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Monday, January 12, 2015

**JULY 15TH M C

From the Lafayette Advertiser of July the 15th., 1899:

NOTICE OF ELECTION.

 By virtue of the powers in us vested by law, and by virtue of the adoption of an ordinance by the City Council of the town of Lafayette for that purpose according to law and the proclamation of the mayor of said town, notice is hereby given that an election will be held in the Town of Lafayette, parish, of Lafayette, La., on Saturday, August the 26th, A. D. 1899, submitting to the property tax-payers of said town, entitled to vote under the general election laws of this State, the proposition to levy a special tax of two mills on every dollar of the assessed value of the property situated in said town and subject to taxation therein, in excess of the limit allowed by law, for a period and term of ten years, beginning January 1st A. D. 1900, for the purpose of securing the location of the State Industrial Institute provided for by Act No. 162 of the General Assembly, approved July 14th, A. D. 1898, in the parish of Lafayette, La., the title thereof to be in the public, in conformity to article No. 232 of the Constitution of 1898, and Act No. 131 of the General Assembly of 1898.

 The election shall be held at the court house of this Parish located in said town, being the poll or precinct therein established according to law before the last election; the polls shall be opened from six o'clock a. m. to seven o'clock p. m. that the ballots to be used at said elections shall be printed as follows:

 FOR the special tax of two mills for ten years to be devoted for the purpose of securing the location of the State Industrial Institute provided for by Act No. 162 of the General Assembly approved July 14th, 1898, in the parish of Lafayette, La., the title thereof to be in the public under the terms and conditions set forth in the property taxpayers' petition.

 AGAINST the special tax for two mills for ten years to be devoted for the purpose of securing the location of the State Industrial Institute provided for by Act No. 162 of the General Assembly approved July 14th, 1898, in the Parish of Lafayette, La., the title thereof to be in the public under the terms and conditions set forth in the property tax-payer's petition.

 That the commissioners of election shall receive the ballots of all property tax-payers of the Town of Lafayette entitled to vote at said election under the laws of the State of Louisiana, and before depositing their votes in the ballot box, the commissioners of election shall endorse on the official ballot to be cast by each voter, the amount of such assessment, but not the name of the voter, as will be shown by the official rolls for the year 1899 ;  and said commissioners shall make returns of the number of votes and the amounts of the assessed value of the property voted, for and against, the levy of said special tax, and otherwise, according to law.

 The following persons are hereby appointed commissioners to hold said election:  R. C. Greig, Joseph Ducote, H. A. Eastin. Clerk of election, D. V. Gardebled.

 In testimony whereof we have affixed our official signatures at Lafayette, La., on this 12th day of July A. D. 1889.
P. A. DELHOMME,
A. M. MARTIN,

Board of Supervisors of Election Lafayette Parish, Louisiana.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1899.

   
    





Cumberland Telephone Rates. 

Three parties on the same line, $1.50 per month each.

 Direct line, $2.50 per month.

 Direct metallic lines, long distance outfit, $3.50 per month.

 Residence.

 Three parties on same line, $1.00 per month each.

 Direct line, $1.50 per month.

 The above rates apply to location within a distance of one mile from the central office, beyond which an extra charge will be made according to distance and location.

 Public pay stations will be opened at any place, if so located as to be convenient for passing public or neighborhood.

 The evolution of the telephone business of the country within the past few years has been very marked; new instruments and apparatus have been devised whereby conversations at long distance has become perfectly practical. The extension of lines has been pushed to the extent that parties can, by providing themselves with the long distance outfit, communicate with perfect satisfaction with others near and remote, thus enabling them to transact a larger amount of business in person to keep in close touch with their customers, and save the greatest amount of time.

 In presenting this schedule of rates, the special study has been to enable us to put the cost of telephone service within the reach of small users without lowering the grade of the service.

 The telephone system is the greatest facility added to commerce since the advent of railroads.

 This company requires no long time contracts from its customers; but if desired, will enter into contracts at the above rates for any period from one month to five years.
                     CUMBERLAND TELEPHONE
               AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY.
                       C. G. DAVIDSON, Local Mgr.

Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1899.

 



 "WE KNOW
  Very Little About..."

  The above words are part of a sentence to be found in Oberon's correspondence in another column.


  He wrote about some lands in the parish which for the last eighty or ninety years have been produced luxuriant and heavy crops without any fertilizers and which at the present moment are worn out, and thus he exclaims: "Much land is to be fertilized and this is a subject we know very little about."


 These words are very suggestive and affecting as they do not only the vitality of the lands spoken of but also coming in close touch with the future prosperity of the farmers, it behooves all concerned to study this most important subject - fertilizing out lands.



 And it is not a subject to be postponed, neighbor it is to be regarded as a frivolous one.


 Many may think that fertilizing land is an easy matter and that any kind of commercial fertilizers will answer the purpose, but the writer has known lands, which after certain commercial fertilizers had for several years been used upon them, have become entirely worthless and unproductive.
Therefore the subject is worth knowing.

 The producing elements of the lands are not inexhaustible, and when year after year those elements are taken out of the soil by the various crops growing upon it and without replacing them by a well judicious fertilizing, it necessarily follows that the time comes when the land will become non-productive or at least will not reader a full yield.


 A complete knowledge of the composition of the land is necessary to the farmers for replacing the nutritive elements which are taken out by the various crops and absorbed by the heating sun.

Such knowledge is acquired by practical learning in an educational institution where such learning is taught practically as an "Industrial School."
Thus will see another and new important object for the Industrial School. Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1899.





CORRESPONDENCE.
To Editor, Lafayette Advertiser:

 Dear Sir: -

 When I travel around in our parish and see the largest and best crop that the parish has ever raised, I am rejoiced and want to tell someone about it. Corn is fine, the ears are so large and so much of it that will more than fill all the barns. I hear many farmers inquiring for hogs to fatten this Fall with large surplus of corn. I think we will have to shell and ship it to find a market. Stock are fat, chickens, eggs and poultry or every kind are plentiful with plenty to eat.

 The election for State, Parish and United States officers coming on, with the active determined spirit of our people to get the Industrial School will keep us from sitting under the shade. Our people were slow to realize the importance of such a valuable institution, but this is the spirit to win - make haste slowly.

 The farmers' institute will meet in Lafayette, next Monday, July 17th. All who can should attend. There is much information to be gained by the farmers.

 Dr. Stubbs, Dr. Dalrymple and others will give us valuable ideas. Mr. Aug Lesseps an able and active sugar cane raiser will address us in french to the satisfaction of many who do not understand english. Our State Commissioner of Agriculture, Gen. Jastremski will also be with us to help in the important work.

 Much of the land in Lafayette parish after eighty or ninety years in cultivation will have to be fertilized in some way, and this we know very little about, as it has not been necessary heretofore.

 The fruit crop on which so many of us have feasted so bountifully in past years is not with us this year, but watermelons are plentiful, - the colored man is happy, the white man ditto.

 Mr. Editor as it is about time to commence looking around for a candidate for governor - The Hon. John Dymond has been mentioned and I think, he would make an able executive officer being a man of large capacity, a fine speaker and in every way suitable and a staunch democrat. As I am doubtful of having the right to nominate a candidate for president, I will only say that W. J. Bryan suits me.

 Farmers have made their crops self-sustaining. Few could get credit consequently do not owe any part of it ;  necessity has learnt us a lesson of much value, that - we can live even if we cannot buy on credit. We raise our own supplies. There are good gardens, plenty of hogs and other farm products, and if pushed to it our good house wives will hunt up their cards ;  looms and spinning wheels and weaves our own clothes.

 Fearing I am encroaching on your valuable space I will close.
     (Signed) OBERON.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1899. 




   

A Kindergarten.

 Prof. R. C. Greig has perfected arrangements, to open next Fall a kindergarten department in connection with his school. An experienced teacher will be employed to take charge of the new department and it is to be hoped that the public will give the enterprise, the support and encouragement to which it is entitled. The system of Kindergarten training has revolutionized the educational world and today is considered the only true ground work of a thoroughly practical education. We hail with delight the establishment of this institution and feel perfectly confident of its abundant success. 

Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1899.





Selected News Notes (Advertiser)  7/15/1899.

Mr. John Creighton went to Crowley on a visit.

Mr. P. Krauss left last Thursday night for New Orleans.


Judge Parkerson returned last Wednesday from the Crescent City.


The Cumberland Telephone rates will be found on page 4 of this issue.


Dr. G. A. Martin went to Crowley, a few days ago, to visit his sick nephew.


Mr. Louis Domengeaux went to New Iberia last Sunday to attend the State Liquor Dealers Association.


You hear nothing but smacking of the lips at Louis Domengeaux's bar, since Mr. Jack Preiger is fixing up the mixtures.


Don't forget the excursion to Galveston, Texas on next Monday, July 17th. Round trip from Lafayette $7.00.


If you have a Canary or Mockingbird you will be interested in - the show window, at the MOSS PHARMACY. They have everything for the bird.


Dentist H. P. Beeler informs us that notwithstanding all rumors, he has no intention of leaving Lafayette, if he were to do so, due notice of it would be given through the press.

The new office of Wm. Campbell just completed by contractor L. S. Broussard is another proof of the workmanship of the latter who is now occupied in adding a second story to Mr. R. C. Greig's residence.

Mr. T. M. Biossat who went to New Orleans last week in regard to the work to be done on Bayou Vermilion informs us that the proposal to receive bids for the cleaning up of Bayou Vermilion from Dermas Broussard to the Rail Road bridge will appear in the Picayune on July 17th, and bids will be opened on August 17th.

From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 15, 1899.












 From the Lafayette Gazette of July 15th, 1899:

LAFAYETTE IN THE LEAD.

 The Jeanerette Herald says if Lafayette fails to levy a special tax Jeanerette will offer the largest bonus and will get the Industrial School, but the Herald frankly concedes the victory to us if the tax is carried.

 We have it on good authority that the only hope of St. Martin and Iberia lies in the defeat of the tax in this parish. The situation is very encouraging for the people of this parish and those who have worked so well since the inauguration of the campaign should continue their efforts with renewed energy and undiminished zeal.


 Lafayette is ahead and ought to win the fight. It is happily situated and nothing should be permitted to impede the way to success. Our parish has never had a better opportunity to do something for itself and it would be an act of sluggish indifference to our best interest if we failed to take advantage of it.

 The gentlemen who have taken an active participation in the fight since the beginning and who are waging on the war against retrogression and ignorance with zealous activity are certainly to be commended for stand they have taken. Those who have, from mercenary motives, attempted to array one portion o the community against another, will no doubt be visited with the punishment they deserve. Their sublime disinterestedness is, to say the least, not to be expected of mundane things, and we have no doubt that before swallowing in toto their proffers of advice and assistance the voters will see the traditional bug which is hidden under the chip. The Gazette does not charge that all the opponents of the tax are instigated by a desire to be elected to office. Doubtless there are among the opposition men who are honest though mistaken, but The Gazette feels confident that therer are some who are going about the country poisoning the minds of the voters for no other purpose than to gain a little fleeting popularity by which they expect to get into office. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.     



CLEANING THE BAYOU.

 Mr. T. M. Biossat visited Engineer Brownlee in New Orleans a few days ago and ascertained the fact that bids for the cleaning of Vermilion bayou from Darmas Broussard's to the railroad bridge will be advertised for in the Picayune of July 17. This work is of much importance to the business interests of Lafayette as it will afford transportation facilities to the people living along the stream. A steamboat plying between this place and Abbeville will be the means of bringing a large amount of cane and cotton to the mills in and around Lafayette. Those who wish to bid for the contract can procure blanks from Mr. Biossat. As the government will furnish an engineer to direct and supervise the work the contractor need not possess any exceptional qualifications. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


LAFAYETTE'S CHIEF.
[From the Crowley Signal.]

 J. T. Allingham is chief of the Lafayette Fire Department and a deservedly popular man. He spent the fourth in Crowley as the guest of Hose Company No. 1, and while here added many to a long list of those who were already his friends. The boys of the company felt honored in having him with them, and it can be assured that they showed him a good time.

 He brought with him a flag that has been in use seventeen years, and which at one time belonged to Lafayette Company No. 1, of the New Orleans volunteer department. Another interesting article brought down by him was a silver trumpet. Both of these appeared in the parade.

 Lafayette's chief is evidently a well posted man on fires and methods of fighting them. Being of that disposition which leads him to take an intense interest in whatever he enters, he is always on the lookout for new ideas that would aid his department.

 In the parade he was given a position of honor and if Lafayette has more like him they are indeed a fortunate town. Mr. Allingham is always welcome among the boys of No. 1 and other citizens of Crowley. From the Crowley Signal and in the Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.

   










Pilette Defeats Jeanerette Team.

 The Pilette baseball club has again scored a victory over the Jeanerette boys. The game took place last Sunday and the score was six to five. The Pilette boys now hold the undisputed championship of Southwest Louisiana and are willing to defend it against all comers to the grand contest which will take place at Lafayette in the near future. To enter this contest an entrance fee of $25 and a deposit of $10 will be required. Several clubs have already entered. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


Plonsky in New Orleans.

 Sam Plonsky, well-known by the people of this town is now in the employ of Michel Lion & Co., the celebrated clothing firm, Canal street corner Baronne and Deccatur street corner St. Ann, New Orleans. Sam writes The Gazette that he would be pleased to hear from his friends here and that he will be in Lafayette with a full line of samples and fall goods to take orders for clothing. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


Impressed with Lafayette.

 W. F. Snodgrass of Carl, Iowa, was in Lafayette this week looking for a place to locate. Mr. Snodgrass expressed himself highly pleased with this section and stated that he will return in October to stay. Mr. Snodgrass says that he is more favorably impressed with this country than with any other he has visited. While here Mr. Snodgrass was the guest of Mr. I. N. Satterfield. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.



 Assessment Reduced.

 Last Tuesday and Wednesday representatives of the Lafayette Sugar Manufacturing Company appeared before the Board of Reviewers and urged the boy to reduce the assessment fixed on the property of the company by Assessor Martin. Wednesday morning Judge O. C. Mouton appeared before the board and argued in favor of a reduction, advancing the proposition that the refinery was assessed too high and not in proportion to the assessment of other mills. Assessor Martin contended that the assessment of the refinery, which he had fixed at $125,000, was fair and proper and he appealed to the Jury not to grant the reduction he asked for.

 Upon a motion to lower the assessment to $100,000 a vote was taken resulting as follows:
Yeas: Brown, Avant, Hebert, Billeaud.
Nays: Primeaux.

 The Gazette thinks that the Jury did well to reduce the assessment. Assessor Martin was no doubt sincere in his contentions, and we are confident that if he has erred it was an error of judgment and not of the heart as he would not intentionally do injustice to any one in the discharge of his official duties. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


B. M. A. Meeting.

 The Business Men's Association held a regular monthly meeting last Monday. President C. O. Mouton was in the chair and Mr. Jno. I. Bell was at his desk.

 The roll was called and some twenty members answered to their names and paid up their dues for the month of July.

 Mr. E. G. Voorhies, chairman of the finance committee, made a report of the collections and disbursement of funds. The report showed that $206.10 had been realized by the festivals and private subscriptions and that $186.53 had been expended for the barbecue. The report was accepted.

 Upon motion the chair appointed Messrs. B. Falk, Ambroise Mouton and Crow Girard a committee to confer with the committee appointed by the Police Jury to make arrangements for the Farmers' Institute which will be held here on the 17th of July.

 After approving a number of bills the Association adjourned.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


Insurance Rates.

 Holders of insurance policies in Lafayette have petitioned the secretary of the Southeastern Tariff Association at Atlanta, Ga., asking a reduction of rates. The petition shows clearly that this town is being discriminated against. It is shown that other towns, with the same system of fire protection, are given the benefit of rates much lower than those paid by Lafayette. This town has a  well equipped fire system and there is no justice in the action of the Southeastern Tariff Association in retaining the rates at the present high figures. The Gazette understands that several other towns will join Lafayette in demanding fair treatment at hands of the association.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


A Burglar Arrested.

