Follow by Email

Monday, January 12, 2015

**SEPTEMBER 3RD M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of September 3rd, 1898:



Demanade Takes Charge of Post Office.




 Postmaster Demanade took charge of the post office on the first of September. Mr. Joe E. Mouton remains as first assistant and Aby Demanade, second assistant. No doubt the new incumbent feels perfectly "at home" in the role of postmaster, having had the advantage of four years' experience under President Harrison.
 Laf. Advertiser 9/3/1898.


We Need a Foundry.

Lafayette needs a foundry, and needs one very much.

 The man with enough capital and energy who will start a foundry in this town will no doubt realize a large profit on his investment. Within a radius of fifteen miles we have at least forty cotton gins, while at our doors is one of the largest refineries in the State and a cotton compress, to say nothing of a number of smaller concerns which would give a great deal of work to a foundry. We don't know of a town in the State that offers a better opportunity for an enterprise of this kind than Lafayette. This town is happily situated, having railway facilities equal to those of any point in South Louisiana. If these facts are brought to the knowledge of capital seeking investment in this branch of trade, we have no doubt that they will be fruitful of good results. Lafayette Gazette 10/3/1898. 









The Five O'clock Tea Club.

 In last Sunday's N. O. Picayune Dorothy Dix gives the following interesting sketch of the Five O'clock Tea Club of Lafayette:

 "Probably there does not exist within the bounds of the State a feminine organization more happily organized and more successfully carried out than the Five O'clock Tea Club, of Lafayette. Combining social, literary, artistic and charitable features, the club has extended its beneficent influences along the channels mapped out, and has proven successful beyond the most sanguine hopes of its promoters. Every move has been forward, and a marked improvement has been the outcome of each meeting.

 "The club was organized on March 2, 1896, through the able and wise direction of Mrs. T. M. Biossat, who became its first president. Mrs. Biossat's efforts were ably seconded by Mrs. N. P. Moss, as vice-president; Miss Lea Gladu, secretary, and Miss Stella Trahan, treasurer. The prime mover and chief spirit of this vigorous young club, however, was Mrs. T. M. Biossat, whose intellectual attainments, indomitable energy and unusual tact have contributed in a great measure to the success which has crowned the work of the club. Mrs. Biossat is the wife of Mr. T. M. Biossat, and a daughter of Dr. R. Rushing, of Alexandria, and has been a resident of Lafayette for only six years, but despite domestic duties, has been closely identified with the social and intellectual life of the place. Mrs. Biossat was succeeded as president by Miss Clye Mudd, who is a young woman of great culture and brightness, who graduated with distinguished honor at Silliman Female College, at Clinton, La., where she was valedictorian of her class, and who is admirably fitted to advance the club's best interest.

 "The Five O'clock Tea Club was an outgrowth of a desire to bring the women of the town into closer and pleasanter social relations, and as women are never so happy as when they are doing good, to this was added a bit of philanthropy of a peculiarly delicate and gentle nature, and it was decided to impose a small due on each member, the money thus accruing to be used in relieving the wants of some less fortunate sister. The members meet once a week at each others house, a light repast is served, and the time devoted to a discussion of some literary topic, reading, recitation, music, or some game devised by the young people who belong to the club. Once a month the club meets to transact business, adopt measures for the good of the organization, and consider the philanthropic matters they have in hand, which are carried out in accordance with the biblical injunction of secrecy. The meeting each week are almost in the nature of a family gathering, and are a source of continual delight to the members. The club is prosperous and progressive, and many, besides it members, have reason to bless the Five O'clock Tea Club."

From the N. O. Picayune and in the Lafayette Gazette 10/3/1898.









Ran Off Tracks. - The night train on the Southern Pacific Road, which is due here at 2 a. m., did not reach Lafayette, last Monday until 5 a. m. The train ran off the track between here and Houston, the engine and mail car being overturned. The engineer stuck to his post and no casualties were reported.   Lafayette Advertiser 9/3/1898.


Gerac Partners With Ader.

 Mr. Henry Gerac, of our town, becomes partner with Mr. Ader. The firm is engaged in the wholesale business of groceries and liquors and is also doing commission business. Their office is located at the corner of North Liberty and St. Anna streets.

 The new firm commenced operations on the first of September. Mr. Henry Gerac was in Lafayette during the week, hustling taking orders for the firm and we learn with pleasure, that he has met with much success. In wishing success to our friend Henry, be can but regret his departure from Lafayette, but what is the latter's loss will be New Orleans gain. Lafayette Advertiser 9/3/1898.





