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Monday, January 12, 2015

**AUGUST 17TH M I

From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 17th, 1889:


Before Judge Edwards.


Last Monday before Judge Wakeman W. Edwards, at the court house in Lafayette commenced a formal examination or the charge against the Carencro prisoners for lynching the negro Sam Keys etc.  

 Hon. Walter H. Rogers, Attorney General and R. C. Smedics Esq., District Attorney represented the State and J. Numa Augustin, Esq., and Crow Girard, Esq. of Lafayette represented the prisoners. The examination of witnesses consumed the time of the court until Thursday at noon. The testimony adduced fully established the commission of the crimes as charged and the identity and connection of the prisoners therewith. These facts have never been denied by the prisoners who have claimed the right to bail. No new phases in the case were developed during the examination. Thursday at noon after closing the testimony on motion of the Attorney General Anatole Breaux and Fernand Broussard were discharged. The case was then by the attorneys submitted to the court upon briefs without oral argument. Late in the afternoon Judge Edwards delivered his opinion. Simenet Breaux, Alcide (Matout) Bernard and Ernest Crouchet ere admitted to bail in the sum of $250 each on the charge of jail breaking and murder. The following prisoners were admitted to bail on the on the charge of jail breaking in sums ranging from $1,000 for Ernest Bertrand down to $250 but were remanded to jail without bail on the charge of murder to await the action of the grand jury at the next October term of court to wit. Ernest Bernard Gabriel Dubeau, (unreadable first name) Guilbeau, Dupleix Breaux, Gaston Blot, Rosemond Broussard, Joseph (Bebe) Potier, Dr. Ursin Prejean, Hypolite Hebert, Joseph Stavmen, Saul Broussard, Adolphe Prejean and Octave (Gateau) Castille.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1889.


Quite Warm. - The weather during the week has been quite warm with frequent local showers. Caterpillars have made their appearance in nearly every section of the parish though many farms have so far escaped their invasion. Paris green is being used extensively. If we could only have hot clear weather it is believed the ravages of these pests could be checked. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1889.



MANY IMPROVEMENTS

Added to People's Cotton Oil Mill. - Capacity Increased to Sixty Tons Daily.

 Everything Overhauled and Made Ready for Next Season's Business.

 Through the courtesy of Mr. F. E. Voorhies, the superintendent, an Advertiser reporter was shown over the People's Cotton Oil Plant and ice plant one day last week. Considerable additions increasing the capacity of the oil plant have been mad and a general overhauling and repairing have just been completed and repairing  have just been completed. Everything looked neat and attractive, and the mill is evidently in splendid shape for handling the coming season's business.

 The first department visited was the boiler room, containing the large boiler room, which furnish power for both plants. A new 14 inch fire wall has lately been built as a safeguard against fire, which is a much needed improvement and will prove valuable.

 The engine room was next visited and the reporter found much pleasure in looking over the powerful engines, dynamos which furnish the electric lights, and other machinery which all together supply the motive power for the various machines which take the seed, strip it of its lint, and carry on the manufacture of oil and meal. The engine room had a brand new appearance, every engine having been cleaned, polished and painted and everything put in neat order.

 In the press room a new press, new steam heater and an accumulator system of the latest improved Stillwell Bierce machinery has been added, enlarging the capacity of the plant and placing it strictly in the up-to-date list in all respects.

 The lint room was not overlooked in making improvements and here eight new latest pattern Carver linters have been installed, also a separating device designed and build by Supt. Voorhies, to separate the meat from the hulls. The separator works very satisfactorily. The reporter examined a number of hulls which has passed through it and found the hulls entirely free of meat.

 In adding new machinery to secure room and at the same time provide as far as possible against fire, the cotton press was placed in a separate building built of brick. This is arrangement has greatly reduced the cost of insurance and will prove of decided advantage in other ways.

 With the enlargement of the plant from a capacity of 40 to 60 tons daily, more trackage became necessary for handling the product and under Supt. Voorhies' supervision a new track is being put in, to afford facilities for loading cars.

