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Monday, January 12, 2015

**JULY 4TH M C


From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 4th, 1903:


 ACT IN TIME.

 It is useless to criticize and object when it is too late. The proper and sensible thing to do, of course, is to act at the right time. In a short while we shall be called upon to select men to fill the different parish offices, and this we should do carefully and with a single view to their efficiency and ability; and especially and particularly should great care be exercised in choosing our Police Jurors and School Board, two bodies which are of supreme importance to the parish. Two full tickets for the offices of sheriff, clerk of court, coroner and representatives are in the field offices of great importance and necessary for the welfare of our parish; but the office of Police Juror or member of the School Board is equally as necessary and honorable, and in some ways more important, and should be aspired to by our ablest and best citizens. And the people should see to it that these two bodies shall be composed of intelligent, progressive, and conscientious men, who believe that "public office is a public trust."

 The Police Jury particularly, which is our parish legislature, should concern us vitally; for upon its wisdom depends largely the making of wise local laws which will mean much for the material advantage of all.

 The question of good roads is a most serious one, and we want men who are both capable and conscientious to deal with it, men who will make it a personal and impelling duty to solve the problem in a satisfactory manner.

 There are many ways in which a live, progressive, intelligent Police Jury can serve their fellow citizens, and one of these ways is by actively and persistently being on the watch for everything that will inure to the benefit of the parish.

 And last but not least, the finances of the parish should be entrusted to those only who have the capacity to expend the people's money wisely and and well. It is not enough that a man be honest; he must have ability as well, that the parish funds be economically and advantageously administered.

 As for the School Board, which comes next, if not equal to him, in importance, the same high class of citizenship is needed.

 Educationally Lafayette is moving up to the front rank, and able, progressive men are required at the helm, and we as the right kind of men compose these bodies. As yet no candidates have announced themselves for these offices, and now is the time and opportunity of the people to express themselves. Mass meetings should be held in every ward and men chosen for members of the both the Police Jury and School Board.

 And though members of The School Board are appointed by the governor, nevertheless, when he shall be made acquainted with the choice of the people, there will be no difficulty in securing their commissions. Let us then by all means have the very best Police Jury and School Board that the parish can afford. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.






Education The Guardian of Political Liberty.

    Pilette, La., June 30, 1903.

 Mr. Editor, Fellow-citizens of the Parish of Lafayette - When we realize the state of things at the beginning of the feeling of generosity of man to man in the pre-historic ages - then, meditate at the present state of civilization - ponder at the succeeding steps of the centuries of antagonistic struggles that have bettered society which bespeak of a still higher mode of life in generations to come, why should we shut ourselves in fear to the great sentiment of advancement like the oyster does in his deathly fear of the sea-gulls pouncing at him before he closes his shell house? The dawning of this uplifting civility that made its way from epochs to epochs did not move faster than the motion of glaciers, but, inevitably brought a gradual feeling of the brotherhood of man - his self-livelihood has gradually changed to th idea of neighborhood. Concerted action brought the distribution of political power; brought little by little the equal rights of enjoying life in its noblest sense; little by little distributed equal privilege to all; allowed individual and discriminate choice of livelihood. Then, the sublime idea of liberty and freedom struck the tender part of his patriotic impulse; thus, when he put a foot-hold on the western side of the Atlantic - the land of the unknown race - the red man, planted that immovable structure, the American government.

 Glory to the world that the recognition of personal and independent merit of individuals to prominence in this country stunned the minds of the monarchs of the old countries who got their merits from noble birth; glory to the world that we live in a country of meritorious political privilege, and not inherited political privilege; in a country of self-action in the development of the intellect of the peasant, as well as the intellect of the millionaire.

 The world's politics, that has been in so absolute control of the few nobles and the "Divine Kings" as if they only were specimens of mankind crushing the peasants is now being distributed into the hands of the many on all parts of mother earth. Thank God, these criminous ideas of nobility and "Divine rights of Kings" are gradually fading away to a universal feeling of brotherhood by politics - that evolving science of government which is the cradle that has rocked the world from the lowest State of barbarism to this present state of maturing civilization. Man, to-day, on this American soil, by toils and hardships regardless of birth entitled to the diplomatic corps of the wide world. So how wonderful are his actions when we think of the facts of history, of the conditions in the primitive days, where on a little insignificant island he was of the lowest and most brutal savage, stood apart, even from his fellow men, in self-isolation, bound to no tribe, acknowledged no law. All his interests were centered in himself; his house was the first cave he found. Then, in the lapse of centuries the polish Storm Age brought him the idea if organizing into clans under leadership of a chief. Thus he lived in villages consisting of groups of holes dug in the ground. With that growing instinct of social feeling the Bronze Age influences him to higher leaps toward the idea of society. Then, living in settlements under leadership, possessed of crude sorts of government, his villages emerged from the ground. The clans transmigrating, founded for the future superstructure. These kingdoms eventually intermingled, affiliated and united into a sovereignty of one kingdom, thus assimilated, made one people, the English nation, the present mistress of the world in military and culture.

 There is no door of doubt in the temple of faith. We American people nursed by this same blood of the Cave-man have won the glory of the world in type of government, have won the comment of the world as having a greater per cent of educated people according to population; yet, how humiliating it is to think that we must except one spot in this country of ours that has an enormous per cent of illiterates! How better it is to acknowledge that our dear Louisiana is the only spot of the Union which has thirty-five per cent of the population illiterate - the land we love, because it feeds such a brave blood that has fought for a great principle in 1861 to 65; the land which is spoken of throughout the world to-day, from the fact that the American people are making the greatest preparations this country ever had to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of its purchase.

 Larmartine, a great statesman, said, "When there is no election every man is a slave or a serf; when election is limited to a small number of citizens, some are sovereigns and others are subjects; when election pertains to all no one is a subject, no one is a slave; all are free, all are subjects, all are citizens, and more than citizens, all are kings." If there would be no illiterates all would be kings; no one would be shut from the polls - the polls where the test of citizenship tells the State, the polls where the rights of man are decided.

 Oh! Lafayette with her grand edifice and noble instructors to satiate the thirst of the ambitious; Lafayette with her best system of schools in the State that welcomes the little ones who crave for their inheritance of the world's art, science and literature; Lafayette with her tremendous wealth; Lafayette with her beautiful churches; Lafayette with her splendid indications of mineral wealth; Lafayette with her brave, loyal, patriotic and God-fearing American citizens. Oh! Lafayette in the name of all these and more, in the name of your glory, why should you not have the future pride of boasting to the world that every one of your sons and daughters is educated to enjoy the legitimate privilege of ideal citizenship?
(Signed) ALCIBIADES BROUSSARD.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.                   

A Good Game.

 Last Saturday's game at the Ball Park was one of the best that has so far been played here. There was a snap and go from the beginning, and the hustling qualities of both teams kept the "fans" guessing as to which would walk off with the score heavy on their side. It was neck and neck up to the eighth inning, when the scorer tabbed 4 to 4, and then the Opelousas boys made a spurt and cinched three runs, and kept it that way. The ninth inning was a zero for both, and left the card 7 to 4 in favor of the visitors.

 Two fine games will be played to-morrow, Sunday, and on Monday, when the local team will cross bats with the St. Martinville Juniors. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.


  



A Surprise Party.

 A delightful surprise party was given by the young people in honor of Miss Arsene Hollier of Opelousas, who is the guest of Mrs. Louis Lacoste, on Wednesday evening. In the games, which added greatly to the pleasure of the occasion, Mr. Joe Lacoste was the lucky winner of the first prize, and Mr. Albert Robichaux carried off the booby prize. Those present were: Messrs. R. Dugas, C. Russell, L. Delahoussaye, Jos. Lacoste, Jos. Bienvenu, C. Bourgais, T. Debaillon, F. Siadous, A. Robichaux, R. Mills, P. Brun, W. Montgomery,  Misses C. and B. Hebert, Lelia Blanchet, Elva Brun, Florence Price, Louis Nollive, Odille Crouchet, Monique Lacoste, Frances Clark, Jeanne Siadous. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.


Mt. Carmel Convent.

 The closing exercises of Mt. Carmel Convent took place Friday night of last week, after a most successful year's work under the able management of Mother Superior Zita. A large number of friends and parents were present and highly enjoyed the excellent program prepared for the occasion, which consisted of cantatas, charades, recitations and songs. Miss Emma Verret received highest honors, a gold medal, and Master Paul Salles awarded a gold medal for deportment and efficiency.

 During the evening Sontag's band furnished delightful music.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.

 Home Institute Closed.

 The Lafayette Home Institute, R. C. Greig principal, closed last Friday after a most prosperous and satisfactory session. The enrollment for the last scholastic year was nearly one hundred evidencing the substantial character of the institute and the confidence of its many patrons in the ability and efficiency of the teachers. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.


 Will Not Go.

 In our last issue we stated that Fernand Mouton would go to Europe in the early part of July, in the interest of the New York Life Insurance Co. Since that time he has further considered the matters and the following letter explains all:

        New Orleans, June 25, 1903.
  Fernand Mouton Esq., Lafayette, La.