 Yesterday afternoon Deputy Sheriff Mouton arrested Alexander Pourtau in the town of Carencro for burglary committed last January in that parish of St. Landry. He is charged with having broken into and robbed the store of Alex Burleigh near Sunset. Pourtau was found in possession of part of the stolen property, consisting of a double-barreled shot gun, a Winchester rifle and a number of knives. Pourtau admits having stolen the weapons but denies the theft of $150 alleged in the affidavit. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


 Fight at Broussard.

 Jos. G. LeBlanc swore out an affidavit against Homer and Albert LeBlanc charging them with assault with intent to murder. The affidavit was the result of a fight which occurred in Broussard in which the plaintiff was considerably bruised. Judge Debaillon fixed the bond of the accused at $500 each, which was furnished. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.

 The Lafayette Laundry.

 The Lafayette Laundry has secured the services of Mr. C. G. Borne, an expert laundryman, lately of Washington Steam Laundry, New Orleans, and is better prepared to do first-class work. A trial is all we ask. Lafayette Laundry, J. O. Lisbony, proprietor. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


Death of Mrs. Rosemond Landry.

 Mrs. Rosemond Landry died at her home in this parish Friday, July 7. At the time of Mrs. Landry's death, her husband was critically ill in the same house. At this writing Mr. Landry is almost hopelessly ill and his relatives and friends are in constant fear that the next hour will be his last. Mr. Landry is one of our best citizens and it is the sincere wish of all who know him that a kind Providence will give him strength to survive his present illness.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.  




 Senator Caffery and The Fig-tree.

 To the Lafayette Gazette:

  Foreman's Flat, Lafayette parish, July 11th, 1899. - I see in the papers that some of the big guns had a political meeting at Rayville a few days ago. The principal orators at the meeting were Senator Don Caffery and Mr Charlie Boatner. A few years ago Mr. Caffery was helping Gov. Foster to save the "manhood of Louisiana" and incidentally to kill the "octopus". But as well-known the "octopus" was killed. Foster got to be governor and Caffery went to Washington. Boatner stayed home. Foster settled down to practical things and Caffery continued to fight octopi, in the shape of free silver, Dingley bill, Bryan, a corrupt ballot and "the machine."

 Being an unwary countryman I will not try to say anything about the "situation", but I want to tell what went through my mind after reading the senator's speech. He says he don't want office, but simply wished to purify the ballot, break up the machine and then he wants to under his fig-tree in St. Mary and enjoy the gulf breeze. Now I don't like to impugn the senator's motive, but I have a sort of creeping suspicion that Don won't be satisfied alone under that fig-tree. He's bent on taking Murphy along with him. There's the rub. Murphy ain't going to no fig-tree if he knows himself. Don will have the doggondest time in all his life. If Murphy wants any fruit, he'll prefer a senatorial plum to the largest, juiciest fig in Cousin Donnie's orchard. I think I can be of some service to my old friend. My experience as a stock-man has taught me that one's got to be awful slick to catch what is called a "stock-horse". The stock-horse is used to herd stock. He is the slickest, shrewdest animal in the push. The mere sight of a saddle is enough for him. He knows what it means and he gives it the widest kind of berth. So that the first thing that the cowboy does when he starts out to catch the stock horse, it to hide the saddle. He may succeed in roping him but it's no use to try to get him where he is wanted if he sees the saddle. Now what I want to say Mr. Editor, is this. If old man Don wants to get Murphy under that fig-tree he'd better hide the fig-tree well, for if he don't he'll never get him. My experience with "stock-horses" makes me think that Don had better hide the fig-tree if he intends to rope Murf because he'll never, no never, get him there alive.
   (Signed)  COWBOY.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.




 Police Jury Proceedings.

 Lafayette, La., July 6, 1899. - The Police Jury met this day in regular session with the following members present:  R. C. Landry, C. C. Brown, Ben Avant, Jno. Whittington, Jr., J. E. Primeaux, Alonzo Lacey, and Alfred Hebert. Absent: M. Billeaud.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

 Hon. O. Cade here appeared and represented the necessity of constructing railroads and tramroads to encourage the development of the agricultural resources of the parish. He asked that the Jury exempt from taxation all such roads under provisions of Article 230 of the State constitution, and by motion duly made the following resolution was unanimously adopted:

 Resolved, That under provisions of Article 230 of the constitution of the State of Louisiana there shall be exempt from taxation for a period of ten years from the date of its completion, any railroad or pat of such railroad or tramroads that may hereafter be constructed in the parish of Lafayette, La., and completed prior to January 1, 1904.

 Mr. Primeaux was authorized to construct a new bridge south of B. F. Flanders' place.

 By motion Theodule Baudoin, appointed constable of the 4th ward, vice, Napoleon Melancon, resigned, was declared entitled to the fixed salary of his predecessor in office from date of qualification.

 The sum of $10 additional was allowed Jasper Spell for right of way for public road.

 The committee appointed to check up the tax collector's accounts for special road tax and licenses, submitted the following report which was adopted:

 To the Hon. Police Jury:  Your undersigned committee has verified the accounts of Sheriff and Tax-collector Broussard in the collection of special road and license tax up to May 1, 1899, and find the same correct, exhibiting the following amounts to the credit of the various wards:

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 Very respectfully,
JNO. WHITTINGTON, JR.,
M. BILLAUD, JR.

 The following report of jury of freeholders was read, duly adopted, the road trace declared a public highway, and the sum of $12 appropriated and set aside to meet the expropriation therein mentioned:

 State of Louisiana, Parish of Lafayette. - Be it known that on this day, June 7, A. D., 1899, before me, Ben Avant, notary public, came and appeared Emile Lepine, Austin Daily, Silas Hoffpauir, Moise Baker, Emile Tero, Oneal East, having been duly sworn to lay out a public road from Indian Bayou to meet a certain road on opposite side of Bayou Queue Tortue now open and in use for public travel in Acadia parish, La. Starting from northwest corner of land of Martin Sarver, Jr., running south seven acres, twenty feet wide, which he hereby donates on west side, and thence on east side of land of Joachim Leger for a distance of seven acres, twenty feet wide, which he hereby donates; thence fourteen acres on south side of same land, twenty feet wide, which he also donates; thence seventeen acres on north side of land of Emile Lepine, twenty feet wide which hereby donates; thence eleven acres on north side of land of Emile Tero, twenty feet wide, which he hereby donates; thence fourteen acres running west on south side of land of Mrs. Celestine Baker, twenty feet wide, which she hereby donates; thence about seven acres running north on land of unknown owners, forty feet wide, which we expropriate and value at the sum of twelve dollars; thence making connection with a public road in Acadia Parish. We, the undersigned, do hereby donate land unto the parish of Lafayette, La., all the lands described in the above plat for a public road:  Emile Lepine, Joachim (his mark) Leger, Martin Sarver, Jr., Emile (his mark) Tero, Celestine (her mark) Baker, and is fully described on the plat hereto attached and marked B. Thus done on the day and date first written in presence of Charles D. Harrington and Raleigh Avant, who signed with donors and committee appointed by Hon. Police Jury: Emile Lepine, Oneal (his mark) East, Emile (his mark) Tero, Moise (his mark) Baker, Austin Daily, Silas Hoffpauir.
BEN AVANT, Notary Public.
Witnesses: Charles D. Harrington and Raleigh Avant.

 The treasurer submitted the following reports:

 To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements of parish funds since my last report:

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page 3 column 3
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 Respectfully submitted,
J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.

       Lafayette, La., July 6, 1899.
  To the President and Members of Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette, La. - Following is statement of receipts and disbursements of the special road tax since my last report:

 -------------------------------

page 3 column 3
==========================

 Respectfully submitted,
J. E. MARTIN, Treasurer.

       Lafayette, La., July 6, 1899.
  The following amounts were ordered paid out of the special road tax fund of the respective wards:

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 There being no further business the Police Jury adjourned to meet Tuesday, July 11, as Board of Reviewers and also to meet July 20, for the transaction of ordinary business.
R. C. LANDRY, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.


