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Monday, January 12, 2015

**AUGUST 10TH M C

 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 10th, 1904:

 
Opportunities!

Every merchant has daily opportunities to help the local paper without it costing him a cent. The editor must depend largely upon his fellow townsmen for news, and even to a considerable extent, for ideas. The brightest man on earth would soon run dry were it not for ideas conceived from outside sources.


 Help Your Newspaper. - About the most valuable quality in a newspaper man is that of recognizing a good thing when he hears it, and crystallizing it then and there. The profound mind is all right in its place, but a keen and appreciated scent for the pertinent paragraph, with the ability to express it clearly and tersely, is at the bottom of the success of many, if not most of the widely read and greatest newspapers of the day.


 Good ideas occur to you; make a note of them. Little items of news may now and then come to your ears, jot them down, and when the editor or reporter comes along with his eternal "anything new," hand them to him. He will not be slow to appreciate your efforts, even if he can't use your efforts, even if he can't use your stuff, and you'll get many a complimentary notice, or perhaps a better position for your ad in payment.

 Besides, this habit is a distinct help to you. It makes you more observant, causes you to pay more attention to expressions and will be of no little assistance to you getting up your ads. Try it for a month. You'll keep it up.
 

 Also when your ad brings excellent results, tell your publisher of the fact; don't try to hide the good news for fear he will raise your rates; no fear of that; he wants you to succeed. Besides, it furnishes him with a most convincing argument to induce some backward fellow to advertiser. -
The Ad Writer. 
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.




Persistence Wins in Advertising."If there is one enterprise on earth that a 'quitter' should leave severely alone, it is advertising. To make a success of advertising one must be prepared to stick to it like a barnacle on a boat's bottom. He should know before he begins it that he must spend money. Somebody must tell him, also, that he cannot hope to reap results commensurate with his expenditure early in the game. Advertising doesn't jerk; it pulls. It begins very gently at first, but the pull is steady. It increases day by day and year by year until it exerts an irresistible power." John Wanamaker. 
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.





UNDER CONTRACT.

 The propositions of the Standard Electric Co., of New Orleans, La., which are hereto annexed to furnish the town of Lafayette, La., with one "Chuse" engine, as per specifications hereto annexed, and plans to be prepared, and to furnish also two C. & C. dynamos of seventy five kilowatts each, as per specifications hereto annexed and plans to be prepared: Said engine and dynamos to be complete in all respects, (any omissions in said specifications to the contrary notwithstanding, are hereby accepted.)


 Shipment to be made seventy five days from recent order. Price of said engines and dynamos is six thousand three hundred and fifty three dollars, one half cash on delivery in Lafayette, La., and other half after trial and acceptance, time of trial not to exceed thirty days. The said town of Lafayette, La., being herein represented by A. E. Mouton, chairman of said town and being duly authorized in this behalf by resolution of said council adopted July 18, 1904.

Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.



Dissolution of Partnership. - The partnership heretofore existing between Jno. Bunt and Fred Rupeter was dissolved August 1 by mutual consent. All accounts outstanding are payable to Fred Rupeter who also assumes all obligations due by the firm. FRED RUPETER, JNO. BUNT.

 I will continue the manufacture and sale of pop. Thanking the public for their past liberal patronage, I request a continuance of same.

Respectfully, FRED RUPETER.
 

 Having sold my interest in the pop factory, I have moved back to my old stand on Vermilion street, where I will re-open an Oyster, Fish and Vegetable market. Thanking the public for their liberal patronage in the past. I respectfully solicit a continuance of same. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.
JNO. BUNT


Nearly Finished. - The work of removing the trees from the strip recently acquired by the city to finish widening Jefferson street, is about completed, all that remains is to saw up and cart away the pieces. The fence has been moved back and if the weather permits it will not be long before the short piece of concrete walk needed to join the other walks will be put in.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.


 


Charged With Obtaining Money Under False Pretenses.

 Friday Deputy Sheriff A. Peck and Mr. E. Begnaud arrested a white man, who gives his name as Leonce Mayeaux, on the charge of obtaining money under false pretenses. The officers state that he has been going among the negroes making them believe that they were entitled to 160 acres of land from the government, and was securing a fee of $3.oo from them for filling out papers for them to be sent to Washington. He was arrested in a negro cabin near Breaux Bridge with blanks etc., spread out. When searched a pistol and $28.40 was found on him. He seems to be about 35 years of age, states that he is married and gives Cottonport as his home.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.

 

Hotel In New Hands. - The Brown News Co., of Canada, have secured the hotel privileges along the Southern Pacific, having outbid the Crescent News Co., and will take possession September 1st. 

Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.
  


 
New Fast Trains. - The Mobile and Ohio limited, leaves New Orleans, at 7:30 p. m., arriving St. Louis, 5:44 next evening. The St. Louis express, leaves New Orleans 9:10 a. m., and arrives St. Louis next morning morning at 7:52. Both are solid vestibuled trains of the very latest pattern carrying the finest Pullman sleepers, parlor and library-observation cars. New Orleans to St. Louis without change, dining cars with large electric fans, serving all meals al la carte. Patrons pay only for what they order and get the best that the market affords.

 World's Fair literature, maps and time cards cheerfully mailed on application. 
   Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.  


 On a Pleasure Trip. - A party composed of Leo Doucet, Andrew Prudhomme, E. B. McNaspy, Mike Crouchet, Philip Mouton, J. R. Domengeaux, Remy Landry, Joe Mouton, B. J. Pellerin and Geo. Debaillon left Sunday on Louis Livet's gasoline launch, "The Dove," for Vermilion bay on a short pleasure trip.
 Laf. Advertiser 8/10/1904.






Captured in Napoleonville.

 Sheriff Reed, of Lake Charles, came in on the 9 p. m. train Sunday night with a negro charged with murder, who was arrested in Napoleonville. He left on the morning train with his prisoner.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.


 Reappointed Beneficiary.

 Rousseau Mouton was reappointed beneficiary cadet to the State University from this parish by the Police Jury last Thursday and an allowance of $250.00 made him for expenses.

 Rousseau has made a fine record at the University standing fifth in a class of 161. During the year his name was placed on the honor roll 6 months out of eight. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904. 


Base Ball.

 The Lafayette team played in St. Martin Saturday and Sunday. The weather was unfavorable both days and Sunday it rained during the whole game. Notwithstanding disadvantages the games both days were good and developed some fine playing. The score the first day was 4 to 0 in favor of Lafayette. The second game resulted 4 to 3 in favor of St. Martin, but it required ten innings to decide. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.


Officers Elected.

 At the last meeting of the stockholders of the Bank of Lafayette, the following board of directors was elected:  C. O. Mouton, E. G. Voorhies, J. J. Mouton, Leo Judice, Simeon Begnaud, F. H. Gregory, Gus. Schmulen, Wm. Campbell, Crow Girard.

 Messrs. Begnaud and Schmulen are new directors, having been elected to replace Wm. Clegg and Dr. P. M. Girard resigned.

 On last Wednesday the directors met in the bank office and elected officers as follows: C. O. Mouton, president; Crow Girard, vice-president; J. J. Davidson, cashier; Fred Voorhies, assistant, Crow Girard, attorney and notary public. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.



Candidate Announcements.

 We are authorized to announce the candidacy of Phillip S. Pugh, of Acadia, for Judge of the 18th Judicial District, composed of Lafayette and Acadia Parishes, subject to the Democratic Primary to be held Sept. 10, 1904.

 We are authorized to announce the candidacy of Wm. Campbell for District Attorney of the 18th Judicial District, composing the parishes of Lafayette and Acadia, subject to the primary election to be held September 10, 1904. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.


Teacher's Examination.

 In accordance with instructions from State Superintendent Aswell the next regular examination of applicants to teach in the public schools of this parish will be held at the Industrial Institute on August 25 and 26, 1904, beginning at 9 a. m.

 Possession of unexpired certificates to teach in the public schools of this State is a prerequisite to appointment.

 For further information apply to
L. J. ALLEMAN, Superintendent.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.  



Delightful "Peanut Pick."

 Last Wednesday evening Mrs. Charles Parkerson entertained at a "Pea-nut Pick" complimentary to her guest Miss Kathleen Kingsley Read of Baton Rouge.

 The parlors were most beautifully decorated with pink roses and crape myrtle, festooned with smilax, and ropes of strung peanuts.

 The spacious bay window was transformed into a perfect bower of beauty, in which the punch bowl stood, most graciously presided over by Mrs. James Parkerson.

 Miss Read was a vision of loveliness in white silk, while Mrs. C. Parkerson was daintily gowned in white tulle.

 Excitement reigned supreme during the "Pick." Miss Viola Young succeeded in carrying off the ladies' first prize, while Messrs. Sontag and Torian cut for the gentleman's first prize. Miss Challie Tolson was awarded the consolation, while the boobies were carried off by Miss Bailey and Mr. Debaillon.

 Delicious ices were served and the guests were sincere in their thanks to their charming hostess for a most enjoyable evening. Mrs. Parkerson is noted as an excellent hostess, and the young folks always enjoy her functions.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.


A Lively Experience.

To the Editor of Lafayette Advertiser:

 Having been requested by some of my friends to give my experience as editor and proprietor of a Texas news paper, so, though having published some of these facts many years ago, I send you this short account.

 On a visit to Sabine Pass in East Texas I there met an enterprising merchant who had known me before. He said they were building up a wide awake up-to-date town, and was much in want of a brave, enterprising man to run a newspaper there to let the world know there was such a place as Sabine Pass which had about two hundred and fifty inhabitants. My merchant friend said he would foot the bill. So I wrote to Odom & Brixler, of New York, dealers in newspaper outfits, to send me a full outfit by the first ship sailing to Galveston. After four or five months my press and full rig came to hand, there was not a railroad in Texas at the time. Securing a young fellow by the name of Wm. Murray as assistant, who had worked with me in New Iberia, we went to work opening boxes and getting the press in shape. Among the first things I came to was six muskets and one hundred rounds of ammunition. I was surprised and wrote back to know what to do with the musket. The answer came saying, "Keep them concealed. If you have any genuine newspaper stuff in you, you will soon find use for them." After due consideration I named by paper the Pistol and Bowie Knife and got out a short issue on the following Saturday morning. Among other interesting news I gave a glowing description of the town, its future prospects and the beauty and intelligence of the fair sex. All went swimming until I thought I would mildly call attention to some of the glaring short comings of the citizens of our town. There was an old bummer named Bill Strong, who seemed to have no other occupation but to sit around one of the other of three saloons, drink whiskey, chew tobacco and get ready to move out in Texas which was all he did the three years I stayed there. Old strong had two big rough girls named Sainia and Maud. I found it was in some way understood I was to marry Sainia and Murray was chosen by Maud as they often visited our sanctum and was all smiles. As soon as I heard how they had fixed it up, I put in an editorial saying there were some girls in our town so brazen and bold, I thought it would be a season or two before their matrimonial aspiration would be realized. They caught on at once. They passed the office one morning and told Murray they wanted to slap the poor red headed fool printer's jaws. In my next editorial I said some of those rough belligerent girls looked like United States soldiers more than bosom life companions. This raised a part of the rough element of the town. Next morning at day break I heard cursing in front of my office, with yells of "You dirty skamp, come out from under your bed." I opened the door and there was old Strong and six or seven more toughs. The cursing opened in earnest with an advance on Murray and me. I stepped back. set out the six muskets, gave a whoop and said, "Come on." They did not come, so I closed up, sold The Pistol and Bowie Knife and moved to Lafayette. No more Texas for
OBERON.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.      




 Will Confer Crosses.

 Mouton-Gardner Chapter U. D. C. will, some time in September, appoint a day for conferring crosses of honor upon the old veterans and request that all those who are eligible will send their names to Miss Aimee R. Mouton.

 Those wishing to contribute to the fund for oil paintings of Gen. Alfred Mouton and Gen. Frank Gardner will kindly send same to Miss Aimee R. Mouton, president; or Mrs. V. Dupuis, vice-president.

 The Daughters are supporting an old veteran who is disabled by sickness which goes to show they are doing a good deed and are deserving of much credit. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.


 No Ball Planned.

 The B. of L. F. wish to call the attention of the good people and citizens of Lafayette to the ball advertised to be given by them Sunday, September 4. It is a mistake. Camelia Lodge, No. 653, B. of L. F., are giving no ball and have not authorized anyone to use their name for such. They have no objection to anyone giving a ball on Sunday, if he wishes to do so, but one thing is sure - he cannot use the name of the B. of L. F. will not be responsible for any bills contracted for the ball advertised to be given Sunday, September 4, 1904.
  Respectfully,
    W. H. KIMMER,
Master Lodge 653.
Lafayette, La., August 9, 1904.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904. 




