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Monday, January 12, 2015

**AUGUST 15TH M C

 From the Lafayette Gazette of August 15th, 1903:

END OF BATSON.

 Murderer Hung Without Making a Confession, but Gives an Envelope Containing Letters, to His Mother, Before Mounting the Scaffold.

 [Special to the Lafayette Gazette:]

 Lake Charles, La., Aug. 14, 4 p. m. - Gov. Heard having refused to interfere with the verdict of the Calcasieu court, A. E. Batson, the murderer of six members of the Earle family, was hung at 1:43 this afternoon in the Lake Charles jail. The drop fell and in fourteen minutes the muscular body of the Missourian was lifeless. Without a tremor he walked to the scaffold and met his fate, displaying to the last that wonderful nerve which has never deserted him since his arrest.

 Batson spent the morning chatting with reporters. During the forenoon his mother called and he was allowed the freedom of the jail corridor. The parting with his mother was a most affecting scene. His mother elapsed him to her breast and gave him  a farewell kiss which brought tears to every eye. He handed his mother an envelope which is believed to contain letters addressed to friends. At 1:20 prayers were said. He ate a hearty dinner and when the fatal moment drew near he dressed himself in the habilaments of death with the utmost coolness.

 He made no confession, his last words being "good-bye." The drop was seven feet. Only fifteen persons were allowed to witness the execution, but there was a large crowd in the jail yard. His body was embalmed and sent to Richards, Mo., his old home, for burial. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.


LEAVING THE G. O. P.

Two Members of Republican Parish Committee Withdraw from that Party.

 There appears to be some defection from local Republican ranks. Some days ago Dr. H. D. Guidry, a member of the Republican Parish Executive Committee, announced his abandonment of that party and in Wednesday's Times-Democrat Mr. C. Doucet, a member and vice-president of the same committee, states that he has also decided to quit the g. o. p. Mr. Doucet has published the following address defining his position:

            Lafayette, La., Aug. 10, 1903.
 "To the Republican Electorate of Lafayette Parish:

 "Gentlemen - As your vice-president, I feel it incumbent on me to endorse the statement of the Republican party in Louisiana recently issued by Dr. Guidry, executive committeeman of the First ward of this parish. I desire to emphasize particularly, and to endorse, the allusion to reciprocity with Cuba, which will have the effect of destroying the sugar industry of the State; and the policy of imperialism and expansion, which will have the effect of bringing those tropical islands in disastrous competition with the chief products of our own State; and for the further reason, upon which the doctor did not dwell, the favoritism which has made it possible for an obscure army surgeon to rise rapidly, until to-day he stands within measurable distance of the commandership of the United States Army, over the heads of two-score of veterans who have grown gray in the service of their country; in view of the travesty of justice which sought to discredit the hero of Santiago, Winfield Scott Schley, and gave the emolements, as it sought to give the honor, to a nonparticipant in the decisive battle of the Spanish war, simply because he was a pet of the Crowninshed clique, upheld by Roosevelt.

 "And now comes the post office scandal, the rottenness of which is a stench in the nostrils of all decent citizens, regardless of their political affiliation; the whole capped by the negrophilism of the President, and his efforts to force social equality, as part and parcel of good Republicanism, makes it an utter impossibility for any decent, self-respecting Southern Republican to longer affiliate with the Republican party, and shows the necessity of changing the national administration, as too long a lease of power has evidently made honesty in Republican politics an impossibility.

 "For these reasons, I join my esteemed friend, Dr. Guidry, in advising the Republican voters to affiliate loyally with the Democrats, national and state, and to stand by the nominees of the next primary."
               (Signed) C. Doucet, Vice-President, Member of Republican Parish Executive Committee."
Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.



LUCKY TOWNSHIP NINE
Oil Townships of Three Parishes Have That Number.

[From the Crowley Signal.]

 Dr. F. R. Martin, whose large holdings in three of the four great Southwestern Louisiana oil fields are rapidly bringing him to the front as an oil magnate, has just returned from Anse la Butte, which he regards as one of the most promising fields in the State. Among the recent activities in this field is the drilling of a well by the New Iberia Oil & Mineral Company on their tract near the holdings of the Crowley Oil & Mineral Company within about 600 feet.

 Speaking of the various Louisiana oil fields, Dr. Martin notes this coincidence:

 "The four great oil fields of this vicinity are all in townships number nine. The largest field of the State, the famous Manou field, is in township number nine of Acadia parish, range two. The Welsh field is in township nine of Calcasieu parish. The Anse la Butte field is in range four of township nine, St. Martin's parish, while the Bayou Bouillon field is in range eight, township nine, of the same parish. I understand that the oil discovery recently made between Canal Switch and Midland is also in township number nine, which seems to be a favorable sign. The fact that the townships number nine are all on a line running east and west, with Crowley as the geographical center, lends additional force to the statement of the Picayune and a number of the great Northern papers, to the effect that Crowley is the center of the Louisiana oil development." From the Crowley Signal and in the Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.



Pontifical Mass.