 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 7/15/1899.

To the tax payers of Lafayette Parish: Please take notice that valuation and listing of properties being completed by the assessor, the said lists will be exposed in the office of the assessor for inspection and corrections for a term of twenty (20) days beginning June 8, 1899. - A. M. Martin, Assessor.

 Lee Begnaud, editor of the wide-awake Breaux Bridge Valley, was in Lafayette this week.

 Galbert Comeaux, of Scott, has bought an interest in the Royal Saloon and is always to be found at that popular resort. Galbert invites his friends to call on him.

 The Gazette received a visit a few days ago from Ozeme LeBlanc, Jr., who has returned from Fort. St. Philip where he did garrison duty as a private in the regular army. Mr. LeBlanc was compelled to leave the army on account of ill health.

 Dr. H. P. Beeler requests The Gazette to state that the rumors recently circulated to the effect that he will leave Lafayette have no foundation. The doctor says that he is doing well here and has no intention of going away.

 In order to enable people of this town to see the races at Opelousas to-morrow an excursion train will be run, leaving here in the morning and returning in the evening. One dollar will be charged for a round-trip ticket.

 Gov. Foster passed through Lafayette yesterday afternoon on his way to Leesburg, where he had gone to see about the location of a biological station. The governor was met at the depot by a number of citizens who dined with him at the Star and Crescent House.

 If the patriotic women of Lafayette want to earn the gratitude of the fire boys they are offered a splendid opportunity. The boys need a banner and the ladies are the ones to give it to them.

 The Pilette boys will play a game of ball at the park to-morrow with a club from Iberia.

 The ordinance of the Council compelling property-holders to cut the weeds around their properties is generally approved by the community. It's a good ordinance and ought to be enforced.

 Dr. Raoul Olivier is spending some time with his relatives in Lafayette. Dr. Oliver has just graduated from a college of dentistry at Louisville, Ky. He has decided to locate at Baldwin where he will practice his profession.

 Assessor Martin has kindly furnished us with the parish assessment by ward. It will be published in our columns next Saturday.

 Dr. N. P. Moss and family and Mrs. Mills and son, Willie, left Thursday for the North and East. They will be away about two months. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1899.













  









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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of July the 15th., 1893:


Bad Weather.


 The combination display of wind rain and lightning here last Thursday amounted to a little war of the elements. It is not often that we have so hard a rain in so short a time. The wind blew with considerable violence, and probably, some damage was done to the cotton and corn crops. At the corner of Vermilion and Madison streets, in town, a telephone pole was struck by lightning and broken off near the ground, the noise from the thunder and lightning was great but we have heard of no other damage. Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1894.


Mecca of Bachelors.

 Several strollers from our town visited Scott last week, who pronounced that place the Mecca of bachelors ;  there being an abnominally large per centage of that specie of the human race congregated there. It is the spot of all spots where single blessedness seems to command a premium. The most plausible reason has been submitted so far, in explanation of this curious condition is, that the characteristic kind heartedness and good fellowship pervades the community of Scott, provides to its individuals the comforts and blessings that are otherwise to be secured only the state of connubiality.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1893.


 Rail Road Meeting.

 Pursuant to notice a meeting of the Lafayette and Breaux Bridge Rail Road Co. was held in the directive room of the People's State Bank building here on the 12th instant. The reports of committees were heard and much other business of importance was discussed. The company is considering well the subject in all its bearings and by moving slowly and surely to bring about the greatly desired railway, within the most reasonable time possible. After the close of the meeting (which was adjourned subject to the call of the president) members of the Business Men's Association appointed for that purpose, escorted the friends of the rail-road project from Breaux Bridge, to the Spacious dining hall of the Crescent Hotel where a beautiful repast was spread before them that was greatly enjoyed by all. Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1893.

   


City Council Proceedings.

        Lafayette, La., July 10th, 1893.
 A regular meeting of the City Council of Lafayette was this day held with the following members present:  William Campbell, Mayor, Albert Cayard, A. T. Caillouet, Fred Mouton, I. N. Satterfield, Felix Demanade, A. M. Martin and John O. Mouton.

 The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved:

 The report of the Finance Committee was read and accepted, and ordered to be placed on the minutes.

 To the Hon. Mayor and Council of Lafayette:

 The undersigned Finance Committee having examined the Book of the outgoing Treasurer do hereby make the following report to-wit:

 The Treasurer's Book shows account on hand as per report of outgoing Finance Committee to be;

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 The Police Jury then adjourned until Tuesday, July 11th, at 10 o'clock a. m.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President,
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.

        Lafayette, La., July 11th, 1893.
  The Police Jury pursuant to adjournment, met this day with the following members present :  W. B. Torian, C. C. Brown, J. G. St. Julien, H. M. Durke, A. A. Delhomme, R. C. Landry and Ford Hoffpauir.

 The reading of the minutes of the previous meeting was dispensed with.

 By motion duly made the following resolution was adopted.

 Be it Resolved, That the Police Jury petition from Hon. A. C. Allen, Judge of the 17th Judicial District Court that inasmuch as Sosthene C. Broussard has been declared insane by certificate of expert physicians appointed by the Police Jury, that the said Sosthene C. Broussard be interdicted in chambers as soon as practicable, in order that he may be received into the insane asylum at Jackson for proper treatment.

 Resolver further, that the Sheriff be authorized to purchase an ordinary suit of clothes for the insane person.

 The Police Jury here resumed consideration of the communication from I. N. Satterfield road contractor asking for an extension of 90 days in order to comply with the terms of his contract. Mr. Satterfield in his own behalf made a statement as to the difficulties which delayed the working of the roads and said that he had not been able to attend personally to the work heretofore, but if granted an extension of time as prayed for would promise in future to comply fully with the terms of his contract.

 By motion of Mr. Brown duly seconded, the following resolution was unanimously adopted relative to Mr. Satterfield's communication.

 Resolved that I. N. Satterfield, road contractor be granted an extension of time to the first of October 1893 in order to comply with the terms of his contract. Provided that the sum of $500.00  be retained out of his yearly contract payment, as a forfeit to the parish, because of his non-compliance with the terms of his contract.

 The Police Jury then adjourned to meet at 2 o'clock p. m. of even date, as Board of Reviewers of the assessment list.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President,
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1893.



Board of Reviewers.

        Lafayette, La., July 11, 1898.
 The Board of Reviewers of the Assessment lists met this day with the following members present :  J. G. St. Julien, C. C. Brown, W. B. Torian, Ford Hoffpauir, H. M. Durke, R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry and A. A. Delhomme.

 The Board proceeded to examine the assessment lists and after several hour's labor, adjourned until 9 o'clock a. m. July 19.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President,
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.

        Lafayette, La., July 12, 1893.
 The Board of Reviewers met this day with all members present, and resumed consideration of the assessment question.

 By motion duly made, the assessment lists as presented by the assessor was accepted and the Board then adjourned.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President,
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1893.




Selected News Notes (Advertiser)  7/15/1893.

 Last Tuesday evening we were visited by a most terrific thunder-storm and rain that appeared to have something grave against Lafayette. Several trees were struck by lightning, while an occasional telephone pole leaned from the course of the breeze.



 The neat cottage that contractor Fred. Mouton is building for Mr. P. B. Roy, on his lot adjoining Moss Bros. & Co., is rapidly nearing completion. Mr. H. A. Eastin is presently engaged in painting the structure in a way as to add much to its exterior appearance.


 Mr. T. M. Biossat was elected a member of the board of directors, as also Secretary of the Business Men's Association, at a meeting held last Tuesday night. The selection of Mr. Biossat for the positions named was judicious and will redound to the credit of the Association.


 When our support of a good cause comes in conflict with unreasonable ideas and make enemies upon such stand, we cannot afford to hire us to other pursuits to mend such discord. The high school is going right up the hill, and for the sake of our children and their welfare, we must go along with out aid and comment, however feeble.