From the City's Council's Proceedings.
Lafayette, La., August 1, 1904.
 

A regular meeting was held this day, with mayor Charles D. Caffery presiding:

 Members present: A. E. Mouton, M. Rosenfield, Geo. A. Deblanc, D. V. Gardebled, John O. Mouton, Henry Fontenot. 
 Moved and seconded that minutes of last meetings be approved as read. Carried.

 Committee on Water and Light reported that they had signed a contract with the Standard Electric Co., represented by Mr. Henry Widmer for an engine and two dynamos according to specifications agreed upon.
 

 Moved and seconded that the action of the committee be approved and contract spread on the minutes. Carried.  Lafayette, La., July 19, 1904.








Assessment Notice.

      Lafayette, La., August 6, 1904.
  The sub-committee of the Judicial Executive Committee of the Eighteenth Judicial District of Louisiana composed of the Parishes of Lafayette and Acadia, having reported the assessment of the primary ordered to be held on September 10, 1904 for the selection of a candidate for Judge and District Attorney in the sum of five hundred dollars:

 Notice is therefore given, that candidates for nomination desiring to submit their applications in accordance with the rules established by the Committee must accompany the application with the deposit of one hundred and twenty-five dollars.
CROW GIRARD, Chairman.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.




City Council Proceedings.

        Lafayette, La., August 1, 1904.
  A regular meeting of the City Council was held this day, with Mayor Chas. D. Caffery presiding:

 Members present: A. E. Mouton, M. Rosenfield, Geo. A. Deblanc, D. V. Gardebled, John O. Mouton, Henry Fontenot. Absent: Felix Demanade.

 Moved and seconded that minutes of last meetings be approved as read. Carried.

 Committee on Water and Light reported that they had signed a contract with the Standard Electric Co., represented by Henry Widmer for an engine and two dynamos according to specifications agreed upon.

 Moved and seconded that the action of the committee be approved and contract spread on the minutes. Carried.

CONTRACT.

       Lafayette, La., July 19, 1904. 
  The propositions of the Standard Electric Co., of New Orleans, La., which are heretofore annexed to furnish the town of Lafayette, La., with one "Chuse" engine, as per specifications hereto annexed, and plans to be prepared, and to furnish also two C. & C. dynamos of seventy five kilowatts each, as per specifications hereto annexed and plans to be prepared; said engine and dynamos to be complete in all respects, (any omissions in said specifications to the contrary notwithstanding), are hereby accepted.

 Shipment to be made seventy-five days from receipt or order. Price of said engines and dynamos is six thousand three hundred and fifty three dollars; one half cash on delivery in Lafayette, La., and other half after trial and acceptance; time of trial not to exceed thirty days. The said town of Lafayette, La., being herein represented by A. E. Mouton, chairman, of Water and Light Committee of the City Council of said town and being duly authorized in this behalf by resolution of said council adopted July 18, 1904.
A. E. MOUTON, Chairman,
STANDARD ELECTRICAL CO.,
per Henry Widmer P & Mgr.

 The Water and Light Committee further reported that the purchase of new Engine and dynamos would require a new switch board including all connections and that it would be necessary to construct before hand the foundation required for the new machinery.

 Moved and seconded that the said committee be and they are hereby authorized to acquire said switch board and all necessary connections and build said foundation. Carried.

 TREASURER'S REPORT FOR MONTH OF JUNE 1904.

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 The petition of Jos. C. Breaux, James Marsh, F. H. Thompson, and others asking for a street light at the corner of Madison street in the Mills addition was read and considered and the following was read and considered and the following was adopted.

 Resolved, that it is the intention of this council to use its best endeavor to place additional street lights at different points in the town and to extend the water mains at the earliest possible moments. Carried.

 The following communication was submitted to the council from L. H. Thompson:
        Lafayette, La., July 15, 1904.
  We, the undersigned proprietors, respectively of the buildings, fences etc., moved by L. H. Thompson, contractor having in charge the moving of the buildings back on Vermilion street, certify hereby that the said work of removal has been done by the said Thompson in a satisfactory manner to ourselves, the said buildings, and fences, etc., having been placed in position similar to that in which they stood at first.
  (Signed) MRS. B. FALK, I. B. BENDEL,  GUS. LACOSTE, MRS. ADELE CORNAY, per Mrs. Arthur Bonnet, L. F. SALLES, M. MOUTON, MRS. J. L. MOUTON, MRS. JOHN GRASER, JOS. A. CHARGOIS.

 Moved and seconded that balance due L. H. Thompson on said contract for moving back buildings, fences, etc., on Vermilion street be paid and warrant issued. Carried.

 The secretary reported the following warrants drawn during the month of July and up to date, and the same was approved, and ordered spread on the minutes:

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 There being no further business, Council adjourned.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Mayor.
J. P. COLOMB, Asst. Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.



Police Jury Notes.

 The Police Jury met in regular session Thursday, August 4, with all members present. Messrs. Breaux and Boudreaux, reported that they had called for bids for building a new bridge at Coulee Mine, and had awarded the contract at $60.00.

 A petition was submitted by citizens of the 6th ward, asking that the ward be divided into two road districts with two overseers. On request of Mr. Connolly, member from that ward, he was allowed more time to fix the roads.

 The proposition of Mr. Onezine Breaux to grade and keep in repair all the roads of the 6th ward was referred to Mr. Connolly, member from that ward. Mr. Boudreaux, who had been appointed a committee of one to investigate drainage of public road in front of J. Billeaud's place, reported that the obstruction had been removed.

 The contract for earth work approaches to the D. O. Broussard bridge was let at $424.

 The contract with E. P. Alsbury & Sons for the construction of the D. O. Broussard bridge was ordered recorded.

 $250 was allowed Rousseau Mouton for expenses at the State University.

 Valery Boudreaux and J. E. Mouton were appointed to supervise the construction of the cement walk around the court house square.

 A. Theall, Hypolite Savoie and Eloi Vincent were appointed to investigate location of the Sellers' public road.

 J. A. Begnaud, Alex Delhomme and Supt. Alleman were appointed to investigate complaints about the flow of water near Francois Thibodeaux' place and find remedy.

 Messrs. Chas. D. Caffery, W. A. LeRosen, Wm. Campbell, Crow Girard and O. C. Mouton, acting as a committee on the part of the town of Lafayette, appeared before the Jury and urged the necessity of widening the streets around the court house square and that the Jury build a new walk so as to leave 8 feet all around for use for street purposes. The Jury postponed considering the matter until the meeting to be held August 11.

 Ludovic Billeaud was appointed to take assessment for road tax on vehicles in the town of Lafayette.

 It was moved and carried that public roads donated to the parish must be graded before acceptance. The salary of the court house keeper was made $200. The treasurer's report showed a balance on hand, general fund $2,285.42; special road fund, $1,577.74.

 The committee composed of J. E. Mouton, J. H. Connolly and P. R. Landry reported the road running from the property of Mrs. Baptiste Malagarie to that of Mr. Aurelien Olivier as in good condition.

 After allowing a number of accounts the Jury adjourned to meet August 11 as a board of reviewers for the town assessments. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.

  

Selected News Notes 8/10/1904.

Chas. Debaillon, Jerome Mouton, Vic Levy and Willis Roy left Friday to take in the Fair at St. Louis.

 Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Greig left Saturday for New Orleans where they will visit relatives. Later they will go to Mississippi for a short stay.


 Mrs. Louis Domengeaux and Miss Lea Gladu left for the Crescent City yesterday.


 Mr. Florence Kahn, of Rayne, is visiting her uncle, Mr. G. Schmulen.


 Albert Estorge, of New Iberia, was in town Saturday seeing the drug trade.


 Misses Kate Andrus and Clara Price, of Opelousas, are visiting Mr. F. K. Hopkins’ family.


 Mr. C. S. Babin kindly presented us with a pocket map of Lafayette Friday. These maps are complete, showing all the additions to the town, and are sold by Mr. Babin for 50 cents.


 Mr. and Mrs. F. Demanade and son Harold, returned Thursday from Pascagoula, Miss., where they spent about two weeks.


 Prof. Greig’s Home Institute will re-open for eighth session Monday, September 5th.
 

  Moses Plonsky, who for the past year has been employed in Beaumont, Texas, returned to Lafayette Friday.

 Mr. J. B. Benoit, of Youngsville, paid The Advertiser an appreciated visit Thursday.


 Mr. A. E. Mouton’s handsome new residence is nearing completion, and when finished will be an ornament to that part of town. 
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1904.





 From the Lafayette Gazette of August 10th, 1901:

Mixed Excursions?


White excursions are not always what they should be.  

Excursions in this country have gotten to be very much like a ball in the remote districts where several fights are deemed necessary to give social eclat to the affair. We seldom hear of an excursion which can not boast of at least half a dozen hoodlums who distinguish themselves by shooting at telegraph posts, frightening the women and children and performing other heroic acts. Sometimes they grow very bold and use some inoffensive excursionist for a target. And what is worse, they are seldom, if ever punished.

 But however bad, the white excursion is a thing of exquisite joy and peace compared to that most prolific source of trouble, known as a mixed excursion.

 Recently a number of these excursions have been given on the Southern Pacific road. Some were under the management of the company and others under the auspices of local associations.

These mixed excursions are, in many instances, patronized by the turbulent classes of both races, who, after "filling up" with the vilest kind of whiskey, set at defiance of the law and its officers. Last Sunday evening an excursion train, with white and black people on board, signaled its entrance into this town by firing several pistol shots. We are informed that fire arms were discharged at a number of points on the road. 
 

 The railroad company would recognize the advisability of mixed excursions and put an end to them. At any rate, white persons, particularly ladies, should refuse to patronize them. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1901.



Lafayette By Moonlight? - The Gazette fails to understand why the whole town is allowed to remain in utter darkness when some of the streets at least could be brilliantly illuminated by the use of arc lights. Last Tuesday the night was very dark and strange to say only the arc lamp near the railroad crossing was lighted. We are informed that it is the rule of the management of the plant to save coal on moonlit nights. From a standpoint of economy that is very well, but we are inclined to think that too much is being expected of the moon. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1901.



New Business. - The store which is being built by Mr. P. B. Roy for the use of Mr. Abramson will be one of the largest business houses in town. Gradually the street leading to the railroad station is filling up with business houses. Laf. Gazette 8/10/1901.



 School Building. - From what the Gazette is able to learn the people of the town are unanimous on the question of a new school building, centrally located. A number of citizens have expressed themselves on the subject and we have yet to hear of a dissenting voice. Laf. Gazette 8/10/1901.


 Train Accident. - Last Monday afternoon one of the ice carts of the People's Company ran against the switch engine at the main crossing. Fortunately the driver and horses escaped unhurt and little damage was done the cart. It appears that the driver failed to see the signal of the flagman. Laf. Gazette 8/10/1901.


Passenger Service on Alexandria Branch. - On and after Aug. 15 the Southern Pacific will run a passenger coach with the freight on the Alexandria branch, between this point and Cheneyville. The train will leave Lafayette at 8:20 in the morning and will arrive at 8:45 at night. This will facilitate passenger traffic between Lafayette and Cheneville. Laf. Gazette 8/10/1901.


 Empty the Mains! - If the town would have the mains emptied about once a week the water furnished by the waterworks plant would be greatly improved. As it is the water is seldom changed and in some instances it has been found almost unfit for use. A number of persons complain that the water, after remaining too long in the mains, is exceedingly damaging to porcelain bath-tubs. Superintendent Melchert is always anxious to give satisfactory service to the patrons of the plant and we have no doubt that he will do his best to give the people a superior quality of water. Laf. Gazette 8/10/1901. 








PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
Appointment of Teachers - Competitive Examinations Ordered.

 The committee for appointment of teachers, of the Board of School Directors of Lafayette parish, met in the court-house on Aug. 6, 1901, and beg to submit the following report:

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 In all instances where there was no competitive examination ordered, the school is left open until after the preliminary examination when those who have passed successfully will be considered.

 I take this opportunity to advise all the teachers of the parish to stand the preliminary examination at 9 o'clock on Aug. 24, 1901, in the Industrial Institute. Even though they hold certificates they would be greatly benefited by the examination, and there is nothing to lose. This would put the teachers in line for the coming regular examination next October, and would be one step higher in the ladder of proficiency.

 The examination to be held on the 24th is not a regular examination and therefore no certificates will be issued to those who pass it successfully; it will be purely a test, and at the same time a competitive examination where two or more applicants apply for the same school.

 Let the entire teaching force of Lafayette parish present itself at the examination which is soon to be held, and thus prepare for a step higher in October.