 My Dear Mr. Mouton - I undertand that, after further consideration, you have finally concluded not to accept the proposition suggested to you yesterday relative to the European trip. Of course, as far as I individually am concerned, am really overjoyed at the ideas that we are not going to lose you from our corps of New York Life workers in Louisiana, of which you have amply demonstrated yourself as being one of the best.

 With very best wishes for your continued success, and assuring you that if there is anything that I can do to serve you at any time;
    With respects, Yours very truly,
              H. J. SAUNDERS,
                   Agency Director.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.



Death of Mrs. Darby.

 Died at her home near Lafayette, Sunday at 6:30 p. m., June 28, 1903, Mrs. F. E. Darby, nee Challie Tolson; aged 45 years, 10 months and 10 days. She had been sick a year, but had been confined to her bed only the last four months, where a loving husband and eleven dutiful children administered to her every want. Not a sigh or whisper of hers, but was heard by eager and listening ears, and many blessed words fell from her dear lips that will ripen and bear fruit, rich fruit later. Her life has been one long sermon, a life of devotion and love. One of her beautiful messages was, "Live as I have lived, trusting in the Lord, and all will be right." Her dying eyes rested on the crucifix, which has hung by her bed for 28 years, and she asked that it be given her that she might give it with her own hand to one of the loved ones. These words went with the gift; "Live for the crucified Jesus." For the husband, five daughters, six sons, two little grand  daughters, two brothers, one sister, nieces, nephews, and those dear to her by marriage ties, we ask God's blessing, and thank Him for the many messages He in His loving kindness allowed here to give her loved ones before taking her to himself.
     (Signed)  ONE WHO LOVED HER.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.


Back after Three Weeks.

 Last Saturday Judge J. G. Parkerson, Miss Lizzie Parkerson and Mr. John R. Parkerson returned from California after a delightful stay of nearly three weeks. While there they visited Los Angeles, Pasadena and other points. Judge Parkerson states that the Marine Garden on Catalina Island is one of the most wonderful sights he has ever seen. It consists of a large lake of clear water, in which you can see down to a depth of 30 or 40 feet. To view it, a glass boat is provided, and as you row about the thousand forms of animal and vegetable life of the sea is revealed to your gaze, making a living, moving picture that is intensely fascinating. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.


Mouton-Butcher Wedding.

 Last Wednesday Mr. John Gaston Mouton and Miss Eleanor Butcher were married at 7:15 p. m., at the residence of the bride's parents near Mouton Switch. Rev. Father Combriere officiating. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.

  



    


School Board Proceedings.

       Lafayette, La., July 2, 1903.
  At a regular meeting of the Parish School Board, the following members answered the roll call: A. Olivier, President; Alex Delhomme, Sr., Dr. N. P. Moss, H. Theall, A. C. Guilbeau and S. J. Montgomery.

 Mr. spell reported that the canal being dug on the school land in the second ward nearing completion and requested that the Board appoint a committee to receive, and pay for the work. Dr. Moss moved that Messrs. Spell, Judice and Alleman be appointed to receive the canal, and, that the president be authorized to issue warrant upon the acceptance of the committee. On the second of Mr. Montgomery the above motion was carried.

 The Auditing Committee here reported that they had examined the books of the Treasurer, Mr. J. E. Martin, and of Mr. I. A. Broussard, Sheriff and Tax Collector. The Treasurer's book showed a balance of cash on hand of $2,884.60.

 Finding the books of the above named parish officers to be correct and kept in a business like manner the Auditing Committee recommended that the School Board issue the customary quietus. Mr. Theall moved that the president be authorized to issue a quietus to each of the above named officers. Carried.

 Mr. J. E. Bordeau and Dr. A. J. Burkett presented a petition numerously signed by residents of Milton and vicinity praying for the removal of the Theall School to a site on Bayou Vermilion to be donated by Mr. Bordeau. The citizens of this community propose to remove the building at their own expense; and a written communication from Vermilion parish was read making a proposition to pro rate the expense of running the school with this parish. Mr. H. Theall was appointed a committee of one from this parish to confer on the location of the school-house to confer with Mr. A. B. Broussard, of Vermilion parish. The secretary on motion duly seconded was authorized to see that all the details in connection with the removal and establishment of the school at Milton be carried out and to prepare for the opening of the school for the coming session. The president was authorized to accept in the name of the Board the donation of one acre of land from J. E. Bordeau.

 Mrs. Clement Romero donated two acres of land to the Parish School Board and on motion of Dr. Moss, seconded by Mr. H. Theall, the Board agreed to build a school-house on this property after plans and specifications furnished by the Building Committee; provided that a sufficient number of citizens sign a note in solido in order to raise sufficient with which to build at once. The Board agreed to take up this note when it comes due. In order to further protect the Board from any possibility Mr. Cleo Romero binds to remove the school-house at his own expense to any spot within two miles of the present site, if for any cause such removal become necessary.

 Moved by Mr. Theall and seconded by Mr. Guilbeau that the Board's acceptance of Dr. Young's proposition to exchange a lot of his own for the present Royville school lot be annulled and that Dr. Young's letter to the secretary relative to the matter be published:
      Youngsville, July 2, 1903.

MR. L. J. ALLEMAN,
               Lafayette, La.
 Dear Sir - Owing to the illness of my family I will probably be unable to attend to-day's meeting of the Board. After looking into the matter I find that the proposition made by my father at the last meeting of the Board cannot be fulfilled as he is unable give a clear title to the property. Be so kind as to explain this to the Board and oblige.
                  Yours etc.,
                      R. O. YOUNG.

 On motion of Dr. Moss seconded by Mr. Theall the president was authorized to accept in the name of the Board two acres of land from Mr. Albert Duhon in the eighth ward and a school-house was ordered to be constructed there by the building committee as soon as possible. The following citizens of the vicinity have offered to raise sufficient funds with which to build the school-house at once and the Board will refund the amount as soon as practicable: Albert Duhon, Aimee D. Landry, Hypolite Dronette, Francois Broussard, Drosin Duhon, Ant. Broussard, Demaire Duhon, Desire Montet.

 On motion of Mr. Theall seconded by Mr. Spell, the president was authorized to issue to the Tax Collector and Parish Treasurer a quietus up to July 1, 1903.

 The town schools of the parish were ordered to open for the coming session on Monday September 7, 1903.

 The following resolution offered by President Olivier, on motion of Mr. Theall seconded by Mr. Guilbeau, was adopted.

 Whereas it has come to the knowledge of the Board that whipping has been resorted to by teachers in the public schools of this parish.

 Be it resolved that it is the sense of the body that the method of correction is prohibited. It is the opinion of the Board that the application of the whip is ineffective as a method to correct recalcitrant pupils, and may lead to very serious results.

 It is therefore ordered that the superintendent remove instantly any teacher who is guilty of a violation of this resolution.

 There being no further business the Board adjourned.
A. OLIVIER, President.
L. J. ALLEMAN, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.




Police Jury Proceedings.

 The Police Jury met last Thursday with all members present except Messrs. John Whittington and P. R. Landry.

 Further instructions were given Messrs. Abel Hoffpauir and Alex M. Broussard relative to dams in the Second ward.

 Mr. Mouton reported having conferred with the Vermilion Police Jury relative to rebuilding the D. O. Broussard; but had been unable to induce that body to respond to any overtures. By motion of Mr. Buchanan the Jury resolved to discharge all conference committees and await some fair and practical proposition by the Vermilion Jury.

 Messrs. T. Guidroz, Garbriel Dugas, S. Chiasson, Jean Chiasson, Veloer Richard, J. P. Guidroz, Numa Chiasson,  and L. E. Bernard donated a public road known as a continuation of the Lebesque public road. Accepted.

 Road overseer Labbe, of the 5th ward, having resigned April 1, his salary was ordered paid into the special road fund of that ward.

 By motion of Mr. Buchanan all officials subject to appointment and election by the Jury were reelected and reappointed for the ensuing fiscal year at the same salaries, as heretofore.

 Messrs. Buchanan, Lacy and Greig were appointed to settle with the treasurer.

 Mr. Pierre Guilbeaux was allowed $12.50 as an indigent.

 Upon the official statement of the Board of Supervisors, the Jury adopted an ordinance promulgating and carrying into effect the special school tax voted by the parish June 18.

 The treasurer's report showed a cash balance in the general fund of $2,576.52. and in the special road fund of $355.90.

 After approval of accounts including all special election expenses the Jury adjourned until Monday, July 6, to sit as Board of Reviewers. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.



 The Annual Concert.

 Thursday night the annual concert of Prof. Sontag's music class was held in the Industrial Institute Auditorium. A large crowd was present, and greatly enjoyed the excellent program, which was a splendid testimony of Prof. Sontag's excellence as a teacher. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.

  




 Selected News Notes (Advertiser) 7/4/1903.

 Leo Judice left Sunday for an extended trip through the North and East.

 A number of ladies met at the court-house last Wednesday to organize a chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy, but owing to the inclement weather and small attendance they adjourned to meet next Wednesday at the same place at 5 p. m.