 Thursday's test was made of the entire plant which proved eminently satisfactory.

 Leaving the oil plant Supt. Voorhies conducted the reporter over the ice plant, and carefully explained every step in the manufacture of ice form from the moment the water is drawn from their well of splendid artesian water and distilled until it is turned out in blocks of clear beautiful ice. The process is very interesting and wonderful. The ice plant has a capacity of 30 tons daily and has been in operation four years, during which time it has run smoothly and efficiently; not a single day has it failed to furnish an ample supply of ice to the residents of Lafayette, a record justly to be proud of.

 The mills are now receiving a large supply of coal to provide against emergency.

 Mr. Voorhies has been connected with the mill since it was erected eight years ago, and now begins his ninth season.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.

   



  

   



  














Police Jury Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., Aug. 10th, 1889. - Pursuant to adjournment the Board of Public School Directors met this day with the following members present: Dr. J. D. Trahan, President; Dr. J. P. Francez, Jasper Spell, O. C. Mouton, T. Begnaud.  Absent: J. S. Whittington, M. Billeaud, S. LeBlanc and D. Hulin.

 The reading of the minutes was dispensed with.

 The building committee of the First Ward reported that an acre of land had been donated by Mr. T. Begnaud, and that they would be able to build the new schoolhouse in a short time.

 A communications from the patrons of Mr. Fletchet's school, in the 2nd Ward, stating that they were well pleased with Mr. Fletchet as a teacher, and asking that he retained as teacher of said school, was read.

 Agreeable to the above the following resolution was adopted:

 WHEREAS, The complaint made against Mr. Fletchet is not sufficient to cause his removal:

 Be it Resolved, That Mr. Fletchet be retained as teacher of said school.

 Messrs. Matieux and Sonnier appeared before the Board, and stated that if the Board would allow the school in the 1st Ward to remain at Mr Matieux's, that they would donate an arpent of land to the school house at their own cost.

 On motion of Dr. Francez the offer of Mr. Matieux was accepted, and that a vote of thanks be tendered to Mr. Matieux for his munificent offer.

 A petition from the citizens of the 6th Ward, asking that a school be established in said ward was read; but the amount apportioned to said ward not being sufficient for the number of schools already established in said ward. Dr. Francez moved that the petition be laid on the table indefinitely.

 On motion of Mr. O. C. Mouton, duly seconded, the Treasurer was instructed to apportion the amount of $269.55, being the amount on hand un-apportioned, to the several wards according to law.

 On motion of Mr. O. C. Mouton, duly seconded, it was
    Resolved, That the teachers shall examine their pupils at the end of every week on the lessons they have gone over during the week, and that they shall examine them every month on the lessons they have gone over during the month.

 On motion of Dr. J. P. Francez the Superintendent was instructed to furnish the teachers with a list of the text books adopted by the State Board for the use of public schools as soon as he received the same, and that the teachers use the same in their schools.

 The resignation of Dr. J. D. Trahan as President of the School Board was duly accepted.

 Dr. Trahan, in offering his resignation, said that he regretted very much severing himself from the School Board, but they it was impossible for him to do his duty to his patients and be a member of the Board, and that his connection with the Board had been most harmonious and pleasant.

 On motion of Mr. O. C. Mouton, duly seconded, the Board tendered a vote of thanks to Dr. Trahan for his efficient, generous and impartial actions while President of the Board, and that they hereby express their sincere regrets at his resignation.

 Dr. J. P. Francez nominated Mr. O. C. Mouton as President, who was unanimously elected.

 The following accounts were approved:

 -----------------p. 5---------------------

 There being no further business, the Board adjourned.
O. C. MOUTON, President.
H. E. TOLL, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1899.


Lafayette News Notes (Advertiser) 8/17/1889.



 Owing to the rains the pasturage has been unusually fine of late and the stock are in good condition.


 Chas. D. Caffery, Esq., is building a law office on Madison street alongside the office of Jos. A. Chargois Esq. 


 Muscadines and grapes are ripe and been on sale on our streets for a week or more.