 It is highly probable that the Board of School Directors will soon elevate the standard of required proficiency, and our teachers should begin now to prepare for that day when teachers in a state of mental stagnation will be asked to step aside and give place to those of the profession who are more progressive. The people are tired of teachers who do not improve; they have found out for themselves that the teacher who does not improve is on the retrograde, and they value their dear little ones too highly to submit them to the blighting influence of a teacher who has become intellectually dead. If they wish to hold their positions as teachers they must look up, not down; they must march forward, not backward.
L. J. ALLEMAN,
Parish Superintendent.
Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1901.   






 Cotton Samples.

 Ben Schmalinski, of the Lafayette Compress and Storage Company, brought to the Gazette office yesterday samples of the cotton crop of Mr. D. Bono near Scott. One stalk bore twelve bolls and ten other stalks had from five to eight bolls. Mr. Schmalinski says that prospects throughout the parish ar very fair. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1901. 





 REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

 The following real estate transfers were recorded in the clerk's office during the past week.

 E. H. Vordenbaumen to Lucien Arceneaux, one lot in Mouton addition, $150.

 Mme. Jules Langlinais to Hypolite Fabre, 21 arpents 4th ward, $420.

 Clemile Trahan to Desire Granger, 1 1/2 arpents 8th ward, $100.

 Vincent Breaux to Joseph Guidry, 20 arpents 8th ward, $364.50.

 F. Vavasseur Mouton to Jules J. Mouton, 83 arpents, $4,000.

 Francis Guilbeau to J. C. Couvillon, 1/2 lot Boudreaux addition, $50.

 A. Olivier and others to J. Hazard Bernard, 64 arpents swamp land, $106.
Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1901.


Concerts for Mr. Hayden.

 Mr. Wm. A. Hayden, the talented musician, assisted by a number of his friends, will give a concert at Breaux Bridge to-night. Monday night a concert will be given in the auditorium of the Industrial Institute. The program, which follows is a most interesting one:

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Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1901.


 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 8/10/1901.


 Congress street is being widened and graded from the Methodist church to Mr. O. J. Leblanc's residence.

 Ben Schmalinski, of the Lafayette Compress and Storage Company, brought to the Gazette office yesterday samples of the cotton crop of Mr. D. Bono near Scott. One stalk bore twelve bolls and ten other stalks had from five to eight bolls. Mr. Schmalinski says that prospects throughout the parish are very fair.
 
 

 Mr. W. S. Parkerson, Esq., of New Orleans, is on a visit to relatives in Lafayette.

 Miss Mary Littell, local manager of the Western Union, has gone to Opelousas to spend a month with relatives and friends. During Miss Littell's absence the Western Union office here will be in charge of Mr. George Carroll of New Orleans. 

 Miss Cammie Allen, of New Orleans, is the guest of her friend and former schoolmate, Mrs. S. R. Parkerson.
 
 

 Nicholson has just received a carload of White Elephant buggies, surreys, road-carts, etc.

 E. G. Voorhies is spending some time on Week's Island.  

 Rev. Bollard has returned to Lafayette after an extended visit in the North and East.

 The Jury commissioners will meet on Aug. 26 to draw the venire for the regular criminal term of the district court which convenes on Sept. 30.

 Judge Debaillon has gone to Pascagoula to spend several days.

 Miss Cammie Allen, of New Orleans, is the guest of her friend and former schoolmate, Mrs. S. R. Parkerson.
 

 President Sligh of the Mansfield Female College, and Dr. A. F. Whitworth of the Female College at Brookhaven, Miss., were the guests of Rev. C. C. Wier during the week. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1901.         
















 From Lafayette Advertiser August 10th, 1901:

A NEW SCHOOL BUILDING.

 The time has now come when the people of Lafayette should make an effort to erect a suitable school building. No one will deny that the education of the children is about the most important matters before the public. Then why not provide what is necessary for the purpose and of the best? It will cost money to do so; but if a man wants his child educated, he has got to pay for it, and money spent on a child's education is certainly most wisely spent. There is no use in urging the benefits of education, everybody recognizes that; but unfortunately everybody does not recognize the great part that environment plays. Give the children a handsome school building, it will be an ornament to the town; provide it with all necessary furnishings; and then depend upon it, the teachers can do better work, and the children profit tenfold for the extra cost. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1901.


 A Parish Fair.

 The move made towards securing for Lafayette parish a yearly fair is a good one, and The Advertiser hopes that the gentlemen who have been named on the different committees, will take hold of the matter and carry it to a successful issue. It should not cost a great deal, and the benefits to be derived from a friendly emulation among our farmers and stockraisers will more than repay the small cost. The times are such that only intensive methods in all lines of work will succeed, and the best means of showing the advantages of new methods in farming and stock and poultry raising are the ocular demonstrations at the fair. Each one who attends is in a position to instruct and be instructed, and the result to each who profits by what he learns, will be measured in dollars and cents.

 To make the fair as successful and useful as possible, the State Farmers' Institute should be held the same week as the fair, thus securing for all who attend both practical and expert instruction.

 It is not too late to have a fair this year, and if the gentlemen on the committees will act at once, Lafayette can begin the good work with a splendid fair this fall. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1901.



Ice-Wagon Struck by Train.

 As one of the wagons of the People's Cotton Oil Ice Company was crossing the railroad at the depot on Tuesday, the engine ran into it damaging it about $10.00 worth. The driver succeeded in jumping in time and escaped injured. Fortunately also the horses were unhurt. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1901.


City Desires to Secure Services of Prof. Sontag.

 The city council has very generously appropriated $100 towards the salary of Prof. Sontag in order to secure his services in organizing a brass band and a string band. Lafayette has no park or public place of amusement, and it is to be hoped that in consideration of the aid given by the council, the band will give at least one open concert a week during the summer for the benefit of the public. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1901.


FLORENT SONTAG.
New Chief of the Department of Music, Southwestern Industrial School.

 President E. Lewis Stephens, of the Southwestern Industrial Institute, located in Lafayette, La., has given renewed assurance of his level-headed executive ability in his recent selection of Florent Sontag as head of the department of music of the institute. Florent Sontag has the honor of being a Louisiana boy, and, too, Louisiana has the honor of claiming him as one of her own. The son of a musician of eminence, the paternal grand-nephew of a prima-dona, Henriette Sontag (in her day a French colony,) Florent Sontag has added to a natural love for music the skill and knowledge attained by infinite work and pains taking. He has a vast practical experience. George Sontag, his father, was in his day New Orleans' favorite bandmaster, the entertainer of thousands of people at both West End and Spanish Fort. He came from Strassbourg. Alsace-Lorraine, and was a finished musician of original powers. At the age of thirteen years, his son, Florent Sontag, was to be found, the veriest boy, playing the second violin, under the baton of Martin in our French opera. That was seventeen years ago. He was born in Breaux Bridge in 1871, in the parish of St. Martin. The youngster began the study of the piano under his father, at the age of seven; two years later he added the study of the violin, so that it was only five years afterwards that, even at the extreme youth, we find him sufficiently proficient to be dabbling with the great masters of music with the second violin, before the most critical audiences in America and under an inexorable audiences in America and under an inexorable chief. Two years later he undertook the cornet and on the three instruments he worked so indefatigably that to-day it is impossible for the skilled ear to tell which is his favorite. He played at the French opera for twelve years, in summer seasons with Paoletti at West End, in those fine organizations which this gifted master knew so well how to organize. For the past five years he has been cornetist in the Grau Opera Company and this summer and last has played with the Metropolitan and Olympia Opera Companies respectively. He would have been with the Grau Opera next season had President Stephens not captured him.

 Sontag is thorough. He loves music. Whether with violin or cornet he has attained the skill which, with his keen appreciation of the beautiful in music, and his knowledge of the art, makes him a soloist of splendid entertaining power. Added to his practical knowledge and equipment, he understands theory. Altogether, the selection not alone reflects credit on President Stephens and the man selected, but it is a distinct gain to the state, seeing that the institute is building on a broad and splendid plan, with powerful influences reaching throughout Louisiana, for goo or ill.

 HARLEQUIN desires to extend congratulations to all concerned.
From the N.O. Harlequin and in the Lafayette Advertiser of 8/10/1901.


 TO DEVELOP MARSH ISLAND.
[From the N. O. Picayune.]

 Mr. I. A. Broussard, sheriff of Lafayette parish, has about completed arrangements to consolidate the holdings on Marsh Island, which is located at the mouth of Vermilion bay, about 30 miles below the town of Abbeville, and in the parish of Vermlion.

 Mr. Broussard has been in this city for several days attending to the legal details of the transaction. Mr. Lawrence Fabacher of this city and Mr. Broussard, own about 37,000 acres out of a total of 70,000. Attorney John D. Grace, of this city, and Capt. Victor Van Shoeler, own 10,000 acres. Mr. Webb, of Rayne, La., W. W. Duson of Crowley, and Mr. Broussard, own jointly 20,000 acres more. There are small holders on the island who possess 3,000 acres.

 It is known positively that there is one of the most valuable salt deposits to be found anywhere in the country on this island. Besides the salt there is every reason to believe both oil and sulpher abound. Those who have investigated say most valuable phosphates exist at a moderate depth from the surface.

 Aside from the mineral deposits which the owners of the island propose to develop, Mr. Broussard desires to utilize the splendid pasturage there in raising cattle. March Island is without doubt the best winter grazing location to be found anywhere in the United States. Cattle will live on the island all winter grazing location to be found anywhere in the United States. Cattle will live on the island all winter long and in the spring will be as nice and sleek as if they had been fed on corn. There is a fresh water lake on the island and besides the lake artesian wells can be produced at a very small outlay. The plan on which Mr. Broussard is working and which now seems to be so near completion, is one which contemplates the issuing of bonds in the sum of probably $70,000 and securing them with a first mortgage on the island. The money thus raised will be used in developing the minerals and all those who have looked into the matter are sure that the venture will prove a veritable gold mine.

 Marsh Island was entered from the state by the enterprising citizens mentioned when the oil excitement was at its height a few months ago.
From the New Orleans Picayune and in the Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1901.


RAIL ROAD NOTES.

 The excursion from Lake Charles to Opelousas last Sunday, was certainly a corker, nine coaches being literally packed with a sweltering mass of humanity; many persons here who intended going could not do so for want of accommodation.

 Bob Salzman and Don Greig returned from a few days sojourn at the sea shore. Bob says that Don saw a sea serpent "in his mind."

 A carload fo Chinamen passed through here on Nov. 9, last Saturday in bond; their destination being China.

 Jim Marsh and George Weigel of the Alexandria Branch have caught all the excursion and special runs this season. Jim says the would rather unload a car of local freight than take out an excursion.

 Uncle Mack Burkholder, for many years employed as carpenter for the S. P. R. R., at this point, has resigned. He will, we understand go into the timber business at Lake Charles.

 Assistant agent C. C. Mabry and family returned last Sunday from a month's recreation in the salubrious clime of Colorado. He is looking well and speaks in glowing terms of his trip.

 Mr. Jos. Thibodeaux of Morgan City is now assistant to section foreman Weigel at this point.

 Gentil, the flagman is an expert on watermelons; he used to raise such large and flue ones, when he was a farmer.

 Mr. P. J. Maguire, master car builder, and J. P. Notan, master mechanic at Algiers, was here on business Wednesday.

 Maurice Boudreaux, formerly on the Morgan City and Lafayette local, is now running on the local between here and Lake Charles.

 General Manager Van Vleck accompanied by the new L. W.  Supt. Mr. G. W. Hartman arrived here Wednesday evening on a special train, they lay over here until Thursday morning, going east on No. 8. Mr. Hartman comes from the Mexican Central R. R., and succeeds Mr. W. B. Mulvey.

 There is every indication that this season's business in the yard here will be extra heavy. There are several new men being broken in as it may require a third engine and crew.

 Judge Coffey, who is representing the Trainmen at Houston, came over on a short visit last, and returned Tuesday morning to complete some important business.

 A young lady on the excursion last Sunday was heard to remark as Lucien Chopin was looking at her, "I wonder if he is making those goo-goo eyes at me.

 The carpenters under foreman Voss are making general repairs to the company's buildings at this point.

 Bob Bailey, who has been firing on the Morgan City and Algiers local, returned home Wednesday.

 We learn that engineer Peter Danehauser is not improving; his many friends here hope for his ultimate recovery.

 Uncle Jake Wiegel took in the excursion to Opelousas last Saturday.
    (Signed) SWITCHMAN.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1901.



  



  












       



 City Council Proceedings.
   Lafayette La., Aug. 5th, 1901.
 


The City Council met this day in regular session. Mayor Chas. D. Caffery, presiding. Members present: J. O. Mouton, A. E. Mouton, B. Falk, G. A. DeBlanc, H. Hohorst, F. Demanade, F. E. Girard.
 

 Minutes of previous meeting were adopted as read.

