. This is noticeable in the main building where spacious galleries afford the girls ample play room during rainy weather. The class rooms are large and airy, furnished with automatic desks and other accessories necessary to a thorough course of instructions.

 The buildings are nearly surrounded by huge and magnificent oaks casting a perennial shade over the neat and attractive playground. This well kept lawn forms a fine recreative spot which is fully appreciated by the children, and it is indeed a pleasure to the passer-by, during recess hour, to hear the peals of merry laughter, and so hearty and happy it rings out, that it becomes contagious, clearly indicating the existence of the most cordial relations between teachers and pupils.

 For the pleasure of the boarders, during evening recreation hours, there is a large play room in which are several pianos, where the time can be most profitably and enjoyably spent until the retiring hour.

 The course of study is broad and liberal and the constant aim is to employ the means best adapted to enable a steady advancement in all departments. The faculty embraces eight sisters of the order of Mt. Carmel, with Mother Patrick as superioress. The present attendance is about 30 boys, and 100 girls of which the latter number 32 are boarders, the boarders being mostly from the adjoining parishes, and a few from New Orleans.

 A writer in "Current Topics", who visited the place not long since, expresses the subjoined impression:

 "... The convent, a fine educational institition is as pictureesque as it is deserving of note. It covers with its several buildings and wide lawns and gardens a large area of ground and is presided over by Mother St. Patrick and sweet sisters and nuns who hold such a loving place in the hearts of all Louisianians. ..."

 In a hasty newspaper article it is possible to mention only a few of the main features of an institution of this kind, therefore necessarily very incomplete. However this we wish to impress upon the mind of the reader: This splendid educational institution is located in a most healthful locality, and the rates of tuition and board are decidedly low.

 The people of Lafayette are, and have every reason to be proud of this noble institution. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.


 Twenty-fifth Anniversary.

 On the occasion of the twenty-fifth anniversary (silver wedding) of their wedded life, last Wednesday, Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Gerac were visited by a host of friends who wished them many returns of the day; they were, also, recipients of many tokens of substantial remembrances. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.


   For a Refinery.

 It is said that the pay roll of the Southern Pacific railroad represents $144,000 a year at this point a good part of it spent in town. A central refinery would in a year or two add, perhaps, $200,000 more. The total in circulation would make many enterprises possible. Lafayette must have the refinery. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.




Bridge Failed.

 In driving across the bridge near Moss store the planking gave way, and one of the horse's feet caught in the break and he fell, while the other horse kept on pulling until the carriage was over the prostrate horse, when the latter made a struggle to get up, and did succeed so far as to throw the carriage over, precipitating the occupants to the ground. In the carriage were Mrs. Kelly, Miss Effie Young, Miss Zaza Cornay, and in the arms of one of the ladies was the baby of Mr. E. J. Trahan, and the driver. Except some slight bruises to Miss Cornay, no injuries were sustained by the parties. It was a very luck escape. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.  



 Police Jury on Bridges.

 In regard to complaint of our correspondent "Cherokee" in regard to bridges, we will state that the Police Jury, at its last sitting, authorized the purchase of several car loads of lumber. When received, we have no doubt the proper authorities will attend to the bridge in question. We think the Police Jury is disposed to do their best, and will give attention to, and correct, all causes of complaints. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.



Decided Best to Go Home.

 A young man named Robert Borrow, aged about 16, ran away from his home in New Orleans, enticed by, and in company with a tramp, and on reaching this town was apprised of a telegram from his parents, stating that arrangements had been made with the railroad people to give him transportation home, and would also provide for his immediate needs. Notwithstanding the urgent request of the tramp that they should continue journeying together, Robert very wisely decided to return home to his parents. His short experience no doubt convinced him that to see the world a la tramp did not hold the comforts anticipated. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.



Married.
MOUTON-MOUTON. - At Lake Arthur, Tuesday the 12th instant, by the Rev. J. Peters, Mr. Sidney Mouton, of Lafayette, and Miss Marie Gadrat Mouton, of Lake Arthur.

 Sidney is one of the most popular young men in Lafayette, and has a host of friends who are happy in the tender of congratulations on the new ties he has assumed; and the bride, a fair and accomplished maiden, is the daughter of Hon. Ambroise Mouton, of Lake Arthur. The many friends of the young couple unite in wishing them heaven's choicest blessings, and express the hope that not a shadow will fall athwart their path on life's journey to mar the perpetual sunshine. And to which The Gazette adds so mote it be. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.

MOUISSET-LACOSTE. - At the Catholic church, Thursday, the 13th instant, by Rev. P. J. Healey, Mr. Ernest Mouisset to Miss Louise Lacoste.