A New Firm. - Messrs. Holt & Carter have opened a store next to the post-office. These gentlemen are experienced and successful merchants are in every way equipped to meet all competition. Like all successful business men they believe in the efficacy of printer's ink and will always have something to say to the public through the columns of the Gazette. Read their advertisement elsewhere in this paper. Lafayette Gazette 10/3/1898.







Attention Democrats. - A meeting of the Parish Democratic executive committee will be held in Lafayette, La., on Sept. 10th, 1898 at 10 a. m., for the selection of delegates from this parish to the Congressional convention which take place at Thibodeaux, La., on Sept. 19th., to nominate a democratic candidate for the 3rd District; and also to the Baton Rouge convention, on Sept. 21st to nominate a democratic candidate for Railroad commissioner for the 2nd District, and for other matters.
All members are requested to attend said meeting on said date.
    D. A. COCHRANE,
   Chairman Ex. Com. of Democratic party of Lafayette, La. Aug. 30th, 1898.

 


Attention Republicans.- A general mass meeting of the regular republicans of Lafayette will be held of September 3rd, 1898, for the purpose of electing delegates to the Congressional convention to be held at Morgan City, Sept. 6th, 1898. Laf. Adv. 9/3/1898.

Ran Off Tracks. - The night train on the Southern Pacific Road, which is due here at 2 a. m., did not reach Lafayette, last Monday until 5 a. m. The train ran off the track between here and Houston, the engine and mail car being overturned. The engineer stuck to his post and no casualties were reported.   Lafayette Advertiser 9/3/1898.

Thanks! Thanks! Thanks! - The driving public is generously thankful to Dr. Martin, chairman of the street committee, for the filling up of the ugly mud holes on Lincoln Avenue, near the racket store. Continue the good work, Mr. Chairman, - our praising pencil is always to be found.
Laf. Adv. 9/3/1898.


 Just What Lafayette Needs. - Our Police Jury appropriated $25 towards defraying the expenses for descriptive circulars and maps of Lafayette Parish, for free distribution, under the management of Ambroise Mouton.
Laf. Adv. 9/3/1898.  





Prospectors.

Two practical farmers, Messrs. B. M. Pierce, of North Louisiana and John M. Carter, of Miss., were in Lafayette during the week, with a view of acquiring real estate.

 It is unnecessary to say that they were chaperoned by our hustler Amb. Mouton, who feels confident that if they can see a good bargain, he will surely close a deal with them.

 We have always room for experienced farmers as these gentlemen are and a welcome is awaiting all such.   Lafayette Advertiser 9/3/1898.


Nearly Killed. - Last Sunday, Mr. A. Bagnal came very near meeting his death. Being out driving his horse ran away throwing him out of his buggy, receiving a severe contusion upon his head. Being very weak from his fall and wound, he was obliged to be carried to his home.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/3/1898.



An Evening Party.

 At the hospitable home of Mrs. L. F. Rigues on the night of the last of August, a bevy of charming young ladies escorted by young gentlemen had assembled there, to spend a few hours in throwing off life's burdens and cares, only thinking of its bright side.

 They were all friends of the hostess and therefore everything tending to their comfort and enjoyment was looked after.

 The dining room was gayly decorated; the flowers were sparkling amidst the lights, but none were so bright and so fair as the diamond sparkling eyes of the feminine sex.

 Misses Rita Trahan, Anna Hopkins and Marie Mouton entertained the company with sweet, well felt and soothing music, while others were engaged in various games.

 Delicious refreshments were served and the table groaned under delicacies.

 It was nearly midnight before the young guests began to realize that there is an ending to everything.

 Good-byes were said and the delightful evening was a thing of the past.

 Those present were: Misses Rita Trahan, Emma and Rose Wiggle, Anna Hopkins, Louisa Tolson and Aimee Mouton.

 The stronger sex was represented by: Chas. Debaillon, Aby Demanade, Eben Morgan and Ambroise Mouton.
Lafayette Advertiser 9/3/1898.





Hobson Social Club.

 Thursday evening was a gala one for the members of Hobson Social Club. The event being a reception given the members by Miss I. A. McDaniel, assisted by her charming cousins, the Misses Desbrest.