 Moved by G. A. DeBlanc seconded by B. Falk, that the W. W. & E. L. Company be charged with procuring water mains immediately if possible and to cancel order given L. Lacoste if necessary. Carried.


 Moved by G. A. DeBlanc seconded by F. Demanade that W. W. & E. L. Company be authorized to contract on part of the town, for one year’s supply of Fuel Oil for Plant. Carried.


 Moved and duly seconded that Finance Committee Report be accepted as follows.
Carried.

 


FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT, GENERAL FUND.To cash last report $1500.48
“ “ Licenses 766.09
“ “ Mayor’s Court 122.59
“ “ Stock Fines .75
______
$2389.82

 


 Whereas the City of Lafayette, La., heretofore executed, and delivered its water works and electric light bonds in the aggregate sum of $36,000 dated September 1st, 1896 bearing interest at the rate of six per cent per annum, payable annually March 1st, and,

 Whereas, the principal of bonds of said issue numbered 22 and 23, each of the denomination of $500.00 and aggregating the sum of $1,000.00 due March 1st, 1901 have not been paid, and there are not sufficient funds in the treasury of said city which can be appropriated to the payment of same.


 Now therefore, be it resolved that the Mayor and Treasurer of said City of Lafayette be and they are hereby authorized and directed by and with the consent of the holders of said bonds now past due as aforesaid to execute and deliver to the holders of said bonds new and additional coupons to be attached thereto whereby the payment of the principal of said bonds shall be extended and became due as follows:

 Bond number 22 shall be extended and become due March 1st, 1903.
 Bond number 23, shall be extended and become due March 1st, 1903.
 

 Moved by B. Falk seconded by G. A. DeBlanc that an appropriation of one hundred dollars per annum be made for the purpose of procuring the services of Prof. F. Sontag, as leader of the Brass Band and Orchestra in this town, payment quarterly; said appropriation to take effect on and after Sept. 1st, 1901 and to be paid as long as the Brass Band shall exist. Motion adopted.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1901.





  Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 10/8/1901.


 Dr. T. B. Hopkins is putting up a comfortable residence to rent.

 Miss Anna Hopkins and her guest Miss Maud Herring left Monday for Patterson to visit Miss Fannie Trelue, a former classmate.

 Messrs. Leopold Lacoste and Arthur LeBlanc, after several weeks stay in Hot Springs, returned Tuesday very much improved in health.

 Miss Zerelda Bailey is enjoying a pleasant stay with Mrs. Dr. Ducrocq at Lafourche.

 Mr. Emile Hauptman, a first class piano tuner is in Lafayette. If your piano needs tuning leave your orders at the Advertiser office.

 Our clever clerk of court, Mr. E. G. Voorhies, is off on a well-earned vacation.

 Mrs. Parker of Simsport, La., is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Tom Hopkins, Jr.

 Father Baulard has returned from an extended visit to the North and East.

 Dr. Watkins, of Whiteworth Female College, Brookhaven, Miss., was a guest of Rev. C. C. Wier.

 Mr. Hayden, the talented blind pianist, will give an organ recital at the Methodist Church Sunday at 11 o'clock.

 The city council has made a much needed improvement by widening Congress street sixteen feet. This is the narrow street on the side of the Methodist church.

 Prof. T. S. Sligh of the Mansfield Female College, is here in the interest of his school. He is the guest of Rev. C. C. Wier. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1901.





  











  

















 






 From the Lafayette Gazette of August 10th, 1895:


1895: To the Mayor & Town Council.


Laf. La., 8/5/1895. - Your undersigned committee, appointed to compile the charter of the town of Lafayette with amendments and all ordinances of the city council, beg leave to make this report:

 That they have been unable to get the books wherein the proceedings of the city council and ordinances were kept previous to 1869; the outgoing secretary and treasurer not having them in his possession and being unable to account for the disappearance; we have compiled all the ordinances from that date up to the present, under proper headings and in alphabetical order; also the original act of the Legislature incorporating the town, together with legislative amendments thereof as well as those adopted by the people at the election held for that purpose in 1884.

We will call your attention to the fact that section nine of act of the Legislature approved March 11, 1836, incorporating this town, provides that the clerk of the council shall keep two books one bound book in which shall be recorded all the laws and ordinances passed by the council, signed by the president (Mayor) and countersigned by the Clerk (Secretary), and a book in which shall be recorded the proceedings of the City Council.

 This is as far as we have been able to discover has never been completed with in respect to number of books; there being only one wherein proceedings of the council and ordinances are kept together.

 We believe that this should be done. It would facilitate the members of the council, as well as the public, in being conversant with the resolution and ordinances in existence. The book for ordinances should have an alphabetical index, wherein it should be the duty of the clerk to enter in its proper place all ordinances passed by the council; whereas as it now is, it requires a great deal of labor to do so, when it is considered that one would have to search all through the book.

 We would recommend that the council authorize the clerk to purchase a book for that purpose, wherein it shall be his duty to record all laws and ordinances to be signed by the Mayor and countersigned by himself.

 As to those ordinances already passed and compiled by us, and annexed to this report, we would suggest that the council have them recorded and indexed in the book when procured, or be printed in pamphlets for the use of the council and the public or both as it might appear advisable.

 Respectfully submitted by Orther C. Mouton, T. M. Biossat, J. D. Trahan,
 Moved by Jos. Ducote, seconded by Leo Doucet, that committee on compiling the above be tendered vote of thanks for their laborious task which they have so well done, and same be accepted and committee be discharged.


 Moved by O. C. Mouton, seconded by J. O. Leblanc, that secretary be instructed to purchase record book in which to record act of incorporation and all ordinances separate from minutes which have been arranged alphabetically.

 Moved by Dr. Trahan, seconded by Jos. Ducote, that ordinances be transcribed in new book for said purpose and also that several numbers be printed in pamphlets for the use of of council and public in general. Also that the committee of two be appointed to confer with printing houses for the purpose of getting best figures. The mayor appointed on said committee Dr. J. D. Trahan and O. C. Mouton. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.





Back in Lafayette.

 Miss Lizzie Webb, daughter of our fellow-parishioner, Thos. F. Webb, has arrive at her old home in Lafayette after an absence of many years in Asiatic countries engaged in missionary work. She will spend about a year with her relatives and will return to resume her most laudable work in behalf of humanity. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.


Hired by The Advertiser.

 Mr. E. Laberge, a young gentleman who recently came to this country from Canada, has moved to Lafayette and is now connected with The Advertiser. We learn that Mr. Laberge is also reading law under the direction of Messrs. O. C. & J. Mouton. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.



Ladies' Newspaper.

 Misses Pearl Hermanson and Florence Truman, two enterprising young ladies from Opelousas, came to Lafayette last Saturday to sell copies of the woman's edition of The Opelousas Courier and we are pleased to state they succeeded in selling a large number of papers. Such charming "newsboys" will always find Lafayette an excellent field. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.


Mouton Bros. New Store.

 Messrs. Mouton Bros. have been moving this week into their new and commodious store building on Lincoln avenue facing the drugstore of Trahan & Doucet. Messrs. Mouton are receiving a large stock of goods, and they will be better prepared than ever to supply their town and country trade. The increased capacity of their place of business has enabled them to put in complete lines of dry goods, notions, groceries, etc. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.



Sunday School Convention.

 The second annual convention of the Lafayette Sunday School Association was held in the Presbyterian church last Wednesday. Over one hundred delegates were present, representing the various Sunday School Societies in this parish. Prominent workers in the cause were there and preached sermons and read papers on the subject of bible teaching. Among those who participated were Revs. Geo. Frazer, T. F. Webb, W. J. Barret, T. S. Randle, J. A. Griffes, Mr. Fred. Webb, Mrs. J. A.Griffes, Misses Nannie Randle and F. S. Greig. The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, Thomas P. Webb; secretary, R. C. Greig; assistant secretary, Miss Eulah Koch.

 One of the interesting features of the convention was the entertaining talk of Miss Lizzie Webb, who spoke on Sunday School work among the natives of Turkey, where an experience of 10 years as a missionary enabled her to give a vivid description of the hardships of missionaries in that country.

 The convention which was presided over by Mr. C. A. Tiebaut, State organizer, was eminently successful, the reports from the different schools showing increase in membership and unflagging interest in the cause of Sabbath instruction of the bible. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.



Carencro News.

 The rain last Sunday interfered with several well planned picnics, making sad faces the order of the day.

 Mr. Lemaire, of New Iberia, was in Carencro for several days last week, the guest of Mr. A. C. Guilbeau.

 Cotton picking has commenced.

 The Carencro Union Ginning Company, have placed a large water trough on the road in front of their property, which is for the use of the general public, and will no doubt be much appreciated.

 Prof. L. Tappisier was compelled to resign as teacher of the Carencro Band, owing to ill health.

 Mr. G. H. Guilbeau has moved into his new store building, and has just received a new and large assortment of goods, which will be added to his general stock. It is Mr. Guilbeau's intention to keep a thoroughly first class and "up to date" store.

 The Brass Band is progressing steadily.

 Mrs. Scranton, of Royville, was a visitor in Carencro this week, the guest of Mrs. C. C. Brown.

 Miss Ophelia Broussard gave a reception to a large number of young boys and girls, an evening last week in honor of her guests, Misses Mercedes Broussard and Lucie  Judice. It goes without saying that those who were present had a most delightful time.

 Our farmers express themselve as being perfectly satisfied with the present satisfied with the present condition of their crops. It is to be sincerely hoped that they may realize living prices for their products, when harvest time arrives.

 Mrs. Saul Broussard was a visitor in Sunset last week.

 Dr. W. W. Lessley and Mr. Geo. Melchoir were in Scott last Saturday.

 Misses Anita and Sophie Martin of Lafayette are spending several days with Mrs. Maurice Francez.

 Mr. Maurice Francez and family have removed to their cottage near the depot.

 John T. Block, Jr., of New Orleans, is spending a few days with relatives in Carencro.

 The parish can well feel proud of its Police Jury. It is composed of business men, public spirited and careful of the people's interests. There is scarcely another body of its kind, that has accomplished as much, with the limited means at its command.

 The many friends of Mr. A. J. Guilbeau will be pleased to learn of his entire recovery from his recent illness.

 Miss Lucy Bernard is with friends in Broussardville.

 Mr. and Mrs. Chachere, of Opelousas, were visitors in Carencro Sunday last.

 Miss Eloise Veavey, of New Iberia, has been spending several days with Miss Eugenie Bernard.

 Messrs. Walter and Abel Melancon, and Amilear Martin, of Breaux Bridge, were entertained last Sunday by the family of Dr. J. P. Francez.

 Misses Nidia and Alida Campbell, of Lafayette, were in town this week.

 We had the pleasure, last Sunday, of greeting our old friend Dr. D. T. Courtney.

 Mr. Laberge has accepted a position with The Lafayette Advertiser. Mr. Laberge has many admirers and friends in Carencro, who wish him every success in his new home.

 Mrs. R. Tanner, of Lafayette, returned home last Monday, after spending several days with her brother, Mr. Edm. Villere.

 Mr. Sam P. Brown informs us that it is a long road between Carencro and Royville - and he certainly knows whereof he speaks.

 We regret to learn that Mr. Clifford Estilette has been quite sick.
From the Carencro Correspondent of the Lafayette Gazette.
Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.


At Royville.

 Caterpillars have made an appearance and are devastating cotton at a rapid rate. This is very unfortunate at this season of the year, when cotton is small and tender and only forming its bolls. The only remedy is for farmers to treat the little monsters to copious draughts of Paris Green. Only a little courage and determination and will yet be well.

 Messrs. Romain Melancon, M. Langlinais, Albert Landry, Edgar Guidry and Mr. Benoit will spend the hot month of August Cheniere-a-la-Croix.

 That eminent officer, Eustache Comeaux, from the 7th ward, was in town Saturday. Eustache is a candidate for re-election, and we would like to know the reason why he'll not succeed himself.

 Landen Lewis a colored farmer living near Royville, has a calf born with live feet. The little animal is active and strong, and seems to be totally indifferent as to its additional leg. The calf can be seen at any time by calling Lewis' farm.

 Miss May Scranton, one of Royville's fairest daughters, is visiting friends in Lafayette.

 Lost - Friday between Bayou Tortue and Mr. Jos. Girouard's plantation, a pearl handle S. and W. revolver, .38 caliber. A suitable reward will be paid if returned to either Messrs. Alex. Billaud, of Broussardville, or J. R. Domengeaux, of Royville.

 The city council met in regular session, Monday Aug. 5.

 The ball at Dezire Langlinais' Hall Saturday night was largely attended. Two of Royville's best known dudes who "diked" out in patent leather slippers, white vests, swallow tail coats, etc., were forced to wade knee deep in mud and water so as to get back home. Some joker simply had a little fun at our friends' expense by cutting the lines. We would suggest, McIntosh and rubbers next time, friends.