 Young Mike Kennedy, well known here in railroad circles, was run over by a train and killed in Houston, about 9 o'clock on Thursday night. He was employed as brakeman, running between this place and Houston on the Southern Pacific, and boarded at the Olivier House when here.



 Death robbed two happy homes in our town this week, of two fondly cherished cherubs. On last Sunday the infant child of Mr. Phil Crouchet departed this life, and two days later the soul of the five weeks old babe of Mr. Felix Salles, took flight after a very brief illness. The ADVERTISER joins its sympathies to those of the entire community in the hour of sad affliction of the grief stricken parents.


Miss Lou Hafkesbring of New Orleans, arrived on Wednesday last and will spend some time with her aunt Mrs. R. C. Greig.

 Mr. F. O. Cornay, now located at Baldwin in the employ of the Western Union Telegraph Co., has been enjoying a much needed rest with his family this week.


 Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Vallier left Sunday and will visit their daughter Mrs. Gormas of New York and will visit Canada and the Columbian Exposition before they return.


 This is going to be an extremely scant pecan season. Last year was the most prolific in many years but we believe the present one could be surpassed by most any.


 Mr. Leonce Guidry took possession of his new bakery one block south of the bank building, last Saturday, and is now better prepared than ever to serve his numerous patrons.


 Mr. Leopold Lacoste has moved his farm implement and machine shops from the old stand to the livery stable formerly occupied by E. Constantin, where he will re-open.


 Mr. Leon Devers of Lake Charles has contracted to build a large and attractive dwelling for Mrs. Givens in the pretty portion of the Mudd Oak grove recently purchased by her.



Notice is hereby given that Mr. C. Ordway's connection the LAFAYETTE ADVERTISER ceased on the 20th of June.
 Mr. Ambroise Mouton of Lake Arthur has been in town for several days.


 Supt. Wm. F. Owen of the Morgan line was in town last Saturday.


 Mr. Henry Gerac made a flying trip to Mermentau last Saturday, returning Sunday.


 The local passenger trains have been running off their schedule for a week or more.


 Mrs. F. C. Triay and children are on a visit to her father Mr. C. A. Younger of Avoyelles Parish.


 Mr. Emile Girard is filling the position of flagman at the crossing on Lincoln Avenue.


 Miss Martha Mouton left last Saturday for Duchamps on a visit to her brother Mr. Jules Mouton.


It is reported that the S. P. will put on fast mail and local pass train on the 1st on or before the 15th of September.


 
 Miss Elvire Veazey, of New Iberia, has returned home, after a visit to the home of Mayor D. A. Dimitry. She was accompanied by Miss Eugenie Bernard, who will spend a while with Miss Veazey.


 There is on exhibition at the office of the Huron Refinery, a stalk of this year's cane, showing several red joints.

The rainy season seems to have permanently set in, which is going to ring the death knell to the water melon.

The combination display of wind, rain and lightning here last Thursday amounted to a little war of the elements. It is not often that we have so hard a rain in so short a time. The wind blew with considerable violence, and probably, some damage was done to the cotton and corn crops. At the corner of Vermilion and Madison streets

 The railroad from here to Breaux Bridge is bound to be a certainty. There is no foreign effort or interest mixed up in the endeavor, the necessity is local and immediate, and will remain an intention until arrangements can be made and the road built. Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1893.  








 From the Lafayette Gazette of July 15th, 1893:


 THE PARISH MONEY.

 In the Lafayette Advertiser of the 8th instant there appeared an editorial bitterly complaining of the refusal of the Police Jury to accept the offer of the People's State Bank to take the parish funds on deposit and pay therefore two per cent interest on daily balances.

 The editor seems quite surprised that the proposition was "regarded by some of our people entirely new and possibly inimical to the parish."

 He seems a little irritated. He attempts to create the impression that the Police Jury, in its desire to sub-serve some individual benefit, lost sight of the interest of the public in the matter - the amount resulting from the 2 per cent.

 The statement is made "that the custom of banks being made the depositories of public funds, and paying interest upon them prevails throughout the length and breadth of this land."

 In his endeavor to substantiate his position that the custom prevails he refers to Article 115 of the Revised Civil Code. But from his own statement of what those provisions are, he forgets that this is a special statute referring to special funds held by administrators, curators, etc. They are not public funds.

 He also refers to the law creating a fiscal agent for the State. This also does not apply. It refers to the State funds, and not to parish funds.

 It is well known that parishes are political corporations with powers limited to those expressly delegated to them by the legislature.

 We venture the assertion that the will look in vain for any law creating or authorizing the creation of fiscal agents for parishes or towns in this State.

 Police Juries, as stated above, have limited powers.

 They are especially restricted in matters concerning the levy of taxes, and the disbursement of public funds. The law very zealously guards the interest of the people in these respects. It would, indeed, be a poor government, which boasts of being a government, "by the people and for the people," if the public funds, taken from the toil of the citizen, could be raised without limit, and not protected and kept sacred.

 The law which gives the powers to Police Juries is very plain. Section 2743 of the Revised Statutes defining the powers of the Police Juries, provides:

 Tenth - To appoint a treasurer for the parish.

 Certainly, no one will deny that from the nature of that proposition, the Police Jury naturally came to the conclusion, that if the funds had been deposited the bank was to use it in its business ;  that the proposition of the bank to pay 2 per cent interest on the deposit, was not made for glory ;  that the object was to use loans on satisfactory endorsements or on mortgages at a higher rate of interest, and that it was a business proposition, carrying with it the privilege of speculating upon and using, the public funds in its manifold money transactions as practiced in the business of State banks.

 The power to inaugurate a system of speculation with public funds is not expressly delegated in the provision of law contained in Section 2743, above referred to.

 Public office is a trust and public funds levied for specified purposes, and wrested from the citizen to defray the expenses of government, should not and cannot be diverted from its legitimate uses for private gain, or to jingle in the coffers of institutions established for speculation.

 As a matter of power or right to do so,  the fact that the proposition was made by a home institution that all would like to see prosper,, does not change the question.

 We feel confident that the bank would have rendered account for all funds entrusted to it; but we cannot conceive how the Police Jury could permit speculation with public funds, in absence of express legislative authority.

 And such being the provisions of the Revised Statutes, it is refreshing to see the surprise of the editor of The Advertiser that the proposition "would seem to be regarded by some of our people as entirely new and possibly inimical to the parish."

 The Advertiser further says:  "It is said that if the parish funds are deposited with the bank, they will be used, and such ought not to be. Just why this argument does not weigh against any individual doing the same kind of business the bank is engaged, is not explained."

 This is very unkind. It is unkind against the Police Jury because it is based on an assumption.

 The Police Jury can hardly be charged to presume that the treasurer is using the parish funds in his business, when the law prohibits and punishes it, and when as a matter of fact he has had the funds in cash in a separate box for the purpose, and which it is invariably counted by the committee of the Police Jury and School Board, in preparing their reports on the finances.

 We believe that our Police Jury have performed a plain duty by refusing the proposition ;  that they were actuated by good and pure motives and without any consideration of individual benefit, and that by not allowing speculation with public funds they have established a safe and wholesome rule and have sub-served public interest.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


EXPRESS YOUR OPINION.

 A petition was presented to the city council, at its sitting last Monday, asking the body to reconsider and recall the resolution passed at a previous meeting against permitting the roaming of cattle on the streets of the town.

 To reach the sense of the people on this question, which, by the way, has raised some discussion, it has been decided to hold an election, under the supervision of the town council, on Thursday, the 20th instant, where an expression of opinion on the matter is invited. It is thought, by these means, a fair test of public opinion can be had.

 There are two sides to the question.

 On the one hand it is contended that the putting in effect of this resolution will entail hardship on the poor, who are dependent on the milk of a cow or two for a living, by the fact that their means are so limited that they cannot afford to pay pasturage, hence they will be sufferers.

 On the other hand it is claimed that the roaming of cattle causes much damage to the sidewalks, ditches, and at night they are a menace and nuisance to the pedestrian. And, that inasmuch as there is a parish stock law against the roaming of cattle at large, the cattle owned by the town people would be confined within the limits of the corporation for grazing grounds.