 Last Tuesday morning high mass was celebrated at St. John's Catholic church in memory of the late Pope. A large number of people attended the services. The civil authorities were represented by Judge Debaillon, District Attorney Campbell, Mayor Caffery and members of the City Council. Father Savoure, of Chenal, preached an able and eloquent sermon highly eulogistic of the great churchman. Father Forge, who conducted the services, was assisted by Revs. Engelbring of Opelousas, Gerault of Patoutville, Langlois of Breaux Bridge, Stockhalper of Grand Coteau, Bollard of Charenton, and Cambiaire, the vicar of St. John's church. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1901.




 How Would it Do in Lafayette?

 Franklinton New Era:  In Cook county, Illinois, they have a law which requires the owners of property to have all noxious weeds cut and burned after fifteen days' notice. If it be not done within the time limit the Lord High Weed Exterminator throws a gang of men onto the lot, the weeds are cut and burned, and the owner finds the cost assessed him when he comes to pay his taxes. That law might work to advantage in some other places. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.    


 Fernand Mouton to Paris.

 Fernand Mouton left Wednesday for New York where he will board a steamer for Paris. The new position to which Mr. Mouton has recently been appointed by the New York Life Insurance Company requires that he should have his headquarters in the French capital. The Gazette congratulates Mr. Mouton upon his promotion and wishes him much success in his new field of work. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.





Euchre at Parkerson's.

 Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Parkerson entertained at a euchre party last Saturday in honor of their nephew, Godfrey Parkerson, of New Orleans. A prize was given to the best lady and gentlemen players, which were won by Miss Viola Young and Thomas Debaillon. Those present were: Misses Ula Coronna, May Bailey, Mabel Dauterive, Viola Young, Rhena Boudreaux, Ruby Scranton, Bessie Caffery, Gertrude and Rosalie Coronna, and Alice Moss. The young men were: Godfrey Parkerson of New Orleans, Charles, George and Thomas Debaillon, L. D. Nickerson, Jeff and James (unreadable last name), Moore Biossat and Frank E. Broussard. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.

 The Wild West Show. The cowboys have arrived with their horses and all the paraphernalia for a regular wild-west show. The entertainments will begin at 3:30 every afternoon to-day, Sunday and Monday. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.




TRAINMEN CHARGED IN SHOOTING.

 Last Tuesday morning a Mexican named Gustave Martini, who was trying to steal a ride on a west-bound freight train, was shot and seriously wounded near Segura. The case was reported to the authorities at New Iberia by who, an investigation of the shooting is being made. Conductor Foster and the three brakemen, who were on the train, have been arrested in connection with the shooting, but we are informed that the wounded man has failed to identify any one of the men as the person who did the shooting. Owing to the condition of Martini, who is at the Charity Hospital in New Orleans, the trainmen had not secured bail up to Thursday evening. The friends of the men are confident that they are innocent of the crime charged against them. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.



CHARBON
Said to Prevail in Western Part of the Parish.

 It is reported that cases of charbon have occurred in the western part of this parish. Several head of stock died recently in that section and the symptoms seemed to indicate that they were affected with charbon. It is hoped, however, that the disease is not charbon and that the farmers will be spared an epidemic of that dread disease. We understand that precautionary measures have been taken to prevent the spread of the disease in the event that it should develop to be charbon.

 Mr. John Whittington sends The Gazette the following prescription which is claimed to be a cure for charbon:

 "Tincture of iodine, 4 ounces; spirit of hartshorn; 4 ounces; oil of spikenard, 4 ounces; tincture of cantharides, 4 ounces; spirit of turpentine, 12 ounces. Mix and shake; rub swollen parts every half hour until blistered or disease is under control. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.


Killed By Lightning.

 Lightning killed three goats on Mr. John Whittington's plantation last Monday. The goats were seeking shelter under a large oak when lightning struck them. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.






 Case Dismissed.

 The district court, Judge Debaillon presiding, convened Thursday to try the application of M. R. Williams who wanted to be appointed receiver of the property of the Louisiana Drilling Company. It appears that a compromise was effected and at the opening of court Mr. Crow Girard moved to dismiss the application, which was ordered by the court. Cline & Cline, attorneys from Lake Charles, were in court to appear in behalf of the Drilling Company. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.



Gazette Now Printing With "Gas."

 The Gazette has bought through Denbo & Nicholson, a three-horse power Reindeer gasoline engine, with which we are now running our presses. With the aid of the engine our facilities for printing are greatly improved. We are now better equipped to fill promptly all orders for printing. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.

      

 

 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 8/15/1903.

 Mrs. Dr. Earnest Terry, of Jennings, was the guest of her mother, Mrs. A. E. Mouton, this week.

 Mrs. F. Sontag and her little nephew, Charles Fuselier returned from Breaux Bridge last Saturday.

 L. F. Salles of the Red Store, left yesterday for the North on his fall purchasing trip. Although this firm always carries a large and varied stock. Mr. Salles informs us that in view of the excellent prospects for a line of winter business he will buy a larger stock than ever.

 Mrs. Antoine Guidry and two daughters, Misses Corinne and Effie Guidry, and Mrs. Earnest Constantin left last Saturday, for High Island, Tex., where they will spend some time.