 Mrs. B. Falk and son I. B. Bendel returned Sunday from New York, and will make their home here. 

 Rev. W. A. Zingler, a prominent minister of the Louisiana Presbytery, will preach in the Presbyterian church Wednesday evening, July 8, at 8 o'clock.

 Last Wednesday Mr. John Gaston Mouton and Miss Eleanor Butcher were married at 7:15 p. m. at the residence of the bride's parents near Mouton Switch, Rev. Father Combriere officiating.

 Miss Cora Desbrest spent Sunday with her sister in Franklin.

 W. W. Duson and daughter, Miss Mayme, were in town this week as the guest of Dr. Hopkin's family.

 A. A. Mouton, L. Nevue, Willie Lelanne and A. J. Sprole left Wednesday for a months's vacation visiting Southern California and the Northern part of Mexico.

 Mrs. C. K. Darling and children of Houston, Tex., arrived in Lafayette Tuesday, on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Nickerson.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.



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 From the Lafayette Gazette of July 4th, 1903:


SEVEN TO FOUR
In Favor of Opelousas, But Lafayette Played Grand Ball.

A LARGE CROWD PRESENT.

 The Opelousas Pitcher Was Too Much for the Lafayette Team.

 The baseball game played last Sunday afternoon on the diamond of the Lafayette Baseball Park was a most interesting contest from beginning to end. There was too much wrangling over the decisions of the umpire who was fair and correct, and another disagreeable feature of the game was the interference of outsiders who should at all times be kept off the field. No one, except those who have business there, should be permitted to occupy the space between the stand and the diamond.

 The teams were well matched, as is shown by the score. Up to the fifth inning it was a tie, and it would have remained a tie to the last, if Lafayette had not weakened in the latter part of the game.

 The game was called at about 3:30 with Opelousas at the bat. A double play made by Tierney at second, and Bercier being retired at first, made short work of the visitors, and Lafayette was given the first opportunity to try its mettle at the bat, but in less time than it takes to tell it three men were out.

 Opelousas returned to the bat with more luck than at the first time. L. Dejean hit to Tierney who let the ball pass. Dejean reached second safe, was advanced to third on Barnett's out and scored on A. Dejean's. Peck's fumble enabled Sabatier to get to first, and Suarez's failure to catch the third strike put Hollier at first and Sabatier at second. Sidney Dejean brought Opelousas' half to an end by hitting to Alpha who very skillfully threw him out at first.

 In Lafayette's second Alpha to the pitcher and was victimized at first. Labbe drew a free pass, stole second and third and scored on Riu's hit to right field. Meaux was knocked out at first.

 Perkins opened the third for Opelousas with a fly to center which Riu handled in great style. G. Dejean was retired at first, and Bercier failed in an attempt to steal second.

 In the third inning for Lafayette, Comeaux made first and stole second, and scored when Schuling lined out a safe hit to right field. Schuling made a bold steal of second and third and scored on Sabatier's wild throw. Suarez got to first on balls, Alpha was fanned, and Peck was thrown out at first.

 Opelousas stock went up in this inning. Sabatier hit a hot one to left field and sent L. Dejean and Barnett home. Alpha made one of his clever double plays. Comeaux put the third man out.

 Lafayette's fourth was played without any interesting feature, the score remaining unchanged. In the fifth inning, neither team scored.

 L. Dejean started out with a fly which Tierney caught with one hand, making one of the best plays of the game. Opelousas made another run. Lafayette was retired in quick order. In the seventh inning each scored one point, Hollier making the run for Opelousas and Meaux for Lafayette. The eighth inning passed without any sensational features, neither side scoring. But in the ninth Lafayette made no runs, went all to pieces and allowed Opelousas to score three times.

 Sunday and Monday Lafayette will play St. Martinville at the Lafayette Baseball Park. Lafayette Gazette 7/4/1903.


 BISHOP ROUXEL
Visits His Former Pastorate - Will Administer Confirmation Monday.

 Bishop Rouxel will arrive in Lafayette to-morrow after visiting Breaux Bridge, Youngsville and Broussardville where he administered the sacrament of confirmation to a large number of people. Monday morning he will confirm a class of 1,200 persons at the Catholic church in this town.

 Bishop Rouxel was the rector at this place years ago and is kindly remembered by many people who have the greatest love and respect for him. Lafayette Gazette 7/4/1903.


CONCERT
By the Pupils of Prof. Sontag at the Auditorium Thursday Night.

 The Gazette wishes to extend its felicitations of Prof. Florent Sontag upon the brilliant success of his concert at the auditorium of the Industrial Institute last Thursday night. Two weeks ago The Gazette announced that the people of Lafayette would be afforded a real treat in the shape of a musical entertainment. Those who attended the concert given by the pupils of Prof. Sontag, under the direction of their able teacher, need not be reminded that The Gazette was eminently correct in making the announcement. Prof. Sontag's ability as a musician of the highest order is well-known, and this, coupled with an indefatigable energy, gives to his work as a teacher of music a thoroughness of conception and execution. Besides the merit of the concert as an entertainment, Prof. Sontag has demonstrated that among the young people of this community there is a great deal of musical talent of the highest development. The excellent training of the boys and girls composing the Juvenile Symphony Club was shown in the faultless execution of two selections. The program from the beginning to the end, was happily arranged, and without being too short, had the rare merit of brevity. Judging from the applause, the Juvenile Club and Miss Eva, the little daughter of Judge Julian Mouton, struck popular chords and made decided bits, but all did well and deserve a full measure of praise. Miss Rosa Bernard, a bright young lady from Broussardville, who is one of Prof. Sontag's best pupils, performed most skillfully on the violin. Miss Genevieve Mouton played a classical selection on the piano very creditably.

 The following was the program:

 ----------------p. 1-----------------

 The Gazette has had a cut made of the Juvenile Symphony Club which appears elsewhere in this issue. We have no doubt that the readers of this paper will be pleased to see a reproduction of this interesting group of young musicians and their teacher. Lafayette Gazette 7/4/1903.


AT SURREY PARK
Good Races Witnessed by a Large Crowd.

 A large crowd of people witnessed the races at the Surrey Park last Saturday and Sunday. It was known that there would be a number of good races and many people came from this and adjoining parishes. The Surrey Park association had done all in its power to have the entry of the best horses and the success of the races shows that its efforts did not go unrewarded. An excursion train from Morgan City and reduced rates from all points on the Southern Pacific  served as an inducement to many who availed themselves of the opportunity to spend the day in Lafayette. This town is well located for a racing association, being accessible to the people of all the adjacent parishes. It is to be hoped that the gentlemen interested in the Surrey Park Association will receive the proper encouragement as the success of their entertainment will not only be an incentive to the raising of good horses in this section, but it will greatly redound to the benefit of Lafayette.

 The races were as follows:

 First Race - Docress, Lucy Roy, Nelly B., Sambo, Salvation. Half mile, running. Sambo won in 0:52 1/2.

 Second Race - Pelagie, Henry, Carrie Nation, Barnett, Brulley; half mile, running.  Carrie Nation won in 0:52.

 Third Race - Jessie, Wild Pirate, Dick, Zazet, Nellie: half mile running. Zazet won in 0:514.

 Fourth Race - Didier, May S., Inscara; three-eighths of a mile, running, Didier won in 0:36 1/2.

 Fifth Race - Mileton, Bay Ida, May S.; half mile, running Bay Ida won in 0:50 1/2.

 Sixth Race - Zazet, Sambo, Carrie Nation; half mile, running. Zazet won in 0:51. Lafayette Gazette 7/4/1903.

 Mr. Morse Resigns.

 Mr. S. F. B. Morse has resigned as assistant passenger traffic manager of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Mr. Morse is generally recognized as one of the most progressive railroad men in the South. During the past few years he has done intelligent and effective work in advertising Southwest Lousiana. Mr. Morse's successor has not yet been appointed. Lafayette Gazette 7/4/1903.


MT. CARMEL CONVENT.
Successful Session Closed With Exercises Friday Night.

 Award of Medals and Premiums.

 The Session Characterized by Large Attendance and Good Work.

 The Mount Carmel Convent, which has to its credit more than half a century of intelligent and faithful work in the education of the young, in moral instruction and literary training of the boys and girls of this parish, closed another session last week. As usual the last scholastic term of this popular institution of learning has enjoyed a most generous patronage. Few schools in the State have done a greater work in the cause of the moral and intellectual uplift of the youth of the country. The good nuns, who came here nearly fifty years ago and founded the Mount Carmel Convent, were pioneers in the cause of education. In those days there were few, if any schools in the towns, and none in the rural districts, and the Mount Carmel sisters taught thousands of little boys and girls, who, without their help, would never have had a chance to learn to read and write. With them teaching has been a labor of love, for they have often taught the children of the poor who were unable to pay for their schooling. The closing exercises took place Friday night and the distribution of premiums Saturday morning. The program, which was published in The Gazette last Saturday, was very creditably rendered. The following are the pupils to whom medals and premiums were awarded:

 ---------------p. 1----------------

 Lafayette Gazette 7/4/1903.



 New Buildings.