 The cozy parlor was made beautiful by many flowers and greens, whose odorous scent diffused their sweet fragrance throughout the evening. The members, after having been favored with fine vocal selections by the young hostess and Mr. Young, as guests of the Club were entertained in a very novel and interesting manner with "Blind Drawing." Excitement ran high as the game progressed, and finally resulted in a tie, for the first prize between Messrs. W. D. Huff and Young. In the second trial Mr. Young was the fortunate winner and was presented with a pair of cut glasses. M. A. Deffez carried off the Booby.

 Delicious refreshments were then served while toasts were proposed in honor of the hostess, the gallant men of our country, and the brave boys who wore the blue.

 Many parlor games were introduced during the evening which helped to pass the time very pleasantly. Miss Holland of New Orleans, and Mr. Young of Texas, were the welcomed and honored guests of the Club.

 Miss Alta Deffez will entertain the Club on the 15th. inst.
 Lafayette Advertiser 9/3/1898.



Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 9/3/1898:

Mr. Alfred Martin left for Crowley to spend a few days.

 Miss Mina Feitel, of New Orleans, is visiting Mrs. Alta Deffez.

 Mr. Felix Canateller, the popular young president of Hobson Social Club, is again at his post, after enjoying a pleasant vacation with friends in New Orleans and Gretna.

 Mr. Welsh, the hustler, was in Lafayette last Wednesday, in the interest of the State Fair, which is to be held at Alexandria October 4th to the 8th.

 Prof. W. A. Lerosen, principal of the High School arrived in Lafayette, last Wednesday.

Mr. Vic Levy returned from New York last Tuesdaym where he went to order his goods for his new store.

 Edward Mouton is now night operator at the Telephone Exchange instead of John Creighton.

 Miss T. Lodoiska Mouton entered on the first day of September with Messrs. Holt and Carter, the new merchants of Lafayette. She has in charge the dry goods and notions department.

 Miss I. A. McDaniel has re-opened her school on Lincoln Ave.

 A brick falling from a chimney inflicted a wound on the head of Mr. Andre Mouton's young boy. Lafayette Advertiser 9/3/1898.










 


 From the Lafayette Gazette of September 3rd, 1898.


ABOUT A HIGH LICENSE.

Under the new constitution the Police Jury and City Council are empowered to fix the liquor license at whatever amount they may see fit. We understand that the Police Jury will, at its next meeting, consider the question of a high license.

 If the license is to be raised it should be placed at figures high to accomplish the end desired - lessen the liquor evil and increase the revenues from that source.

 There is in this parish a number of small grog-shops which cause a great deal of trouble. If a high license will close these it will have done much to be thankful for.

 The criminal history of all parishes shows that a large percentage of the crimes of a violent character owe their origin to strong drink sold in many instances at barrooms in isolated localities, where there is little or no police protection. It is generally in these places that men imbibe too freely of alcoholic beverage and break the criminal laws.

 It is generally conceded that prohibition, even in Kansas, does not prohibit. Therefore to reduce the quantity of liquor consumed is the wisest, as it is the only practical, solution of this vexing question. The most uncompromising opponent of prohibition or high license will agree that the world would be better if there were no whiskey distilled, but as whiskey will continue to be made and as it will always be impossible to stop the evil altogether, let us do out best to curtain its opportunities for doing mischief.

 A high license will tend to concentrate the liquor trade in the towns where the police is better and men do not enjoy the unrestrained freedom that they do in the rural districts.

 From a financial standpoint the change will be beneficial. The public revenues from that source will undoubtedly be increased, and it is certain that the criminal expenses will be reduced.
Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.



A Sad Case.

 Mayor Caffery has received a letter from the father of James Birney or Birne, who died on the train between Lafayette and Crowley a few days ago. The unfortunate man's real name was James Birney Slaven, but her bore an assumed name which, coupled with the fact that in one of his letters found on his person he was informed by his sister that he could return to his home at North Warren, Pa., and that the officers would not molest him, let to belief that he had been a fugitive from justice. In his letter to Mayor Caffery the father of the man says that he was not a fugitive, but while at school his mind was affected by overstudy and he imagined that he was being pursued by enemies. Some time ago he wrote home requesting his parents to address his letters to "James Berney" and to omit the family name, "Slaven.