 Married. - Mr. Albert Labbe and Miss Alice Breaux were married Thursday afternoon. The marriage took place at the home of the bride in this parish. Judge Debaillon officiating.

 Mr. Turpin, who fell from the roof of a house in Mudd's addition last week and who sustained serious injuries, is doing much better.

 Gilbert Delhomme has bought from Mr. J. Nickerson a lot on Lincoln avenue and will build a residence thereon. The price paid is $1,000.

 Camille Ramoles, a tenant on A. M. Martin's farm brought several open bolls of cotton to the compress this week.

 Wanted. - A white family are wanted to work as tenants on a plantation near the town of Lafayette. Apply at The Gazette.

 Dr. J. D. Trahan went to Cypremort, Monday.

 B. J. Pellerin left this week to meet Mrs. Pellerin at Ocean Springs, Mississippi.

Mr. and Mrs. Armand Levy, of Lake Charles, were in Lafayette this week.

 Miss Lizzie and May Bailey, returned from Patterson last week, after spending some time with friends.

 Mrs. Jules Jeanmard was in Lafayette Thursday as the guest of her son, Charles Jeanmard.

 Mrs. Charles Jeanmard left Friday morning for St. Louis to buy a new and up-t0-date line of goods for her millinery and dressmaking store.

 Misses Ida and Estelle Mouton left yesterday for St. Louis where they will select the stock for their new millinery store. It is their intention to buy a large and complete stock of goods.


 Mr. Alfred Hebert and family left for Grand Chenier this week, to spend some time among relatives.

 Last Sunday a game of baseball was played at Broussard, between the Lafayette Greys and Broussardville Juniors. The score was 10 to 9 in favor of the Juniors. Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.










From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 15th, 1896:


 50th Anniversary.

 ...Mt. Carmel...
 


We are informed that elaborate preparations are in process to celebrate with great eclat and magnificence the Fiftieth Anniversary of the establishment in Lafayette, of the Convent, under the direction of the able and highly cultured Sisters of Mount Carmel.

 October 15th, of the present year, in the date appointed, and the Sisters will spare neither trouble nor expense to make the occasion one of the red letter days in the annals of the school's history. A solemn High Mass at 9 a. m. will be celebrated on the Convent grounds. All the friends, former pupils, and patrons of the Institution are kindly invited to be present.

 His Grace, Archbishop, Janssens of New Orleans, will honor the occasion by his presence and will afford us the pleasure of listening to his eloquent language in an English address Rev. Father D'homme, Rector of Washington, La., will be the French orator of the day. It is mete and just that a worthy celebration take place, and that all the well-wishers of the convent turn out en masse to do homage to the school and prove their appreciation to the dear Sisters for their fifty years of gentle, earnest labors in our midst.

All praise and honor to Mt. Carmel!
All glory and success to its celebration!
Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.




Progress in the South. The industrial progress of the South is one great incentive that should actuate the people in the development and utilization of its immense resources. These are virtually thus far unearthed. Yet under the impetus thus given in utilizing its ores, coal beds, oil wells and other resources, giant strides have been taken toward a future of unequaled wealth, power and greatness. Yet the efforts thus far made are but as the zephyrs or morn as compared with the proportions trade winds that will send the ship of advancement spinning forward toward the eventual harbor of full development, where it will reap the profits of a successful voyage.

Already the mighty forces are at work bringing into prominency the unrivaled advantages, the unlimited resources, the salubrity of climate, and the golden fertility of the soil of this magnificent section that is the garden spot of the world in its undeveloped mines of wealth that will eventually rival all the massive treasures dug from the bowels of the earth. The construction of railways has brought to light the silent wastes that have been untouched by the hand of labor and industry. With these are flowing into this modern Eden of America capital and population. Under the inspiration of their presence the is beginning to pulsate with new life. The whir of the cotton spindle, the blasts of furnaces, the hum and clatter of factories and industries of all kinds, are awakening the solitudes and disturbing silent forests and busy marts with the buzz of machinery.

Steadily the cotton mills are traveling into the great belt where the fleecy staple is cultivated and gathered. Their open gateways will soon no longer be found hundreds of miles away in the East, but here at home, where the raw material can be carried from the field, snowy with the staple, into the spindles and looms of the factories, thus adding hundreds of millions to revenues of the South.

These are aids of progress and greatness that need only the lapse of time, patient labor and awaiting to develop into the fruition of the loftiest expectations of those who are up and doing. Human industry, perseverance, effort, are sure of eventual reward, and this country is traveling on the highway that leads to success. Work and wait. The goal is in sight. 


From the Shreveport Times and in the Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.










Some Items from City Council Meeting of 8/3/1896.


 Moved by T. M. Biossat; seconded by B. Falk that the mayor appoint a committee of three to confer with Mr. Zell, contracting engineer in regards to a scale of prices to be charged for electric lights and water works in residences and business places. Said committee to also take same steps to procure coal for the use of plant at lowest prices.

 The mayor appointed on said committee; B. Falk, Leo Doucet and Dr. J. D. Trahan.