 Armand Levy has thoroughly repainted his store on Washington street and it looks quite neat in its new dress. Mr. A. Bonnet is doing artistic work. 

 We have had the pleasure several times of meeting Mr. J. Numa Augustin, of New Orleans, since his soujourn with us during the examination of the case of the prisoners charged with lynching, etc. Mr. Augustin's polished manners and affable temperament have made him well lnown and highly esteemed by our community. He will always had a warm welcome among us.


 Monday night a carload of negroes passed through this place bound for Southwestern Texas to work at building an extension of the Southern Pacific Railroad. They had been collected along the road between here and New Orleans. We noticed a labor agent here for that purpose last week but he met with little success. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1889. 














 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 17th, 1901:
 
 Needed Improvements. 


 All things come to him who wait is probably true, provided that there has been earnest endeavor, careful plans, and a determined manipulation of circumstances by the one who waits to see the fruition of his hopes; but the adage is not true for those who wait. Micawber  like, for something to turn up. In this strenuous age, when only the bold and ready achieve their purpose, he who desires to have profit, gain, or advantage, "must be up and doing, still achieving, still pursuing," lest his more forward brother step in and seize the prize.
 So it is with communities. To obtain desirable additions, to secure advantages, to reap benefits, they must be bold and ready. A progressive spirit among the citizens, a readiness to invest their money, a wise generosity, - all are necessary for the up the town.


 Lafayette has shown a great liberality in the matter of the Industrial Institute. The spectacle of a small parish voting the magnificent sum of $70,000 to an educational institution, has challenged the admiration of the State, and its fame has spread far beyond its borders.
 Such an act gives us standing before the world. It speaks in no uncertain tone of the splendid body of citizens we have, and gives to capital the very strongest inducement to come among us.


 We have done well in the past. Our town has steadily grown. It has many improvements, and such as testimony to the advanced spirit of the people; but we can not rest here. There can be no standing still, it is either forward or retrograde. The Business Men's League and the citizens generally should at once hand their energies over toward further improvement. We need suitable facilities for our public schools; indeed, a new need. There are other things, factories for instance, that Lafayette should have, and most likely will have; but one thing at a time. Let us have what is most pressing. It will require money to erect the kind of school building we need; but nothing worth having can be had without labor and expense. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1901.

Enlarging Their Store. - Owing to their increasing business Messrs. Mouton & Salles will make their store room 105 feet in length by 30 feet in width. These progressive gentlemen will handle a larger and more varied line of goods than ever, adding Men's Pants and Hats, a fine line of Dry Goods, Notions, Fancy goods, etc., and a big stock of Groceries. Mr. Salles left for New York and Boston last Sunday to make his purchases and will be gone three weeks. On his return he will bring with him an experienced and fashionable modiste and ladies tailor, who will take charge of their up-to-date dress-making department. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1901.

More Telephone Service. - The Louisiana and Texas Long Distance Telephone Co. will start work Monday, and will build telephone exchanges all over Louisiana and Texas. They will begin operation at Crowley, then at Rayne, Gueydan, Lafayette etc. They will reach Lafayette in about thirty days. A large force of line men will be employed to hurry the work. This company is backed by heavy capital, and they will use every means to give the public a first-class service. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1901.


WOMEN AS VOTERS.


 That the advocates of equal suffrage - or suffrage in which there is no discrimination on account of sex - are gaining ground there is not the least doubt. They have recently given another evidence of their increasing strengths. The Alabama constitutional convention has decided by a vote of 65 to 45 that women who own may vote in municipal elections involving bond issues. Years ago Louisiana took an advanced position on the question of suffrage. The tax-paying women have been entitled to vote in all elections held to levy special taxes, and it must be said to their credit that in exercising their privilege of franchise they have never failed to take a progressive and enlightened view of public questions. It will be remembered that in the elections held here to levy special taxes for municipal improvements and the Industrial Institute the women of Lafayette showed conclusively that the constitution made no mistake in clothing them with the franchise. They were found among the most progressive citizens battling for municipal advancement and better educational facilities.