 The frame buildings which are going up for A. J. LeBlanc & Co. and Pellerin & DeClouet and the brick buildings of M. Rosenfield and the Wholesale Grocer Company show the increase in business in Lafayette. The carpenters in the town are all busy. Lafayette Gazette 7/4/1903.

  



 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 7/4/1903.

 From all accounts the recent rains have fallen in the various sections of the parish greatly benefiting the crops. Unless something happens to destroy the plants or to check their growth between new and harvest time, the farmers will be favored this season with a fair crop.

 A representative of The Gazette visited the Martin oil derrick yesterday evening and saw unmistakable traces of oil coming out of the well. A large flow of oil is momentarily expected.

 Rev. W. A. Zeigler, one of the most eloquent ministers in the Lousiana Presbytery will preach in the Presbyterian church, Wednesday evening, July 8, at eight o'clock. All are cordially invited to attend.

 Mr. Gaston Butcher and Miss Elina Butcher were married last Thursday, at the home of the bride's father, Mr. W. C. Butcher, in this parish. Father Cambier officiating.

 A. A. Mouton, Alley Sprole and Lock Nevue left Wednesday for a trip in the West. They will be away about a month. It is their intention to spend some time at San Francisco. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1903.




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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 4th, 1891:


Not the Regulators this Time.

 The result of the robbery of the old negro Henry Chest has been another of those outbreaks which have placed us under reproach, but we do not believe this act was done the organization known as the "regulators." It was an outbreak of a few men, who are now in the hands of our law officers. Such action as they resorted to was wholly wrong; and is condemned by the right thinking people of our parish. Where our peace officers have shown the vigilence and diligence that was shown in the search for and arrest of the guilty parties in this matter, and while they were under surveillance of legal authority, and before a trial, or a farce of a trial, there was no call for summary action. The following facts taken from a Lafayette special to the Times-Democrat give all we have been able to learn:

 "Wednesday, the 24th of June, Sheriff Broussard apprehended Onezime Melancon and Wm. Benoit, of Vermilion parish, and Alexis Leblanc, Eloi Broussard and Jean Comeau, of Lafayette parish, charged with assault and battery perpetrated upon the bodies of Philogene Williams and Odille Squire, both colored, of this parish, through their counsel, Edward G. Voorhies, Esq. Bail was applied for and granted at chambers by Judge O. C. Mouton, who fixed their bond at $75 each. It appears that several other negroes were thrashed, but they were unable to recognize any of the party. The first house visited was that of Alcide and Alcee Andrus, who state that last Sunday night at about 11 o'clock a crowd of men rushed in at the door and blindfolded them before they could see who they were. They were taken out and thrashed.

 The next place heard from was that of Philogene Williams and Odille Squire, about a mile distant from the house of Andress. Her the same programme was gone through with, and the men thrashed. Three men were left to guard the wife of Philogene while they were being whipped. When they finished whipping the two men they then thrashed Philogen's wife. Philogene Williams and his wife say they were given until daylight to leave, while Alcide and Alcee Andress were given three days to move away." From the N. O. Times-Democrat and in the Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.





Southern Pacific Office Back in Algiers. - The train dispatcher's office, which was transferred from Lafayette to Algiers during the overflow from the Ames' Crevasse, as the most available point, was ordered back last Wednesday. Messrs. J. O. Donahue, J. D. Whelan and J. J. Daniel, the clever and agreeable gentlemen who conducted the office, leave behind them the memory of an agreeable acquaintance coupled with regret at their departure from our society. The fact that the railroad saw it most expedient to put their dispatcher's office Lafayette, when it found it necessary to remove it from Algier's shows that our town is the place of importance on the road of the Southern Pacific. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.


Windy Day Near the Depot. - There was quite a flurry of wind on Thursday of last week, which was more severe in the neighborhood of the depot where Chimney flues were blown from the roofs of the business houses of John O. Mouton and Schayot Bros.  Laf. Adv. 7/4/1891.


MT. CARMEL CONVENT COMMENCEMENT.

 The 45th term of this Institution, which has done so much for the women of our parish, and the Attakapas region, closed last Tuesday, June 30th. The examinations showed the merits which had been induced by its training, and was a gratification to the Mother Superior. Those who attained distinction may be proud of it; those who did not equal them need not feel abashed, for they were working for the end to be achieved, and were not all so far behind.

 The examination was not public, and was conducted under the supervision of Rev. E. Forge, pastor of St. John's Catholic Church, who took delight in distributing the prizes among the children. He delivered a touching and fatherly address, which pointed the children to the cheerful endurance, higher effort, and an ambition to make life "beautiful, entire, and clean." He expressed much approval at the progress of the scholars, (whose every feature he has watched with loving care); and gave them all the enheartening cheerfulness of his genial enjoyment of the occasion.

 The prizes for the various departments, in order, were as follows:

 THE BOARDERS: The gold medal for good conduct was awarded to Miss May Scranton; Misses Marie Breaux, Lydia McKeon, Irma Landry and Emeranthe Domengeaux receiving honorable mention.

DAY SCHOLARS: The gold medal for good conduct was awarded Miss Nellie Bailey; Misses Lena Levy, Louise Bendel, Isaure McDaniel and Blanche Fietel received honorable mention.

 The silver medal for good conduct among the boarders was won by Miss Ida Savoy; Misses Cecile Girouard, Therzile Broussard, Juanita Martin, Melanie Broussard, Editha Girouard and Louise Cayret received honorable mention.

 The second silver medal for good conduct was awarded to Miss Anna Cazeauz; Misses Noemie Duclos, Amelie Comeaux, and Rosa Castex, received honorable mention.

 The 1st silver medal for good conduct among the day scholars was won by Miss Carrie Graser; Misses Emma Falk, Victoria Riu and Edna Landry received honorable mention.

 The 2nd silver medal for good conduct was won by Miss Aline Couvillon; Misses Laura Plonsky, Lea Montet and Lucille Revillon received honorable mention.

 For application and success in music a gold medal was awarded to Miss Mamie Rooney.

 The following young ladies received crowns for "application": Nellie Bailey, Therzile Broussard, Isaure McDaniel, Carrie Graser, Irma Landry and Edna Landry.

BOY'S SCHOOL.

 In this separate department of the Convent instruction, the following boys have achieved distinction: The first medal was won by Master Stephen Delmouly; Masters Onezime Mouton, George Guidry and Eraste Landry were recommended for good conduct.

 The second medal was won by Master Ephis Deffez; Jean Bacque and John Tierney receiving recommendation.

 The following boys received crowns for "application":  George Guidry, Stephen Delmouly, Onezime Mouton, Gonzague Gladu and Leon Feitel.

 The close of the session of the school is most gratifying to the Mother Superior, as the number of scholars was in excess of last session, and their progress showing the usefulness of the advantages and improvements which have been made to the institution. The next session will open on the 1st of September next.

 The chapel on the Convent grounds is finished; and the premises are in thorough repair. It is an old, reliable and more than familiar - motherly, institution of this section of our State, and we believe it is coming more and more into the appreciation of our people each year. Lafayette Gazette 7/4/1891.


Death of Leon Billaud.

 At his residence near, Lafayette, on Sunday, June 28th, 1891, at 1 o'clock a. m. Leon Billaud, aged 60 years, passed away.

 Mr. Billaud was born in France and came to this country at the age of nine years, and has since resided here. He served in the Confederate Army, and after the war he engaged in farming and was quite successful. He leaves a a widow and a number of children to mourn his loss. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.



Back to Algiers.

 The train dispatchers office, which was transferred to Lafayette from Algiers during the overflow from the Ames' crevasse, as the most available point, was ordered back last Wednesday. Messrs. J. O. Donahue, J. D. Whelahan and J. J. Daniel, the clever and agreeable gentlemen who conducted the office, leave behind them the memory of an agreeable acquaintance coupled with regret at the departure from our society. The fact that the railroad saw it most expedient to put the dispatcher's office at Lafayette, when it was found necessary to remove it from Algiers, shows that our town is the place of importance on the road of the Southern Pacific. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.


Sickened By Ice-Cream.

 Mr. H. L. Monnier's family and others, were made violently sick last Friday, the 26th ult., from eating ice-cream. The custard, which was not frozen until the morning following the evening it was made, Mr. Monnier declares was still fresh and pure. The suspicion that the poisonous effects of the cream eaten was due to the extract of lemon used for flavoring it, having grown until it began to circulate as being the expressed opinion of the attending physician, prompted Dr. Moss of the firm of Moss Bros. & Co.,  from whom the extract in question was bought, to test the purity of the article, several ounces of which still remained in the container from which the quantity sold was taken. Assisted by Mr.S. B. Joyner, an analytical chemist. Dr. Moss made a critical qualitative analysis of the extract of lemon and failed to detect the slight evidence of adulteration or impurity. Messrs. Moss Bros. & Co. state furthermore, that some of the same extract of lemon was sold to no less than half a dozen different persons within the forty-eight hours preceding the poisoning reported above, two ounces of which was used to flavor two gallons of ice-cream made and sold in one evening by Mrs. E. (unreadable last name) and Mrs. A. Cornay, from which no (unreadable word) effects followed.