 Moved by O. C. Mouton seconded by Leo Doucet that marshal be instructed to collect all delinquent taxes at once according to law.
 Moved by Dr. Trahan seconded by O. C. Mouton, that street committee be instructed to advertise for bids, terms and conditions for working all streets in the corporation limit.


 Said committee to report back at next meeting. Moved and seconded that the charges against Deputy Himel now be taken up. In connection with additional charges made against Ulysse Himel referred to proceedings of July 3, at the Police Board reported that Mr. Jean Vigneaux by whom the charges were made, stated that he would not urge the charge or give names of witnesses until pending charges against the said Himel were disposed of.


 The council thereupon went to executive session and having deliberated upon and discussed the charges pending against Deputy Constable Himel adopted the following:

Judgement in the matter of Shear, vs. Himel Deputy Constable.
 Whereas in the opinion of the City Council, a breach of the peace results from use of grossly indecent, profane or abusive language towards any other person, on officer or other citizen, upon the public street and in the presence of others; and whereas, in our opinion the constable has the authority made the law to arrest any person committing breach of the peace interest a warrant.


 And whereas, in the of this council the constable or any other officer may use the necessary force to arrest when the resistance to arrest renders it necessary; and whereas, ministers of justice, as constables, while in the execution of their offices are under the peculiar protection of the law; a protection founded on wisdom and justice and in every
principle of political justice; for without it the public tranquility cannot be possibly maintained, was in the ordinary course of things will offenders of any kind be amenable to justice.

 And whereas, it is a notorious fact that there is in this community a lawless inclination to resist the officers of the police line, which in a measure has been the  causes leading to this peculiar affair.

 Therefore, be it resolved; that whilst this council will not tolerate, for one instant, the abuse of power by an officer, it will uphold in him the lawful exercise of his formations and some to this town a respect for law and order.

 Be it further resolved, that having carefully considered the foregoing petition and the testimony  taken thereon by the Board of Police, and with the sole purpose to do absolute justice therein we find that there is no cause to discharge or suspend the said Ulysse Himel, deputy constable, against whom these charges are leveled.

 Be it further resolved, however, that whilst no cause exists to suspend or discharge said officer, we cannot with justice pass over this case without severely reprimanding him for having stopped at a saloon while on duty and entering into a conversation with a drunken individual and gratify his manifest purpose to make trouble.

 To the matter of Jacques R. Delhomme vs. Ulysee Hymel, Deputy Constable.

 Resolved that in this case the Council finds said Ulysse Hymel guilty of conduct unbecoming an officer, for which he is hereby suspended for ten days from date.

 The mayor then propounded the following questions to the council.

 1st. Has the Mayor any authority under the ordinance and charter of the town to suspend an officer pending an investigation of charges against him?

 2nd. Has the police board such authority?

 Resolved upon motion duly seconded that in the opinion of the council neither the mayor or the police board have such authority under the charter or ordinances of the town adopted.

 Council then adjourned.
   Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.





About the School Board:
To the Editor of the Lafayette Advertiser.

 There appeared in last Saturday's Gazette an article headed School Board Meeting in which the writer conveys the ides that the present School Board has not done its duty, and has accomplished very little in the way of educating the children of this parish, and asserts that nearly every parish in the State is forging ahead of Lafayette which I am constrained to publicly deny.

 The present School Board has done more to educate the children that any of its predecessors, and as much if not more than any of the other parishes, considering the funds at their disposal. They have built school-houses for every school in the parish.

 The school sessions have been long and the children have advanced more rapidly in their studies. The schools have been well attended with an enrollment of sixteen hundred and fifty-five. Now when you consider that but a few years ago there were no school houses in the parish, but few schools, with a session of four or five months during the year and but few children attending school, and little if any interest taken in them by the patrons, you can well understand that the writer of the article is either very ignorant of the condition of our schools or has written in a malicious spirit.
                      Yours Respectfully,
                            H. E. TOLL, Supt.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.   







Letter to the Editor:

From John Nickerson:
 Mr. Editor,

 Will you kindly allow me once more and I hope for the last time, space, in your columns to answer some remarks made by X. Y. Z. in your last week's issue.

 As Col. Breaux has left the field without trying to substantiate any of the charges he made against me, I shall not attempt to follow that part of the controversy any further.

 But X. Y. Z. (who is well known) is very anxious to build up a little notoriety, has seen fit to come out and attack me again. I shall be compelled in self defense to continue this controversy a little further. X. Y. Z. commences the attack, I suppose for the want of something to say, by repeating on old charge made in the their first article, and fully answered in my last.

 Then they say Col. Breaux considers me and my article, entirely beneath his notice, and a little further on X. Y. Z. repeats nearly all the same words, which reminds me of a great big schoolboy who went in for a fight and got whipped, and went off crying. "I don't care for you, you are a good for nothing boy, my papa is a bigger man than your papa is anyway." Well I suppose they think that the shortest and easiest way out of a bad mess that they go themselves into.