 Intelligent legislative bodies everywhere recognize the rights of women. Many of our readers are perhaps ignorant of the fact that women are eligible to serve on school boards. And why should they not be eligible to discharge the duties of school director? Man's innate conceit is responsible for his proneness to sneer at the arguments of those who wish to do but simple justice to the daughters of old Mother Eve.

 Though The Gazette is not yet entirely converted to the cause of equal suffrage - because it feats that the dear girls will do themselves much harm without succeeding in purifying politics - it appreciates the force and logic of the following editorial utterances from te very able Washington Post:

 "...How can it be right to deny women property-holders a vote in municipal elections in the choice of the officials who are to lay, collect and expend their taxes, if it be wrong to deny them the ballot in elections involving bond issues? A municipal legislature can and often does expend public funds rashly and even corruptly. Municipal rings fatten on spoils derived from taxation without any bond selling. It is impossible to offer an argument for this just and expedient provision that the Alabama convention has put into the new constitution that is not equally an argument for equal municipal suffrage. The movement, once begun, is bound to go on. The next step must be full municipal suffrage to all tax-paying women. And then will come another step, to wit, equal suffrage rights for both sexes. Not  large proportion of the women in the United States own taxable property in their own right. But all women have interests more sacred than those of property. The lives and liberties of women are at the mercy of the laws. Who will undertake to say that if it be just to let tax-paying women vote, it is right to withhold the ballot from all other women? The interests of home, the marital relation, and much that affects the lives of the women are at the disposal of those who make and enforce the laws. The Post does not advocate unrestricted suffrage. The Post would like to have ignorance and crime eliminated from the electorate. But The Post believes in equal suffrage, equal voting rights for both sexes, and, thus believing, is glad to see Alabama setting its face toward that goal, taking a step which logically leads right up to it. ..."      Lafayette Gazette 8/17/1901.     

   








Local News Notes (Advertiser) 8/17/1901.


 A few more stores on Lincoln Avenue and Lafayette will have a Main Street.

 A society for the prevention of cruelty to animals would be a good move for Lafayette.

 The Lafayette Cotton Compress has built a private telephone line from Lafayette to Washington by way of Carencro, Sunset, and Opelousas.

 Falk & Hannen announce that they have just finished burning 150,000 pressed bricks, which they now offer for sale. A sample is on exhibition at the First National Bank.

 The reason the arc lights were not lighted lately, we are informed, was on account of adding two new dynamos to the plant. It will take several days yet to complete the work.
  
 The "boys" are waiting impatiently the time when Prof. Sontag can be with them. They are all enthusiastic and no doubt will give Lafayette a brass band to be proud of.

 Mr. Numa Broussard is now the owner of a nice gasoline boat which he constructed himself. Mr. Broussard's intention is to run his boat between Lafayette and Vermilion bay. He will be in Lafayette every week with fish, crabs, & etc. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1901.














From the Lafayette Gazette of August 17th, 1901:



The Oldest Engineer on the S. P. Line.

 Bore Reputation of Most Careful and Skillful Than Any One in Yard.

 Peter Dauenhauer, Sr., well known in railroad circles in Lafayette, is now numbered among the dead. The following notice is from the New Orleans Item:


 Peter Dauenhauer, Sr., one of Jefferson parish's foremost citizens, died yesterday evening at 7 o'clock, at his residence in McDonoughville.

 Mr. Dauenhauer had been ill for the past several weeks and on several occasions it was believed that he was near the end but his strong constitution and the skillful medical attention brought him safely through the crises. During the earlier part of last week he had the appearance of recovering, but an unfavorable turn for the worse set in yesterday, and at 7 o'clock his death occurred, while he was surrounded by afflicted lived ones and a few friends.