 To correct any erroneous impression that may have been made in this connection, with regard to the part played by the extract of lemon used on this occasion, and also, in justice to the attending physician, Dr. J. D. Trahan, we have been requested by Dr. Moss, to publish the subjoined letters, which are self-explanatory:

       LAFAYETTE, LA., June 29th, 1891.
Dr. J. D. Trahan, Lafayette, La.
    DEAR DOCTOR - The report is current, that as the attending physician in the case of poisoning or Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Monnier and others, from eating ice-cream, you expressed opinion that the poisoning was attributable to the extract of lemon used for flavoring the cream in question.

 Please inform me if there is any foundation for the report above detailed.

 Please inform me if there is any foundation for the report above detailed.

 Your early reply will greatly oblige.
          Yours truly,  N. P. MOSS.

      LAFAYETTE, LA., June 29th, 1891.
To Dr. Moss,
   MY DEAR DOCTOR - Yours of to-day just at hand. In reply, can only say that symptoms of poisoning, doubtless in my opinion, existed in a marked form, but in reply to questions, have simply stated doubts as to the source, as nothing short of an analysis of materials used in the making of the cream, can establish the true cause. As yet, nothing of the kind was done, at least to my knowledge.
         Respectfully,
                J. D. TRAHAN, M. D.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.




The Henry Chest Robbery.

 The result of the robbery of the old negro Henry Chest has been another of those outbreaks which have placed us under reproach; but we do not believe this act was done by the organization of "regulators." It was an outbreak of a few men, who are now in the hands of our law officers. Such action as they resorted to was wholly wrong; and is condemned by the right thinking people of our parish. Where our peace officers have shown the vigilance and diligence that was shown in the search for and arrest of the guilty parties in this matter, and while they were under surveillance of legal authority, and before a trial, or a farce of trial, there was no call for summary action. The following facts taken from a Lafayette special to the Times-Democrat give all we have been able to learn:

 "Wednesday, the 24th of June, Sheriff Broussard apprehended Onezine Melancon and Wm. Benoit, of Vermilion parish, and Alexis LeBlanc, Eloi Broussard and Jean Comeau, of Lafayette parish, charged with assault and battery perpetrated upon the bodies of Philogene Williams and Odille Squire, both colored, of this parish, through their counsel, Edward G. Voorhies, Esq. Bail was applied for and granted at chambers by Judge O. C. Mouton, who fixed bond at $75 each. It appears that several other negroes were thrashed, but they were unable to recognize any of the party. The first house visited was that of Alcide and Alcee Andruss, who state that last Sunday night at about 11 0'clock a crowd of men rushed in at the door and blindfolded them before they could see who they were. They were then taken out and thrashed.

 The next place heard from was that of Philgene Williams and Odille Squire, about a mile distant from the house of Andress. Here the same programme was gone through with, and the men thrashed. Three men were left to guard the wife of Philogene while they were being whipped. When they finished whipping the two men they then thrashed Philogene's wife. Philogene Williams and his wife say they were given until daylight to leave, while Alcide and Alcee Andress were given three days to move away." Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.


 Erected Wire Fence.

 Messrs. Gerac Bros. have created a neat wire fence in front of the lot adjoining their store. It is not barbed, but is of a new design, of smooth wire, and will not injure stock. It is perhaps a little more costly than the barbed wire, but has many advantages over it. Examine it, and consult Messrs. Gerac Bros., who will tell you what they think of it. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.

Heavy Weather.

 Tuesday evening the neighborhood of Cade's station was visited by a heavy hail, rain and wind storm. The crops were considerably damaged. The building for a Catholic church, which was near completion, was blown down. The loss does not amount to a great deal, and the building will soon be erected. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.



STATE TEACHER'S INSTITUTE.

 The Institute held an evening session Thursday which was attended by several people. The meeting was called to order by Julian Mouton, Esq., President of the School Board, who introduced Hon. Laurant Dupre, of Opelousas. Mr. Dupre addressed the audience in his usual happy style, provoking considerable mirth by his many bright and witty passages.

 Prof. Smith then spoke of New Education, illustrating the vast superiority of the present system over the old.

 Miss Louise Bendel delighted the audience with the rendition of a musical selection entitled "Rain Storm." Miss Jennie Clarke performed a fine selection of instrumental music. Masters Walter Mouton and Henry Gerac captivated all by the production of the most exquisite music with cornet solo and piano accompaniment. The young gentlemen received a well deserved encore.

 Friday - the last day of the Institute - opened with a fair attendance of teachers and patrons. Prof. Smith spoke on teaching history, giving an outline of the method best adapted to the study. He also lectured on Geography and school programme, which was well appreciated.

 At the close of the Institute, the following resolutions were adopted by the teachers and patrons of public education, expressive of their sentiments toward Profs. Caldwell and Smith, for their untiring zeal exhibited by them in conducting these Institutes, which have been productive of so much benefit to the teachers of the State:

       Lafayette, June 26, 1891.
 We, Teachers and School officers, attendant upon the Institute held at Lafayette, June 22d to 26th inclusive, have from day to day listened with profound interest, unalloyed pleasure and profit to the able and instructive lectures presented by Profs. A. L. Smith and B. C. Caldwell, and we desire in some way to express the deep sense of gratification felt by us for the earnest and sincere zeal exhibited by them in their efforts to advance the cause of Public Education in our State and regret our inability to more adequately express our appreciation;
   Therefore be it Resolved, that we recognize in Profs. Smith and Caldwell two of the foremost and distinguished educators of the day, and hereby tender to them our heartfelt thanks for the benefit we have derived from their lectures the past week.

 Resolved further, that we hereby bid them Godspeed in their grand work of reformation, and tender to them our sincere well wishes for their future success and prosperity.

 Resolved, That we, as teachers, will endeavor to the best of our abilities, to put in practice the ideas and methods advocated so earnestly before us, and do our utmost to fulfill the responsible obligations of our profession, toward the children of our beloved State, whose welfare and prosperity is so intimately interwoven with the cause of public education.

 Resolved, that we, the teachers and the public spirited people, who have attended this Institute in Lafayette, do tender our thanks to State Superintendent W. H. Jack and Thos. D. Boyd, President State Normal School, for selecting this place for an Institute, further be it
  Resolved, that we, the teachers and people of the parishes of Lafayette, Acadia, Iberia and St. Landry, do hereby express our warmest appreciation of the liberality of Dr. Curry of the Peabody Fund in sustaining these valuable and helpful Institutes in our State.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.


THE ANTI-LOTTERY MASS MEETING.

 The meeting at the court house, last Saturday, was a splendid representation of the people of Lafayette parish, showing an attendance of the most influential men from each ward; who thereby demonstrated their interest in the future welfare of the State. Every seat in the court room was occupied, and standing space was in demand. The venerable Alexander Delhomme, President of the Anti-Lottery League, called the meeting to order. Hon. Overton Cade was chosen Chairman, and Messrs. H. Theall and J. O. LeBlanc Secretaries. Mr. Cade addressed the assemblage and stated the purpose of the meeting in a few clear and comprehensive remarks, which were highly appreciated. The following list of Vice-Presidents were appointed:

 Judge O. C. Mouton, Harrison Theall, Dr. M. L. Lyons, Ant. Guidry, J. G. St. Julien, C. C. Brown, P. A. Chiasson, Victor E. Dupuy, J. O. Broussard, Dr. J. D. Trahan, Dr. T. B. Hopkins, Dr. P. D. Beraud, Dr. Geo. W. Scranton, Dr. N. D. Young, Cleobule Doucet, Alex. Broussard, Alex. Martin, A. C. Guilbeau, Jos. A. Chargois, Louis Anselet, Alcide Judice, Ben Avant, Clemile Landry.

 The following were appointed a Committee on Resolutions: Dr. Fred J. Mayer, J. O. LeBlanc, T. Begnaud, J. C. Couvillon, C. C. Brown, Julian Mouton, W. B. Torian, W. B. Bailey.

 Letters of regret were read from Hons. C. H. Mouton, Chas. Parlange and and A. D. Lafargue, all expressing their sympathy with the purpose of the meeting, and condemning the lottery.

 The first speaker introduced was Walter J. Burke, Esq., of New Iberia, who handled the theme in a masterly logical discourse, showing that it would be detrimental to the prosperity of the State and subversive of the Democratic party to vote for the lottery amendment. His remarks were listened to with close attention, and the orator made a decided impression of good for his cause upon the audience.