 Then X. Y. Z. comes in with his raging canal poetry, and a long essay on the Porpoise-Whale. These two effusions ought to be embalmed and recorded to the memory of X. Y. Z. For their information I would say that the Porpoise-Whale, as the sailors generally call them on account of their going in large schools like the Porpoise and are perfectly useless for either oil or blubber, they are to be found in latitude 35, 36, 37 along the Pacific coast and before a storm can be seen puffing and spouting in every direction, X. Y. Z. and our noble Lord has taken great pains all through their article to remind the people that I am a Canadian and a new-comer, this is done to create, if possible a feeling of jealousy and hatred against me; what a noble and generous spirit they must have? It is true I am a Canadian and I am proud of it, and it is also true that I am comparatively new comer, although I have been here for nearly five years, I don't think any of my neighbors think any the less of me for being either. Parties who will resort to such tactics in order to accomplish some selfish motive are the worst enemies to the welfare and prosperity of our Country. What is X. Y. Z., but a Canadian born and reared in the same parish on the shores of Lake Erie, within seven miles of where Mr. Nickerson and his family came from. In conclusion I will repeat what I have already said; this controversy is not of my seeking or commencement, I have acted only in self defence. I hope X. Y. Z. who commenced it about nothing is satisfied with the glory they have got out of it, they are welcome to it all, I don't envy them in the least.
                 J. NICKERSON.      Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.

 




City Council Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., Aug. 3, 1896. - City Council met this evening in regular session following members present:

 Mayor Caffery; Messrs. T. M. Biossat, B. Falk, Jos. Ducote, Leo Doucet, J. O. LeBlanc, O. C. Mouton and Dr. J. D. Trahan.

 Minutes of July 6th.

 July 8th, July 25th, were read and approved as read.

 The street committee asked for further time regarding the crossing at second street.

 Approved accounts.

 ------------------p. 2----------------

 Collector's Report.

 To the Honorable Mayor and City Council of Lafayette.

 GENTLEMEN: - I have collected since the last meeting the following sums to-wit:

 ------------------p. 2-----------------

 Respectfully submitted,
         SIDNEY J. VEAZEY,
             Constable and Collector.
      Treasurer's Report.
  Lafayette, La., Aug. 3rd, 1896.
 To the Honorable Mayor and Members of City Council of Lafayette, La.

----------------p. 2---------------

 Respectfully submitted,
        D. V. GARDEBLED, Treasurer.
   The mayor reported having collected since last report.

--------------------p. 2-----------------

 Moved by T. M. Biossat seconded by B. Falk that the mayor appoint a committee of three to confer with Mr. Zell contracting engineer in regards to a scale of prices to be charged for electric lights and water works in residences and business places.

 Said committee to also take some steps to procure coal for the use of plant at lowest prices.

 The mayor appointed on said committee: B. Falk, Leo Doucet and Dr. J. D. Trahan.

 Moved by O. C. Mouton seconded by Leo Doucet, that marshal be instructed to collect all delinquent taxes at once according to law.

 Moved by Dr. Trahan seconded by O. C. Mouton, that street committee be instructed to advertise for bids, terms and conditions for working all streets in the corporation limit.

 Said committee to report back at next meeting.

 Moved and seconded that the charges against Deputy Himel now be taken up.

 In connection with additional charges made against Ulysse Himel referred to proceedings of July 3, at the Police Board reported that John Vigneaux by whom the charges were made, stated that he would not urge the charge or give names of witnesses until pending charges against the said Himel were disposed of.

 The Council thereupon went into executive session and having deliberated upon and discussed the charges pending against Deputy Constable Himel adopted the following:

 Judgement in the matter of Shear
vs. Himel Deputy Constable.

 Whereas, in the opinion of the City Council, a breach of the peace results from the use of grossly indecent, profane or abusive language towards any other person, an officer or other citizen, upon the public street and in the presence of others; and whereas, in our opinion the constable has the authority made the law to arrest any person committing breach of the peace interest a warrant.

 And whereas, in the opinion of this council the constable or any other officers may use the necessary force to arrest when the resistance to arrest renders it necessary; and whereas, minsters of justice, as constables, while in the execution of their offices are under the peculiar protection of the law; a protection founded on wisdom and justice and in every principle of political justice; for without it the public tranquility cannot be possibly maintained, was in the ordinary course of things will offenders of any kind be amenable to justice.

 And whereas, it is a notorious fact that there is in this community a lawless inclination to resist the officers of the police, which in a measure has been the causes leading to this particular affair.

 Therefore, be it resolved; that whilst this council will not tolerate, for one instant, the abuse of power by an officer, it will uphold in hi, the lawful exercise of his formations and scene to this town a respect for law and order.

 Be it further resolved, that having carefully considered the foregoing  petition and the testimony taken thereon by the Board of Police, and with the sole purpose to do absolute justice therein we find that there is no cause to discharge or suspend the said Ulysse Himel, deputy constable, against whom these charges are leveled.

 Be it further resolved, however, that whilst no cause exists to suspend or discharge said officer, we cannot with justice pass over this case without severely reprimanding him for having stopped at a saloon while on duty and entering into a conversation with a drunken individual, whereby, opportunity, was given to this individual and gratify his manifest purpose to make trouble.

 To the matter of Jacques R. Delhomme, vs. Ulysse Hymel, Deputy Constable.