 The deceased was 51 years of age, and had been a resident of McDonoughville since his early manhood. He leaves a wife and five children, three sons and two daughters.
The eldest daughter is Mrs. Charles Penisson, whose nuptials were celebrated so happily a few short months ago at the home which death has now made desolate. Peter Dauenhauer Jr., the eldest son, is also married, and is a prominent young resident of McDonoughville. The other children are still at home. Mr. Dauenhauer also leaves many other relatives, four of his brothers, Michael, J. B., Cosimer and Thomas, residing in Gretna.


 Mr. Dauenhauer was the oldest engineer, in service, on the Southern Pacific road in Algiers, and bore the reputation of being one of the most careful and skillful who first entered the service of the Southern Pacific Company when a mere lad, and rose steadily until he finally secured the most important passenger run on this division of the road. Mr. Dauenhaur had been in a number of wrecks, but his coolness never deserted him in time of danger, and always managed to escape unhurt.

 An evidence of the trust reposed in his skill as an engineer was manifested during the recent departure of President McKinley from New Orleans. Mr. Dauenhauer was assigned to handle the throttle of the engine that pulled the distinguished guests out over the Southern Pacific road.

 The funeral will take place to-morrow morning from his home in McDonoughville.
Mr. Dauenhauer was a devout Catholic, and the impressive service of that faith will be conducted at the obsequies. He was also a member of the following fraternal and benevolent organizations, the members of which will attend his funeral: Algiers Lodge, B. of L. E.; Lee Benovolent Association Mechanics' Hook and Ladder and Hose Company No. 1, St. Joseph Benevolent Association, Catholic Knights of Ladies of America.


 Mr. Dauenhauer was also a jury commissioner of Jefferson parish by appointment of Judge Rost, and many of the prominent parish officials will be in attendance at the obsequies.


 From the New Orleans Item and in the Lafayette Gazette 8/17/1901.





Farewell Concert. - The Concert given in the auditorium last Monday for the benefit of Prof. Hayden was a distinct success judged from the standpoint of artistic merit. With Hayden, the blind master of sounds; Jean Durand, the delightful cornetist; Mr. and Miss Melancon, whose music never fails to please; Miss Lucille Revillon, whose voice charms the ear and fills the soul with poetry; Mrs. McBride, whose skillful execution on the piano always captivates the lover of good music; Mrs. Lorena Simon, who sings only as the nightingale can; and last, though by no means least; Miss Paola Franceschini, the ever popular entertainer, the concert was a fitting farewell to the gifted North Louisianian. When the feast of music ceased Prof. Hayden thanked the audience for its generous assistance and spoke feelingly of his kind friends in Lafayette. Lafayette Gazette 8/17/1901.


The Arc Lights. - In its remarks last Saturday anent the failure to light the arc lamps. The Gazette did an injustice to the management of the electric light plant. The Gazette has since been informed that on account of much needed repairs which are being made by Mr. Melchert it has been impossible to furnish the town with street lights. A new foundation has been placed under the engine and while the work was being done it was not safe to tax the plant to its full capacity. It appears that the original foundation had to be replaced by a new and stronger one. As soon as practicable the arc lamps will be lighted. Lafayette Gazette 8/17/1901. 


 Will Build Larger. - Owing to their increasing business, Messrs. Mouton & Salles will make their store 30 feet longer, giving them store room 105 feet in length by 30 feet in width. These progressive gentlemen will handle a larger and more varied line of goods than ever, adding men's pants and hats, a big assortment of shoes, a finer line of dry goods, notions, fancy goods, etc., and a big stock of groceries. Mr. Salles left for New York and Boston last Sunday to make his purchases and will be gone three weeks. On his return he will bring with him an experienced and a fashionable modiste and ladies' tailor, who will take charge of their up to date dress-making department.
Lafayette Gazette 8/17/1901.







 




 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 17th, 1904:


VERY WET WEATHER. 

Estimated to Have Curtailed Cotton Crop Fully One Fourth.
 


 The continuous rains for the past four or five weeks, have, as far as we can learn, injured the crops throughout the parish from twenty-five to thirty per cent, but some consolation may be had in the fact that the wet spell has been general throughout the cotton area with an estimated damage of fully one fourth.