 The next speaker introduced was R. F. Broussard, Esq., of New Iberia, who made his address in French. It was intensely practical, and was made to "point a moral." He started out with the statement that he is of Creole descent; and, as he was proud of his section and State, and had no other interests to sub-serve, he would express himself as best he could to that end. The lottery boasted that it could buy up the 'Cajuns in his parish. This shows how John A. Morris regards a whole people, whom he is asking to appoint him guardian of their welfare, because he as been able to purchase a few so-called representatives. It was a slander that should burn every honest Creole heart, and should be wiped out with each individual ballot at the polls, the palladium of Liberty; where, "though they fall as light as snowflakes, are as terrible as an army with banners." No man with the ancestry of us here, the "Acadians," could afford to rest under this imputation, nor would do so if there were a remedy by resort to individual refutation of a slander. Where it is hurled at a good people of a great State by an alien, "lying on flowery beds of ease" plucked from our sun-loved roses, our only remedy is the freeman's vindication - unfurl your ballot to the world. Our ancestors were heroes. Rather than back from principle and bend to British yoke, they waved farewell to all that man can call his own - home and fireside, and accepted the fate of outcasts. Thank God! they landed here in our beautiful country, which, in obedience to tender memory, they christened "Acadia." Here they have achieved prosperity and renown. In all of the wars of our country since our establishment here we have furnished soldiers whose records will shine with any page in history, and scientists and jurists and examples of civic regeneration under seemingly overwhelming burdens, that will stand as an example forever. And because most of us are agriculturists, and simple and frugal and hospitable, and cannot argue the sophistries of politics or the economy of government, which are left to our trusted representatives (whom Mr. Morris sometimes buys), we are 'Cajuns, ad he is going to buy s all. He cannot do it - not in my parish; and, gentlemen of Lafayette, I would not harbor in my heart for one moment that there is a man in the sound of my voice who will not say, Lafayette is the same.

 The next speaker was Hon. Don Caffery, whose introduction was greeted with welcome applause. Mr. Caffery made a brilliant address, covering all the grounds of argument against the lottery; and as he is so well known and respected here and throughout the State, his argument received close attention of the audience, and no doubt carried great weight of conviction with it. He was frequently greeted with rounds of applause. He illustrated one point of his argument as to the utter folly of giving John A. Morris the exclusive privilege of controlling lottery gambling as follows:  A little game of draw poker between himself and Dr. Mayer and W. B. Torian would be a matter between themselves, as no doubt occurs all over the country. We have our money there, say $500, and it remains with us with probably little change of ownership. We risk our judgment, science and skill on the game. But Mr. Morris comes and says, give me the $500?  He takes $250 and puts it in his pocket; then puts four slips of paper into a hat (one for himself, you see,) and then we all draw to see who will get the remaining $250. Mr. Morris has $250, which he goes off with, and we are left to "hold the bag!" What has Morris done for the $250 he got? This is one of the many illustrations he made to show the rapaciousness of the Morris scheme. His speech was very interesting throughout.

 Julian Mouton, Esq., then delivered a very brief address in French, which was really remarkable for its smoothness and eloquent appeal, and had a good effect. He had many congratulations upon his happy effort.

 The committee on resolutions presented the following, which were unanimously adopted:

  WHEREAS, It is mete and proper that at this time we should repeat our professions of political faith, reaffirming our devotion to the doctrines laid down by Jefferson and Jackson, and therefore again arraigning before the bar of public opinion that Afro-Republican institution the Louisiana State Lottery, which is seeking to filch another franchise, the granting of which would forever enslave our people, endanger 'white supremacy,' and make this proud old Commonwealth an outcast among her sister States, therefore be it
   Resolved, By the Democracy of Lafayette in mass meeting assembled, -

  1st. That, mindful of the teachings of the fathers, we are opposed to all monopolies and particularly to one that has the malodorous stench of the negro legislature of 1868 hanging to it; that we are determined to destroy this last vestige of the era or reconstruction and negro domination.

  2nd. That we extend our heartfelt thanks to the Chief Executive Officers, and to that Spartan band in the Legislature for striving so valiantly to stem the tide of venality and corruption.

 3d. That this issue, thus thrust upon the party must be manfully met.

 4th. That we resent as a deadly insult the infamous proposition made by an alien and his colored Republican confreres, to violate the honor of our State, for a moneyed consideration.

 5th. That we call upon all Democrats, to bury any petty jealousies, factional differences and personal animosities, and join us in a united effort to preserve the purity of Democratic institutions and uphold the Democratic institutions and uphold the supremacy of our race; and in furtherance of this end, we desire that this issue (not of our seeking) may be settled by the white Democracy of the State; therefore
  Resolved, That we counsel moderation, and desire that the proposition (insulting though it is), may be calmly and dispassionately discussed, according to every Democrat the privilege we claim ourselves, of thinking and acting as his conscience may dictate; and we will do all, consistent with our honor as Democrats and as men to preserve the peace and harmony, which should ever exist within our ranks.

  Respectfully submitted,
FRED J. MAYER,
J. O. LEBLANC,
T. BEGNAUD,
J. C. COUVILLON,
C. C. BROWN,
JULIAN MOUTON,
W. B. BAILEY,
W. B. TORIAN.

 Dr. Fred J. Mayer was then called upon, but in a few brief remarks excused himself, stating that the eloquent oratory which we had all listened to covered the whole ground. He was only too happy in having been a participant in such a meeting.

 A feature of the occasion was the excellent music rendered by the Carencro "White Camelia Band," under the leadership of Mr. F. A. Broussard, Jr. This band plays remarkably well for so young an organization.

 On motion it was resolved, That the thanks of this meeting be and is hereby tendered the eloquent orators who have this day addressed us; and also to to the president and secretaries of this meeting.

 On motion the meeting adjourned.
O. CADE, President.
J. O. LEBLANC, HARRISON THEALL, Secretaries.

 The result of this meeting proves that the white people of Lafayette are fully alive to their interests, and the interests of the Democratic party, in this struggle. The lottery has gained no converts here; and we believe before the campaign is fairly begun it will recognize the fact that is has no hope of taking Lafayette parish under the shadow of its vampire wing. We trust that the several Vice-Presidents mentioned above will keep the spirit of this meeting alive in their several sections and instill the anti-lottery feeling where there is an opportunity. We have reason to regard this meeting as a most suspicious commencement.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.    
     
   
Windy Day Near the Depot. - There was quite a flurry of wind on Thursday of last week, which was more severe in the neighborhood of the depot where Chimney flues were blown from the roofs of the business houses of John O. Mouton and Schayot Bros.  Laf. Adv. 7/4/1891.


 Little Folks to Entertain.

 On Thursday, the 16th inst., the children of the town will give an entertainment at Falk's Hall. Their object is to add to a special fund they have in the Catholic Church. They are studying an interesting little play termed "Inez; or, the Little Rope Dancer;" a drama in four acts. They will give a good exhibition, and there will be refreshments and other adjuncts to the attractions of the evening, - music and singing by some of our well known and appreciated home people. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.


CHARTER OF THE "LAFAYETTE HIGH WHITE SCHOOL,"
(Limited.)

 State of Louisiana,
Parish of Lafayette.

 WHEREAS, by voluntary subscriptions and the generous assistance of the public in general, a certain sum of money has been raised  for the purpose of constructing a suitable building to establishing a free public High School in the town of Lafayette, Louisiana, for eh education of the white children exclusively of the parish of Lafayette, which school house, is to be constructed on a lot of ground, situated within the corporate limits of the town of Lafayette, and belonging to the Lafayette High School, now for the purpose of carrying out the object as proposed and intended by those aiding and contributing to said fund.

 Be it known that on this 20th day of April, A. D., Eighteen hundred and ninety-one, before me, Edward G. Voorhies, appointed, commissioned, sworn and duly qualified Notary Public in and for the parish of Lafayette, and in presence of the witnesses hereinafter named and undersigned, personally came and appeared the following undersigned persons of the parish of Lafayette, subscribers and contributors to the aforesaid fund, viz ;  Louis G. Breaux, L. C. Delhomme, J. P. LeBesque, Romain Francez, E. Priollaud, E. Guidry, R. Gentil, Julian Mouton, Oscar L. Alpha, D. A. Cochrane, Jean Breaux, John Solari, S. Bernard, Lucien S. Broussard, B. A. Salles, H. H. Hohorst, L. Lacoste, James Higginbotham, M. Vial, L. Durham, Mrs. J. O. Sprole, F. Demanade, Moss Bros. & Co., F. K. Hopkins, A. E. Mouton, Schayot Bros., Hebert & Landry, Eli McDaniel, John Hahn, D. Domengeaux, J. A. Veazey, J. J. Revillon, Philip Mouton, J. E. Martin, Jos. Plonsky, G. M. Esswein, J. D. Mouton, E. G. Voorhies, John Clegg, W. B. Bailey, Zephirin Doucet, Mrs. Lafond, Mrs. Castel, J. E. Trahan, W. Campbell, Dr. P. D. Beraud, Sidney Martin, C. O. Mouton, Alexandre Delhomme, Dr. Thomas B. Hopkins, Chas. P. Alpha, Benj. Falk, Antoine Guidry, Dr. G. W. Scranton.

ARTICLE I.

 The object and purposes for which this corporation is created and established are the instruction of the white children of the parish of Lafayette, in all branches of learning taught in the public schools of the State of Louisiana.

 ARTICLE II.

 The name and style of this corporation shall be and is the "Lafayette White High School," in which corporate name all the business shall be transacted. Its domicile and place of business is fixed at Lafayette State of Louisiana.

 ARTICLE III.

 The corporate powers of this corporation are vested in and shall be exercised by a board of directors composed of nine trustees shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of all business.

 ARTICLE IV.