 The father feelingly refers to the blasted career of his son. He says that he began life with brilliant prospects, having graduated from Alleghany College, at Meadville, Pa., and adopted the profession of civil engineering. After graduating he went to Butte City, Montana, and was employed there two or three years by a mining company. He then traveled throughout the West, finally drifting South. At the breaking out of the war he wrote to his mother that he thought of enlisting, but he did not. He subsequently wrote from Lake Charles, expressing a desire to return home and his brother Fred Slaven, offered to send him some money to pay for a ticket, if he would let him know where to send it.

 Mayor Caffery has, in compliance with requests made by Mr. Slaven, sent to the family everything found on the body. He has also marked the grave in the event the relatives decide to convey the remains home at any future time. Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.       


LAFAYETTE NEEDS A FOUNDRY.

Lafayette needs a foundry, and needs one very much. The man with enough capital and energy who will start a foundry in this town will no doubt realize a large profit on his investment. Within a radius of fifteen miles we have we have at least forty cotton gins, while at our doors is one of the largest refineries in the State and a cotton compress, to say nothing of a number of smaller concerns which would give a great deal of work to a foundry. We don't know of a town in the State that offers a better opportunity for an enterprise of this kind than Lafayette. This town is happily situated, having railway facilities equal to those of any point in South Louisiana. If these facts are Brought to the knowledge of capital of trade, we have no doubt they will be fruitful of good results.
Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.
 



High School Set to Open. - We are authorized to state that the High School, under Prof. LeRosen, and the primary school, under Prof. Simmons, will be opened Monday, September 5. In reply to a number of inquiries The Gazette will state that is has been unable to ascertain when the public schools will be opened in the different wards of the parish. The board will meet Monday and the matter will then be decided.
Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.




Contract for New Bank. - The contract for the building of the new bank has been given to the well-known contractor from New Iberia, W. H. Daily. The building will be a two-story, brick structure and will be thoroughly modern in construction and appearance.
Lafayette Gazette 9/2/1898.

 New Firm. - Messrs. Holt & Carter have opened a store next to the post-office. These gentlemen are experienced and successful merchants and are in every way equipped to meet all competition. Like all successful business men they believe in the efficacy of printer's ink and will always have something to say to the public through the columns of The Gazette.
Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.


Gerac to N. O. - Henry Gerac will leave in a few days for New Orleans where he will enter into a partnership with Mr. Bertrand Ader in a general commission business. The firm's name will be Ader & Gerac and besides the commission business it will carry a large stock of groceries for the wholesale and retail trade. Mr. Gerac is a young man of business qualifications and thoroughly equipped by experience and education for a successful career in the commercial world. The firm will solicit consignment and Mr. Gerac desires to call the attention of his friends to this fact. The Gazette bespeaks much prosperity for the new firm. 
Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.  




HON. R. F. BROUSSARD.

 Two years ago when the time came to nominate a Democratic candidate for Congress The Gazette was the first paper to suggest the name of Judge Allen of St. Mary as that of a man who possessed all the qualifications necessary to make a good representative. The Gazette gave its support to that eminent jurist because it knew him to be able and honest. The best proof that our opinion of Judge Allen was shared by a large number of Democrats of the district was the handsome vote he received in the convention. He was defeated by only one vote, and Hon. R. F. Broussard was nominated. This contest, which was a very close one, is not likely to be repeated this year, as indications from all the parishes of the district point to the re-nomination of Mr. Broussard without any opposition. It is certainly a great compliment to one as young as Mr. Broussard to be Broussard to be the unanimous choice of the Democracy of the district. Such an achievement would be a source of just pride to a much older man.

 Mr. Broussard should be returned to Congress. He has made a good record as a representative. No man has worked more for the interest of his constituents and it is doubtful if any if any representative that Louisiana has sent to Washington has accomplished more in so short a time.

 Mr. Broussard is young, active, industrious and able, and the third district will do well to keep him in his present position. With experience in the national halls of legislation he will become a very useful legislator. Unfortunately Southern districts are too prone to send new men to Congress. There is nothing to gain by changing at every election. The East has long since seen the folly of such a policy, and the great influence wielded at Washington by that section is the strongest kind of proof of the wisdom of keeping the same men in Congress so long as they show themselves diligent and honest.

 Mr. Broussard has done well since his election to Congress, and The Gazette is pleased to note the unanimity with which his re-nomination is being advocated by the Democrats of the third district.

Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.




The Five O'clock Tea Club.

 In last Sunday;s Picayune Dorothy Dix gives the following interesting sketch of the Five O'clock Tea Club of Lafayette.