 Early in the season there was promise of a "bumper" crop which caused serious apprehension of a low price for the staple, and such probability existing, the curtailment in production caused by the weather, may develop into an advantage, as now there are bright prospects for twelve cent cotton, perhaps more, which will more that offset what seems at present to be a loss.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.






 MANY IMPROVEMENTS.

 - Added to People's Cotton Oil Mill.
 -Capacity Increased to Sixty Tons Daily.
       -Everything  Overhauled and Made Ready for
         Next Season's Business.

 Through the courtesy of Mr. F. E. Voorhies, the superintendent, an Advertiser reporter was shown over the People's Cotton Oil Plant and ice plant one day last week. 

 Considerable additions increasing the capacity of the oil plant have been made and a general overhauling and repairing have just been completed. Everything looked neat and attractive, and the mill is evidently in splendid shape for handling the coming season's business.

 The first department visited was the boiler room, containing the large boilers which furnish power for both plants. A new 14 inch fire wall has lately been built as a safeguard against fire, which is a much needed improvement and will prove valuable.

 The engine room was next visited and the reporter found much pleasure in looking over the powerful engines, dynamos which furnish the electric lights, and other machinery which all together supply the motive power for the various machines which take the seed, strip it of its lint, and carry the manufacture of oil and meal. The engine room had a brand new appearance, every engine having been cleaned polished and painted and everything put in neat order.

 In the press room a new press, new steam heater and an accumulator system of the latest improved Stillwell Bierce machinery has been added, enlarging the capacity of the plant and placing it strictly in the up-to-date list in all respects.

 The lint room was not overlooked in making improvements and here eight new latest pattern Carver linters have been installed, also a separating device designed and built by Supt. Voorhies, to separate the meat from the hulls. The separator works satisfactorily. The reporter examined a number of hulls which had passed through it and found the hulls entirely free of meat.

 In adding new machinery to secure room and at the same time provide as far as possible against fire, the cotton press was placed in a separate building built of brick. This arrangement has greatly reduced the cost of insurance and will prove of decided advantage in other ways.

 With the enlargement of the plant from a capacity of 40 to 60 tons daily, more track-age became necessary for handling the product and under Supt. Voorhies' supervision a new track is being put in, to afford facilities for loading cars.

 Thursday a test was made of the entire plant which proved eminently satisfactory.

 Leaving the oil plant Supt. Voorhies conducted the reporter over the ice plant, and carefully explained every step in the manufacture of ice from the moment the water is drawn from their well of splendid artesian water and distilled until it is turned out in  blocks of clear beautiful ice. The process is very interesting and wonderful. The ice plant has a capacity of 20 tons daily and has been in operation four years, during which time it has run smoothly and efficiently; not a single day has it failed to furnish an ample supply of ice to the residents of Lafayette, a record justly to be proud of.

 The mills are now receiving a large supply of coal to provide against emergency.

 Mr. Voorhies has been connected with the mill since it was erected eight years ago, and now begins his ninth season.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.





A Pleasant Evening.  - Friday evening a number of young people gathered at the home of Mr. F. H. Clark and passed the evening most pleasantly in playing games. Delightful refreshments were served which gave an added pleasure. Those present were: Misses Juliet and Lagarde, of New Orleans, Bertha Hebert, Agnes Breaux, Lydia Broussard, Cecilia Babin, of Opelousas, Daisy Bertrand, Francis and Attie Clark; Messrs. Chas. Martin, Jack Howard, Agnon Broussard, Leon Broussard, Farrar Lindsay, Orez Babin, James Breaux, Nicholas Hebert, Lee Delahoussaye.  Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904. 



Will Reopen First Monday. -  Mt. Carmel Convent will reopen its 59th session the first Monday in September. During vacation the Convent was repainted and a number of modern improvements have been made for the comfort of pupils. The patronage of the public is solicited, and parents are cordially invited to call and investigate our superior advantages for the instruction of the young.  Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.
 