 Thanks to Rodolph Roy for the grosbeck left at our "shop" Monday evening.

 Prof. Alcibiades Broussard returned Friday from Ruston, La., where he was an active member of the Chautauqua. He is delighted with his visit and says he does not remember ever having received kinder treatment. He intends returning next year.

 While in Lafayette the other day gathering in our forces, we caught a glimpse of our friend, Andre Martin, talking politics to some of our followers. Andre is yet a clever and able politician, but old man we'll make it spicy and hot for you this fall. This is a friendly remark, Andre, and although we mean it, take no offense.
  (Signed) CHEROKEE.
The Gazette's Royville correspondent.
Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.


Road to Breaux Bridge.

 Our public-spirited neighbor, the Valley of the Teche, contains the following well-considered editorial on the much-talked of road to Breaux Bridge:

 "As we have announced in our last issue Mr. J. O. Boudier has already begun the work on the road leading from Breaux Bridge to Lafayette. This road is one of the worst kinds in rainy weather, and the traffic between Lafayette and our town has been greatly reduced on account of its bad condition. It is very gratifying for us to see the parish of St. Martin ahead of the parish of Lafayette in this respect, but Lafayette has a business men's association, and if these gentlemen take the matter in hand, it is almost a certain fact, that the road will be continued on the Lafayette side of Bayou Vermilion. What this country needs is good roads, and roads built well enough to stand the wear and tear of continuous communication.

 "Nobody is more interested in it than the liveryman of Lafayette and we have no doubt that an appeal made to them would be promptly responded to. They are sending every day their buggies to Breaux Bridge, and will be the first ones to reap the benefits of this improvement. Even if only self-love, they ought to complete the road on their side of the bayou, for the difference between one side and the other would be too striking, and the traveling public would find the road far worse if allowed to make the comparison between the two pieces of road.

 "Nevertheless, as we have a tendency to judge the civilization of a country by the condition of the public roads, and we have suffered too much here in the past, not be glad to command in this matter the action of the Police Jury in making an appropriate almost sufficient to make the road, and to congratulate the few, very few, citizens of our town who have contributed by their generosity to the completion of the funds necessary to have the work satisfaction and thoroughly done." From the Valley of the Teche and in the Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.     





City Council Proceedings.

        Lafayette, La., Aug. 5, 1895.
  At the regular meeting of the city council held this evening, the following were present:  Mayor A. J. Moss, Dr. J. D. Trahan, Messrs. J. O. LeBlanc, O. C. Mouton, T. M. Biossat, Jos Ducote, Leo Doucet. Absent: B. Falk.

 Minutes of July 1st and of special meetings of 2nd and 23rd inst. were read and approved.

 FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT.

       Lafayette, La., Aug. 3, 1895.
  To his Honor the Mayor and Members of the City Council of Lafayette:

 Your undersigned finance committee beg leave to make this their quarterly report, after examination of the books of the constable and collector, treasurer and mayor:

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page 2 column 1
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 The mayor and constable having settled with the treasurer, and the treasurer having settled with our committee in accordance with ordinance of July 6, 1891, which requires a settlement by these officers every three months, we would respectfully recommend that they be granted full discharge for this quarter and a quietus be given them for all monies received by them up to and including Aug. 3, 1895. We have taken possession of the warrants shown to have been paid in this report, and would ask the authority to destroy them.

 The amount of taxes and licences collected and turned over in the treasury for this quarter by the constable amount to $383.90, on which he is entitled to a commission of 5 per cent as per ordinance of July 1, 1895, making 19.9; and having overpaid ninety-five cents in the treasury as shown in this report, we would recommend that the council authorize the secretary to issue a warrant in his favor for $20.4 in settlement thereof.

   Respectfully submitted,
ORTHER C. MOUTON,
T. M. BIOSSAT,
LEO DOUCET,
Finance Committee.

 Moved by Dr. Trahan, seconded by Jos. Ducote, that treasurer, collector and mayor be granted a quietus for the first quarter ending Aug. 13.

 Moved by Dr. Trahan, seconded by Jos. Ducote, that cancelled warrants be (instead of being destroyed,) turned over to city clerk and filed among the papers of city kept by him. Carried.

 Moved by Jos. Ducote, seconded by O. C. Mouton, that secretary issue warrants to D. J. Veazey, for $20.14 in accordance with finance committee's report.

 Following is a report of committee appointed to compile the charter of the town of Lafayette with amendments and all ordinances of the city council.


       Lafayette, La., Aug. 5, 1895.

 To the Mayor and Members of the City Council of the town of Lafayette:

 Your undersigned committee, appointed to compile the charter of the town of Lafayette with amendments and all ordinances of the city council, beg leave to make this report:

 That they have been unable to get the books wherein the proceedings of the city council and ordinances were kept previous to 1869; the outgoing secretary and treasurer not having them in his possession and being unable to account for their disappearance; we have compiled all the ordinances from that date up to the present, under proper headings and in alphabetical order; also the original act of the Legislature incorporating the town, together with legislative amendments thereof as well as those adopted by the people at the election held for that purpose in 1884.

 We will call your attention to the fact that section nine of Act of the Legislature approved March 11, 1836, incorporating this town, provides that the clerk of the council shall keep two books; one bound book in which shall be recorded all the laws and ordinances passed by the council, signed by the president (Mayor) and countersigned by the Clerk (Secretary), and a book in which shall be recorded the proceedings of the City Council.

 This as far as we have been able to discover has never been complied with in respect to number of books; there being only one wherein proceedings of the council and ordinances are kept together.

 We believe that this should be done. It would facilitate the members of the council, as well as the public, in being conversant with the resolution and ordinances in existence. The book for ordinances should have an alphabetical index, wherein it should be made the duty of the clerk to enter in its proper place all ordinances passed by the council; whereas as it now is, it requires a great deal of labor to do so, when it is considered that one would have to search all through the book.

 We would recommend that the council authorize the clerk to purchase a book for that purpose, wherein it shall be his duty to record all laws and ordinances to be signed by the Mayor and countersigned by himself.

 As to those ordinances already passed and compiled by us, and annexed to this report, we would suggest that the council have them recorded and indexed in the book when procured, or be printed in pamphlets for the use of the council and the public or both as it might appear advisable.
   Respectfully submitted,
ORTHER C. MOUTON,
T. M. BIOSSAT,
J. D. TRAHAN.

 Moved by Jos. Ducote, seconded by Leo Doucet, that committee on compiling the above be tendered vote of thanks for their laborious task which they have so well done, and same be accepted and committee be discharged.

 Moved by O. C. Mouton, seconded by J. O. LeBlanc, that secretary be instructed to purchase record book in which to record act of incorporation and all ordinances separate from minutes which have been arranged alphabetically.

 Moved by Dr. Trahan, seconded by Jos. Ducote, that ordinances be transcribed in new book for said purpose and also that several numbers be printed in pamphlets for the use of the council and public in general. Also that committee of two be appointed to confer with printing houses for the purpose of getting best figures. The mayor appointed on said committee Dr. J. D. Trahan and O. C. Mouton.

COLLECTOR AND TREASURER'S REPORT.

 To the Honorable Councilmen of the Town of Lafayette, La.

 I have collected the following sum since my last report to-wit:

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 The following resolution was offered by O. C. Mouton, seconded by Dr. Trahan.

 ELECTION RESOLUTION.

 Resolution ordering an election by the qualified electors residing in the corporate limits of the town of Lafayette, as fixed by Act. No. 111 of 1869, submitting the proposition to be voted on at said election, whether they concur in, consent and accede to the proposed annexation of certain lots or lands contiguous thereto, into the corporate limits of said town.

 Whereas, a majority in number and value of the qualified electors under the general election laws of this State residing upon the lots or land contiguous and adjacent to the corporate limits of said town and hereinafter described, voting at an election held at the Court House in said town on the first day of July 1895, under resolution of the city council of said town of Lafayette and proclamation, submitting the proposition whether they desired such lots or land should be annexed to and included in the corporate limits of said town of Lafayette and be subject to the jurisdiction, control and authority of said municipal authority as fully and to all intents and purposes as if the same had been originally included therein, have voted in favor thereof.

 And whereas, the returns of said election showing said result, were recorded and transcribed in the public record book wherein the ordinances or official proceedings of said municipal authorities are usually kept, and the same permanently preserved among the official records of said town;

 And whereas, the municipal authorities of the town of Lafayette have, within ten days after said election, made public proclamation of said result of said election by publication in the "Lafayette Advertiser" and "Lafayette Gazette," newspapers published in said town:  Therefore,
   Be it resolved by the Mayor and city council of the town of Lafayette; That an election be and is hereby ordered under the provisions of Act No. 105, of the general assembly of this state for te year 1892, approved July 7, 1892; said election to be held under the general election laws of the State by the qualified electors under the general election laws of the state residing within the corporate limits of the town of Lafayette as established by Act No. 111 of 1869, submitting to them in the proposition whether they concur in, consent and accede to the proposed annexation to the territorial corporate limits of the town of Lafayette as fixed by said Act No. 111 of 1869, to be subject to the jurisdiction, control and authority of the municipal authorities thereof as fully and to all intents and purposes as if the same had been originally included therein, certain lots or land contiguous and adjacent to the corporate limits of said town as follows, to-wit:

 Starting at the bridge on the coulee west of said town, between the properties of Henry Hohorst and Dame Anita Hohorst, wife of Doctor and Franklin J. Mouton, and running from thence along said coulee, North 86 1/2 West, a small ash, 33 feet; North 67 East, a small ash, 36 feet; thence N 1/2 E., 300 feet in Hohorst's pasture; thence N. 27 1/2 E., 300 feet thence N. 12 1/2 East, 170 feet, in cemetery 200 feet; thence N. 15 E., 389 feet; thence N. 18 1/2 E., 110 feet; going from cemetery to Mrs. Judice's place, 470 feet; thence N. 7 1/2 W. 800 feet; thence N. 20 E. 300 feet to south east corner of Arthur Greig's property; thence N. 1/2 E., 623 feet to the big ditch, 1,600 feet to public road leading to Scott, 2,553 feet to the Louisiana Western railroad, 2,653 feet to the north side of said railroad; thence, E. 1,024 thence South 77 E. 660 feet to the Morgan railroad (L. W. Division) 1,250 to center of Morgan road, 1,760 feet to the public road leading to Breaux Bridge, 1,810 feet into Dr. F. S. Mudd's field, 3,820 feet to the south west corner of his garden, 3,900 S. about 75 feet beyond Dr. Mudd's residence, 4,300 feet in Dr. Mudd's back lot, 1,050 feet into Crow Girard's property, 1,790 feet to stake.

 Thence south 55 degrees west, 70 feet between Nicholson and Cochran, 840 feet to Dowdell, 864 feet to stake. Thence S. 27 W.,  890 feet to Chargois, 950 feet to red oak (2 feet in diameter); thence 46 W., 1,050 feet to N. E. corner of Roundhouse yard 1,520 feet to main line Morgan Railway, 1,820 to Mouton addition; thence S. 29 W., 1,414 feet to oak lane, 2,650 feet to public road leading to Pin Hook; thence N. 49 W., following the public road 1,900 feet to a coulee in front of the residence of M. E. Girard's; thence S. 54 W., to S. E. corner of Mr. Girard's yard; thence 8 76 W., in Mr. Girard's pasture, 1,000 feet in Dr. E. Mouton's field; thence N. 87 W., 462 feet an oak (2 feet in diameter) south of Dr. Mouton's barn, 500 feet to a coulee; thence following the coulee the bridge starting Point N. 1/2 536 feet.

 Resolved, That an election under the general election laws of this State be held at the Court House of the parish, in the town of Lafayette on Tuesday, Sept. 2, 1895, to be voted at only by those qualified to vote under the general election laws of said State and who reside in the territorial limits of the town of Lafayette as established at present by Act No. 111 of 1,869.

 Resolved, That the following proposition be submitted to said electors to be voted on at said election, to-wit: - Whether they concur in, consent and accede to the annexation to the territorial corporate limits of the town of Lafayette those lots or land, contiguous and adjacent thereto, fully and accurately described in section one of this ordinance or resolution, and be subject to the jurisdiction, control and authority of the municipal authorities of said town as fully and to all intent and purposes as if the same had been originally included in the territorial limits thereof by act approved March 11, 1836, incorporating said town.

 Resolved, That every property owner voting at said election is hereby requested to write or cause to be written his name on the back of the ballot, so that the result may be readily ascertained, whether a majority in value, as well as in number, of the qualified electors voting at said election, have voted in favor of annexing and including the lots or land aforesaid to the territorial corporate limits of said town.