 This corporation shall have the right to sue in the name of the president, for the use and benefit of said corporation, and can be sued in its corporate name. Citation and all legal process to be served on its president, or in his absence from domicile this corporation, said citation and processes to be served on the secretary of the corporation.

ARTICLE V.

 The corporation shall have the right to own property, and with the concurrence of a majority of the trustee, composing the board of directors, it shall have the right and power to acquire property, both movable and immovable, by purchase, assignment, transfer, donation "mortis causa" or otherwise, and to do all acts that are impliedly necessary for the furtherance of its own corporate purposes.

ARTICLE VI.

 The time which this corporation shall exist shall be fifty years to date from the day of the registration of this charter with the approval of the District Attorney in the office of the Recorder of the parish of Lafayette.

 ARTICLE VII.

 A secretary of this corporation shall be appointed by the board of directors, and he shall hold his office subject to the pleasure of said board, he shall keep minutes of all business transactions and proceedings of this corporation and shall transcribe and preserve the same in a well bound book. The secretary shall be ex-officio treasurer of this corporation and as such shall furnish bond and security as may be fixed by the board of directors.

 ARTICLE VIII.

 The board of directors shall make and adopt such rules and by laws for the management of the business of the corporation not in conflict with this charter and the laws of this State.

ARTICLE IX.

 The following persons, viz: Julian Mouton, C. O. Mouton, Alexandre Delhomme, Dr. Thomas B. Hopkins, Chas. P. Alpha, Benjamin Falk, Antoine Guidry, Dr. Geo. W. Scranton and John Hahn, are hereby appointed trustees to compose the present Board of Directors of this corporation, and Julian Mouton is hereby appointed president of the Lafayette White High School; said trustee and president shall hold their offices until the first Monday in May, A. D., 1892, until their successors are elected or appointed and qualified. In case of a vacancy in their office of trustees, the same be fixed immediately by a majority of the remaining ones; and in case of a vacancy in the office or president said trustees shall immediately appoint among themselves a successor. This corporation is hereby limited under provision of act No. 36 of A. D., 1888, of the State of Louisiana.

 ARTICLE X.

 On the first Monday in May, A. D., 1892, and annually thereafter, there shall be an election, held at the house of the High School for nine trustees to constitute the Board of Directors, at which said election to be called by its president, every member of this corporation shall be entitled to vote in either in person or by written proxy and the nine receiving a majority of the votes cast at said election shall be trustees and board of directors for the term of two years from the date of said election; and they shall be considered as having qualified on giving a written notice in the secretary that they have accepted the trust.

ARTICLE XI.

 Any person wishing to become a member of this corporation shall present to the secretary a written application accompanied by whatever contribution he or she desires to offer to the common fund of this corporation, said application to be addressed to the Board of Directors, a majority of whom at a regular meeting consenting and accepting shall ipso facto constitute the applicant a member.

ARTICLE XII.

 In furtherance of the object and purposes for which this corporation has been created and established, the nine trustees composing the present Board of Directors of this corporation and their successors in office are requested and they are fully authorized and empowered to assign, transfer and turn over the gratuitous use of said school house with all furnitures and appurtenances belonging to this corporation to the School Board of the Parish of Lafayette, on condition that the said School Board shall open and keep open a public school in said huse for the instruction of the white children of this Parish, subject in all other respects to the rules and regulations governing the public schools in this State, on the further condition that the professor or professors in said school shall be selected and assigned by the said School Board and shall be paid as other teachers, out of the public school fund of the State, and if the School Board does not furnish the necessary instruction as above required, the use of the property to be transferred to it, shall revert and return to the control and management of the Lafayette White High School.

 ARTICLE XIII.

 The charter of this corporation, may be amended at any time by a vote to that effect of two thirds of the members of said corporation.

 Done, read and signed at my office at Lafayette, La., on the day, month and year first written at the caption hereof in presence of Messrs. Leopold Hirsch and A. M. Martin, competent witnesses, who have signed these presents with me, Notary, after due reading hereof.

 WITNESSES.
Thos. B. Hopkins, Charles O. Mouton, Louis G. Breaux, Ant. Guidry, L. C. Delhomme, E. A. Broussard, B. Falk, Julian Mouton, D. A. Dimitry, F. W. Courtney, Jno. P. LeBesque, Raoul Gentil, P. D. Beraud, G. W. Scranton, H. D. Guidry, Wm. Graser, Alex. Delhomme, John Hahn, B. A. Salles, R. S. Broussard, Leon Plonsky, C. P. Alpha.
NOTARY PUBLIC.
Edw. G. Voorhies.

 The foregoing act of incorporation having been submitted to me for official approval and finding the said Charter to be consistent with the laws of this State, the same is hereby approved. Done at Abbeville, this 10th day of May, 1891.
MINOS T> GORDY, JR.,
District Attorney.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1891.

    

  
 From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 4th, 1874:

   
At Godard's Oak Grove.

Vermilionville, La., June 28, 1874.

 At about ten o'clock this morning, at the sound of the music of the Hyperion Brass Band, under the leadership of Mr. R. Palmer, the white people of the parish of Lafayette assembled at the "Godard Oak Grove" in this town.

 The meeting was organized by calling Col. A. D. Boudreaux to preside, and Col. J. R. Creighton, R. L. McBride, Norbert Landry, Treville Bernard, Lessin Guidry, P. O. Richard, Onesiphoire Broussard, and Victor Martin, Vice-President - and C. Debaillon and J. Edmond Mouton to act as secretaries.

 Before taking his seat, the President thus addressed the meeting; "Ladies and Gentlemen; I think that it is unnecessary for the President to explain the object of the meeting because on one side you have the White Banner and on the other the Black Banner - choose !!

 The first orator introduced to the meeting was Col. A. Aleibiade DeBlanc of St. Martinville. The Colonel spoke in French. As usual he made a stirring speech.

 The President then appointed the following gentlemen: C. H. Mouton, Valery Guilbeau, J. O. Giroir and L. G. Breaux a committee to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting as the champion of the White League. He spoke in English. His speech was listened to with the greatest attention. Everybody was pleased with him.

 C. H. Mouton, Esq., as Chairman of the committee on Resolutions, then reported the following resolutions, which were read in English and in French and unanimously adopted.

   1. Resolved that the white people of the Parish of Lafayette, here assembled this day, adopt the sentiments contained in the address made to the white of St. Martins, and adopt the principles therein enunciated.

   2. Resolved that we will use fair and legal, but active and efficient means to promote the object of our association.

   3. Resolved that we demand and will insist upon a fair and honest expression of public opinion through the ballot box, ourselves as good citizens, always ready and willing to acquiesce and submit to the will of the majority fairly and honestly expressed.

   4. Resolved that, entertaining no opinions that we are not prepared to proclaim to the world in broad day light, we will oppose and denounce all secret rings and schemes, as are calculated to engender fraud and foster corruption in public affairs.

   5. Resolved that considering that union and organization among the whites of the State are indispensable to bring about a change in the administration of our public affairs, and check the adventurers and plunderers who through the negro votes and negro influence have seized the State Government, and who by mal-administration and a legalized system of spoliation, have nearly reduced the Tax payers to despair, we will abstain from condemning those of our white fellow citizens who have not yet joined us or even who have opposed us, in the great reform movement we have inaugurated, but on the contrary, with a brotherly feeling, we invite them to join us, at any time, and to give their co-operation to rid Louisiana of her present polluted government.

     6. Resolved that at the same time that we will acknowledge and respect the rights and opinions of others, we are determined to exercise and enforce our own.

   7. Resolved that whereas union and concert of action are indispensable to secure success, your committee would recommend, a thorough organization of a White League or political party of the whites, in opposition to the Republican negro party in this State; and would suggest that the President of the this meeting appoint a committee of Nine, to be called the Central Committee of Lafayette, whose duty it shall be to organize clubs in each Police Jury ward of the Parish and devise the most efficient means for said organization. The Central Committee to remain in existence until the next general assembly of the White League of this Parish. In case a vacancy occurs in the Parish Central Committee, said vacancy shall be filled by the members of said committee.


 8. Resolved that the white people of the other parishes of this State are earnestly invited to organize in their respective Parishes with the view of having a general State Convention of the White People, sometime before the next State election.


 After the adoption of foregoing resolutions, the President appointed the following named gentlemen to compose the Parish.

 After the adoption of foregoing resolutions, the President appointed the following named gentlemen to compose the Parish Committee, viz ;  C. H. Mouton, Alex Del'Homme, Valsin Broussard, R. C. Landry, Numa Breaux, Theobule Hebert, Jr., John Caruthers, E. L. Hebert and Cleobule Doucet.

 Gen. A. Declouet of St. Martin, then addressed the meeting in French. The earnestness with which the General spoke of the miserable government in Louisiana since the war, impressed everyone with the necessity or organizing. We are sorry we are unable to reproduce the speech of Gen. Declouet.

 The meeting then adjourned.
A. D. BOUDREAUX, President.
C. DEBAILLON, J. EDM. MOUTON, Secretaries.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1874.  