 Resolved that in this case the Council finds said Ulysse Hymel, guilty of conduct unbecoming an officer, for which he is hereby suspended for ten days from date.

 The mayor then propounded the following questions to the Council.

 1st. - Has the Mayor any authority under the ordinances and charter of the town to suspend an officer pending an investigation of charges against him?

 2nd. - Has the police board such authority?

  Resolved upon motion duly seconded that in the opinion of the council neither the mayor or the police board have such authority under the charter or ordinances of the town adopted.

 Council then adjourned.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
BAXTER CLEGG, Clegg.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.


 School Board Proceedings.

 Pursuant to adjournment the Board of School Directors of the Parish of Lafayette met this day in special session with the following members present:  J. O. Broussard, President; P. A. Chiasson, J. Spell, J. E. Trahan and D. Bernard.  Absent: Dr. W. W. Lessley, A. C. Guilbeau, and J. B. Whittington.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 Mr. Trahan reported that he had seen Mr. Close about the lot belonging to the school board, and had rented the lot to Mr. Close for fifty cents a month for two months.

[UNREADABLE PORTIONS.]

 On motion duly seconded (unreadable words) went into secret session.

 On resuming open session (unreadable word) Mr. Chiasson moved that the appointment of teachers be deferred until the new school board is appointed, which was carried.

 The following accounts were approved.

 -------------------p. 3--------------------

 There being no further business the board adjourned.
J. O. BROUSSARD, President.
H. E. TOLL, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.





Police Jury Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., Aug. 6, 1896.

 The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: C. C. Brown, A. Hebert, Benj. Avant, M. Billeaud, Jr., A. Lacy, and J. E. Primeaux.  Absent: R. C. Landry and J. Whittington, Jr.

 The President being absent the secretary called the meeting to order and by motion Mr. C. C. Brown was elected president pro tem.

 Mr. Hebert reported that the two bridges in the 3rd Ward had been built satisfactorily and by motion the committee was discharged.

 By motion of Mr. Primeaux, A. Primeaux and Prosper Savoie were appointed on Jury of freeholders in the 4th ward vice J. E. Primeaux and E. Baudoin resigned.

 By motion of Mr. Primeaux, J. B. Benoit was appointed road overseer in the 4th ward, vice A. Landry resigned.

 By motion of Mr. Avant the following jury of freeholders was appointed to trace and lay out a public road forty feet wide and according to law, from Alex Broussard's land, running North and then East to the corner of Alexis Breaux' land, Alexis Breaux, Ralph Foreman, Gustave Domingue, Frank Foreman, J. W. Broussard and Israel Prejean.

 Justice Coffey of the 3rd ward here appeared and signified his willingness to enter into a contract with the Parish Jury for criminal services on the same terms as fixed with Justice McFadden, i. e. $15.00 per month. By motion it was resolved that no contract be made with Justice Coffey.

 Mr. J. E. Mouton appeared and represented the unsafe condition of Pont des Moutons over the Vermilion river. Messrs. Alfred Hebert and J. E. Mouton, were authorized to advertise for and accept bids for the repair of said bridge and the hauling of lumber necessary. Bids to be accepted  Saturday Aug. 15 at the office of Mr. Alfred Hebert. Plans and specifications to be furnished by committee.

 By motion Mr. Joseph Ledoux was granted free a half license as peddler for 1896.

 Constable Andrew Cummings reported stock sold, gross receipts $20.75 and costs $10.50, leaving a balance in favor of the parish of $10.25 receipt for which was accepted and approved.

 Mr. A. D. Landry reported that Mr. William and Louis Whittington authorize the building of a bridge between Messrs. Drozen and Gustave Duhon.

 By motion a committee composed of Messrs. Alfred Hebert, O. C. Mouton and R. C. Greig was appointed to draft a suitable ordinance for carrying out the provisions or Act 38 of 1878 and 29 of 1894 relative to the employment and leasing of convicts and prisoners by parochial authorities.

 By motion the claim of Dist. Attorney Gordy for services as legal adviser of the Police Jury from Jan. 1st to July 1st, 1896, was rejected and the secretary instructed to notify him of this action.

 By motion of Mr. Avant the following act of donation was accepted and declared a part of the public highway.
       State of Louisiana,
            Parish of Lafayette.
 Be it known that on this day July 1st, 1896 before men, Ben Avant, Notary Public, came and appeared Alf. Derosia of the parish of Lafayette, who declared that he does hereby donate, give and set aside twenty feet wide for a distance of (14) fourteen acres North and South, said land is donated to the parish of Lafayette for a public road and situated on the West side of an eighty acre tract owned by said Derosia, this done and signed in the presence of Clarence Avant and J. S. Brown competent witnesses who signed with the appearer and me, notary after the reading of the whole. Said donor not knowing how to sign makes his ordinary mark.
     (Signed) J. S. BROWN, ALFRED X DEROSIA (his mark.)
      BEN AVANT, Notary Public.

  By motion of Mr. Avant, the road leading from the North west corner of Alfred Derosia's land, running South to the land of Silas Hauffpuir or the public road from Rayne to Lafayette, was declared a public highway forty feet wide throughout its entire length.