 Be it further resolved, That the electors shall vote by ballot, and the ballots used at said election shall be of white paper upon which shall be written these words: - "For the proposed annexation." "Against the proposed annexation." The votes shall be counted for or against the proposed annexation as cast; but in every case when the name of the voter shall keep a record of how he voted opposite his name on the list of names, so as to ascertain the result as to value.

 Be it further resolved, That R. C. Greig, J. Edw, Martin and Ernest Constantin, be and hereby appointed the commissioners of election, and in case one or more of said commissioners should fail to act then commissioners to be appointed in accordance with the general election laws of the State; that the poll he opened from the hour of six in the forenoon until seven in the afternoon; that it shall be duty of said commissioners to keep a list of the persons voting at such polling place, which list shall be numbered from one end to the other, and shall be signed and sworn to as correct by the commissioners after the poll is closed and the votes are counted; and before entering on their duties the commissioners shall be sworn according to law, and if no officer authorized to administer oaths be present to administer the oath to the commissioners, it may be administered by any voter, or if no voter be present, by the commissioners to each other; the commissioners shall proceed to count the votes without moving the box from the room or place where the votes were received, and in presence of any voter or voters who may desire to be present; that two tally sheets shall be kept of the count, which shall be marked with tallies in lines from the beginning to the end of the page, and the total amount of the tallies shall be be written in figures immediately after the end of the tallies, and in letters, so as to prevent any alteration thereof; and after the count is completed, the ballots counted shall be put back in the ballot box, which shall immediately be sealed, with the ballots therein. As soon as the votes are counted and the ballot box sealed, as above stated, the commissioners shall make two completed statements of the votes cast, how many for and how many against the proposed annexation, also the number of ballots contained in the box, the number of ballots contained in the box, the number of ballots rejected if any, and the reasons therefore. The compiled statements shall be sworn to by the commissioners, the oath to be administered as before provided, and the compiled statements, list of the persons voting and tally sheets, shall be delivered to the Mayor of said town within forty-eight hours after the closing of the poll at said election, together with the ballot box and the votes therein contained.

 Be it further resolved, That such election shall be preceded by a notice of ten days to be given in the Lafayette Gazette and the Lafayette Advertiser, two newspapers published in the town of Lafayette; the said notice to set forth specifically the manner in which said election is to be conducted, and the boundaries and description of the lots or land proposed to be annexed to and included in the territorial corporate limits of said town, and also designating the polling place and the names of the commissioners of election, as well as the manner of counting the votes and making the returns.

 Be it further resolved, That the notice of election shall be issued and signed by the Mayor of this council.

 The votes stood as follows: Yeas: T. M. Biossat, J. O. LeBlanc, Leo Doucet, O. C. Mouton, D. Trahan, Jos. Ducote. Nays: None.

 The following is an ordinance offered by O. C. Mouton seconded by Leo Doucet, regarding fast driving in the city limits.

 An ordinance to amend and reenact an ordinance passed June 17th, 1869, relative to riding or driving in the street.

 Be it ordained by the Mayor and City Council of Lafayette; That it is prohibited from riding any horse, mule or other quadruped, or any velocipede, tricycle or bicycle, or to drive a vehicle of any kind on the streets within the corporate limits of the town of Lafayette without a reasonable cause at a greater speed than eight miles an hour.

 Be it further ordained, That any one violating section one of this ordinance, on conviction, shall be imprisoned not more than five days or fined not more than twenty-dollars or both at the discretion of the mayor.

 Votes as follows: Yeas: T. M. Biossat, J. O. LeBlanc, Leo Doucet, O. C. Mouton, Jos. Ducote. Nays: None. Dr. Trahan absent.

 There being no further business the council adjourned to next regular meeting, Sept. 2nd, 1894, 4 o'clock p. m.
BAXTER CLEGG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.


     
 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 8/10/1895. 

 Caterpillars are reported in some parts of the parish.

 Ice cold root beer (non-alcoholic) on draught at the Moss Pharmacy.


 To-morrow the Pelican Brass Band will give a basket picnic in Girard's woods. All are invited.


 There will be some fine races at Breaux Bridge to-morrow.

 Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Davidson have returned from their bridal tour and are now at their beautiful home in McComb's addition.

 Mr. W. S. Torian and niece, Miss Mattie, left this week for Goliad, Texas, where they will spend some time.

 Dr. Irion's Dental Parlors, over post office, are always open from 8:30 a. m. to 1:30 p. m. and 3 to 5 p. m.


 Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Davidson have returned from their bridal tour and are now at their beautiful in McComb's addition.

 The Gazette is requested to announce that the Rev. Paul S. Swicky, a missionary, will preach sermons in French Saturday and Sunday at the next meetings being held near Duson.

 Miss Anna Dubernard, of Scott, visited relatives in Lafayette this week.

 Mrs. Wm. Clegg left last Sunday for Ratford, Va., where she will remain a month or two at the home of her brother.

 Paul Bailey, the efficient drug clerk at Clegg's went to New Orleans this week on business.

 Drs. F. R. Martin and Durio, the well-known physicians from Breaux Bridge, were in Lafayette Wednesday.

 Miss Anna Gamard, who was the guest of Miss Yolande Rigues, left Tuesday for her home in New Orleans.

 Dr. Wadlington who was so seriously ill at Scott has about completely recovered. His recovery is a source of pleasure to a great number of people.

 Mr. W. S. Torian and niece, Miss Mattie, left this week for Goliad, Texas, where they will spend some time.

 J. N. Roussel, resident student at the Touro Infirmary, visited the family of Mrs. A. Cornay Monday.

 Charles L. Voorhies was in Lafayette this week. He went to Huron to repair the machinery of the large refinery at that place.

 C. C. Higginbotham, of tonsorial fame, was in Lafayette the other day on his way to Houston where intends going in business.

 Rev. de Stockhalper, the eloquent and beloved Jesuit priest so wll-known to the Catholics of Lafayette, has been elected president of the St. Charles College at Grand Coteau.

 Will C. Chevis, the gentleman whose trenchant pen makes the Baton Rouge Advocate so intensely interesting, was in Lafayette a few hours Monday. Mr. Chevis continued his journey t Rayne and from that place went with Mrs. Chevis is to Baton Rouge.

 Last week after we had gone to press we received the first number of The Creole-American; a paper recently established in this town with Geo. M. Goolsby as publisher. In its "bow" the paper announces that it will be independent un Politics. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895.




Mouton Bros. Moving. - Messrs. Mouton Bros. have been moving this week into their new and commodius store building on Lincoln avenue facing the drugstore of Trahan & Doucet. Messrs. Mouton are receiving a large stock of goods, and they will be better prepared than ever to supply their town and country trade. The increased capacity of their place of business has enabled them to put in complete lines of drygoods, notions, groceries, etc. Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1895. 










From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 10th, 1889:  


 Peculiar Weather.

 The weather during the week has been “peculiar.” Sunday was a very hot day, closing with a violent shower. Monday was very warm, with a heavy rain and thunder storm during the afternoon, during which lightning struck at several places in town, doing very little damage, however, besides killing a cow belonging to Mr. Allingham near the roundhouse. Tuesday, it began to turn cooler, and since we have had cool, windy, showery weather, more like October than August. The crops have shown no material damage, so far, though injured to some extent. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1889.


 Much Could Be Accomplished. - The idea has been suggested to us that much could be accomplished in the way of stimulating to higher education the youths of our parish, by an offer of an appropriation to cover the expenses to the Louisiana State University and A. & M. College, by the Police Jury, - the beneficiaries to be determined by competitive examination. Not only would such a plan act as a great incentive to our more advanced youths, but the salutary effect would extend all the way down to renewed effort and assiduity to studies in order secure if possible the much prized opportunities offered. The competitive feature in addition,  to opening the benefit rendered to all alike would ensure reward to the most meritorious only. We believe that an opportunity for such a purpose could not be objected to on any reasonable grounds, and the good results bound to follow a measure so far reaching in its beneficial effects upon the youth of the entire parish, would more than compensate the expenditure.

 This plan is already in successful operation in several parishes of this State, and we recommend to the serious consideration of the president and members of our Police Jury the views here presented. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1889.





AN ORDER TO SHERIFF BROUSSARD:

To SHERIFF I. A. BROUSSARD: You are hereby ordered and required, in the name of the State of Louisiana, to bring before me, the undersigned authority, on or before Friday, the 9th day of August, 1889, at 10 o’clock a. m. of said day, at the court house, in the town of Lafayette, for the purpose of preliminary examination, which is fixed for said day, the following named persons, now in custody and detained in the parish prison of Orleans on the charge of resisting, obstructing and assaulting an officer of this State in the service and execution of the process of a court, to-wit.

 [Here follows the names of the prisoners, etc.]


Sheriff Broussard had gone down to New Orleans Sunday morning. Monday night deputy sheriffs L. G. Breaux and John Breaux went to the city and delivered to Sheriff Broussard the above order. Tuesday morning Sheriff Broussard and his deputies, having in charge the prisoners, took the Southern Pacific train for Lafayette. Before leaving the jail the prisoners paid their respects to the managers of the “Orleans Hotel,” thanking them for the courtesies and kindness shown them during their imprisonment. On the train, when conductor Jim Ashton came to collect fares, he found that the sheriff had purchased commutation tickets for himself and deputies which bore their names, and Jim punched out the requisite coupons for their fares and demanded fares for the prisoners. The sheriff told him to punch it out of the tickets. The conductor informed him that he was not authorized to “do that,” and that the fares must be paid for the prisoners, or they would have to get off. The sheriff refused to pay, other than by offering the aforesaid tickets, or to remove his prisoners from the train. And thus the case was argued,  pro and con, between Jim and Isaac (at the rate of forty miles and hour), and telegrams flashed back and forth, until the train reached Schriever, where the conductor found orders to collect fares of put the prisoners off. We here us the language of the Times-Democrat correspondent, who accompanied the party.


 “The conductor then made a demand on the sheriff for full fare for the prisoners and the sheriff handed him the thousand-mile ticket, which was refused. The sheriff then refused to pay, and the conductor asked him to take his prisoners off. 'I don’t order you off, but the prisoners,' said the conductor. ’If the prisoners go I will have to stay with them, and it is virtually putting me off,’ said Broussard. 'I had better cut the car out,' responded the conductor. 'No,' replied the sheriff, 'I don’t want to stop the train, and you have ordered the prisoners off, I will go off with them.' The prisoners, headed by the sheriff, and accompanied by Father Welti and your correspondent, left the train, which started west. The prisoners were marched to a small hotel near the railroad track and placed in rooms, where they will be kept under guard until to-night.”


 When the West bound express reached Schriever that night, the sheriff (in the meantime having communicated with Governor Nicholls) placed his prisoners on board, paid their fares, and brought them safely to Lafayette, where they are now quartered in the Court house under guard. We understand the course of proceeding against the prisoners will be as follows: Friday will commence the examination of the charge of breaking jail, assaulting officer, etc; and Monday it is expected to take up the charge for murder. Judge Edwards, Attorney General Rogers, B. C. Elliot, Esq., and R. C. Smedes, Esq., are conducting the examination.  Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1889.



The View from Carencro. - In regard to the action of Sheriff Broussard in calling on the Governor, for assistance, we think he did perfectly right, and it was the duty of the Governor to do just what he did. The people of Lafayette have no better, truer friends in Governor Nichols and Sheriff Broussard, and we that some of the men arrested do not think less of their officers because they did their duty, from this fact. When one of the deputies went to arrest Mr. Rosemond Broussard, Mrs. Broussard was offended and did not wish to give breakfast, as she was requested; but Broussard, like a true man, said: “You must not get mad with Mr. -----, because he is doing his duty, and I respect him for it;” and having the matter thus explained the good wife soon had breakfast, and her husband ready to go. Mr. Gaston Blott said: “The sheriff is doing his duty like a man, and I honor him for it.”

From “Carencro Notes” in the Lafayette Advertiser of 8/10/1889.




MARRIED. - At  St. John’s Catholic Church, Lafayette, La., on Wednesday, August 7, 1889, by Rev. E. FORGE, MR. ANTOINE CLOSE to Miss ALICE LAFOND, both of Lafayette.
 

 A number of friends of the bride and groom were in attendance from Washington and Opelousas. THE ADVERTISER was kindly remembered by a liberal donation of cake and wine, and extends its heartiest congratulations to the handsome young couple.  Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1889.






Police Jury Proceedings.

      Lafayette, La., Aug. 5th, 1889.

 The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present: Messrs. C. P. Alpha, J. G. St. Julien, C. C. Brown, A. A. Delhomme and Ford Huffpauir. Absent O. Theriot.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 The committee appointed to examine the Treasurer's accounts made a report showing them to be correct in every particular.

 The Treasurer submitted his monthly statement which was accepted.