 The groom is a popular salesman at the store of Moss Bros. & Co., and the bride is the charming daughter of Mr. Leopold Lacoste. A large number of friends and acquaintances were present to see them joined in the holy bonds of wedlock, and to wish - and The Gazette begs to join in the wish - that they may have "their lives tinged with roseate hues of happiness, and that a full share of earth's prosperity may attend their union." Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.






 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 9/23/1893.

 The dust is beginning to grow annoying.

 The mosquito bill abideth with us in all his glory and viciousness.


 The farmers of Lafayette are desirous of making the sugar cane, their money crop, and this they are assured of a factory to work it.

 Aladin Robichaud has gone to St. Martinville to help Fred Mouton build a residence in that town.

 The court-house square could be made a thing of beauty by the judicious use of a little money.

 John Vandergrief took a pleasure trip to St. Martin parish last week.

 Dr. Trahan and Mr. Jack Nickerson, of Lafayette, were in New Iberia last Saturday.

 Next Wednesday the stores of our Jewish fellow-citizens will be closed, being the day of Atonement.

 Messrs. S. Kahn, Henry Bendel and J. Colitz spent some days this week in the city the guests of Mr. B. Falk and family.


 The mosquito is one fellow that stands no nonsense when he presents his bill. You've got to settle, for he takes it out of your hide.

 Sheriff Ike Broussard reports having quite a time with the poor unfortunate man that he was taking to the State Asylum.

 The many friends of Rev. Father Forge will be pleased to learn that he has returned from his trip to the Pacific coast.

 Mr. and Mrs. D. Mossiker, of Orange, Texas, and Mr. Armand Levy, of Lake Charles, were the guests of their parents Mr. and Mrs. L. Levy, during the holidays.

 Dr. G. A. Martin left Wednesday morning for the Fair. The doctor requested us to state that Dr. F. R. Martin, of Breaux Bridge, will replace him during his absence.

 Mr. F. E. Voorhies has leased the residence occupied by Mr. J. J. Mouton, and has moved therein. Mr. Voorhies and family are now permanent residents of Lafayette.

 Judge Parkerson, Dr. N. P. Moss, Mrs. Mills and Misses Lizzie Parkerson and Ada Moss, after quite a stay in Chicago visiting the World's Fair, returned home Sunday.

 The Gazette entertains the belief that the organization of a Chataqua circle among the young people of Lafayette would be the means of affording much enjoyment and instruction during the coming winter evenings.

 Mr. B. J. Pellerin, relief agent of the Southern Pacific Railroad is in charge of affairs at the station here during the absence o the regular agent, Mr. J. J. Davidson, who is off on a recreative and pleasure trip.

 We are informed that the management have left nothing undone to make the ball to-night at Falk's hall a decided pleasurable and social success. Those attending may safely anticipate a most enjoyable time.

 Last Monday was the 5,654th anniversary of the creation of the world according to the Jewish calendar and the Israelites of Lafayette observed the day with religious services at the synagogue, which was followed by feasting and general rejoicings. Lafayette Gazette 9/23/1893.






Lagniappe:


CLEANLINESS AND BEAUTY ARE COMPLIMENTS.

  We took pleasure in commending the City Council last week for its efforts to improve and beautify the town by replacing the unsightly and insanitary plank walks with Shillinger walks, and would suggest now that as cleanliness and beauty are complements, of each other, they direct their attention to devising some method of keeping all parts of the town in as clean and sanitary condition as possible. The benefits are obvious. Lafayette compares in healthfulness with any place in the union and has an unrivaled climate. With proper sanitation and a reasonable regard for hygiene, cases of serious sickness should be far and few between. But in order to achieve anything like success along sanitary lines it must be done through the city authorities. This is a case where the community as a body must act through its representatives, as individual effort will invariably, fail, owing to the indisposition of some to do their part.

 When one considers the difference in doctor's bills between a clean town and a dirty one, not to mention or even consider the suffering caused by sickness, it seems absolutely astounding that anyone would for an instant be satisfied to live in unsanitary environments, when by the expenditure of a few dollars he could avoid both sickness and expense.

 Lafayette is not a clean town, and it is simply owing to the marvelous healthfulness of the place that our health rate is as good as it is.

 The streets should be put in a thoroughly clean condition, all the weeds cut off the sidewalks, and kept that way. The vacant lots should be kept in good condition, and the premises and outhouses over town receive a thorough cleaning up and be required to be kept clean. As a means of doing this, every person in town should be required to attend his premises and it should be the duty of the police to make a weekly inspection. The city on its part should establish a scavenger service which could be made self sustaining by a small fee charged for its use, which fee would be very light upon all.

 This matter of keeping the town clean need not be burdensome nor expensive, but it does necessitate a sharp and continual vigilance upon the part of the officers. The benefits that would result are simply incalculable, and our City council can do no greater or better thing for Lafayette than to make it thoroughly and wholesomely clean.

LAFAYETTE ADVERTISER 

9/23/1903.                                                 




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