 President R. C. Landry appointed Messrs. O. C. Mouton and Leo Doucet as auditing committee in pursuance to the ordinance adopted July 17, 1896. The committee will meet at the Court House monthly on the Monday previous in the regular meeting of the Police Jury.

 The following accounts were approved:

-------------------p. 3-----------------

 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
O. C. BROWN, President pro tem.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.

                                                                                                                                                                                                   
 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/15/1896.

 Mr. Henry Gerac made a flying trip to Lake Charles this week.

 Misses Lucile and Louise Revillon are visiting friends in St. Martinsville.

 Mr. Vic Levy after spending some time in New York, returned last Sunday.

 Tell your friends about the Battle Abbey and what it is for, and then see that they come.

 Mrs. Max Klaus, and four daughters of Washington are visiting Mr. Leon Plonsky's family.

 The Lafayette Minstrel Co. are progressing nicely in their new play for the 21st. All new jokes and new situations.

 Our genial friend Mr. Ed. Lehman is now to be found behind the counter at Leon Plonsky's, ready to serve all comers.

 Miss Gussie Wolf, of Washington, is the charming and accomplished guest of Misses Louise Bendel and Emma Falk.

 J. C. Couvillon will deliver fine ripe juicy pears at your door for 5 cts. a dozen. If you don't believe it call up telephone No. 14 and ask him.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1896.











 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 15, 1874:

 
Published Every Saturday By
 WM. B. BAILEY.
        

           Saturday - August 15, 1874.  Crops are suffering for rain.
 Heat oppressive and dust suffocating.

 Cotton worms have made their appearance in force in a number of fields in this parish, and the planters are fighting them with Paris Green.

 

 Court Items. - The preliminary examination into the charge of murder against Charles Simon and Eugene Simon, was commenced last Tuesday before Judge Mouton and was concluded Wednesday night. The accused were required to furnish bond in the sum of five hundred dollars each, to appear at the District Court, to answer to the charge of murder.

 The case of the State vs. Drauzin Navarre, charged with the murder of Thomas DeBarge, was inquired into by Judge Moss last Thursday, and the evidence showing that the act was done in self-defence, the accused was discharged.  Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1874.



 Mr. Edmond Cain, the well-known merchant of this place, left here last Monday for New York, for the purpose of of purchasing a stock of fall and winter goods. During Mr. Cain's absence Mr. Joinville Hebert will have charge of the establishment. Mr. Hebert is a young gentleman who will be found always ready to accommodate customers. Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1874.

 GEORGE H. WELLS, Esq., of Calcasieu, the Democratic candidate for the 10th Senatorial District, arrived yesterday morning, and will address the people of the parish, at the Court House this evening at 7 o'clock P. M. All are invited to attend, particularly the ladies. Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1874.
 





 
 From Opelousas: - A very strange and at the same time unfortunate accident occurred last week on Mrs. E. Wartelle's plantation, near town, by which Mr. G. Wartelle lost two fine horses, valued at from three to four hundred dollars.  The two horses, one a three year old colt and the other Mr. Wartelle's saddle horse, were at play in the yard, where an ordinary harrow had been left - its enormous iron teeth turned toward the earth, of course - when the colt, closely pursued by his companion, rushed madly by the harrow, one of the handles of which struck him full in the breast, piercing his intestines. The terrible shock did not stop him however, the momentum acquired in his headlong course carrying him about a hundred yards off, where he fell. But the shock had thrown the harrow upon its side, with its pointed teeth turned toward his pursuer, who, striking upon them with terrible force mangled and lacerated himself in a horrible manner. Both died a few hours after the accident. -

From the Opelousas Courier and in the Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1874.




Police Jury Proceedings.


 Vermilionville, La., July 13, 1874.

 The Police Jury of the Parish of Lafayette, met pursuant to adjournment.

 Present: G. Dubau, President; Rosemond Leblanc, R. C. Landry, Jean Bernard and S. J. Montgomery.

 The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

 On motion of G. Dubau, Resolved, that the Tax Collector of the parish of Lafayette, proceed to the collection of the parish taxes of 1873, according to the parish Roll upon his giving bond in the sum of three thousands five hundreds dollars and in default of furnishing said bond, the District Attorney pro tem, is hereby ordered to proceed against the Tax Collector to compel him to furnish said bond and to desist from the collection of said parish taxes until he complies with this resolution.

 The Finance Committee reported that they had made arrangements with the Lafayette Advertiser to continue the publication of the proceeding of the Police Jury and all parochial printing upon same contract that was made with J. Y. Gilmore of the Cotton Boll, deducting the time during which the Cotton Boll acted as official journal of this body, which report was, upon motion of S. J. Montgomery, adopted.

 On motion of G. Dubau, the District Attorney pro tem, was allowed until the next regular meeting to make his report upon the progress of the collection of the Parish Tax.

 The following petition of the citizens of the fifth ward of the parish of Lafayette, praying for a public road from Broussardville to the parish of Iberia was presented and read:

 -----------------p. 1---------------------


 On motion of R. C. Landry, Resolved, that the following persons J. G. St. Julien, Marcel Melancon, Joseph Levime Landry, Martial Billeaud, Florentin Bourg, Valsin Broussard, E. D. Pellerin and Martial Fabre, be appointed a committee to examine into the propriety of establishing a public road as prayed for in the petition of Valsin Broussard and others, and to report at the next meeting of this body.