     

  

   












 
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From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 4th, 1874:


 ADVERTISER NOT IN WITH THE WHITE LEAGUE.

 The statement was made last Sunday by one of the White League speakers, that the ADVERTISER was the official paper of this parish. 

 The manner in which it was done showed that his intention was to insinuate that we were not independent in politics. If the gentleman had been properly informed, in all probability, he would not have committed such an indiscretion. His audience was aware that the aspersion was unjust and uncalled for. This writer was a Confederate soldier during the whole war, in the army of Virginia, and as a soldier, as a citizen and as a man, has always endeavored to do his duty faithfully and on the square. He was born and raised in this parish and has always been a Democrat and is one yet, and has the honor at this time, of being a member of the State Central Committee. He obtained the public printing without solicitation or any promise whatever on his part. He has never flinched in any duty and has always been consistent, and is now, free as the air itself, and as independent, he feels as Old Hickory ever was.

 We desire reform as much as any one and more sincere to effect it, than some of the self-constituted leaders of the White League. But we maintain that it should be brought about in a legal and peaceable manner. We are opposed to violence and revolution, and no gratuitous and slanderous insinuation or considerations of any kind, can shake us from a position we consider  sound and patriotic. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1874.








THE WHITE LEAGUE MEETING.
A Disastrous Success.

 The meeting last Sunday was tolerably well attended but only a small portion of the crowd sympathized with its objects. Extensive efforts and preparations had been made to make the affair a success and as imposing as possible. After the organization, E. T. Lewis, Esq., of St. Landry, was introduced as the Champion of the Cause in Louisiana. He took for his text an article in The Advertiser of the 20th ult., and undertook to answer some of the questions there raised. We and many others were anxious to hear all those questions satisfactorily answered. The only one he endeavored to answer by argument was, "Supposing all the whites band together against the Republican party, what can they accomplish?" He maintained that the white voters were in the majority in the State and proved by the U. S. Census, that the number of white males between the ages of 18 and 45, exceeded the colored by over 6,000. He was careful however, to conceal the facts, that there are some 5,000 white republican voters and over 5,000 aliens who cannot vote at all, included in the figures exhibited and which he counted as White League voters. Some of the questions, he did not undertake to answer and the balance of them were demolished by his simple denials and assertions. He denied that the objects of the League tended to excite a conflict of races and before closing, proved conclusively that a war, was inevitable.

 He may find when the time arrives, that it will require more than "dutch courage," to face the music. To prove the great strength of the League and that it was not confined to a fraction of the whites in a few parishes, great stress was laid upon the fact, that the Crescent Club had affiliate with the party. It must have appeared to every one else, an evidence of weakness, that only one in about one hundred clubs in New Orleans, had favored the movement. The Champion confessed openly and unblushingly, that in advocating Fusion doctrines as a Liberal Republican, he was simply trying to "pull the wool over niggers' eyes." It was a strange and damaging confession and the questions naturally suggested themselves. Is he sincere now? Who is he trying to humbug this time? It's not all strange, that such a champion, has failed to convince the white people of his own parish, of the soundness of his present political creed.

 Col. DeBlanc, who is always sincere, gallant and eloquent, addressed the meeting in French language.

 General DeClouet read a carefully prepared speech and was listened to with respect and attention.

 C. H. Mouton, Esq., made a short trip appeal and begged the ladies to encourage young men to advance and win the fight - it was they, who must stand the shock of battle. We admire the prudence and generalship of the Champion of the Cause in Lafayette parish.

 We had expected and were prepared to hear solid arguments, but were disappointed in hearing nothing but passionate appeals to the prejudices of race and which had the effect only of exciting a few unthinking men and exposing the weakness of the cause. If the orators succeeded in anything, it was in convincing the whites that they ought to rule the country - proposition that has never been denied in this parish. But they failed to convince them, that a white minority should govern all hazards. They failed also, to convince any intelligent man, of expediency and practicability of the movement, without wading through blood. If no better and arguments can be produced, the movement is doomed to a miserable failure and the Champions will be sorely disappointed in not being able to sail into office on that breeze. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1874.


AT GODARD'S GROVE.

 Vermilionville, La., June 28, 1874. - At about 10 o'clock this morning, at the sound of the music of the Hyperion Brass Band, under the leadership of Mr. R. Palmer, the white people of the parish of Lafayette assembled at the "Godard Oak Grove.

 The meeting was organised by calling Col. A. D. Boudreaux to preside, and Col. J. R. Creighton, R. L. McBride, Norbert Landry, Treville Bernard, Lessin Guidry, P. O. Richard, Onesiphore Broussard, and Victor Martin, Vice-Presidents - and C. Debaillon and J. Edmond Mouton to act as secretaries.

 Before taking his seat, the President thus addressed the meeting :  "Ladies and Gentlemen :  I think it is the first time that it is unnecessary for the President to explain the object of the meeting because on one side you have the White Banner and on the other side the Black Banner - choose !!

 The first orator introduced to the meeting was Col. Alcibiade DeBlanc of St. Martinville. The colonel spoke in French. As usual he made a stirring speech.

 The President then appointed the following gentlemen: C. H. Mouton, Valery Guilbeau, J. O. Giroir and L. G. Breaux a committee to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting ;  which committee then retired.

 E. T. Lewis, Esq., of Opelousas was then introduced to the meeting as the champion of the White League. He spoke in English. His speech was listened to with the greatest attention. Everybody was pleased with him.

 C. H. Mouton, Esq., as Chairman of the committee on Resolutions, then reported the following resolutions, which were read in English and in French unanimously adopted.

 1. Resolved that the white people of the Parish of Lafayette, here assembled this day, adopt the sentiments contained in the address made to the white of St. Martins, and adopt the principles therein enunciated.

 2. Resolved that we will use fair and legal, but active and efficient means to promote the object of our association.

 3. Resolved that we demand and will insist upon a fair and honest expression of public opinion through the ballot box, holding ourselves as good citizens, always ready and willing to acquiesce and submit to the will of the majority fairly and honestly expressed.

 4. Resolved that, entertaining no opinions that we are not prepared to proclaim to the world in broad day light, we will oppose and denounce all secret rings and schemes, as are calculate to engender fraud and foster corruption in public affairs.

 5. Resolved that considering that union and organization among the whites of the State are indispensable to bring about a change in the administration of our public affairs, and check the adventurers and plunderers who through the negro votes and negro influence have seized the State Government, and who by mal-administration and a legalized system of spoliation, have nearly reduced the Tax payers to despair, we will abstain from condemning those of our white fellow citizens who have not yet joined us or even who have opposed us, in the great reform movement we have inaugurated, but on the contrary, with a brotherly feeling, we invite them to join us, at any time, and to give their co-operation to rid Louisiana of her present polluted government.

 6. Resolved that at the same time that we will acknowledge and respect the rights and opinions of others, we are determined to exercise and enforce our own.

 7. Resolved that whereas union and concert of action are indispensable to secure success, your committee would recommend, a thorough organization of a White League or political party of the whites, in opposition to the Republican negro party in this State ;  and I would suggest that the President of this meeting appoint a committee of Nine, to be called the Central Committee of Lafayette, whose duty it shall be to organize clubs in each Police Jury ward of the Parish, and devise the most efficient means for said organization. This Central Committee to remain in existence until the next general assembly of the White League of this Parish. In case a vacancy occurs in the Parish Central Committee, said vacancy shall be filled by the members of said committee.

 8. Resolved that the white people of the other parishes of this State are earnestly invited to organize in their respective Parishes with view of having a general State Convention of the White People, sometim before the next State election.

 After the adoption of foregoing resolutions, the President appointed the following named gentlemen to compose the Parish Central Committee, viz :  C. H. Mouton, Alex Delhomme, Valsin Broussar, R. C. Landry, Numa Breaux, Theodule Hebert, Jr., John Caruthers, E. L. Hebert and Cleobule Doucet.

 Gen. A. DeClouet of St. Martin, then addressed the meeting in French. The earnestness with which the General spoke of the miserable government in Louisiana since the war, impressed every one with the necessity or organizing. We are sorry we are unable to reproduce the speech of Gen. DeClouet.

 The meeting then adjourned.
A. D. BOUDREAUX, President.
C. DEBAILLON, J. EDM. Mouton, Secretaries. Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1874.












   

  









  

















Crops. - The crops in this parish at the present time is in a most flourishing condition. Cotton is magnificent - corn, good - rice, potatoes, &c., excellent, - and consequently our planters look more cheerful. Laf. Adv. 7/4/1874.

 










Lagniappe:
Budding Into Womanhood.

 There is a touching beauty in the radiant look of a girl just crossing the limits of youth, commencing her journey through the checkered space of womanhood. It is all dew-sparkle and morning glory to her ardent, buoyant spirit, as she presses forward exalting in blissful anticipations. But the withering heat of the conflict of life creeps on ;  the dew drops exhale ;  the garlands of hope, scattered and dead, strew the path ;  and too often, ere noon-tide, the brow and sweet smile are exchanged for the weary look of one longing for the evening rest, the twilight, the night.

 Original source unknown. In the Lafayette Advertiser 7/4/1874.



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