 Here, then, are the two sides. It is for the people themselves to pass upon the issue. The Council will be guided by the majority vote cast either way, therefore, it behooves every one interested and qualified to cast his vote according to his convictions.

 Remember, the day and date, Thursday July 20, 1893.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


THE ROAD CONTRACT.

 The Police Jury met in special session last Monday and devoted that day and part of Tuesday looking into the alleged violation of the contract held by the public road contractor, Mr. I. N. Satterfield. It is nominated in the contract "bins an obligates himself to deliver on or before the first day of May A. D. 1893, the forty miles, more or less of the roads contracted for, *  *  * well and thoroughly graded and drained," etc.

 That is, in good traveling conditions, in consideration of "$2,000 per annum for four years," and $2 per acre additional for all necessary hedges cut down.

 On the first of May 1893, as events proved, the contractor was not ready to meet the requirements of his contract. The Police Jury allowed the matter to go over without taking any action in the premises, we say without taking any action, because the published official proceedings do not contain a word in reference to the matter. And this they did in the face of this clause of the contract:

 "  9.  The failure, neglect, or refusal at any time on the part of the contractor to thoroughly grade and drained, the public roads this day contracted for, or any part thereof, according to the terms of this contract, and as herein provided, then and in that case, the contract entered into this day, shall by such failure, neglect or refusal be ipso facto, rescinded, annulled, and of no effect, and the Police Jury shall be entitled to recover damages against the said contractor and sureties, if any has been sustained. ..."

 Another two months rolled by, July 1, 1893, arrives, and still the contractor is not ready to meet the demands of the contract, which should have been fulfilled two months before, but makes the request to be granted "an extension of 90 days in order to comply with the terms of his contract" and to quote the record, "Mr. Satterfield in his own behalf made a statement as to the difficulties which delayed the working of the roads, and said that he had not been able to attend personally to the work heretofore, but if granted an extension of time, as prayed for, would promise in future," etc. etc.

 The Police Jury granted the foregoing request, and added the proviso that he (the contractor) forfeit $500 for not "complying with the terms of his contract.

 The contractor received before the 1st of May last something like $1,100 being installments due on his contract, and for cutting down necessary hedges, both items being lumped together. It is admitted that he has done some work on the public roads, but, up to date not a mile of road has been turned over to, and received by the parish, in accordance with the terms of the contract.

 For the faithful performance of his contract Mr. Satterfield a bond of $500, with Mr. A. M. Martin as surety.

 The above are facts, and leads The Gazette to employ the interrogation point:

 Did not the contract of itself, according to the 9th clause of the contract, become null and void on the 1st of May 1893?

 If so, was it not the duty of the Police Jury to so declare it, and at once cause suit to be instituted against the road contractor, and his bondsman, for failure to comply with the requirements of his contract?

 If so, was it not the duty of the Police Jury to so declare it, and at once cause suit to be instituted against the road contractor, and his bondsman, for failure to comply with the requirements of his failure to comply with the requirements of his contract?

 If the contract is, according to clause 9, null and void, can the Police Jury grant an extension on a contract that does not exist ? Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.



Want a Road.
To the Editor of Lafayette Gazette:

 Please permit me to insert a few lines in your columns regarding how we people of the first ward are treated by our law-makers. We have a public road, between Jacques Mathiew and others, which has been closed for over three years. We have done all that we could to have this road opened, but up to date nothing is done.

 Mr. D. Arceneaux went before the lawmakers asking them to have the road opened - the result was that they laughed at him. Since that time we made a petition of 49 signatures, and sent it to Mr. M. T. Gordy in October, 1891, with the request that he should take action before the grand jury, but nothing was done. I, the author of this card, have spoken to some of the lawmakers. I always had a good word, but no road opened.

 This reminds me of my grand-father. When I was a small boy I used to go about him to ask him many things. He would always promise me the first colt that his mare mule would have. But up to date I am without a colt. This is exactly the same thing with the road question - they promise, but no road. If any one want a road they can at once get the colt of their mare mule, but no road.

 I notice in The Advertiser the printing of their resolution in regard to road overseer. They are required to bring a list of those who had worked. I would like to know how they want them to work in a six inch lane; and many places completely closed and others dam up by back water. Complaint has been made, and another grand-father promise made but we are yet to get any thing.

 I think if every man would be taxed three dollars, this would bring better roads, and have the notice written this way: "You are hereby notified that your road tax is now due, and if you desire to work same on public road you will report at ....... for duty. A part or the whole of the tax may be paid in cash.
    (Signed) HUMBUGGER!
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.



Crops Look To Be Good.

 Reports come to The Gazette from every part of the parish that the crops were never in a more promising condition. The cane, rice and cotton are growing nicely, and the farmers are wearing a broad smile of contentment in anticipation of a bountiful harvest.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.




 
Two Out Of Three.

 Out of the three cases before the Supreme Court in which he was interested, Judge Debaillon had two decisions in his favor, and the third was taken to New Orleans when a decision will be given in November next, and this one, also, the Judge feels confident, will be decided in his favor. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.



 

A POOR ASH.

 The following was clipped from the "Questions and Answers" department in last Monday's Times-Democrat, will be read with some interest by the people of Lafayette who may yet retain a faint recollection of having heard of read something about a certain Ash, who appears to be a mighty small stick:

 "... Subscriber: According to the code governing dueling in this State, is the challenger justified in posting the challengee as a coward, because of selecting rifles when accepting a challenge?

 2. Is it not an established usage that the challangee have the choice of arms?

 3. Is one Ash, of South Carolina, author of a Code on dueling, recognized in this State as an authority in such matters? What are the antecedents? If living, can you locate him?

1. No.
2. Yes
3. Cannot place Ash. He, however, is not an authority in this State.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


Rain Is The Test.

Roads are only put to a test in rainy weather. It is then that road overseers should inspect them, and take not of bad places. All roads are good are passable in good weather, and the overseers deserve no credit for their being so. Give us better roads; it could and should be done. If one plan does not work, another could be devised, that would. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.




 Burden Should Be Equal.

 The Board of Reviewers last Tuesday augmented the assessment roll by a considerable amount in requiring the assessor to place upon his list the bank stock of the People's State Bank, amounting to nearly $20,000, as well as mortgages, notes, etc., found on record in the recorder's office amounting to nearly $60,000.

 Thus it will be seen that these two items alone amount to nearly $80,000. Quite a considerable sum which he has heretofore escaped taxation will swell the assessors roll this year and pay a just proportion of the public burden. This is but just. The Gazette will however go a step further and express the hope that next year, that the assessor, require every man, under oath, to give in every note in hand, all bonds, stock cash in hand, etc., as enumerated in the law. That would distribute the burden of taxation and relieve the farmers and real estate owners, who have heretofore contributed nearly the entire revenues of the government, State and parochial. The Gazette predicts that if this is done properly together with a true assessment of the merchandise held in stock, by our merchants, the rate of taxation in Lafayette will soon be reduced from 10 mills parish tax to about one half that rate. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


A GOOD BEGINNING.

 A party, of public spirited citizens from our sister town of Breaux Bridge composed of Dr. H. P. Guilbeau, Esq., Messrs. C. Babin, met some members of the Business Men's Association last Wednesday, and had an informal talk over the best means to be employed to secure a branch railroad between this town and Breaux Bridge. This conference resulted in the adoption of measures, we are told, that will be pushed for all that is in them.

 When the line of action to be adopted is proposed, it is to be hoped that if personal interest is not strong enough, that civic pride will be an incentive powerful enough to induce every man to pull off his coat, as it were, and catch on to the tow line. With a steady pull th tap can be landed.

 Quick and easy transportation between the two points would redound to the benefit of not only the two towns, but the country adjacent would feel some of the benefits.

 There can be no question that such a tap would enhance the trade of Lafayette, perhaps, 50 per cent, while at the same time working to the advantage of Breaux Bridge and vicinity.

 Let us all unite and do our level best to get a branch railroad. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


 Be On The Alert.

 The Board of Trade of New Iberia met Wednesday to "devise some plan for acting in concert with St. Martinville and Breaux Bridge inducing the Southern Pacific railroad company to run a road from New Iberia via Breaux Bridge via St. Martinville."