 On motion of G. Dubau, Resolved that hereafter no warrants shall be issued for witnesses and jurors fees in criminal cases, before the same be ordered by the Police Jury.

 The delegates from Royville appeared and prayed for the establishment of a public road from Royville to Iberia Parish. And upon motion of G. Dubau, Resolved, that the people of Royville are required to make their request by petition accompanied with a plat showing the road they ask for.

 On motion of Jean Bernard, Resolved that the sum of sixteen dollars and twenty-five cents amount of parish taxes of 1866 paid by Wm. Brandt, for taxes wrongfully assessed, he being a resident of the Corporation of Vermilionville, be refunded to said Wm. Brandt and that a warrant issue in favor or said Brandt for said sum.

 On motion of Jean Bernard, Resolved that the Sheriff of the parish of Lafayette be and is hereby authorized to purchase for the use of said Parish, handcuffs and leg irons, provided the costs of the same do not exceed sixty dollars.

 On motion of Jean Bernard, Resolved that the following accounts be and they are hereby allowed, and that parish warrants issue for the same :  W. B. Lindsay, $5.70 ;  L. Hirsch, constable fees, $4 ;  A. J. Moss, Parish Judge, costs in criminal cases, $33.50 ; F. E. Piquette, M. D., costs in criminal cases, $45 ;  H. Eastin, sheriff, $100 ;  H. M. Bailey, $3.50 ;  F. E. Piquette, $3 ;  John S. Rand, for work on public road $41.20.

 And the following accounts were rejected: C. M. Moss, $2.10 ;  J. B. Lyles, $2.10 ;  H. Hawkins, $2.31 ;  Paul Lalande, $15.

 On motion of R. Leblanc, the Police Jury adjourned sine die.
G. DUBAU, President.
C. H. MOUTON, Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/15/1874.   






Lagniappe:
END OF BATSON.

Murderer of the Earles Hung at 1:43 Without Flinching - Dies Without Making a Confession, but Gives an Envelope, Containing Letters to His Mother, Before Mounting the Scaffold.

 Special to The Lafayette Gazette.

 Lake Charles, La., Aug. 14, 4 p. m. - Gov. Heard having refused to interfere with the verdict of the Calcasieu court, A. E. Batson, the murderer of six members of the Earle family, was hung at 1:43 this afternoon in the Lake Charles jail. The drop fell and in fourteen minutes the muscular body of the Missourian was lifeless. Without a tremor he walked to the scaffold and met his fate, displaying to the last that wonderful nerve which has never deserted him since his arrest.
 Batson spent the morning chatting with reporters. During the forenoon his mother called and he was allowed the freedom of the jail corridor. The parting with his mother was a most affecting scene. His mother clasped him to her breast and gave him a farewell kiss which brought tears to every eye. He handed his mother an envelope which is believed to contain letters addressed to friends. At 1:20 prayers were said. He ate a hearty dinner and when the fatal moment drew near he dressed himself in the habiliments of death with the utmost coolness.

 He made no confession, his last words being "good-bye." The drop was seven feet. Only fifteen persons were allowed to witness the execution, but there was a large crowd in the jail yard. His body was embalmed and sent to Ricards, Mo., his old home, for Burial.

Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.

 



THE BATSON CASE. - After thoroughly considering the question Gov. Heard refused to commute the death sentence of Batson. Ali, even those who have doubts as to the guilt of Batson, should acquiesce in the decision of the chief executive. Gov. Heard has had a most difficult duty to perform. That he has not yielded to the appeal of the heart-broken mother, is evidence enough that he was firmly of the opinion that the sentence of the Calcasieu court should be executed. It is far easier for an officer to lean on the side of mercy, than it is for him to resist the tearful appeals of a woman who pleads for the life of a son. Nothing but a high sense of duty and the purest motive could have caused the governor to do as he has done. The performance of such an act is required an unusual degree of moral courage. Whenever a man is called upon to judge so grave a question, in which the life of a human being is involved, we believe it is wiser to withhold any censure, even though the judgement should not coincide with our own opinion. For this reason The Gazette has not deemed proper to join in the unfavorable criticisms of the Board of Pardons when that body recommended a commutation of the Batson sentence. We can well afford to be tolerant, particularly in a case of this kind when the life of a fellow-being hangs in the balance. The Board of Pardons is a body organized under the constitution of the State and it was in the performance of solemn and legal duty that it recommended a commutation of Batson's sentence. It may have erred, but we do not know if its most distinguished critics of the New Orleans press can justly lay claim to infallibility. Surely the Board's recommendation was the exercise of lawful authority and the performance of a very serious duty and its honest opinion deserved at least the respect of honest men. While the Board has no doubt acted conscientiously in this matter, the action of the governor is equally entitled to the respect of fair-minded people. He has performed a disagreeable duty without flinching and he should be honored for it.  Lafayette Gazette 8/15/1903.
  

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