 The road overseer of the First ward made a report of the roads and bridges of that ward; he had collected four fine from Lucien Baptiste for a refusal to perform road duty and had sued William Edmond, J. P., had refused to turn over the amount of fine collected.

 The following was adopted in reference to the above report: Be it resolved, that P. A. Martin, J. P., is hereby ordered to turn over the amount of fine collected from William Edmond, to the road overseer of the first ward without delay.

 The road overseer of the sixth ward reported that he had raised 163 arpents of public road, built 31 bridges, and collected one dollar fine from a party refusing to perform road duty.

 The road overseer of the Second ward reported having no trouble in regard to road duty and that he had built 35 levees and 13 bridges during the past year.

 The jury of freeholders appointed to trace a road from Duson Station to the Indian Bayou bridge on the division line of Lafayette and Vermilion parishes as follows:

 We, the undersigned jury of freeholders, appointed and sworn to trace and lay off a public road from Duson Station to Indian Bayou Bridge on the division line of Lafayette and Vermilion, and to the parties through whose land said road may pass, have traced and laid off said road as follows: Starting at Duson in the 2nd ward, the road shall run as more fully described in plat hereunto annexed. The following parties have donated twenty-five feet along their respective lines:  I. S. Brown, Silas Huffpauir, Hugh Wagner, Jose. Bordes, Thos. Morgan, Paul Bonin, Toussaint & Leges, Philozie Trouve, Bolden Huffpauir, Stareus Huffpauir, Mme. Valsin Trahan. The following parties refuse to donate and we expropriated and assessed damages as follows:  Thos. Floyd, $12; L. Stutes 6; W. G. Bailey $18, Geo. K. Bradford $21; Sevigne Cormier $9; Julien Duhon $9, Winston, Jones & Winston $24.  Twenty feet on north line of N W 1/4 Sec 6, T 10. S R 3 E $4.50; Faustin East; Oneal Simon $4; Livode Breaux $14, Paul Bonin $8; Mrs. M. W. Perry $8; Mme. Ralph Foreman $2; Benjamin Spell $15; Thos. Daily $5; C. D. Harrington $19.

 All of which we respectfully submit to your honorable body. (Signed) J. G. Bertrand, Thos. M. Floyd, Louis Bonin, Jos. Bordes, C. D. Harrington, Hugh Wagner.

 On motion of Mr. Huffpauir the above report was accepted and the road declared open as a public highway, and the President is authorized to issue warrants in payment of all damages mentioned; to receive by legal act all titles to the lands so acquired and to have the same recorded with accompanying documents.

 The jury of freeholders appointed to trace a public road from Duson Station to the southern limits of the parish made the following report:

 We, the undersigned jury of freeholders, appointed and sworn to trace a public road from Duson Station to the southern limit of the parish and to assess whatever damages may be done to the parties through whose land said road may pass have traced and laid off said road as will more fully appear as per annexed plat. The following parties have donated twenty feet along their respective lines; I. A. Broussard, Hugh Hutchinson, Jos. Ledoux, Alex Huffpauir, A. O. Clark, Jackson Booth, M. L. Lyons, Alf. Morgan, Martin Harmon, Eloi Broussard. The following parties refuse to donate and we have assessed damages as follows:  The following parties refuse to donate and we have assessed damages as follows: Valery Broussard $10, Edward Guidry $5, Twenty feet on west of Sec. 4 T 19, S. R. 3 E $20; Sevigne Duhon $10; Preston Huffpauir $10; Twenty feet on east of Sec 16 T 10 S R 3 E $2; Malachi Parry $20; Chas. Burke $10; John Whittington $5; Mrs. Richmond Pery $10.

 All of which we respectfully submit to your Honorable body.  (Signed)  A. O. Clark, Jos. W. Broussard, Ben Avant, Alex. Huffpauir, A. M. Broussard, John Nugent.

 On motion of Mr. Huffpauir the above report was accepted and the road declared open as a public highway; the President authorized to issue warrants in payment of all damages above mentioned; to receive by legal act all titles to the lands so acquired and to have same recorded with accompanying document.

 The jury of freeholders appointed to trace a public road from Lyons' bridge to Rayne bridge made the following report:

 We, the undersigned jury of freeholders appointed and sworn to trace and lay off a public road from Lyons' bridge to Rayne bridge and to assess whatever damages may be done to the parties through whose lands said road may pass have traced and laid off said road, commencing at Lyons' bridge and as more fully appears on annexed plat. The following parties have donated twenty feet along their respective lines; Elijah Huffpauir, Adam Morgan, Hugh Wagner, Jos. Bordes, Vithal Cormier, Alcide Hanks.

 The following parties refuse to donate and we have assessed damages as follows:  Soloman $16; Winston Jones & Winston $46; Alcide Foreman & Bros. $4; Widow Elizabeth Wagner $8; Heirs of Magliore Breaux $7; Thos. Morgan $6; Adam Morgan $5; Livode Breaux $5; Norbert Simon $1; Oncil Simon $7.50; Jules Hanks $3; Omar Constantin $6.50; Mrs. Drozin Navarre $10; Dupre Guidry $2; Alex Pomier $6; Oscar Benoit $1.50; Valsin Stutes $5; Espera Guidry $4; twenty feet on south line of parties unknown $6; forty feet to bridge across land of parties unknown $6.

 All of which we respectfully submit to your honorable.  (Signed) Hugh Wagner, Louis Bonin, Alcide Hanks, Abel Huffpauir, Elijah Huffpauir, Thos. Morgan.

 On motion of Mr. Huffpauir the above report was accepted and the road declared open as a public highway; the President authorized to issue warrants in payment of all damages above mentioned; to receive by legal act all titles to the lands so acquired and to have same recorded with accompanying documents.

 A petition from citizens of the 2d ward praying for a public road to connect the public road at Indian Bayou with the bridge over Bayou Queue Tortue, was read and agreeable thereto the following jury of freeholders were appointed to trace the aforementioned road:  Jasper Spell, Dave Spell, Augustus Perry, Starcus Huffpauir, Austin Davis, Aaron Spell.

 The following resolution duly made was adopted:

 Be it resolved, That a committee, consisting of Messrs. C. C. Brown, Alfred Delhomme and C. P. Alpha, be and is hereby appointed to consider the advisability of laying out a new road, or repairing the old Opelousas route, North of the L. W. R. R., leading to Carencro, and to connect said new road with the public road near Mrs. Daigle's.

 On motion of Mr. Brown, duly made, the following was adopted:

 Be it resolved, That an addition of ($25) twenty-five dollars per annum be made to the salary of each road overseer.

 The following accounts were approved:

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 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
C. P. ALPHA, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1889.




Police Jury Proceedings.

         Lafayette, La., Aug. 1, 1901.
 The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present:  M. Billeaud, Jr., John Whittington, J. C. Buchanan, F. G. Mouton, Alonzo Lacy, J. A. Labbe, J. O. Blanchet, Alex. M. Broussard and Saul Broussard.

 The Jury, by motion duly carried, adjourned until 2 o'clock p. m., to participate in the Good Roads Convention.

 At two o'clock the Jury reassembled with all members present and after reading and approval of the minute of the previous meeting proceeded to business.

 Messrs. Blanchet, Whittington and Cade appointed to confer with the authorities of Vermilion as to the site for the proposed new steel bridge at Olidon Broussard's ferry reported conference held but that pending survey and reported conference held but that pending survey and report from a United States civil engineer no agreement had been reached.

 By motion of Mr. Mouton the following ordinance was duly adopted:

 1st.  Resolved that from and after the first day of October, 1901, emptying or discharging any skimmings, molasses, sweeetened or acidulated waters from steam trains, vacuum pans and double effects in Bayou Vermilion, Bayou Carencro, Bayou Tourtue and Bayou Queue Tortue or any canal, ditch or tributary of said streams, shall be and is hereby declared to be a public nuisance.

 2d.  Be it further ordained that any person or persons violating this ordinance shall be liable to a fine of not less than fifty dollars, or to imprisonment in the parish jail for not less than thirty days nor more than six months or both, at the discretion of the court for each and every offense.

 3rd.  Be it further ordained that one half of the above fine when imposed and collected shall be paid into the criminal fund of the parish and the other half shall be paid to the person or persons furnishing information and evidences for the arrest and conviction of any party or parties guilty of violating this ordinance.

 The Board of Health was recommended to adopt a similar ordinance to conserve the public health.

 Mr. Wallie Theriot appeared and complained of flood water, due to an embankment built by Jules Langlinais, Sr., and Mr. Blanchet was authorized to notify Mr. Langlinais to remove said obstruction. Mr. Blanchet was also authorized to open the channel of the coulee between O. Cade and F. Trahan.

 By motion of Mr. Mouton the Southern Pacific Railroad and Steamship Company be and is hereby notified to raise, lengthen and put in safe condition the approaches to the public crossings near Gerac's ginnery and opposite the Misses Boudreaux.

 Mr. Alex Broussard was granted lumber to repair two bridges on Bayou Queue Tortue.

 Mr. Alfred Hebert appeared and asked that the road leading from Lafayette to the refinery be graded and placed in repair before being subjected to the heavy traffic incident to the harvest season.

 Assessor Martin submitted a statement giving the approximate amount of parish assessment as $2,500,000 and corporation of Lafayette $750,000, making a grand total of $3,250,000.

 By motion of Mr. Whittington the rate of parish taxation for the year 1901 was fixed at ten mills on the dollar distributed in accordance with the items of the budget as follows:

 Officers fund         ... 2 mills
 Criminal fund       ... 3 mills
 Bridge and roads ... 2 mills
 Public education  ... 1 1/2 mills
 Contingent fund   ... 1 1/2 mills

 The secretary was authorized to complete the index of Police Jury proceedings up to Jan. 1, 19012, for $25.

 The following communication was read and on motion duly made the request for right of way therein contained was granted subject to the obligation of building and maintaining in safe and passable condition all crossings and approaches.

         SEGURA, LA., July 13, 1901.

 President of Police Jury of Lafayette Parish, Lafayette, La.

 Dear Sir: - We are building an extension to our railroad which will run about two miles into your parish and in the prosecution of this enterprise it will be necessary for us to cross several public roads in the neighborhood of Blanchet's store. We therefore request that your board pass a resolution at their next session granting us the right of way across such public roads as may be necessary crossings and approaches.

 Enclosed you will please find copy of resolution adopted by the Police Jury of this parish when this line was commenced. Trusting that you will give this matter your early attention, we remain,
          Very truly yours,
             SEGURA SUGAR, CO. LTD.;
                S. O. NUCKOLLS, Supt.

 The treasurer submitted the following reports:

 To the President and Members of Police Jury Parish, Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of parish funds since my last report:

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 Respectfully submitted,
    J. E. MARTIN,
       Treasurer.

        Lafayette, La., Aug. 1, 1901.
  To the President and Members of Police Jury Parish Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of special road funds since my last report.

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    Respectfully submitted,
       J. E. MARTIN,
         Treasurer.

         Lafayette, La., Aug. 1, 1901.
  The following accounts were approved:

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 There being no further business the Jury adjourned.
M. BILLEAUD, JR., President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 8/10/1901.



City Council Proceedings.

       Lafayette, La., August 5th, 1889.
  This being the day of the regular meeting of the City Council, there were present Messrs. W. B. Bailey, Mayor; A. J. Moss and J. S. Parkerson. On account of the absence of a quorum an adjournment was had until to-morrow morning, 10 o'clock.

      Tuesday, August 6th, 1889.
  The City Council met this day in regular session, and there were present W. B. Bailey, Mayor; J. G. Parkerson, A. J. Moss, Jno. O. Mouton, Pierre Gerac F. Lombard and Ed. Pellerin. Absent: O. J. Sprole.

 Minutes of previous meeting were read and approved:

 To the Hon. Mayor and Council of the Town of Lafayette, La.:

 The undersigned Finance Committee having examined the papers and return of J. Vigneaux, late Town Marshal, find he had collected since his report of April 30th, 1889, of taxes, one hundred and forty-one dollars, and of licenses, Four hundred and thirty-five dollars, together making five hundred and seventy-six 09/100 dollars, which he accounted for to the Treasurer, leaving of taxes uncollected for the year: 

 1881 - $3.87
 1882 - $8.20
 1883 - $12.82
 1884 - $17.72
 1885 - $36.36
 1886 - $56.66
 1887 - $63.25
 1888 - $125.76
Total - $324.65

 The Treasurer's book shows total receipts since last report, nine hundred and sixty dollars and payments Four hundred and sixty-one 80/100 leaving on hand in treasury four hundred and ninety-eight 24/100 dollars.

 We have canceled warrants Nos. 264, 310, 311, 312, 131, and 314.