 What action the Board of Trade of New Iberia took in regard to the matter, we do not know. But one thing we do know is that when New Iberia sets out to get anything in this line, she generally succeeds, as the Iberia and Vermilion railroad attests.

 Although New Iberia knows that the section is tributary to and the trade thereof properly belongs to Lafayette, and that trade is worth having, are bending her energies to get it. Will Lafayette sit supinely by and let New Iberia steal a march on her? Breaux Bridge wants to be connected with Lafayette, but if Lafayette does not make any efforts to meet her half way, she will bid us good-bye and will join hands with New Iberia. To prevent this "unholy alliance" we must at once
Get Together.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.



White and Colored Waiting Rooms.

 The new passenger depot, consisting of a white and colored waiting room, express and baggage room, and lunch counter, has been completed and add greatly to the appearance of the surroundings and will be a great comfort; especially to the white people who have heretofore been crowded out of the sitting room by the colored people. Lafayette Gazette 7/17/1893.


 Struck by Lightning.

 A very severe wind and electrical storm passed over Lafayette last Tuesday evening. During the severe gale, heavy rain, and peals of thunder, a bolt of lightning struck the rear end of Mr. Jno. Vigneaux's branch stable tearing away some of the planking, the shock was a strong one, and the horses were badly frightened, we are told. The damage is light. Another bolt struck and tore away the corner of Mr. Vanderwater's blacksmith shop. And still another bolt fell upon and killed a horse belonging to Mr. Lucien Landry. While the storm lasted but a short time, its severity was so strong as to cause uneasiness to many. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


Will Go To Pen.


 Willie Foreman, convicted at the last term of court to 19 years hard labor in the State penitentiary, and whose case had been appealed to the Supreme Court will go to the pen, the Supreme Court having affirmed the decision of the jury. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


Secured One of St. Martin's Fairest.

 The Gazette extends its congratulations to Mr. Guenimiere J. Broussard on his marriage to one of St. Martinville's fairest and most accomplished belles, Miss Berthe Labbe, and which happy event took place in that town on Wednesday last at the residence of the bride's parents. The Gazette hopes that on their voyage through life they will only meet with happiness and prosperity. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


Tragic Accident in North Laf. Parish.

 A strange and unfortunate accident occurred on the 5th instant on the farm of Mr. Philosie Richard. It appears that an old cotton gin building had been torn down and the lumber piled up near by. On the top of the lumber there was a large, heavy wooden roller. A little son of Mr. Menard, four years of age, had climbed up on this pile, and was playing with the roller. It seems that the child lost his balance, and fell to the ground, the roller falling on top of him. Dr. J. P. Francez was summoned immediately, but could do nothing to save the boy, who died on Friday, the 7th instant, after suffering excruciating agony. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.



City Council Proceedings.

        Lafayette, La., June 10, 1893.
  A regular meeting of the City Council of Lafayette was this day held with the following members present: Wm. Campbell, Mayor; Albert Cayard, A. T. Caillouet, Fred Mouton, I. N. Satterfield, Felix Demanade, A. M. Martin and John O. Mouton.

 The minutes of last meeting were read and approved.

 The report of finance committee was read, accepted and ordered to be placed on the minutes.

 To the Hon. Mayor and Council of Lafayette:

 The undersigned finance committee having examined the books of the outgoing treasurer do hereby make the following report to-wit:

 The Treasurer's book shows amount on hand as per report of outgoing finance committee to be:

 ======================
page 3 column 4
======================

 Having found the money in treasurer's hand to be correct, we hereby asks that his old bond be cancelled and a quietus given him.
    Respectfully submitted:
FRED MOUTON,
ALB. CAYARD,
A. T. CAILLOUET,
Finance Committe.

        Lafayette, La., June 13, 1893.
  We also find that the outgoing collector owes a balance as per report of Finance Committee of $19.25 and also un-cancelled stubs amounting to $910, making a total of $28.35 less his commission on $9.10 being 55 cents. Balance due by him, $27.80. We therefore ask that after the above amount be settled that his bond be cancelled and a quietus given him. Respectfully submitted,
FRED MOUTON,
ALB. CAYARD,
A. T. CAILLOUET,
Finance Committee.

       Lafayette, June 13, 1893.
  A petition from the citizens was presented asking the repeal of the Stock Ordinance and on motion was laid till next regular meeting.

 Resolved that the following accounts be paid:

 ===================

page 3 column 4

===================

 On motion the council adjourned to next regular meeting.
WM. CAMPBELL, Mayor.
A. NEVUE, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1993.


Police Jury Proceedings.

        Lafayette, La., July 10, 1893.
  Pursuant to adjournment the Police Jury met this day with the following members present:  W. B. Torian, J. G. St. Julien, C. C. Brown, R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry, A. A. Delhomme, Ford Hoffpauir and H. M. Durke.

 The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved. The treasurer submitted his monthly report as follows:

 To the President and members, Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette :

 The following is a statement of the receipts and disbursements of parish funds since last report:

 =========================
page 3 column 4
=========================

      Respectfully submitted,
WM. CLEGG, Ph. Treasurer.

       July 3, 1893.
  The treasurer also submitted the following supplemental report :

 To the President and members of the Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette :

 Gentlemen - The following is a statement of the receipts and disbursements of parish funds since last report :

========================
page 3 column 4
========================

  Respectfully submitted,
WM. CLEGG, Treasurer.

        July 10, 1893.
  The committee appointed to examine the treasurer's office and grant him a quietus, made the following report, which was adopted.

     Lafayette, La., July 5, 1893.
 Hon. Police Jury, Parish of Lafayette:
    Your undersigned committee appointed to investigate the treasurer's office and grant him a quietus, would respectfully report that we have performed the duty assigned by making a complete and thorough investigation of the said office. The treasurer's books and vouchers show a balance to date in favor of the parish of $979.15 and as the statement of receipts and disbursements were found to be entirely correct in every particular. Your committee has therefore granted unto the treasurer a quietus for parish funds up to date.
   (Signed) R. C. Landry, A. D. LANDRY,
W. B. TORIAN.

 Mr. Satterfield here appeared and explained that he had failed to comply with the terms of his contract by reason of sickness in his family, and difficulties retarding the work until the summer heat prevented much expedition.

 By motion the contract was read and final action on the matter deferred until to-morrow, July 11th instant.

 The secretary was authorized to purchase seven road scrapers for the use of the respective wards.

 Mr. Durke was authorized to contract for the repair of Odillon Broussard's bridge.

 Mr. St. Julien appointed Demas Broussard road overseer for the 5th ward.

 By motion the following committee was appointed to measure the court-house square and correspond with some establishment with a view of ascertaining the cost of an iron fence around the said square:  Wm. Clegg, C. H. Bradley and R. C. Greig.

 The sum of $25 was appropriated to Mr. Brown for the completion of a certain drain on the Opelousas public road between the properties of Messrs. Durio and Guilbeau.

 The sum of $20 was granted unto Mr. Hoffpauir for the building of two bridges in the 3d ward.

 Agreeable to a petition from the citizens of the 7th ward, the following jury of freeholders was appointed to trace and lay out a public road from J. O. Broussard's store by Creighton's bridge to the corporate limits of the town of Lafayette. The jury was authorized to accept all donations, assess all damages and trace the said road to the least detriment of the property holders concerned. Said jury was appointed as follows:  Aurelien Olivier, Albert Landry, Rosemond Landry, T. S. Singleton, Sevigne Sonnier, and J. O. Broussard.

 By motion Drs. A. Gladu and F. J. Mouton were appointed as medico-legal experts to examine the sanity of one Sosthene C. Broussard now confined in the parish jail.

 The following account was laid over:

 G. Gladu, expert testimony and mileage, $15.

 The following accounts were approved:

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 The Police Jury adjourned until Tuesday, July 11, at 10 o'clock a. m.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.


        Lafayette, La., July 11, 1893.
  The Police Jury pursuant to adjournment met this day with the following members present: W. B. Torian, C. C. Brown, J. G. St. Julien, H. M. Durke, A. A. Delhomme, R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry and Ford Hoffpauir.