Attacked by Negroes. - Sheriff Lacoste and Deputy Broussard last night arrested nine negroes who attacked two white men in the eighth ward with bottles and revolvers as they were returning home from town. Two of the negroes have confessed to the crime. One of the white men was seriously cut on the head. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.



Ball T0-day. -  There will be a good game of ball between Lafayette and Pilette to-day at 4 p. m. Tom Behan who played professional ball a number of years ago, will replace Hintz, who has left. Laf. Adv. 8/17/1904. 


To Paint the High School. - Mr. W. J. Avery is passing a subscription list to secure money to paint the High School building, which needs painting badly, both to improve its looks and to preserve it. It may be possible that Mr. Avery may fail to see that some of our citizens, and in that case, it is hoped they will send him whatever they may feel like giving.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.



Allowed Eight Foot Strip. - At a special meeting Thursday the Police Jury took up the proposition to widen the streets about the court-house square and decided to build the concrete walk eight feet back of the edge of the square all around and leave the eight foot strip for use as part of the street.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.


Two New Brick Buildings. - Thursday Mr. Gus Schmulen sold 30 feet on the corner of Pierce and Congress streets at $125  a front foot to the Bank of Lafayette which will erect a modern two-story bank building as soon as plans, etc., can be arranged. Mr. Schmulen will also build on the lot adjoining an up to date store two stories in height, 32x75, and will use the second floor as a dwelling. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.   



WORK DELAYED. -  The continued wet weather has delayed progress considerably on the First National Bank building, the new hotel and the opera house. The bank building will probably be ready for occupancy by October 1, but it may be December 1 before the other two buildings will be completed.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904. 




 Personals from 8/17/1904.


 Mrs. N. Abramson and Miss Estelle Mouton expect to leave to-morrow for St. Louis. 

 Mr. H. A. Gianelloni brought to the office Saturday some very fine red and sweet peppers which he raised in his garden. They are on exhibition in the Advertiser window.

 Jerome Mouton, Chas. Debaillon and Willis Roy have returned from a visit to the St. Louis Fair, where they report having had a fine time. 


 Mrs. C. P. Moss and sister, Miss Julia Huff, were guests at the Cosmopolitan in New Orleans Sunday.

 After visiting relatives and friends in London and Plymouth, F. F. Carter, wife and family will sail from Liverpool August 27, by S. S. Campania for New York. They will visit St. Louis and take in the Fair for a week, and expect to return home about September 15.

 T. M. Biossat has added greatly to the appearance of his jewelry store by doing away with wooden counters and replacing them with handsome glass show case counters.

 Frank Abadie, of Carencro, was in Lafayette Monday. 


 The many friends of Harold Demanade will regret to learn that he is confined to his bed with typhoid fever.

 Mrs. B. Falk left Monday for Lake Charles where she will spend a week with her daughter, Mrs. Armond Levy.

 Mrs. M. E. Girard and Ashton Beraud returned from Uvalde, Texas, Saturday, where Mrs. Girard has been seven weeks visiting her son, Dr. P. M. Girard. 


  Mrs. C. K. Darling and children are visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Nickerson. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1904.













 From the Lafayette Gazette of August 17th, 1895:




WOMEN AS POLITICIANS
...AND REFORMERS. 


 Some enthusiasts in this State are agitating the question of appointing women on the school boards of the several parishes. The Gazette is confident that in this part of Louisiana the good ladies would spurn the offer of public office.

 None could be found to accept positions on the school boards or in any public bodies. The "new woman" business will never be popular in the old Pelican State. It belongs to Kansas, Colorado and other crank-breeding States. It's bad enough that the men have to be in politics without dragging the women in it too. Nothing worse could befall our homes than the introduction of politics within their sacred precincts.