 J. Vigneaux is entitled to commission on last collections of $576.09; thirty-four and 56/100 dollars as due him for same and should be warranted to him by the Mayor on the Treasurer; this close the account with the late Collector, he having turned over all the tax rolls and delinquent lists, and his bond cancelled, and we so respectfully recommend.
J. G. PARKERSON,
A. J. MOSS,
ED. PELLERIN,
Committee.
Lafayette, La., Aug 5, 1889.

  On motion, the bond of the late Constable J. Vigneaux, was ordered cancelled, and a warrant ordered to issue in his favor for said sum of thirty-four and 56/100 dollars. It was further ordered that the rolls, blank licenses, etc., be delivered to Constable Oueilhe.

 On motion, the corporation attorney was ordered to proceed against all delinquent taxes.

 The following communication was read:

          Lafayette, La., June 4, 1889.
  To the Mayor and Councilmen of the Town of Lafayette:

 The undersigned, citizens and taxpayers of the place, keenly recognizing the urgent and imperative need of effective need of effective means of protection against fire, do respectfully and earnestly petition your Honorable body to inaugurate such steps as may be proper and necessary to provide by taxation a sufficient fund to meet the requirement.

 (Signed) N. P. Moss, A. Delahoussaye, L. Doucet, Albert Doucet, C. O. Mouton, and fifty-five others.

 On motion, the following committee was appointed to take into consideration the object of said communication, and to report at next meeting as to the most expeditious and economical plan of action. - A. J. Moss, P. Gerac and Ed. Pellerin.

 On motion A. J. Moss was granted permission to extend his switch across 2d Street under the same conditions as he was allowed to cross Grant Avenue.

 The following committee was appointed to take into consideration the feasibility and cost of opening Garfield Street, as it appears on the map of the Mouton Addition, through to Julia Avenue - Pierre Gerac, Ed. Pellerin and Jno. O. Mouton.

 The following was adopted:

 Resolved, That the hour of meeting of the Council be changed from 5 o'clock p. m. to 10 o'clock a. m. of the first Monday of each month.

 And the Council thereupon adjourned.
W. B. BAILEY, Mayor.
CHAS. D. CAFFERY, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1889.  

  

Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 8/10/1889.

 Our young friend Dom. Cayret, one of the solid merchants of Carencro, was in town last Monday and favored us with a call.

 Miss Noelle Bougere, who has been the guest of Mr. P. Gerac's family for the past month, left for home in New Orleans last Tuesday. 

 Judge W. B. Stansbury the ubiquitous correspondent of the Times-Democrat, is in town. He is accompanied the Lafayette pilgrims from New Orleans.

 We are indebted to our friend Hugh Jameison, for a very large cantaloupe, which was decidedly the finest flavored melon we have tasted this year.


 We acknowledge the receipt of an interesting communication from Broussardville, which will appear in next issue. We would again remind our correspondents that communications should reach us by Wednesday morning to insure publication that week. Frequently, as it happens this week, our space is nearly all occupied by Thursday morning.


 Our old and esteemed friend, Mr. Benjamin Avant, is a gentleman gifted largely with “bowels of compassion,” evidenced by his making of a basket of nice peaches, which were highly appreciated. The donation reached us through the courtesy of Mr. Ford Huffpauir, and we are under many obligations to him for leaving the peaches with us before he attended the meeting of the Police Jury.


 Saturday we were shown by Mr. H. D. Owen several splendid ears of new corn, raised by him on the George C. Mouton Place. We had the curiosity to measure them, and found them to range in length from 10 to 11½ inches, and average 8¾ inches in circumference at the middle. From this field Mr. Owen expects to gather at least 50 bushels to the acre. This is a fine crop for any country. The ears were left at Wm. Cleggs’s drug store. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1889.







 From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 10, 1878:

Lafayette News Notes.

The weather continues favorable, the general health of the parish is good, and the crops promise to yield abundantly.


 The yellow fever is increasing in New Orleans and our quarantine regulations should be maintained and properly and judiciously executed, but not too rigidly enforced against persons from non-infected places. Sanitary precautions should also be continued without cessation.


 We learn that rumors have been in circulation, that yellow fever existed in our town and vicinity. These rumors are entirely groundless. We do not anticipate the appearance of the disease, but if it should come, it is the best policy to announce it promptly and it will be done.
 

Owing, it is said, to quarantines being established between here and New Orleans, our daily mail has been reduced to a tri-weekly one and will arrive here every Saturday, Tuesday and Thursday from below, and goes down the following days.


 Whatever may be the inconveniences by travelers, on account of rigid quarantine, no one can assert that it is not just and proper, and that the actions of the council and committee are not for the good of the community. In such times as these, when there is a probability of this most dreaded disease spreading over the entire country, robbing cheerful and happy homes of their brightest jewels, and leaving sorrow in their stead, it behooves the officers to adhere strictly to their duty regardless of the views or censure of private individuals. That the quarantine committee, composed of Messrs. Vigneaux, Alpha and Hebert, have endeavored to do their duty; no fair minded person will question or deny.

  
 Captain Mathews will shortly move his family to the plantation recently purchased by him on Vermilion Bayou. Such accessions will always receive a glad welcome from citizens of our parish.

 J. G. Brookshier, Esq., of Morgan City, has run the gauntlet of all the quarantines on the route including our own, and is among us again.  
 Miss Noelie Bougere, who has been the guest of Mr. P. Gerac’s family for the past month, left for her home in New Orleans last Tuesday. 8/10/1878.







Police Jury Proceedings.

 The Police Jury met at the Court House, in regular session, this 3d day of June 1878, the following members being present, Onez. Broussard, president, Aurelien Primeaux, Adolphe Comeaux and Alfred Peck. Absent, M. G. Broussard.

 The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

 Resolved, that the sum of eight hundred dollars be and is hereby appropriated for the building of the Carencro Bridge.

 Resolved, that Mr. Jean Guilbeau be and is hereby authorized to sell for cash, that portion of the old lumber of the Carencro bridge which the parish of Lafayette is entitled to.

 Resolved, that the President be and is hereby authorized to appoint a committee to examine the Pin Hook bridge, and that said committee be empowered to contract for the repairing of said bridge.

 On said committee were appointed Messrs. Adolphe Comeaux, Aurelien Primeaux, Alex. Meaux, Lessin Guidry and Syphroyen Landry.

 Resolved, that Bruce Martin of this parish, be and is hereby appointed beneficiary cadet to the Louisiana State University.

 Resolved, that the President be and is hereby authorized to purchase a blank certificate cadet to the Louisiana State University.

 Resolved, that the President be and is hereby authorized to purchase a blank certificate book for the use of the Police Jury, and to draw on Treasurer for the amount of cost of said certificate book.

 Whereas, errors were inadvertently committed by the ordinance passed on the 1st of April 1878 fixing the polling places and election precincts, Therefore be it ordained, two-thirds of the members voting therefor, that the following shall be and are hereby fixed as Election Precincts and Polling Places for the parish of Lafayette:

 Justice of the Peace Ward number One shall be divided into two Election precincts, as follows:  Precinct No. One - Shall consist of all that portion of ward number one lying north of the line running on the southern limits of the property of Joseph D. Breaux, on the public road dividing the First Ward from the Third, to and along the limits of the property of Jean D. Lafond to the western limits of the parish - and the polling place for this Precinct is hereby fixed at Joseph D. Breaux.

 Precinct No. 2 shall consist of and include all of the Justice peace ward No. One lying south of the line above mentioned and not included in the First precinct, and the polling place is hereby fixed at A. D. Boudreaux.

 Precinct No. 3 shall consist of and include all that portion of the Justice of the peace ward No. 2 lying west of coulee Isle des Cannes, and the polling place is hereby fixed at Ford Hoffpauir's.

 Precinct No. 4 shall consist of and include all that portion of the justice of the peace ward No. 2 lying east of coulee Isle des Cannes and not included in Precinct No. 3 - and the polling place for this precinct is hereby fixed at Clemille Trahan's.

 Precinct No. 5 shall consist of and include all that portion of the justice of the peace ward No. 3 lying north of the northern limits of Mme. Gerassin Bernard's and north of the public road leading to Breaux Bridge, and the polling place is hereby fixed at Jean Bernard's.

 Precinct No. 6 shall consist and include all that portion of the justice of the peace ward No. 3 lying south of the plantation of Mme. Gerassin Bernard and south of the public road leading from Mme. Gerassin Bernard's plantation to Breaux Bridge - and the polling place for this precinct is hereby fixed at the Court House of the parish.

 Precinct No. 7 shall consist of and include the whole of the justice of the peace ward No. 5, and the polling place for this precinct is hereby fixed at Valsin Broussard's.

 Precinct No. 8 shall consist of and include that portion of the justice of the peace ward No. 4, lying north of Vincent's Coulee and the plantation of Aurelien Primeaux - and the polling place for this precinct is hereby fixed at the school house near Edouard I. Broussard.

 Precinct No. 9 shall consist of and include that portion of the justice of the peace ward No. 4, lying north south of the northern limits of the plantation and Aurelien Primeaux and Vincent's Coulee - and the polling place of this precinct is hereby fixed at the town of Royville.


 That all resolutions or ordinances in conflict herewith are hereby repealed.

 Upon the vote being taken on the above ordinance, Messrs. Broussard, Comeaux, Peck and Primeaux voted yes. Nays: None.

 The following accounts were approved:

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 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned.
ONES BROUSSARD, President.
J. N. JUDICE, Clerk.
Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1878.
   



  



  

   

  


















From the Lafayette Advertiser of August 10th, 1909:

THE ADVERTISER FORTY-FIVE YEARS OLD.

 With this issue of The Advertiser it enters upon its forty-sixth year. For forty-five years it has been an institution of this town and parish, chronicling the history of the people, promoting the development of this section as far as lay in its power and at all times lending aid to all movement for the welfare and interest of the people. That its services have been appreciated is evidenced by the fact that it is forty-five years old.

 The present proprietors purchased The Advertise June 1, 1903, and during their ownership have done their best to publish as good, newsy and helpful a paper as their means would permit. In this way we have been generously assisted by the business men who have liberally patronized us; for which we here wish to make appreciative acknowledgement.

 When we took charge of The advertiser it was  six column four page weekly. It was not long before we increased it to an eight-page five column paper, then later on to an eight page six column paper. All these changes and improvements being made possible by a liberal support in the way of advertising patronage, subscriptions and job work.

 Two years ago, believing that the size and importance of Lafayette justified a better local news service than could be afforded by a weekly, we changed The Advertiser to a semi-weekly, Sept. 3, 1909. This change was approved and appreciated as has been shown by an increase support fully covering the additional expense.

 Still desiring to give all the service possible, last January we purchased a Linotype at a very heavy expense, added to our reportorial force and have tried to make The Advertiser a valuable, creditable and entertaining paper. A large increase in our subscription list and very many expressions of commendation assure us that we have measurably succeeded in doing so.

 It is our purpose to keep up the high standard of the paper and add valuable feature as fast as the support given us will permit, and that we may have the means to do so, we ask of our friends and the public generally as large and liberal a support in advertising, subscriptions and job work as they can give.

 And remember, the more you support The Advertiser the better paper we can make it and the better able the paper will be to serve the town and parish and you. Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1909.

   

LAGNIAPPE:
The Oldest Democrat.


Perhaps the oldest Democrat in this country is now living near Chrisney, Indiana. His name is Benjamin Moore. He was born in Mary county, N. C., December 25th, 1781. This venerable pioneer was born in one of the most important periods of the Government - at the moment when it was struggling for its existence - and is consequently older than his government, the same age as the confederation of thirteen states, and six years older than the constitution of his country. He was in his seventh year when the first President of the United States was inaugurated, and has a distinct recollection of the older citizens meeting and talking about the inauguration of General Washington. Mr. Moore cast his first vote in 1804 for Thomas Jefferson, who was elected his second term. He refers to his first vote with pride, saying he is to-day the only man living who voted for Jefferson, and that he is the oldest Democrat above the sod. He has voted the Democratic ticker election from 1804 to the spring of 1889.

 The parties he has voted against are as follows: From 1804 to 1815, the Federalists; 1820, the opposition; in 1824, the coalition; 1828 to 1832, the National Republicans; 1836 to 1852, the Whigs; and against the present Republican party since 1856. The old gentleman says he has watched the tariff issue since 1829, and the majority of the people has always been on the side of the Democratic party on the tariff question. He says that there is no difference between Jefferson and Cleveland on this question.

 Mr. Moore is living with his second wife, to whom he was wedded in 1839, and both are now making their home with his son, who is now past 78 years of age, but looking younger than most men at 50. His youngest son is a sprightly young man of 52 summers, whom the old man calls his baby.

 From the Chicago Tribune and in the Lafayette Advertiser 8/10/1889.    




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