 "Probably there does not exist within the bounds of the State a feminine organization more happily organized and more successfully carried out than the Five O'clock Tea Club, of Lafayette. Combining social, literary, artistic and charitable features, the club has extended its beneficent influences along the channels mapped out, and has proven successful beyond the most sanguine hopes of its promoters. Every move has been forward, and a marked improvement has been the outcome of each meeting.

 "The club was organized on March 2, 1896, through the able and wise direction of Mrs. T. M. Biossat, who became its first president. Mrs. Biossat's efforts were ably seconded by Mrs. N. P. Moss, as vice-president; Miss Lea Gladu, secretary, and Miss Stella Trahan, treasurer. The prime mover and chief spirit of this vigorous young club, however, was Mrs. T. M. Biossat, whose intellectual attainments, indomitable energy and unusual tact have contributed to the success which has crowned the work of the club. Mrs. Biossat is the wife of Mr. T. M. Biossat, and a daughter of Dr. R. Rushing, of Alexandria, and has been a resident of Lafayette for only six years, but despite domestic duties, has been closely identified with the social and intellectual life of the place. Mrs. Biossat was succeeded as president  by Miss Clye Mudd, who is a young woman of great culture and brightness, who graduated with distinguished honor at Silliman Female College, at Clinton, La., where she was valedictorian of her class, and who is admirably fitted to advance the club's best interest.

 "The Five O'clock Tea Club was an outgrowth of a desire to bring the women of the town into closer and pleasanter social relations, and as women are never so happy as when they are doing good, to this was added a bit of philanthropy of a peculiarly delicate and gentle nature, and it was decided to impose a small due on each member, the money thus accruing to be used in relieving the wants of some less fortunate sister. The members meet once a week at each other's house, a light repast is served, and the time devoted to a discussion of some literary topic, reading, recitation, music, or some game devised by the young people who belong to the club. Once a month the meets to transact business, adopt measures for the good of the organization, and consider the philanthropic matters they have in hand, which are carried out in accordance with the biblical injunction of secrecy. The meetings each week are almost on the nature of a family gathering, and are a source of continual delight to the members. The club is prosperous and progressive, and many, besides its members, have reason to bless the Five O'clock Tea Club."

From the New Orleans Picayune and in the Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.



Selected News Notes (Gazette) 9/3/1898.

 Prof. W. A. LeRosen arrived Wednesday from Shreveport to make all the preliminary arrangements to open the Lafayette High School on the 5th. instant. 

Jim Marsh and John Miller visited the Lafayette boys at Jackson barracks last Sunday evening.

 Jim Marsh has been transferred from the St. Martinville to the Alexandria branch, on the Southern Pacific.

 Isaac Roos, of the Isaac Roos Cotton Company, was in Lafayette Thursday. Mr. Roos represents a large exporting house.

 Vic Levy has returned from New York where he purchased a large stock of goods for the store which he and his brother, Willie, will open in Gus. Lacoste's new building.
Lafayette Gazette 9/3/1898.




LAGNIAPPE:
 From the Lafayette Daily Advertiser of September 3rd, 1939:


ENGLAND IS AT WAR!!!

"EXPECT FRANCE TO FOLLOW IN STEPS OF ENGLAND..."
   


 "NEW WEAPONS CAN FORCE PLANES TO STAY 20,000 FEET UP..."  

And Back in Lafayette, La.


Newsreels portraying the situation on the other side of the Atlantic were already showing regularly at the Jefferson Theatre. 
                                 
EXTRA! SCOOP!


Double Length News - Giving a complete record of the European Crisis.

PLUS: Mickey Mouse presents The 3 Little Pigs in  "Practical Pig."



Movies Now SHOWING at the JEFFERSON THEATRE:

 Randolph Scott in "Mutiny On The Bounty."

TOMORROW & MONDAY:  The stars you love to see...In Love!

    Tyrone Power, Sonja Henie


                           in

    Irving Berlin's, "Second Fiddle."
      

And at the ROYAL THEATRE:

NOW SHOWING:  

Clark Gable in "Mutiny On The Bounty."

TOMORROW AND MONDAY:

"Blondie Takes A Vacation." 
America's favorite fun family in their third successive hit!!!

SUNDAY: Charles Starret and Iris Meredith in,


"Spoilers of the Range." Laf. Advertiser 9/3/1939.

No comments:

Post a Comment