 Capt. McGrath, of the Baton Rouge Truth, has said the best thing that has been written on this subject. Here it is:


 "There is rapidly growing sentiment in this State favorable to the appointment of ladies on the school boards of the several parishes. The only objection we can urge to this is that it will be no very long time after this concession is made before some of these same women will want to run for sheriff or coroner, and as we have more office seekers in the State than places can be found for, we don't want to see the mourners crowded. As the legislature is kept pretty busy now in creating new offices for political henchmen, what should be the result if women should enter politics? With all due regard to the new woman and the women's right woman, we incline to the opinion that she will have her hands full in properly rearing her brood without adding office holding to her other duties. We have known women to run around the country attending meetings, making speeches and reforming things generally, and yet their own sons, through lack of motherly counsel and parental care, grew up to be ignorant, worthless scamps. Women would no doubt make excellent members of school boards, but they will achieve better results by looking after their own families than by giving their time to the community at large. If each and every mother in the land will only do her full duty to her family and teach her offspring to fear God and to obey the laws of their native land, they will do more good for the human race than could be accomplished by years of services devoted to voting schools to favorite teachers."

From the Baton Rouge Truth and in the Lafayette Gazette 8/17/1895.



ACCIDENT. - A hack collided against two bicycles last Sunday. Albert Theall and Emmanuel Pellerin were riding the bicycles and they are still wondering how it happened that they were not instantly killed. Emmanuel gives a thrilling description of the collision, but Albert prefers not to speak about it. Lafayette Gazette 8/17/1895.


 Sheriff's Sale. - Last Saturday the sheriff sold the property belonging to the Casseo succession. The lot situated near Mr. Doucet's residence was purchased by Louis Casseo, one of the heirs, for $750, and the corner lot facing H. Hohorst's store was bid in by Mouton & Salles for $1,575. The bidding was very spirited and the amount realize for the corner lot which is 96x140 feet, shows that notwithstanding the hard times real estate in Lafayette has not depreciated. It is true that this lot is centrally located, but it has no improvements of any value. We understand that Messrs. Mouton & Salles intend building as modern structure in which to carry on their business. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1895.


News Notes (Gazette) 8/17/1895. 
 


 Mr. and Mrs. E. V. Barry, of Grand Coteau, are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Mouton.

 Louis J. Derbes, the accommodating salesman at Leon Plonsky's, visited in Lafayette Opelousas Sunday. Repairs are being made to the Lisbony Hotel and "Gus" will be prepared for the fall trade.

 The feast of the Assumption was celebrated at the Catholic church last Thursday with the usual ceremonies. A large number of people were present.  Romain Francez was in Lafayette this week.
 

  Willis Eves and family moved to New Iberia Thursday. Mr. Eves will continue in the employment of the Southern Pacific Company. As it is reasonably certain that the additions will soon be in the corporate limits of the town, the street committee of the council is having the weeds along the avenue. Lafayette Advertiser 8/17/1895.



Lagniappe:
Pointed Paragraphs.

You can't put old shoulders under a young head.

 Man proposes and woman disposes of his proposition.

 Nothing boasts a girl's self-concert like two proposals a week.

 All the trouble in the world is due to two distinct causes - men and women.

 A married man who was hypnotized says it felt like it does when his wife makes up her mind.

 Law books are covered with sheepskin - and sheep's kin contribute much to the support of lawyers.

 All wives admire indifference in their husbands - providing it is directed exclusively toward other women.
People who are howling about this little hot spell will be the first to kick when the mercury flirts with the zero mark.

 Wise are they who never love any one for anything but love.

 It is good to grasp an honest hand - consisting of four acres.

 Selfishness is the father of misery, and jealousy is the mother-in-law.

 Mosquitoes and young widows seem to have a special grudge against old bachelors.

 There are a good many stale boarding house prunes in a life of single blessedness.

 A woman's mission on earth is to convince some man that he ought to get married.

 "The Haymaker's Story" is the title of a recent novel. It probably has a grass plot.

 Don't marry a girl who laughs at every fool thing you say. She's playing you to lose if you win.

 It always makes a man mad when in after years his wife laughs at the recollection of how he proposes.

 "The thief who broke into Blank's shoe-shop last night got away with considerable booty," wrote the rural editor - and the next day he was taken to the insane asylum.

 From the Chicago News and in the Lafayette Gazette 8/17/1901.


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