 The reading of the minutes of the previous meeting was dispensed with.

 By motion duly made the following resolution was adopted:

 Be it resolved, That the Police Jury petition the Hon. A. C. Allen, judge of the 17th judicial district court, that inasmuch as Sosthene C. Broussard, has been declared insane by certificate of expert physicians appointed by the Police Jury that the said Sosthene C. Broussard, has been declared insane by certificate of expert physicians appointed by the Police Jury that the said Sosthene C. Broussard be interdicted in chambers as soon as practicable in order that he may be received into the insane asylum at Jackson for proper treatment.

 Resolved further, That the sheriff be authorized to purchase an ordinary suit of clothes for the said insane person.

 The Police Jury here resumed consideration of the communication from I. N. Satterfield, road contractor, asking for an extension of 90 days in order to comply with the terms of his contract. Mr. Satterfield in his own behalf made a statement as to the difficulties which delayed the working of the roads and said that he had not been able to attend personally to the work heretofore but if granted an extension of time as prayed for would promise in future to comply fully with the terms of his contract.

 By motion of Mr. Brown, duly seconded, the following resolution was unanimously adopted relative to Mr. Satterfield's communication: Resolved that I. N. Satterfield, road contractor, be granted an extension of time to the first day of October, 1893, in order to comply with the terms of his contract; provided the sum of $500 be retained out of his yearly contract payment as a forfeit to the parish, because of his non-compliance with the terms of his contract.

 The Police Jury then adjourned to meet at 2 o'clock p. m. of even date, as Board of Reviewers of the assessment lists.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President.
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.

        Lafayette, La., July 11, 1893.
  The Board of Reviewers of the assessment lists met this day with the following members present:  J. G. St. Julien, C. C. Brown, W. B. Torian, Ford Hoffpauir, H. M. Durke, R. C. Landry, A. D. Landry, A. A. Delhomme.

 The Board proceeded to examine the assessment lists, and after several hours' labor adjourned until 9 o'clock a. m. July 12th instant.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President,
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.


       Lafayette, La., July 1893.

 The Board met this day with all members present, and resumed consideration of the assessment lists.

 By motion duly made the assessments as presented by the Assessor was accepted and the Board adjourned.
FORD HOFFPAUIR, President,
R. C. GREIG, Secretary.
Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.

   

   
 Selected News Notes (Gazette) 7/15/1893.

 Clean up your premises, say the City Daddies.

 Judge Debaillon was called to Opelousas Monday on business.

 Judge Debaillon was called professionally to Abbeville Thursday.

 Messrs. H. L. Fontenot and P. B. Torian returned Thursday from Houston and Galveston where they had been on a pleasure trip.

 Hon. Louis Guidry, member of the lower house in the State Legislature from St. Martin was in Lafayette Monday.

 Mr. Ernest Bernard, of Mouton's Switch, returned home last week after having passed several days on the sea coast in company with a number of friends. 

 Mr. Gus. Lacoste will soon have a new sign calling attention to some of the wares that he carries in stock.




 Miss Lou Ella Hafkesbring, of New Orleans, arrived in our city last Wednesday, and is the guest of her aunt, Mrs. R. C. Greig.

 The Gazette has received an invitation to attend a ball on the 27th instant in Crouchet's new hall at Carencro.

 Mr. Florian Cornay, one of Lafayette's handsome young men, now stationed at Baldwin in the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad, was in the city this week visiting friends and relatives.

 Emile Gerard the young man, who received such severe injuries while employed as a yard brakeman has been given the position of flagman, near the railroad crossing, by the railroad company.

 It is rumored that there will be a daily fast mail, in addition to the daily local passenger train, put on or before the 15th of November next.

 Mr. Clemile Trahan is having erected, next to Veazey's stable, a fine building combining room for store and private apartments for family residence.

 Leonce Guidry has moved his bakery to the convenient Falk building recently repaired and altered for that purpose. Leonce will be in a better position than ever to serve his many customers.

 The crops, we understand, did not suffer much from the wind storm of last Tuesday evening. While in some places the high corn stalks were somewhat bent over, there will be but little damage done.

 Mr. John O. Mouton has, perhaps, the best appointed saloon in Southwest Louisiana. His liquors are of the choicest brands, and he keeps constantly on tap ice-cold beer, and because of this fact his place is deservedly popular.


 Messrs. Alcide Judice, of Scott, and Antoine Guidry and J. B. Peres, of Lafayette, registered in the Louisiana headquarters at the World's Fair in Chicago, last Saturday.

 On the 27th instant Mr. Henri Crouchet will give a grand ball in his new hall in Carencro. Those who were fortunate enough to attend the ball given on the 4th need not be told that a pleasant time is assured those attending the one to be given on the 27th.

 There is not a better situation for the erection of a refinery which promises larger profits on the outlay than on the Bayou Vermilion within a mile from this town. Lafayette Gazette 7/15/1893.
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 From the Lafayette Advertiser of July 15th, 1913:

ROAD MAP
Showing Proposed Highways Over State Received by Sec. Crouchet.

 Friday Sec. of the Police Jury Geo. Crouchet received a map made by State Highway Engineer W. E. Atkinson showing all the proposed model roads throughout the state. The model road from New Orleans to Lake Charles passes through this city and also one from Baton Rouge terminates here. The outline of roads covers the State pretty well and if they are ever built will be of the greatest benefit and convenience to the people of all sections. Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1913.



THE IMPROVEMENT OF LAFAYETTE ROADS.

 The preliminary survey of the roads  is purposed to improve in the vicinity of Lafayette is about completed. The work has been in charge of Engineer B. D. Wood, of the State Highway Department, assisted by Engineer Anthony Lambert. All data will be turned in to the office of the State Highway Engineer, W. E. Atkinson, to be used in preparing the necessary plans and specifications for the information of contractors who may be interested in bidding on the work to be done. About three weeks will be required to prepare specifications, etc., and then public notice according to law will be given for the purpose of obtaining bids from responsible contractors.

 The bonds to be issued by authorization of the City Council of Lafayette, on the road tax which has been voted, will not be offered for sale until the money situation will permit of the bonds bringing their par value. This will be about October first. The bonds bear interest at the rate of 5 per cent, and the law contemplates that they shall be sold at par. They would not bring par in the pending tightness of the money market.

 Through the connection the public authorities of Lafayette have made with the State Highway Department monetary aid to the extent of $20,000 will e contributed by the State toward the construction of good roads in Lafayette parish. This aid is conditioned upon the State Highway Department having supervision and control of the road work to be carried out with the approval of the local authorities.

 In the matter of improving the main roads in the 3rd ward around the City of Lafayette the intention is to straighten and shorten these roads as much as possible, and wherever this may be done without serious injury or prejudice to adjacent property is undoubtedly the right thing to do for the advantage and safety of the traveling public. In all such cases it is proper and necessary that private and personal interests should give way to the welfare of the general public. Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1913.

 

Lagniappe:
SILVER vs. GOLD. 

We read in history that at one time there was mighty preparation for war going on in Athens. Every one appeared busy, getting ready to meet the needs of coming battle.

 Diogenes had no particular employment but unwilling to appear absolutely idle when all else were occupied, set to work with immense hub bub and clatter to roll his tub and down the streets.

 After reading our great dailies on this money question we feel like getting out with a tub of our own.


The approaching session of Congress promises to be an interesting one. The war between the adherents of gold and silver is on in earnest and there is every reason to believe it is going to be a "fight to the finish." The indications at this time are largely in favor of silver owing to the fact that the "golf bugs" by present count can not repeal the Sherman law. The diversity of opinion on this subject, by the way, among leading men of the country is confusing to say the least of it. People every where are discussing this question of finance and those who do not understand it, are like ourselves trying to unravel it. There is great preparation for war going on in the land as the session of Congress approaches, and no doubt, the calcium lights of the best brains in the country will be turned upon the question for our benefit.



Original source unknown. In the Lafayette Advertiser 7/15/1893.   

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